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Diners, Dudes, and Diets: How Gender and Power Collide in Food Media and Culture

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The phrase dude food likely brings to mind a range of images: burgers stacked impossibly high with an assortment of toppings that were themselves once considered a meal; crazed sports fans demolishing plates of radioactively hot wings; barbecued or bacon-wrapped . . . anything. But there is much more to the phenomenon of dude food than what's on the plate. Emily J. H. Cont The phrase dude food likely brings to mind a range of images: burgers stacked impossibly high with an assortment of toppings that were themselves once considered a meal; crazed sports fans demolishing plates of radioactively hot wings; barbecued or bacon-wrapped . . . anything. But there is much more to the phenomenon of dude food than what's on the plate. Emily J. H. Contois's provocative book begins with the dude himself--a man who retains a degree of masculine privilege but doesn't meet traditional standards of economic and social success or manly self-control. In the Great Recession's aftermath, dude masculinity collided with food producers and marketers desperate to find new customers. The result was a wave of new diet sodas and yogurts marketed with dude-friendly stereotypes, a transformation of food media, and weight loss programs just for guys. In a work brimming with fresh insights about contemporary American food media and culture, Contois shows how the gendered world of food production and consumption has influenced the way we eat and how food itself is central to the contest over our identities.


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The phrase dude food likely brings to mind a range of images: burgers stacked impossibly high with an assortment of toppings that were themselves once considered a meal; crazed sports fans demolishing plates of radioactively hot wings; barbecued or bacon-wrapped . . . anything. But there is much more to the phenomenon of dude food than what's on the plate. Emily J. H. Cont The phrase dude food likely brings to mind a range of images: burgers stacked impossibly high with an assortment of toppings that were themselves once considered a meal; crazed sports fans demolishing plates of radioactively hot wings; barbecued or bacon-wrapped . . . anything. But there is much more to the phenomenon of dude food than what's on the plate. Emily J. H. Contois's provocative book begins with the dude himself--a man who retains a degree of masculine privilege but doesn't meet traditional standards of economic and social success or manly self-control. In the Great Recession's aftermath, dude masculinity collided with food producers and marketers desperate to find new customers. The result was a wave of new diet sodas and yogurts marketed with dude-friendly stereotypes, a transformation of food media, and weight loss programs just for guys. In a work brimming with fresh insights about contemporary American food media and culture, Contois shows how the gendered world of food production and consumption has influenced the way we eat and how food itself is central to the contest over our identities.

50 review for Diners, Dudes, and Diets: How Gender and Power Collide in Food Media and Culture

  1. 5 out of 5

    Veronica Lozada Tucci

    This book is perfect to keep the excistential anxiety at bay during a global pandemic. It has a fun and light way of exploring gender theory, while also being smart, thought provoking and engaging. I do think she probably spent too much time on Guy Fieri.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mark Johnson

    Short, analytical, thought- provoking

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joey

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mallory DeMille

  5. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  6. 5 out of 5

    CR

  7. 5 out of 5

    Susan Morton

  8. 4 out of 5

    Allyson

  9. 5 out of 5

    suzanne

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Cramer

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jeannie

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  14. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dara

  16. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Cawiezell

  17. 4 out of 5

    David Marton

  18. 5 out of 5

    Evan Sullivan

  19. 4 out of 5

    Leigh Steiner

  20. 5 out of 5

    Marisa

  21. 5 out of 5

    michaelben

  22. 5 out of 5

    Loes Hoefnagels

  23. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa Frazee

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

  27. 5 out of 5

    Perri

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    Jackie

  29. 4 out of 5

    Claire Funk

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah

  31. 5 out of 5

    Bianca Kloti

  32. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Hackman

  33. 4 out of 5

    Lily

  34. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

  35. 5 out of 5

    Dafne

  36. 4 out of 5

    M.

  37. 4 out of 5

    Adrian

  38. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  39. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  40. 5 out of 5

    Johanna Schmidt

  41. 4 out of 5

    Meagan

  42. 5 out of 5

    ANDREW GARRISON

  43. 5 out of 5

    Keith M.

  44. 4 out of 5

    Alanna Russell

  45. 5 out of 5

    Chelsey

  46. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  47. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  48. 4 out of 5

    Jess

  49. 5 out of 5

    Monika Johnson

  50. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

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