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Remy is a Chorister, one of the chosen few rescued from the surface world and raised to sing the Hours in a choir of young boys. Remy lives with a devoted order of monks who control the Leviathan, an aging nuclear submarine that survives in the ocean’s depths. Their secret mission: to trigger the Second Coming when the time is right, ready to unleash its final, terrible we Remy is a Chorister, one of the chosen few rescued from the surface world and raised to sing the Hours in a choir of young boys. Remy lives with a devoted order of monks who control the Leviathan, an aging nuclear submarine that survives in the ocean’s depths. Their secret mission: to trigger the Second Coming when the time is right, ready to unleash its final, terrible weapon. But Remy has a secret too— she’s the only girl onboard. It is because of this secret that the sub’s dying caplain gifts her with the missile’s launch key, saying that it is her duty to keep it safe. Safety, however, is not the sub’s priority, especially when the new caplain has his own ideas about the Leviathan’s mission. Remy’s own perspective is about to shift drastically when a surface-dweller is captured during a raid, and she learns the truth about the world. At once lyrical and page-turning, We Shall Sing a Song Into the Deep is a captivating debut from newcomer author Andrew Kelly Stewart.


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Remy is a Chorister, one of the chosen few rescued from the surface world and raised to sing the Hours in a choir of young boys. Remy lives with a devoted order of monks who control the Leviathan, an aging nuclear submarine that survives in the ocean’s depths. Their secret mission: to trigger the Second Coming when the time is right, ready to unleash its final, terrible we Remy is a Chorister, one of the chosen few rescued from the surface world and raised to sing the Hours in a choir of young boys. Remy lives with a devoted order of monks who control the Leviathan, an aging nuclear submarine that survives in the ocean’s depths. Their secret mission: to trigger the Second Coming when the time is right, ready to unleash its final, terrible weapon. But Remy has a secret too— she’s the only girl onboard. It is because of this secret that the sub’s dying caplain gifts her with the missile’s launch key, saying that it is her duty to keep it safe. Safety, however, is not the sub’s priority, especially when the new caplain has his own ideas about the Leviathan’s mission. Remy’s own perspective is about to shift drastically when a surface-dweller is captured during a raid, and she learns the truth about the world. At once lyrical and page-turning, We Shall Sing a Song Into the Deep is a captivating debut from newcomer author Andrew Kelly Stewart.

30 review for We Shall Sing a Song Into the Deep

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    In "We Shall Sing a Song into the Deep" by Andrew Kelly Stewart, a group of monks prowl the devastated seas of a post-nuclear Earth in an aging submarine. On board is a single nuclear missile, and the monks' mission is to wait for God to declare the Last Judgment. Remy, head Chorister on the submarine, Leviathan, has a secret. She's the only girl aboard the all-male vessel. Her golden voice saved her life when she was captured by the crew, but she's at the age where the other choristers undergo c In "We Shall Sing a Song into the Deep" by Andrew Kelly Stewart, a group of monks prowl the devastated seas of a post-nuclear Earth in an aging submarine. On board is a single nuclear missile, and the monks' mission is to wait for God to declare the Last Judgment. Remy, head Chorister on the submarine, Leviathan, has a secret. She's the only girl aboard the all-male vessel. Her golden voice saved her life when she was captured by the crew, but she's at the age where the other choristers undergo castration, so her secret won't be hers for much longer. The Leviathan's captain dies, and the new "Caplain" is a much stricter master. He wants the Last Judgment to be called, so he can rain down nuclear fire on "Babylon." There's a problem with the controls, though, leading the crew to conduct a raid and capture a "Topsider" technician to repair the equipment. The technician is a woman, and Remy visits her nightly to hear stories of the world above. They formulate a plan to keep the missile from being launched. Remy must choose between the world above and the world below, and whom to save or cast away. The story is somehow spare and lush at the same time. A lot is packed into this short book, which has a taste of "A Canticle for Leibowitz" and "The Hunt for Red October," but is also unique. Some of the characters are not as well-drawn as others, but it's Remy's tale, and she is engaging. The prose is descriptive, and I felt I could hear the groan of the metal as the submarine was under pressure, and the whale songs that contrasted with the Latin mass the Choristers sang. Highly recommended. I received an advanced copy from Macmillan-Tor/Forge and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Gillian Daniels

    A grim thriller and a moving study in searching for hope in the dark claustrophobia of hopelessness.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Tas

    Read this review and other Science Fiction/Fantasy book reviews at The Quill to Live If there is something we always wish there was more of, it is the role of religion within science fiction stories. Neither of us is at all religious, but religion is nigh inescapable within the human experience. For it to just disappear, or not have a meaningful place within a world that is far beyond our own feels off sometimes. So how can we pass up a story that melds a nuclear apocalypse with religion? Due to Read this review and other Science Fiction/Fantasy book reviews at The Quill to Live If there is something we always wish there was more of, it is the role of religion within science fiction stories. Neither of us is at all religious, but religion is nigh inescapable within the human experience. For it to just disappear, or not have a meaningful place within a world that is far beyond our own feels off sometimes. So how can we pass up a story that melds a nuclear apocalypse with religion? Due to a logistical error and someone (*cough* Brandee) misreading our calendar, Alex and Brandee teamed up to review the powerful forces at play in Andrew Kelly Stewart’s debut novella, We Shall Sing a Song Into The Deep. A lone submarine called The Leviathan traverses the ocean with an all-male crew after a nuclear fallout has ravaged the land. The inhabitants–members of a religious order– pass the time in prayer while desperately trying to keep the deteriorating sub afloat. The world is slowly fading away, at least that is what the protagonist is made to believe. A young girl hiding among the crew, Remy knows little about life outside The Leviathan. However, secrets begin to unravel as her captain falls ill and entrusts Remy with the launch key to the world’s last nuclear missile. A new leader takes the helm and begins preparations for the Second Coming, with plans to launch the missile and deliver God’s Last Judgement. The crew’s days are numbered, and a hostage taken from the surface opens Remy’s eyes to the truth – it seems her Brothers have been keeping secrets of their own. Holding the world’s future in her hands, Remy must combat her beliefs and determine her true purpose. We Shall Sing has a lyrical beginning that pulls you deep underneath the waves. It’s downright enchanting…at first. About halfway through the story, there is a defining shift in Stewart’s writing. The second half of the book loses its hushed, reverent approach and turns its turbines into overdrive to propel the now predictable plot forward. In terms of worldbuilding, we know little about the “Topside” world that exists on the surface. However, Stewart does a splendid job bringing you into Remy’s world on The Leviathan. The daily grind of the religious order is captured alongside mechanical details about the submarine, effortlessly easing you into their small, severe world. However, as the second half becomes more of a thriller, the descriptions and atmosphere take a backseat as exposition takes the forefront. The characters follow a similar path to the atmosphere. Remy herself is easy to follow, as she seems wary even after several years amongst the crew. But she’s also instilled with purpose, much like the rest, but is questioning in the way a child insulated from the world would be when given an undue amount of responsibility. She is a delight in the first half but seems to very quickly acclimatize to the new situation halfway through, and it’s a little jarring. The side characters are recognizable archetypes but Stewart adds intimate details that really flesh them out, even if they don’t have much to do. They make the submarine feel like an enclosed ecosystem that has learned to make do with whatever resources it has. Alex This is a tough one for me because I was particularly excited to read this novella. Its premise was so unique within post-apocalyptic fiction. Stewart hooked me deep, luring me with his siren song as he sang about life on the ship. It felt enclosed, filled with purpose, and sailing slowly to its horrid task. Where the book fell apart for me was the halfway point, as the prose switches to a more standard action-oriented and dialogue-heavy affair. It’s abrupt and really pulled me out of the story. My least favorite thing about post-apocalypse stories is when it comes time to talk about the actual apocalypse, I just lose interest. The disaster never feels as interesting as the flow of life after the end. Stewart, for his part, imagines an interesting one, but it’s delivered in such a matter-of-fact manner, it’s impossible to question it from a reader’s viewpoint. I felt it should feel like the story Remy has been told all her life, but instead it just immediately reeks of fact, and Remy adapts to it incredibly quickly. It changes the rest of the book so that the two halves feel very different from each other. It should have felt like a revelation and instead, it just was. Stewart was able to make it feel tense towards the conclusion with a couple twists and turns here and there, but I wasn’t as engrossed. Brandee The element that drew me in like the tide was Stewart’s integration of religion into the story. I was fascinated by the belief system the Brothers established and how it attached itself to the sub’s radioactive power. Religion created interesting dynamics, and I enjoyed seeing how the crew’s beliefs played out. The creative doctrine and cult-like ongoings are definitely the novella’s shining stars. The story itself is well-rounded overall, but it clearly reads like two separate pieces. The beginning was hypnotizing, but the shift quickly snaps you out of the story – eventually dampening the rest of the tale for me. I was ultimately satisfied after reading, yet wished that holy energy had permeated the story until the end. We both agree that Stewart excelled in capturing an often ignored human experience in the aftermath of nuclear fallout. We Shall Sing A Song Into The Deep was a presentable, and often engaging, story despite its balancing act. If you can marry the story’s poetic beginning with its determined end, the novella accomplishes much. Rating: We Shall Sing A Song Into The Deep – 7.0/10 -Alex and Brandee

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    The nitty-gritty: A strange, sad, claustrophobic tale, with unexpected moments of beauty and hope. I can honestly say I’ve never read anything quite like We Shall Sing a Song Into the Deep. This is a dark, atmospheric tale—verging on oppressive—that weaves together several unusual elements: a submarine called the Leviathan commanded by a religious zealot who has stolen young boys from above and forced them to join his doomsday cult; an apocalyptic future (or perhaps an alternate history, I’m not The nitty-gritty: A strange, sad, claustrophobic tale, with unexpected moments of beauty and hope. I can honestly say I’ve never read anything quite like We Shall Sing a Song Into the Deep. This is a dark, atmospheric tale—verging on oppressive—that weaves together several unusual elements: a submarine called the Leviathan commanded by a religious zealot who has stolen young boys from above and forced them to join his doomsday cult; an apocalyptic future (or perhaps an alternate history, I’m not sure) where the world has been nearly destroyed by nuclear war and is populated by “Topsiders” who are a threat to the men and boys on board the submarine; a group of young castrated boys called Choristers who are literally forced to sing for their supper; and a young girl named Remy who is pretending to be a boy but is in fact the only female on board. In its deepest chambers, the Leviathan carries the last nuclear missile on Earth, which will be released as soon as God gives the word, sending all those on board to their Last Judgement. But when a prisoner from the surface is brought below, Remy’s worldview shifts. Has everything she’s been told about the world above been a lie? This short novella is simply dripping with atmosphere, and in my opinion it’s the strongest thing about the story. Stewart’s prose brings the dark, dank bowels of the Leviathan to life, and I can assure you after reading this story, I never want to find myself inside a submarine ever! I could hear every ping and clank, every rush of steam through the pipes, even the drone of the sub’s motors. The crew are almost starving to death and survive on the scant fish they bring in from the ocean, as well as mushrooms harvested from the steamy lower tunnels (ewww). The reactor is bleeding poison into the air and slowing killing everyone. In the lowest reaches of the Leviathan, those boys who have committed one sin or another become the Forgotten and are banished to perform the most dangerous maintenance jobs next to the sub’s nuclear reactors. Add to this the fear of the ancient submarine breaking down and the threat of the Topsiders and the broken world above, and you can see how the characters are in a constant state of unease. There is an air of sadness to the story that rarely lets up. Something terrible has happened to the world above, and the crew of the Leviathan believe they are only safe underwater, despite the hardships they go through. I felt awful for poor Remy and the other Choristers, who have been brainwashed to believe that the world above is evil and the only way out is through death. It’s that typical cult scenario that I’ve read many times before, but it never fails to break my heart. And yet, there are some oddly beautiful moments. Remy’s friendships with the other Choristers are so sweet. As weird as it was, I also loved the idea of a choir of young boys singing Compline and Vespers every day, their lives ruled by the Hours. Remy was chosen for her beautiful singing voice, and singing not only comforts her, but she's proud of what she does. We also find out that two whales often follow the sub, singing back and forth together, and I loved how this parallels the Chorister's singing on the Leviathan. Remy is always listening for them, as if they’re a sign that things are still OK. Remy herself is surprisingly upbeat considering that she was kidnapped from above when she was only five years old and doesn’t remember anything about her previous life.  Once Remy meets the prisoner, a Topsider named Adolphine, the story takes on a certain urgency, as Adolphine convinces Remy to try to escape. I have to admit I found it very hard to give this novella a rating, but I finally settled on four stars simply because I think it has many special and unique qualities. However the overall feel of the story is very depressing and weird, so this isn’t going to be for everyone. I’m intrigued by Andrew Kelly Stewart, though, and very curious to see what he writes next. Big thanks to the publisher for supplying a review copy.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Marlene

    Originally published at Reading Reality Based on some of the blurb descriptions – which call this a combination of the SF classic A Canticle for Leibowitz and the military suspense classic The Hunt for Red October, I went into this book with certain expectations – in spite of never having read Canticle. (A Canticle for Leibowitz is so foundational to SF that even if you haven’t read it, you’ve heard of it and have at least a vague idea of what it’s above. And there are plenty of summaries availabl Originally published at Reading Reality Based on some of the blurb descriptions – which call this a combination of the SF classic A Canticle for Leibowitz and the military suspense classic The Hunt for Red October, I went into this book with certain expectations – in spite of never having read Canticle. (A Canticle for Leibowitz is so foundational to SF that even if you haven’t read it, you’ve heard of it and have at least a vague idea of what it’s above. And there are plenty of summaries available to fill in any gaps.) So, expectations. Expectations that weren’t exactly met. Which doesn’t mean that they weren’t exceeded – because they were. We Shall Sing a Song Into the Deep takes elements from those books cited, a post-nuclear-apocalyptic world and a story that is steeped in nuclear brinkmanship and set in the claustrophobic confines of a submarine, turns those expectations upside down and sends them on a deep dive into times and places that the reader – or at least this reader – was not expecting. Because in spite of that tantalizing combination of antecedents from the blurb, this story isn’t really all that similar to either of the other books. But the crew of that submarine, the former U.S.S. Leviathan, thinks that it is. They believe that they world has ended in a nuclear holocaust, that civilization has fallen and that the survivors outside of their ship are diseased and savage and mutated. And out to get them. And they’re almost right. Also, totally, completely, utterly and absolutely wrong. Escape Rating A-: Like A Canticle for Leibowitz, this is a story that combines the worship and rituals of a Catholic monastery with a post-apocalyptic world. Then it turns the rest of the classic story upside down. Not that the apocalypse doesn’t happen in both stories, but that’s where the similarity ends. Canticle is about the preservation of knowledge, where Song is actually about its destruction. The mission in Canticle is the result of the destruction, where the mission in Song is about the cause. It also feels like Canticle is honest about its faith where Song is about the corruption of it. Also, a bit of Lord of the Flies wouldn’t be out of line in the description of what went into the mix for this book. Because in the tiny world of the Leviathan there’s definitely more than a hint of power corrupting into repression and violence, bullies rising to the top through the success of their bullying, and thought police – to mix in yet another classic metaphor – suppressing everything that runs counter to approved thought and belief. And there’s more than a touch of alternate history mixed in, but I’ll leave for you to discover. While the story has a bit of a slow start – because conditions aboard the Leviathan are grim and gruesome and dark and dank. And the main character seems to be scared, defenseless and alone and it looks like things are only going to get worse but not necessarily more exciting. At least at first. (But then it’s a very short book so the slow start doesn’t take all that long to get beyond.) And the reader does go into the story with all those assumptions. But as we follow Chorister Remy around on this ship that is so obviously on its last metaphorical and mechanical legs, the assumptions start peeling back like a rotting skin, only to reveal that the rot goes all the way through to the bone. But those bones conceal a whole lot of truths. And once Remy starts to see those, it’s a race to see whether anything, or anyone, can be saved. Or should be.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie McDaniel

    This novella is a post-apocalyptic alternate history that the blurbs compare to A Canticle for Leibowitz and The Hunt for Red October. I haven't read either, although that description sounds more like something made for Hollywood. I daresay this would make a good movie, but it would definitely need a discerning, nuanced script. This story deals with faith and religion, from the viewpoint of a young person raised in an apocalyptic death cult, the vaguely Catholic, monkish Brotherhood, waiting to This novella is a post-apocalyptic alternate history that the blurbs compare to A Canticle for Leibowitz and The Hunt for Red October. I haven't read either, although that description sounds more like something made for Hollywood. I daresay this would make a good movie, but it would definitely need a discerning, nuanced script. This story deals with faith and religion, from the viewpoint of a young person raised in an apocalyptic death cult, the vaguely Catholic, monkish Brotherhood, waiting to carry out the Last Judgment. Our protagonist, Remy, is a woman--young girl, rather; she's about thirteen or fourteen--aboard one of the last surviving nuclear submarines, the Leviathan.The Leviathan patrols the oceans twenty-three years after World War III, waiting to launch its one remaining nuclear missile. An act that the cult members are told will send them to heaven and make the sea give up the dead bodies of their comrades. (And, unfortunately, there are a lot of bodies for the sea to give up, as for the past twenty years the Leviathan has been kidnapping young boys to prop up the cult and feed into the rear section of the boat, where the nuclear reactor that powers the ship soon irradiates them.) The most notable thing about this book is its atmosphere: it's dripping with claustrophobia and paranoia. The author has nailed the feelings and sensations of being trapped in a submarine, with the bulkheads pressing close on every side, and never seeing the sun or sky. Remy has even more to hide aboard this boat full of secrets--because no one knows she is female, with the exception of the "caplain" (the cult's term, a blending of captain and chaplain) who rescued her from the Topside, the poisoned surface world, years before. She was saved because of her beautiful singing voice, which lands her a spot with the Choristers, the young boys who sing the hymns that keep the Brotherhood on the straight and narrow. But Remy's faith has begun to crack. Her best friend, Lazlo, was drafted for a Topsider raid, and in the process watched his fellow Brothers slaughter nearly everyone aboard the ship they boarded. He heard these people begging for their lives, saying the war was over and the surface wasn't all poisoned, and those aboard the Leviathan don't have to live the way they are living. For his doubts he is sent to the rear of the submarine, consigned to the reactor room as one of the Forgotten. Remy is deeply shaken by this, so much so she sneaks away to talk to the prisoner the caplain has brought on board ship, the woman he hopes to force to fix his last missile's broken targeting system. This is the story of Remy's taking charge of her life and breaking the terrible shackles of the cult of the Brotherhood, and eventually leading her friends in a rebellion to escape from the submarine as it prepares to carry out the Last Judgment. I do wish the worldbuilding was fleshed out a bit more--this is a novella, of course, so we don't have room for a lot of backstory. There is a bit of necessary infodumping in the middle of the story, as the Topside prisoner explains the state of the world to Remy as best she can. (Short version: this is an alternate 1986 where the Cuban Missile Crisis led to World War III, and Australia is now the world's superpower, or what remains of the world.) The ending is also ambiguous: after Remy and six others escape from the submarine as it goes down, they are afloat on a life raft, waiting for rescue. The implication is that they will be rescued, but we just don't know. Nevertheless, this is a well-paced story, an exploration of faith (and even at the end, Remy still seems to have faith, even though she's now free of the cult). I hope there is a sequel. Exploring what happens to these characters in the new world they have been abruptly thrust into would be fascinating.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    We Shall Sing a Song into the Deep by Andrew Kelly Steward is a short science fiction and post apocalyptic novel. With the entire story taking place within a submarine, it evokes a claustrophobic setting that is sure to please many looking for something dreary and dystopian like. I’ve read this novel being similar and compared to A Canticle for Leibowitz along with The Hunt for Red October but in my opinion it more resembles the Silo series by Huge Howey. Either way, this was a great read and I We Shall Sing a Song into the Deep by Andrew Kelly Steward is a short science fiction and post apocalyptic novel. With the entire story taking place within a submarine, it evokes a claustrophobic setting that is sure to please many looking for something dreary and dystopian like. I’ve read this novel being similar and compared to A Canticle for Leibowitz along with The Hunt for Red October but in my opinion it more resembles the Silo series by Huge Howey. Either way, this was a great read and I believe a first for me from this author. “If I am to die, I will go to God the way I was put into the world.” – Remy I thought it was pretty unique how the author decided to bring religious singing into the forefront of this dystopian setting and mind you, all within a submarine. Remy, our main character and lead singer in the group, has a hidden secret that all the other brothers of this strange world is unaware of. Betraying this secret would undoubtedly result in harsh punishment and even death. When she is all of a sudden entrusted with keeping yet another secret from the dying captain of the sub, her life is in even more danger. Why was she rescued and kept alive in this submarine to live with all the other boys? What is really happening in the world above and why exactly are they bidding their time to unleash a cruise missile upon the world in an event they term The Last Judgement? Why is all of their fate tied to this event? “For one to sing as you do, they must first know how to listen.” – Caplain Amita Anyone looking to take on a short read on one of those stories involving characters being led astray and brainwashed should look into this. The main idea isn’t all that new but the author does do enough to give it a fresh take. Besides, I don’t know about others but I still get goosebumps whenever the reveal is made in these types of stories. It’s like we expect it to happen yet we still get hyped with anticipation when that moment actually arrives. This ultimately leads to me breezing through this short novel within a day. Bravo to this the author. It will be interesting to see if he will continue with this series. Maybe one day he can write another short novel taking place in the same world and timeline but starring the “other side” instead?

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mogsy (MMOGC)

    2 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2021/03/11/... Deep beneath the sea, the last surviving nuclear submarine Leviathan carries a crew made up of a fundamentalist order of monks who believe they hold the power to bringing about the Second Coming, to be unleashed when the time is right. Set in a post-apocalyptic dystopian future, We Shall Sing a Song into the Deep follows Remy, our protagonist who was rescued from the surface and raised to be a Cantor, singing the Hours in 2 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2021/03/11/... Deep beneath the sea, the last surviving nuclear submarine Leviathan carries a crew made up of a fundamentalist order of monks who believe they hold the power to bringing about the Second Coming, to be unleashed when the time is right. Set in a post-apocalyptic dystopian future, We Shall Sing a Song into the Deep follows Remy, our protagonist who was rescued from the surface and raised to be a Cantor, singing the Hours in a choir of young boys. But Remy has a secret. He is in fact a she, the only girl on board—a truth known only to the “Caplain” of the Leviathan. Because of this, he bestows upon Remy the missile launch key before he dies, trusting her judgment to keep it safe and make the right call when the time comes. As a new Caplain comes into power with his own ideas and unbending view of how to run the ship, Remy finds it increasingly difficult to keep all she knows concealed, especially when a close friend of hers returns from a surface raid describing the disturbing things he witnessed. Moreover, a prisoner from above is also brought on board, revealing to Remy even more truths about the outside world and further altering her frame of mind. You know how some books, no matter how hard you try, might just not be for you? This was my experience with We Shall Sing a Song into the Deep. I even restarted it multiple times, as each time I had stalled not long after I began. At first, I blamed the various distractions in my life from pulling me away from it, but eventually, I had to face the truth. I was just not gelling with this book. Everything about this story from its concept to the atmosphere should have pulled me in, and that’s how I’d wanted it to be, but it didn’t happen. My attention would consistently wander while trying to read, and I was always struggling to immerse myself. Part of the problem is the writing style. It’s not the easiest to get into, and this being a novella, its short length meant I never really got a chance to get used to it. That said, I want to make it clear the technical aspects of the writing were mostly great, even too crisp and rigid in some places. Some might describe the prose as lyrical, but for me it felt clunky and lacking in personality, resulting in certain action sequences and emotionally charged scenes feeling too sterile. There’s also not much of a plot, yet somehow it still felt like there wasn’t enough story to fill the relatively small number of pages. World-building was on the sparser side as well, and most of the time I felt disconnected to Remy and had a hard time getting into her headspace to understand what made her click. The singing was an intriguing element, I’ll admit, but like so many other aspects of the world, it felt untethered from the rest of Remy’s reality. Even if it had been the author’s intent, I still think this idea should have been better conveyed, not to mention the ending left things off feeling slightly unfinished. Credit where credit’s due though, one area I thought the book excelled was its atmosphere. It’s claustrophobic and oppressive, and given how most of the story takes place in the ocean’s depths within the guts of a nuclear submarine with a fanatical doomsday cult onboard, I wouldn’t have had it any other way. But at the end of the day, it’s a shame to come to a book and not feel adequately prepared or in the right mood to enjoy it, and although I tried my best, ultimately this might just be a case of not the right book for me. Still, there are clearly good qualities, and judging from the loads of positive reviews from other readers who loved the book, it’s probably worth checking out if the premise speaks to you.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Liz (Quirky Cat)

    I received a copy of We Shall Sing a Song Into the Deep in exchange for a fair and honest review. Andrew Kelly Stewart's debut novella, We Shall Sing a Song Into the Deep has got to be one of the most unique reads I've ever had the luxury of experiencing, and I would like to think that this is saying something. Remy is a Chorister, and while they remember a life before that, they don't remember much. Now it is their job to sing the Hours and keep the mission going. To keep souls and beings soot I received a copy of We Shall Sing a Song Into the Deep in exchange for a fair and honest review. Andrew Kelly Stewart's debut novella, We Shall Sing a Song Into the Deep has got to be one of the most unique reads I've ever had the luxury of experiencing, and I would like to think that this is saying something. Remy is a Chorister, and while they remember a life before that, they don't remember much. Now it is their job to sing the Hours and keep the mission going. To keep souls and beings soothed. It's a sacred job, or so Remy has been told. Remy and their cohorts all live onboard the Leviathin, one of the last nuclear subs – with a deadly mission. However, Remy has a secret of their, or rather, her own. She's a girl hidden in a group of boys, a secret which belies her sweet singing voice. And it's that difference that results in her getting tasked with an all-new mission. “Our collective hum joins the unending chorus of loud pinging, knocking, clanging.” I can tell you with complete and total honesty that I have never read a novella quite like We Shall Sing a Song Into the Deep. It was richly detailed, wonderfully written, and oh so compelling. It also did an excellent job of getting that brain of mine working, coming up with theories and much more. It took me a little bit of time to get into Remy's story, but once I did, boy was I invested in what was happening! It was fascinating, trying to figure out how the world got to this point, what was actually happening, and who was trying to get what done. The best part? Or perhaps the worst, depending on how you want to look at it. There's this lingering sense of paranoia and claustrophobia. It gets worse with time, as it feels like the submarine which has been Remy's home begins to close in on her. It's terrifying. And brilliant. This is one of those novellas that makes me excited to see what else an author will create in time. I can't wait to see what Andrew Kelly Stewart writes next, and I know I'll be reading it, whatever it is. Check out more reviews over at Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jae

    This was a masterpiece in the making. A beautifully written dystopian, nautical, and nuclear armageddon tale, following Remy in learning truths hidden by religious brainwashing. I’ll start with the style. I don’t usually like purple prose or writing that is too lyrical, and while this book seemed that way especially in the beginning, i absolutely loved the writing style in this book. I got absorbed into the story and the author weaved the tale, wrote the book, in a way that captures my attention This was a masterpiece in the making. A beautifully written dystopian, nautical, and nuclear armageddon tale, following Remy in learning truths hidden by religious brainwashing. I’ll start with the style. I don’t usually like purple prose or writing that is too lyrical, and while this book seemed that way especially in the beginning, i absolutely loved the writing style in this book. I got absorbed into the story and the author weaved the tale, wrote the book, in a way that captures my attention solely to character and the plot. I only had a vague reminder of the writing style being that lyrical as i read through simply because i was too focussed on the character. Remy, oh remy. I have no words to describe how much her story impacted me. It was the perfect mix of character depth, backstory and development that continued to move the story forward. The plot I believe was one of the most unique plots ive ever read!! The beginning and ending breaks my heart, and the middle kept me at the edge of my seat. The sombre undertone and the atmospheric way it was written just makes the plot so much more worthwhile. There was a clear and distinct voice leading a carefully laid out plot that had build up, tension and pay off. The themes it explored were handled so well. Religious trauma and cult, the way it was executed felt like the necessary research was done! And an amazing story all round. I can think of few things that could’ve been done better. Maybe this is just my preference but i’d have loved to know more about the world building. Im left with WANTING SO MUCH MORE FROM THIS WORLD!!!! and i wish id gotten it especially considering the way it ended. On top of this side characters could’ve been developed more! All in all this was a great read, and a short one too! So definitely give it a try!! Thank you to Macmillan-Tor/ Forge for providing me with a digital ARC in exchange for an honest review via NetGalley. Trigger warnings: castration, blood, religious cults

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ernest

    When a zealot chaplain stages a mutiny on a nuclear missile sub during the Cuban Missile Crisis, what's the worst that could happen? Pretty much what you expect. Now, a few decades later the Leviathan is still prowling the depths, raiding the occasional topsider, for supplies, fresh crew, and somebody to fix whatever kept the last missile in its silos from launching. The mutineer Caplain is dying, the holy mission of launching the last nuclear weapon to signal the coming of Judgement Day undone, When a zealot chaplain stages a mutiny on a nuclear missile sub during the Cuban Missile Crisis, what's the worst that could happen? Pretty much what you expect. Now, a few decades later the Leviathan is still prowling the depths, raiding the occasional topsider, for supplies, fresh crew, and somebody to fix whatever kept the last missile in its silos from launching. The mutineer Caplain is dying, the holy mission of launching the last nuclear weapon to signal the coming of Judgement Day undone, but he doesn't quite trust the Ex-OH, so he hands off the key to Remmy, the lead choir singer in this demented monastery under the sea. Remmy's voice is as pure as her belief in the boat's holy purpose and the evilness of anyone living on the blighted surface. The Caplain saved her when she was an infant dying on some wrecked or abandoned ship, taught her to read understand the Latin of the liturgies the choir sings daily, and hid the secret of her gender from the rest of the crew, old salts, and young castrated boys all. Remmy's faith is shaken when her best friend comes back from a raid and shares his doubts about what he's seen, but is consigned to the hellish service of the reactor when he's overheard. That raid also brought a woman aboard, a technician that may be able to fix the missile, and though held captive Remmy manages to sneak out at night to speak to her. As she learns more about the world above, her faith shatters and she realizes that she's the only hope for the crew of the Leviathan, and maybe for the survivors above as well. Dark, tense, powerful, it's not a joyful ride towards the future, but Remmy's tale is as compelling as any space opera and chillingly more plausible than most.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra

    "We Shall Sing a Song Into the Deep" is a lovely, lyrical novella about music, faith, and nuclear apocalypse. Remy is a member of a religious order which travels the world's oceans on a submarine equipped with the last nuclear missile in existence, the leader of the order's chorus of castrati, and - though this is a secret to almost everyone else on the ship - the only girl on board. After another woman is taken on board, a prisoner from Topside, Remy begins to question her world, her beliefs, a "We Shall Sing a Song Into the Deep" is a lovely, lyrical novella about music, faith, and nuclear apocalypse. Remy is a member of a religious order which travels the world's oceans on a submarine equipped with the last nuclear missile in existence, the leader of the order's chorus of castrati, and - though this is a secret to almost everyone else on the ship - the only girl on board. After another woman is taken on board, a prisoner from Topside, Remy begins to question her world, her beliefs, and what she's been told all her life. The worldbuilding in this was exquisite; I often find that spec fic novellas which rely on a lot of worldbuilding can be tricky to pull off, but the author has done so admirably here. Information is given to both the characters and the readers very naturally, and is generally not difficult or overwhelming to follow, and the little details (like teeth as a form of currency on the submarine!) made the setting feel very fleshed out and alive. The characters, too, are well-developed, and I found Remy's character arc compelling and believable. The writing style is lovely, easy and enjoyable to read. My one major critique is that, in my opinion, the major 'plot twist' was fairly easy to predict, which I felt detracted a bit from the tension of the last third or so of the book. I'd love to see this expanded on in further books, especially if it's a continuation of Remy's story. I will certainly be following this author's future works, and I'd recommend this wholeheartedly to anyone who enjoys this genre. Thanks to Netgalley and Tor Publishing for an e-ARC of this book, in exchange for my honest review!

  13. 4 out of 5

    The Captain

    Ahoy there me mateys!  I received this sci-fi novella eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  So here be me honest musings . . . A story about a cult in a dystopian future that takes place in a submarine?  Aye!  This debut fit me mood perfectly and I loved it.  Though don't read the blurb if ye don't want spoilers galore. The highlight of this book for me was the setting and atmosphere.  A doomsday cult hides out in a submarine waiting for the day to release the last nuke on board.  Ahoy there me mateys!  I received this sci-fi novella eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  So here be me honest musings . . . A story about a cult in a dystopian future that takes place in a submarine?  Aye!  This debut fit me mood perfectly and I loved it.  Though don't read the blurb if ye don't want spoilers galore. The highlight of this book for me was the setting and atmosphere.  A doomsday cult hides out in a submarine waiting for the day to release the last nuke on board.  The main character, Remy, holds a special position on the sub but even that doesn't have a ton of perks.  Seriously life onboard is harsh.  I felt that this book captured life on an ancient, failing machine quite well. Remy was a fun character to follow, if a bit naïve.  I did enjoy the world-building of a religious order on a sub.  It was fun to see the elements of Catholic monastery life mixed in with ship life.  The plot was a little bit unrealistic in terms of probability at times and needs some suspension of disbelief.  But I didn't ultimately care because I enjoyed it so.  Plus it is a super quick read as well. This novella reminded me a bit of sisters of the vast black and I enjoyed comparing the two takes on religious fervor of the future.  I highly recommend both novellas and I will be checking out more of the author's work in the future.  Arrr! So lastly . . . Thank you Tor.com!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Heather L

    What an original book, I really enjoyed reading this. The story unfolds through Remy, a Chorister, who has lived on an old nuclear submarine with one nuclear missile left. On board with Remy are a group of monks who take care of the submarine, they also fish for food, something that is quite dangerous. The monks gather at Vespers, Compline, Matins etc to sing, the monks are all men, Remy is a woman she has a beautiful voice. All the men have been castrated prior to puberty to retain their voices What an original book, I really enjoyed reading this. The story unfolds through Remy, a Chorister, who has lived on an old nuclear submarine with one nuclear missile left. On board with Remy are a group of monks who take care of the submarine, they also fish for food, something that is quite dangerous. The monks gather at Vespers, Compline, Matins etc to sing, the monks are all men, Remy is a woman she has a beautiful voice. All the men have been castrated prior to puberty to retain their voices, Remy is nearing that age when it will happen to her and her secret will become known. Women who had been previously encountered by the men when 'topside' have been left to their own devices while men have been brought into the submarine. When the old captain of the sub passes away, the new captain makes it known he wants to bring about the last judgment by launching the last missile. The missile launch process requires repairs and the monks kidnap a 'topsider' female to make them. One can certainly feel the claustrophobic atmosphere and the stress of wondering if the next dive is going to cause the sub to be crushed by external forces. I highly recommend. Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for the ARC.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Whimsy Dearest

    Aboard a submarine called the Leviathan lives a doomsday brotherhood who believe it is their sacred duty to bring about the Final Judgment and the End of Days. Among them is a chorister named Remy who is prized for his lovely singing voice. However, Remy has a secret. He is actually a she, and she must disguise the fact that she is a girl, and on top of that, the dying captain gives her the key to the Leviathan’s final launch missile. Now she must grapple with her faith as she tries to figure out Aboard a submarine called the Leviathan lives a doomsday brotherhood who believe it is their sacred duty to bring about the Final Judgment and the End of Days. Among them is a chorister named Remy who is prized for his lovely singing voice. However, Remy has a secret. He is actually a she, and she must disguise the fact that she is a girl, and on top of that, the dying captain gives her the key to the Leviathan’s final launch missile. Now she must grapple with her faith as she tries to figure out what is right and what is wrong. We Shall Sing a Song into the Deep by Andrew Kelly Stewart presents a richly imaginative alternative history to the Cold War, and honestly, I can say I haven’t been this engrossed in a story for a long time. It’s a nail-biting page-tuner that kept me up late at night to finish it, and even after I finished the final pages, the story still lingers with me. Lyrical and haunting, the story borders almost into cosmic horror and magical realism territory, leaving readers to question what IS the truth alongside Remy. Overall, it's a stellar, well-thought-out novella, and I can’t recommend it enough. Thank you, NetGalley and Tor, for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lexi Denee

    **Thank you to NetGalley and Tordotcom for the eARC copy of this book in exchange for honest feedback!** At 160 pages this incredible story left me wanting more. Just the synopsis alone fully grabbed my interest and I knew I needed to read this book. What I DIDN'T know was the emotional rollercoaster I was in for. The main character, Remy, is aboard a retired nuclear submarine run by an order of monks who believe women shouldn't exist and all boys must be castrated to "reach salvation." The ship i **Thank you to NetGalley and Tordotcom for the eARC copy of this book in exchange for honest feedback!** At 160 pages this incredible story left me wanting more. Just the synopsis alone fully grabbed my interest and I knew I needed to read this book. What I DIDN'T know was the emotional rollercoaster I was in for. The main character, Remy, is aboard a retired nuclear submarine run by an order of monks who believe women shouldn't exist and all boys must be castrated to "reach salvation." The ship is carrying a nuclear missile that the order of monks will release at the time of the "second coming," releasing all those worthy of salvation. The monks tell Remy and the other children that they "rescued" from above the water, that the world is poisoned, and only evil doers live above the water. I found this story to be an incredible example of how extreme religious indoctrination can be in some cases, as the characters struggled with their own beliefs and desire for free will. I don't want to say much else and risk spoiling anything, but if you're thinking about it - you should absolutely read this book. If you like post-apocalyptic themes, anything involving cults, or crying (a lot,) you should check this out.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Hélène Louise

    I really liked the beginning of the story, with its strong atmosphere and original setting. While reading I felt more and more oppressed, which wasn't surprising for a dystopian "huit-clos" in a nuclear submarine. The story is interesting, and the development is quite good for the first part, as we learn more and more about Remy, the whole situation, the context. Alas I found very difficult to finish this novella, even as short as it is. I felt the story dragging and a bit repetitive, even in ful I really liked the beginning of the story, with its strong atmosphere and original setting. While reading I felt more and more oppressed, which wasn't surprising for a dystopian "huit-clos" in a nuclear submarine. The story is interesting, and the development is quite good for the first part, as we learn more and more about Remy, the whole situation, the context. Alas I found very difficult to finish this novella, even as short as it is. I felt the story dragging and a bit repetitive, even in full action. I felt uncomfortable, and of course it's not supposed to be a feel good story, and all in all it's not unduly dark or intolerable in any ways. It probably wasn't the right time to me to read this story, a case of "it's not you, novella, but me". Still, the end was a deception, the author uses a rather classical way of finishing its story which I never liked, with many questions unanswered, in a vague way. So rather a deception for me but probably not a reason not to read for anybody who's inspired by the presentation, as the story has many qualities. Paragraphe (I thank Netgalley and Macmillan-Tor/Forge for sending me the ARC in exchange for my honest review)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lena

    This book is such a refreshing, interesting read, I couldn't put it down! I loved the idea of a story set inside a submarine. The author does a great job of making the reader feel just how isolating and vulnerable it can be to be part of the crew, especially a young crew, knowing nothing of the world but what they've been told by their superiors. Remy is a great, compelling character that is developed in a beautiful manner throughout the story, you can really feel what she feels and have the sam This book is such a refreshing, interesting read, I couldn't put it down! I loved the idea of a story set inside a submarine. The author does a great job of making the reader feel just how isolating and vulnerable it can be to be part of the crew, especially a young crew, knowing nothing of the world but what they've been told by their superiors. Remy is a great, compelling character that is developed in a beautiful manner throughout the story, you can really feel what she feels and have the same questions she has. The revelations about the status of the world and what it means for the mission that this crew so firmly believe in are done in a way that makes you question everyone and everything, which makes this book an amazing page-turner. My favourite part about it is the ending, it's perhaps not your traditional ending, but it is the one that feels the most relatable and natural given the tone of the book as a whole. I found this story to be captivating and I haven't stopped talking about this book since I read it, it stays with you and that is the sign of a great book in my opinion.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    My thanks to NetGalley And Tor publishing for an advanced copy of this novel. In We Shall Sing a Song Into the Deep by Andrew Kelly Stewart, a young Chorister with secrets by the name of Remy lives on a decaying submarine somewhere in the Pacific. Crewed by monks, some from the original crew of the Leviathan as they call the submarine, and some taken from raids on the surface world, where Remy is from. Upon the death of their Chaptain(sp) their new leader decides the time of Judgement is upon the My thanks to NetGalley And Tor publishing for an advanced copy of this novel. In We Shall Sing a Song Into the Deep by Andrew Kelly Stewart, a young Chorister with secrets by the name of Remy lives on a decaying submarine somewhere in the Pacific. Crewed by monks, some from the original crew of the Leviathan as they call the submarine, and some taken from raids on the surface world, where Remy is from. Upon the death of their Chaptain(sp) their new leader decides the time of Judgement is upon them and their final nuclear v middle should be launched to cleanse the Earth of wickedness and evil. The world depicted in the book though claustrophobic is well thought out and fascinating to watch unfold, with characters that are interesting and you can't help but root for. The book is novella length, hopefully van intro to this brave new world, as I would love to know more about it. Once the story unfolds it seems amazing that something like this never happened. And looking at the world today hope it never will. A very interesting well thought out novel, one of my favorites I feel for the year.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Elisa

    A short novella with more action than many books twice its size. The characters are all vividly portrayed, even the ones in the background. I’m glad that I didn’t know anything about the plot so that all the twists were unexpected, even from the start. There are so many things I loved about this read. A Gothic atmosphere inside a submarine is genius, as is setting a monastery under the sea. There are many suspenseful moments told in beautiful prose. It is apocalyptic science fiction, speculative A short novella with more action than many books twice its size. The characters are all vividly portrayed, even the ones in the background. I’m glad that I didn’t know anything about the plot so that all the twists were unexpected, even from the start. There are so many things I loved about this read. A Gothic atmosphere inside a submarine is genius, as is setting a monastery under the sea. There are many suspenseful moments told in beautiful prose. It is apocalyptic science fiction, speculative fiction, a spy thriller and a truly original story. Remy, the main character is compelling, resourceful and damaged - trying to do the right thing when it’s hard to know what that is. And the ending is so poignant and emotional. There aren’t enough words in the dictionary to describe how good this novella is so I’ll give 5 enthusiastic stars. I chose to read this book and all opinions in this review are my own and completely unbiased. Thank you, NetGalley/Macmillan-Tor/Forge!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jillian

    A truly interesting and original story in the post-apocalyptic space. The prose definitely takes some time to get used to, I wouldn't say it's an easy read, particularly the beginning, but once it gets going it gets good. A powerful story about friendship, community, and questioning one's faith. The story covers a lot of ground as Remy struggles with some pretty major thems -- right and wrong, and truth and deception, deciding who to trust and who to help. And her ultimate decision to take a sta A truly interesting and original story in the post-apocalyptic space. The prose definitely takes some time to get used to, I wouldn't say it's an easy read, particularly the beginning, but once it gets going it gets good. A powerful story about friendship, community, and questioning one's faith. The story covers a lot of ground as Remy struggles with some pretty major thems -- right and wrong, and truth and deception, deciding who to trust and who to help. And her ultimate decision to take a stand was exciting and heartbreaking at the same time. I didn't love the singing/choir aspect of it just because I struggled to really connect with that but that may just be me and the rest of the world was so different and specific that I got on board anyway. Strange, brutal at times, but ultimately a beautiful experience.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    The increasing popularity of post-apocalyptic and dystopian fiction makes finding an original story somewhat difficult. "We Shall Sing a Song Into the Deep" is not completely unique, but it certainly stands apart from many others. I actually felt like the book could have been longer, which is a testament to its story. I wanted to have a little more time to understand some of the characters and their relationships, especially toward the latter stages of the tale, as well as the origin of the chap The increasing popularity of post-apocalyptic and dystopian fiction makes finding an original story somewhat difficult. "We Shall Sing a Song Into the Deep" is not completely unique, but it certainly stands apart from many others. I actually felt like the book could have been longer, which is a testament to its story. I wanted to have a little more time to understand some of the characters and their relationships, especially toward the latter stages of the tale, as well as the origin of the chaplain + captain AKA caplain. That said, I still think the author did wonderful work and kept the story alive and moving despite the dreary, dark setting. I wanted more from the ending, as well as a more nuanced take on how gender played a role in the story (which may have been difficult for a male author to provide). Thank you to the publisher ad Netgalley for the ARC.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Miriam

    Another novella that should have been a novel. We Shall Sing a Song Into the Deep has a fascinating premise (death cult on the last surviving nuclear submarine) and great characters and ideas. It works pretty well as a novella, too. But this is a story just begging for expansion. There's so much more to explore, both in terms of plot and character. I'd love to see more of Remy's relationship with the Caplain and with Lazlo, as both these relationships are really key to Remy's character and are un Another novella that should have been a novel. We Shall Sing a Song Into the Deep has a fascinating premise (death cult on the last surviving nuclear submarine) and great characters and ideas. It works pretty well as a novella, too. But this is a story just begging for expansion. There's so much more to explore, both in terms of plot and character. I'd love to see more of Remy's relationship with the Caplain and with Lazlo, as both these relationships are really key to Remy's character and are underdeveloped due to the short page count. I"d love to see the plot drawn out longer so that certain character and plot arcs happen more naturally. Stewart has created a really cool world, and I wish she'd let us spend more time in it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Greg Chatham

    Stewart takes a well worn YA premise-- survivors of an apocalyptic event sequester themselves inside an isolated facility, their children are raised to believe the outside world is uninhabitable, all may not be what it seems-- but there's an important caveat. This time it's on a submarine. It's well-written if a bit rote. Compared to the lived in depiction of life on the boat, certain aspects feel underdeveloped. The villains are too single-minded. The religion the crew develops over time doesn't Stewart takes a well worn YA premise-- survivors of an apocalyptic event sequester themselves inside an isolated facility, their children are raised to believe the outside world is uninhabitable, all may not be what it seems-- but there's an important caveat. This time it's on a submarine. It's well-written if a bit rote. Compared to the lived in depiction of life on the boat, certain aspects feel underdeveloped. The villains are too single-minded. The religion the crew develops over time doesn't get weird enough. (Dagon is mentioned at one point, then never again.) And the story feels incomplete without an extended epilogue. But that aside, it's that story you like, now slightly creepier and on a submarine!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    A fresh take on a nuclear apocalypse that also manages to avoid the novella sin of not feeling like a complete story; I for one was perfectly satisfied with the somewhat open-ended final chapter. I found the prose to be incredibly evocative, especially concerning the sounds of the submarine and whales combined with the hymns Remy sang. It felt like I was there. I do however have one incredibly petty criticism, namely that there were too many ellipsis in the dialogue! For some reason, once I notic A fresh take on a nuclear apocalypse that also manages to avoid the novella sin of not feeling like a complete story; I for one was perfectly satisfied with the somewhat open-ended final chapter. I found the prose to be incredibly evocative, especially concerning the sounds of the submarine and whales combined with the hymns Remy sang. It felt like I was there. I do however have one incredibly petty criticism, namely that there were too many ellipsis in the dialogue! For some reason, once I noticed this I couldn’t unsee it and felt rather taken out of the story whenever they were used. Thank you netgalley for the arc.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Thanks for Netgalley, the publisher and the author for the advanced reading ebook in exchange for an honest review.  This novella blew me away. It's set entirely on a submarine peopled with men who have survived the end of the world and formed a heavily Catholic-influenced religion to keep themselves together. Our protagonist is a castrati who provides a window into this harsh world. The imagine of sublime, pure music rising through the decaying, creaking decks of the weathered submarine is so bea Thanks for Netgalley, the publisher and the author for the advanced reading ebook in exchange for an honest review.  This novella blew me away. It's set entirely on a submarine peopled with men who have survived the end of the world and formed a heavily Catholic-influenced religion to keep themselves together. Our protagonist is a castrati who provides a window into this harsh world. The imagine of sublime, pure music rising through the decaying, creaking decks of the weathered submarine is so beautiful to me. This contrast runs through the book.  I slowed down reading this towards the end because I simply did not want it to end. My favourite novella of 2021 so far, easily. 

  27. 5 out of 5

    Clare

    Poetic, mesmerizing, exciting, and other-worldly, this novel makes you feel the close and oily air of its setting, the submarine Leviathan. The characters and thus the reader can only get glimpses of the world above the water, and it's a fascinating and beautiful and scary perspective. I don't read a lot of speculative fiction and I tend to space out when there is lots of world building, but this book didn't do that. I was engaged throughout this book and resonated with me--so in short it would Poetic, mesmerizing, exciting, and other-worldly, this novel makes you feel the close and oily air of its setting, the submarine Leviathan. The characters and thus the reader can only get glimpses of the world above the water, and it's a fascinating and beautiful and scary perspective. I don't read a lot of speculative fiction and I tend to space out when there is lots of world building, but this book didn't do that. I was engaged throughout this book and resonated with me--so in short it would appeal to readers who aren't well versed in sci fi or alternate histories and the like. His description of tasting a lime makes me feel like it's the first time I have ever tasted a lime!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jessie (Ageless Pages Reviews)

    Short but quite imaginative with the time used. Patriarchal doomsday cult (except (view spoiler)[ the main character of Remy, a hidden genderbending girl (hide spoiler)] ) in a submarine, plotting to use the world’s last nuke to bring about the end days. More than a few surprises, and makes an impression. The premise is explored through Remy's unfolding awareness of the reality of the world but it's an abrupt journey from believer to rebel. I did think the open-ended nature of the last chapter lac Short but quite imaginative with the time used. Patriarchal doomsday cult (except (view spoiler)[ the main character of Remy, a hidden genderbending girl (hide spoiler)] ) in a submarine, plotting to use the world’s last nuke to bring about the end days. More than a few surprises, and makes an impression. The premise is explored through Remy's unfolding awareness of the reality of the world but it's an abrupt journey from believer to rebel. I did think the open-ended nature of the last chapter lacked the closure necessary for me personally.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    I highly recommend to anyone interested in nautical fiction, space opera, dystopian fiction, or nuclear armageddon. A stowaway. A nuclear submarine. A forgotten, zealous cult of music plotting the end of days. What's not to love? The author synthesizes many genres to create something truly original that's beautiful, intriguing and terrifying all at once. The crew of the Leviathan are vivid and memorable characters. The story itself has more than a few surprises up its sleeve. A thoroughly engagi I highly recommend to anyone interested in nautical fiction, space opera, dystopian fiction, or nuclear armageddon. A stowaway. A nuclear submarine. A forgotten, zealous cult of music plotting the end of days. What's not to love? The author synthesizes many genres to create something truly original that's beautiful, intriguing and terrifying all at once. The crew of the Leviathan are vivid and memorable characters. The story itself has more than a few surprises up its sleeve. A thoroughly engaging read. I look forward to more from this author.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Allison (SPELLBOUND READER)

    Happy Publication Day! . ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ We Shall Sing A Song Into The Deep by Andrew Kelly Stewart, was an eerie read that captured my attention from the start. Hook, line and sinker! . This is a short story with less than 200 pages, perfect for a quick read or readathons! It was so original - I wish I had more of the story, and more time with these characters... but I enjoyed the book regardless. . Thank you Tor Publishing and NetGally for providing me with an arc in exchange for an honest review.

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