web site hit counter The Last Exit - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Last Exit

Availability: Ready to download

Perfect for fans of Tom Sweterlitsch's The Gone World . In this thrilling futuristic novel, the secret to eternal life is closely guarded by people who will do anything to protect it -- even if it means destroying everything in their path. Set in Washington D.C. 20 years from now, climate change has hit hard, fires are burning, unemployment is high, and co Perfect for fans of Tom Sweterlitsch's The Gone World . In this thrilling futuristic novel, the secret to eternal life is closely guarded by people who will do anything to protect it -- even if it means destroying everything in their path. Set in Washington D.C. 20 years from now, climate change has hit hard, fires are burning, unemployment is high, and controversial longevity treatments are only available to the very rich. Enter resourceful young police detective, Jen B. Lu, and her 'partner', Chandler, a SIM implant in her brain and her instant link to the Internet and police records, and a constant voice inside her head. He's an inquisitive tough guy, with a helluva sense of humor and his own ideas about solving crimes. As a detective in the Elder Abuse unit, Jen is supposed to be investigating kids pushing their aging parents to "exit" so they are eligible to get the longevity drug. But what really has her attention are the persistent rumors about Eden, a black market version of the longevity drug, and the bizarre outbreak of people aging almost overnight, then suddenly dying--is this all connected? Is Big Pharma involved? When Jen's investigations of Eden take her too close to the truth, she is suspended, Chandler is deactivated, and her boyfriend is freaked out by "the thing inside her brain." This leaves Jen to pursue a very dangerous investigation all by herself.


Compare

Perfect for fans of Tom Sweterlitsch's The Gone World . In this thrilling futuristic novel, the secret to eternal life is closely guarded by people who will do anything to protect it -- even if it means destroying everything in their path. Set in Washington D.C. 20 years from now, climate change has hit hard, fires are burning, unemployment is high, and co Perfect for fans of Tom Sweterlitsch's The Gone World . In this thrilling futuristic novel, the secret to eternal life is closely guarded by people who will do anything to protect it -- even if it means destroying everything in their path. Set in Washington D.C. 20 years from now, climate change has hit hard, fires are burning, unemployment is high, and controversial longevity treatments are only available to the very rich. Enter resourceful young police detective, Jen B. Lu, and her 'partner', Chandler, a SIM implant in her brain and her instant link to the Internet and police records, and a constant voice inside her head. He's an inquisitive tough guy, with a helluva sense of humor and his own ideas about solving crimes. As a detective in the Elder Abuse unit, Jen is supposed to be investigating kids pushing their aging parents to "exit" so they are eligible to get the longevity drug. But what really has her attention are the persistent rumors about Eden, a black market version of the longevity drug, and the bizarre outbreak of people aging almost overnight, then suddenly dying--is this all connected? Is Big Pharma involved? When Jen's investigations of Eden take her too close to the truth, she is suspended, Chandler is deactivated, and her boyfriend is freaked out by "the thing inside her brain." This leaves Jen to pursue a very dangerous investigation all by herself.

30 review for The Last Exit

  1. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    3.5 stars This review was first posted on Mystery and Suspense. Check it out for features, interviews, and reviews. https://www.mysteryandsuspense.com/th... It's 2033 and America has big problems. Unemployment has soared due to automation, climate change has devastated the environment, smoke from constant fires pollutes the atmosphere..... .....and a fatal neurological disease called Rapid Onset Spongiform Encephalitis (ROSE) - similar to mad cow disease - is killing people who reach middle age. Ph 3.5 stars This review was first posted on Mystery and Suspense. Check it out for features, interviews, and reviews. https://www.mysteryandsuspense.com/th... It's 2033 and America has big problems. Unemployment has soared due to automation, climate change has devastated the environment, smoke from constant fires pollutes the atmosphere..... .....and a fatal neurological disease called Rapid Onset Spongiform Encephalitis (ROSE) - similar to mad cow disease - is killing people who reach middle age. Pharmaceutical companies respond to the ROSE epidemic by developing a preventative drug that not only wards off the spongiform encephalitis, it extends a person's life span into the hundreds. With ongoing plastic surgery, a 100+ person can look thirty-five for decades. The medicine is VERY costly, however, and available only to the privileged ultra-wealthy. There IS an alternative however. A less costly version of the ROSE-prevention drug extends life for a few decades, but there's a catch. People can only get the medicine if their parents agree to be euthanized (exit) at the age of 65. Moreover, drug recipients must be childless, and are sterilized upon treatment. So recipients of the inferior drug avoid spongiform encephalitis and live into their nineties, but lose their parents and have no children. Still, many people want to take advantage of the cheaper medicine, and convince or coerce their parents to exit, and sometimes kill them if they refuse. There are discussions about the ethics of letting (or encouraging) parents to exit, but much of the population seems to be on board. To reduce parental mistreatment, the Washington DC Metro Police have an Elder Abuse Unit that deals with people bullying/beating/murdering their mothers and fathers. Chinese-American Detective Jennifer Lu is part of the Elder Abuse Unit, and is called to the scene when parents are being harassed or threatened. In addition - as part of an experimental program to improve police performance - Jen has an Artificial Intelligence (AI) unit implanted in her brain. The AI unit can access police files, scan the internet, and see and hear everything Jen sees and hears. Jen's AI, called Chandler, functions as a voice in her head, and the duo discuss evidence, lines of investigation, suspects, perpetrators, and so on. Chandler can be turned off when Jen's not working, but he takes an interest in her personal life, and sometimes asks to be left on when Jen visits her ailing mother, sees her boyfriend Zach, goes to parties, etc. Chandler has a cheeky personality, which adds a touch of fun to story. Jen also has a flesh and blood partner named Les who has an AI unit called P.D. Together, Jen, Les, and their respective AIs form an efficient foursome. The book's plot revolves around Jen's suspicion that a black market version of the cheap ROSE-prevention drug - called Eden - is available. People with access to the illegal medicine could presumably have parents over 65 AND families of their own. However, when Jen mentions Eden to her boss, Captain Brooks, he insists there's no such thing and orders Jen not to investigate. Soon afterwards, the U.S. has an epidemic of young people getting sick and dying within a week, appearing shriveled and 100 years old. Jen suspects this has something to do with Eden, and decides to look into the matter against Captain Brooks' orders. Jen's inquiries involve breaking and entering; interviewing witnesses; going to secret meetings; surveilling suspects; and more. It turns out there's a cabal of sinister conspirators at work, and Jen endangers her life in an effort to expose them. This is a compelling science fiction-detective story, just the thing for readers who want something different. You can follow my reviews at https://reviewsbybarbsaffer.blogspot.com

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lukasz

    Review to come but it's neat. Review to come but it's neat.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Roger Hyttinen

    The Last Exit is a dystopian sci-fi crime novel that follows Jen Lu, a detective in the Elder Abuse Unit, and Chandler, a SIM implant that is embedded in her brain. Her interaction with Chandler was kind of akin to having a conversation with a voice inside your head — although Chandler’s personality is that of a snarky, tough guy, which I found quite amusing. I immensely enjoyed the banter between Chandler and Jen and loved seeing Chandler’s personality develop throughout the pages. In this world The Last Exit is a dystopian sci-fi crime novel that follows Jen Lu, a detective in the Elder Abuse Unit, and Chandler, a SIM implant that is embedded in her brain. Her interaction with Chandler was kind of akin to having a conversation with a voice inside your head — although Chandler’s personality is that of a snarky, tough guy, which I found quite amusing. I immensely enjoyed the banter between Chandler and Jen and loved seeing Chandler’s personality develop throughout the pages. In this world, people are encouraged to “Exit” when they reach the age of 65; that is to say, they are expected to agree to kill themselves. Once they do, their children will be given the Treatment that’ll protect them against a deadly disease called ROSE, an illness similar to Mad Cow except that it’s fatal for a high percentage of the population. If the parents refuse to exit, the children are subsequently denied the Treatment. Needless to say, this opens the door to all sorts of elder abuse, with children forcing their parents to exit should they refuse. Of course, all these rules don’t pertain to the mega-wealthy who are not required to exit at all and who can partake of a different treatment guaranteed to provide everlasting life (people who have this are called “The Timeless.”) So what we have here, then, is a society where the wealthy can prolong their lives indefinitely, whereas those who aren’t rich are expected to terminate their life so that their children don’t die before their time (of 65). I found the idea of this society extremely intriguing….and chilling. The intrigue of this story, however, lies in a black market version of the longevity drug called Eden and the subsequent outbreak of people experiencing accelerated aging and then dying, all within a couple of days. As detective Lu investigates, she unearths a mystery that runs a lot deeper than anyone had initially thought. She ends up getting thrust into the center of a deadly conspiracy. There are also those — including her boss — demanding that she abandon her investigation. I ended up thoroughly enjoying this book and loved how each piece of the tightly plotted puzzle falls slowly into place as we race to the finish line. The author redefines here the boundaries of crime fiction with a novel that is part dystopian/sci-fi, part thriller, and part mystery. I loved Jen’s character in this book; she’s intelligent, relentless, and determined, and the crisp banter between her and Chandler caused several laugh-out-loud moments. But at the end of the day, I found this to be an engrossing and intelligent story — a complex, somewhat chaotic, dark, and entertaining read as we follow the sinister and menacing machinations of a foe whose identity is up to Jen to uncover. And in so doing, puts her own life in danger. Weird, wacky, and wonderful! A huge thank you to Netgalley for providing a review copy of this book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    AC

    The Last Exit features two main characters:on is Jen Lu, a cop in a near-future earth where climate change has ravaged the planet and the Russians appear to have taken over DC(?) but we still have a President and Vice resident. The other is Chandler, an AI implant in Lu's head, who only "lives" for five years. The world of this future has those in their late 40s and early 50s having a good chance of contracting mad cow disease (bovine spongiform encephalopathy, in this work, changed slightly to The Last Exit features two main characters:on is Jen Lu, a cop in a near-future earth where climate change has ravaged the planet and the Russians appear to have taken over DC(?) but we still have a President and Vice resident. The other is Chandler, an AI implant in Lu's head, who only "lives" for five years. The world of this future has those in their late 40s and early 50s having a good chance of contracting mad cow disease (bovine spongiform encephalopathy, in this work, changed slightly to become the acronym ROSE). The top scientists have decided it's because there are too many old people, so the official policy becomes this: a child can receive the treatment for ROSE, but only if their parents decide to exit when they reach their mid 60s. The policy, of course, tends to result in a lot of elder abuse, with parents at time being abused by their children because the parents don't want to exit. The mega-rich, naturally, live by a different set of rules - they neither have to exit, nor do their children lack for the treatment, should they need it. The adults who seem to live forever are called Timeless, a strata unreachable for the usual day to day population. Lu hears rumors of something called Eden - she isn't sure if it's a place or a treatment, but keeps running into mention of it, usually at murder scenes. She mentions it to her boss, but he tells her to stow it and focus on her job. But with Eden popping up again and again, she can't help but poke into it, despite the warnings from her boss, and despite the shadowy figures, including a rep from BigPharma, of course, who meet with her precinct to warn of a counterfeit treatment that causes people to age like progeria on steroids, leaving them dead within three days. Conspiracies galore! The AI, Chandler, seems to be a route through which the author can get to the reader without it being infodumpy, and it does work to an extent. There were a couple of times when I wondered how it could have seen anything if Lu just scanned past something. These were minor issues, though. Overall, it isn't a bad mystery, and while the social justice stuff is here, it is not completely in your face, so if you're of a more conservative bent, it likely won't be too preachy for you. Three and a half stars out of five, rounded up to four. Thanks to Crooked Lane Books and NetGalley for the review copy.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Susan Tunis

    2.5 stars. Supposedly set 20 years from now in Washington, DC, this speculative thriller just didn't ring true in any way. The technological and cultural advances were way too extreme for 20 years, for a start, making it difficult for me to suspend disbelief. But the characters were equally unbelievable. It wasn't that they were unlikable as much as they just had no authenticity. Also, for a novel with technothriller aspects, very little effort was made selling the science. I wanted to like this 2.5 stars. Supposedly set 20 years from now in Washington, DC, this speculative thriller just didn't ring true in any way. The technological and cultural advances were way too extreme for 20 years, for a start, making it difficult for me to suspend disbelief. But the characters were equally unbelievable. It wasn't that they were unlikable as much as they just had no authenticity. Also, for a novel with technothriller aspects, very little effort was made selling the science. I wanted to like this novel, but it just didn't work for me by any measure.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    The Last Exit by Michael Kaufman is an imaginative sci-fi mystery set in the future. With an AI brain implant named Chandler, Jen Lu is a detective with the DC Metro's Elder Abuse Unit.  Elder abuse has become a serious issue because parents must "exit" when they turn 65 in order to let their children receive the "Timeless" treatment that will save them from a rapid onset spongiform encephalitis. If they do not exit, their children will die a horrific death. Jen has heard mention of "Eden" which The Last Exit by Michael Kaufman is an imaginative sci-fi mystery set in the future. With an AI brain implant named Chandler, Jen Lu is a detective with the DC Metro's Elder Abuse Unit.  Elder abuse has become a serious issue because parents must "exit" when they turn 65 in order to let their children receive the "Timeless" treatment that will save them from a rapid onset spongiform encephalitis. If they do not exit, their children will die a horrific death. Jen has heard mention of "Eden" which appears to be a black market version of the treatment. When she mentions her suspicions to her boss Captain Kyrie Brooks, he tells her there is nothing for her to investigate.  But when people begin dying from an advanced form of the encephalitis,  Jen ignores Brooks' order and soon stumbles into a possible conspiracy. Will Jen uncover the truth before more people die? Jen is in her late thirties and loves her career.  With her mother nearing the age of 65, Jen is struggling a bit with the upcoming exit.  Her childhood was quite abusive but her mother's dementia has changed her into a completely different person. Jen has been in a yearlong casual relationship with Zach whose parents have no worries about their exit. Zach, on the other hand, is against their decision even if it might cost his life. Since Jen has not opened up to him about her childhood, he does not understand how she can be so at ease with what is about to happen to her mother.  Jen and Zach are growing closer, but since she is unable to tell him about Chandler, she is uncertain about the future of their relationship. Jen's partner Les is also her best friend but she is keeping her Eden investigation from him. So when she is forced to go a bit rogue, she is on her own except for assistance from an unexpected group of people. She is inventive as she gains access to details that will hopefully lead her to the answers she is searching for. Cool advances in technology are also quite beneficial when she discovers she only has a short period of time to catch the people responsible for distributing the drugs that are causing the multitude of deaths from the advanced encephalitis.  When she finds herself in a very dangerous situation, is there any chance Jen will escape? And will her suspects escape before they can be brought to justice? The Last Exit is a riveting mystery with a fantastic cast of characters and a creative storyline. The sci-fi elements are richly developed and easy to visualize.  Jen's investigation is fascinating and moves at a brisk pace. With intriguing twists and turns, Michael Kaufman brings this clever futuristic movie to an edge of the seat conclusion.  This exciting first installment of the Jen Lu Mystery series will leave readers eagerly awaiting the next book in the series.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Trijntje

    This is the second fantasy book I've read recently set in the not-terribly-distant future, with lots of adjustments for what that future might look like. In this future, climate change is accepted and its effects are woven into everyday life, which is an interesting take: at some point we're all going to have to live with it, and this is a glimpse of what that future looks like - when it's simply accepted that there is no more green grass in public spaces, the temperature in Washington DC is in This is the second fantasy book I've read recently set in the not-terribly-distant future, with lots of adjustments for what that future might look like. In this future, climate change is accepted and its effects are woven into everyday life, which is an interesting take: at some point we're all going to have to live with it, and this is a glimpse of what that future looks like - when it's simply accepted that there is no more green grass in public spaces, the temperature in Washington DC is in the 110's, etc. But in and of itself, all that is mentioned as side comments to the larger murder-mystery-style story, not as warning to our current way of life. It accepts that life will go on for a while, anyway, and we'll adapt. But for current-day us, that projected future looks hot and dry. Also interesting that the main character has AI implanted in her brain with it's own self-awareness. This was a good plot line, I enjoyed it. (mild spoiler) Sometimes I wonder about why authors think the heroine (or hero) needs to be put through such severe physical trials to be the hero; I think TV shows must have something to do with it, but this is not the first book recently I've read where I thought that aspect was a bit over the top. Still, our heroes are not supposed to be normal people, they are heroes, so my suspension of disbelief can accommodate the hero surviving a beating that many could not. Somehow, I knew she'd come through. :) It's good; read it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    PelicanFreak

    The synopsis describes it as a futuristic setting, but the scene set could absolutely be happening today, or any time in the last 30ish years for that matter. As a result, I did feel a little misled reading this book, initially. Finally, several chapters in, it does mention some changes which implied it’s set in the future but the author still did a poor job of making it FEEL futuristic. This didn’t quite hit the spot for me, as I just couldn’t get into it. I don’t feel it was exactly badly writ The synopsis describes it as a futuristic setting, but the scene set could absolutely be happening today, or any time in the last 30ish years for that matter. As a result, I did feel a little misled reading this book, initially. Finally, several chapters in, it does mention some changes which implied it’s set in the future but the author still did a poor job of making it FEEL futuristic. This didn’t quite hit the spot for me, as I just couldn’t get into it. I don’t feel it was exactly badly written, just not super well-written either, and not for me. 2.5 stars. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Note: I listened to the audiobook. The narrators were okay. Not the greatest voice on the male, not one I’d prefer to spend too much time listening to, but easy enough to understand. The female voice was better, but again, not one I’d prefer to listen to all the time. Sort of bland. 4-star performance, not factoring in the voices.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Set in a futuristic Washington DC, Jen Lu is a police officer who has tech in her brain that helps her with detective work. In this world, there is a disease called ROSE that most people will develop. If they are rich, they can pay for treatment and even become younger. But the way most people can get adequate treatment to survive is if their parents to ‘exit’. Turns out there is counterfeit medication on the market that is killing people. Important people want Jen to find out who is putting thi Set in a futuristic Washington DC, Jen Lu is a police officer who has tech in her brain that helps her with detective work. In this world, there is a disease called ROSE that most people will develop. If they are rich, they can pay for treatment and even become younger. But the way most people can get adequate treatment to survive is if their parents to ‘exit’. Turns out there is counterfeit medication on the market that is killing people. Important people want Jen to find out who is putting this stuff out for people to take but she thinks there is more to it than that. This was a really fun sci fi mystery thriller, that mixes together all my favorite genres. Jen is not the most likable. That was my only misgiving with the book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Larry

    The narrator of this novel set in the indeterminate (but worse) future is an artificial intelligence lodged in the neurological structure of a thirty-eight year beat cop (who controls the AI's on/off switch). The society in which both work is unraveling (forced euthanasia at 65, rampant pollution and environmental disasters, chronic unemployment in the face of technology's inroads into job availability, general hopelessness). And the AI is smarter than the cop, who is on the track of a semi-myth The narrator of this novel set in the indeterminate (but worse) future is an artificial intelligence lodged in the neurological structure of a thirty-eight year beat cop (who controls the AI's on/off switch). The society in which both work is unraveling (forced euthanasia at 65, rampant pollution and environmental disasters, chronic unemployment in the face of technology's inroads into job availability, general hopelessness). And the AI is smarter than the cop, who is on the track of a semi-mythical place that promises a getaway from it all without the euthanasia. That intelligence gap is interesting, but it throws the novel off kilter. Continuing to read paid off about halfway through.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Maggie Holmes

    This book is a fast read with interesting characters. However, it really reads like a movie script. Lots of action, descriptions of characters, tension. It wraps up a little too neatly, although the climate has already been destroyed so I'm not sure anyone will really live very long. I would have thought DC would be underwater by now. There isn't enough depth to make it good for a book discussion, or for a reread. It would be a good audiobook with the two voices of Jen and Chandler. Supposedly th This book is a fast read with interesting characters. However, it really reads like a movie script. Lots of action, descriptions of characters, tension. It wraps up a little too neatly, although the climate has already been destroyed so I'm not sure anyone will really live very long. I would have thought DC would be underwater by now. There isn't enough depth to make it good for a book discussion, or for a reread. It would be a good audiobook with the two voices of Jen and Chandler. Supposedly this is the 1st in the Jen Lu series but it doesn't really seem like a series book. Thank you Netgalley and Crooked Lane books for the prepub edition.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    The plot and many aspects of this tale feel quite timely in the fall of 2020. I liked this scifi story because of the characters, the engaging plot, and the somewhat realistic future portrayed. I don't know if this could be considered a thriller, but it does contain a mystery. With good tech and good writing, many scifi fans will probably like this one. Thanks very much for the ARC for review!! The plot and many aspects of this tale feel quite timely in the fall of 2020. I liked this scifi story because of the characters, the engaging plot, and the somewhat realistic future portrayed. I don't know if this could be considered a thriller, but it does contain a mystery. With good tech and good writing, many scifi fans will probably like this one. Thanks very much for the ARC for review!!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    This book was on my local librarys website under new releases. I'd never heard of it nor knew the author. Nonetheless I was very impressed. If you like books that deal with the moral and ethical implications of medicine and technology then this book is for you. Also its a timely book considering the recent winter storm in Texas. These type of books really make you think about what you are willing to do to save yourself and your family. This book was on my local librarys website under new releases. I'd never heard of it nor knew the author. Nonetheless I was very impressed. If you like books that deal with the moral and ethical implications of medicine and technology then this book is for you. Also its a timely book considering the recent winter storm in Texas. These type of books really make you think about what you are willing to do to save yourself and your family.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lydia Kass

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I wanted to like this more than 2 stars, however, I was often confused as to who was narrating the story; was it Jen or was it her SIM? There were quite a few unbelievable stunts and a lot of disbelief, but I really was drawn to the premise of the story. I had hoped there was more explanation about Captain Brooks and how he escaped and how Jen's SIM was able to help her at the end after being deactivated. I wanted to like this more than 2 stars, however, I was often confused as to who was narrating the story; was it Jen or was it her SIM? There were quite a few unbelievable stunts and a lot of disbelief, but I really was drawn to the premise of the story. I had hoped there was more explanation about Captain Brooks and how he escaped and how Jen's SIM was able to help her at the end after being deactivated.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    It was fast to read, and definitely felt relevant for 2020, but there could have been a few improvements. For such a fast read, however, it was a little wordy for my taste. Overall, it ends a little too easily, there could have been a little more of an open ending to make it more interesting. Not my favorite dystopian book, and not something I would read again, but it was interesting.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Neil

    Full of surprises, well paced, great characters and somehow, terribly believable, rooted in a world not all that different than our own.  Most impressively, Michael Kaufman has adopted the style of a crime writer with total commitment to the genre..... and made it better.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dr. Amy

    Fast-paced thriller with great characters & a propulsive plot set in the near future. Sociopolitical aspects underpinning the story are compelling & chilling, given the present from which they originate.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Laila

    I received a copy of the book from Netgalley to review. Thank you for the opportunity. An interesting take on the dystopia genre. The writing is sharp and fast paced but at times, over wordy. The story seemed far fetched at times and became unbelievable. A good read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

    The premise is interesting but I didn't really connect with the characters or the writing itself. The premise is interesting but I didn't really connect with the characters or the writing itself.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brielle Harrison

    Interesting concept, dystopian future. More of a thriller than a mystery.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jaymie

    I wanted to like this. I wanted it to be like Lock In (Scalzi) with the law enforcement mystery AND the science fiction pieces. But it just didn't click for me. DNF 30%. I wanted to like this. I wanted it to be like Lock In (Scalzi) with the law enforcement mystery AND the science fiction pieces. But it just didn't click for me. DNF 30%.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    I'd heard about this in one of the (many) book lists and reviews I get via email.  The premise sounded interesting, with elements I enjoy in my novels: police procedurals, an AI implant as a work partner, climate change...  the main plot deals with the spread of a horrifying variant of encephalitis among the middle aged. Parents can Exit Out, by age 65, opting for euthanasia so that their children can receive a modified longevity treatment once reserved for the super-rich.  This, of course, does I'd heard about this in one of the (many) book lists and reviews I get via email.  The premise sounded interesting, with elements I enjoy in my novels: police procedurals, an AI implant as a work partner, climate change...  the main plot deals with the spread of a horrifying variant of encephalitis among the middle aged. Parents can Exit Out, by age 65, opting for euthanasia so that their children can receive a modified longevity treatment once reserved for the super-rich.  This, of course, does not always go well.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

  24. 5 out of 5

    Chloe

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alexis

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  28. 4 out of 5

    susan m

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bryony

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nicki

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.