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Victories Greater Than Death

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Outsmart Your Enemies. Outrun the Galaxy. Tina never worries about being ‘ordinary’—she doesn’t have to, since she’s known practically forever that she’s not just Tina Mains, average teenager and beloved daughter. She’s also the keeper of an interplanetary rescue beacon, and one day soon, it’s going to activate, and then her dreams of saving all the worlds and adventuring a Outsmart Your Enemies. Outrun the Galaxy. Tina never worries about being ‘ordinary’—she doesn’t have to, since she’s known practically forever that she’s not just Tina Mains, average teenager and beloved daughter. She’s also the keeper of an interplanetary rescue beacon, and one day soon, it’s going to activate, and then her dreams of saving all the worlds and adventuring among the stars will finally be possible. Tina’s legacy, after all, is intergalactic—she is the hidden clone of a famed alien hero, left on Earth disguised as a human to give the universe another chance to defeat a terrible evil. But when the beacon activates, it turns out that Tina’s destiny isn’t quite what she expected. Things are far more dangerous than she ever assumed. Luckily, Tina is surrounded by a crew she can trust, and her best friend Rachel, and she is still determined to save all the worlds. But first she’ll have to save herself. Buckle up your seatbelt for this thrilling sci-fi adventure set against an intergalactic war from international bestselling author Charlie Jane Anders.


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Outsmart Your Enemies. Outrun the Galaxy. Tina never worries about being ‘ordinary’—she doesn’t have to, since she’s known practically forever that she’s not just Tina Mains, average teenager and beloved daughter. She’s also the keeper of an interplanetary rescue beacon, and one day soon, it’s going to activate, and then her dreams of saving all the worlds and adventuring a Outsmart Your Enemies. Outrun the Galaxy. Tina never worries about being ‘ordinary’—she doesn’t have to, since she’s known practically forever that she’s not just Tina Mains, average teenager and beloved daughter. She’s also the keeper of an interplanetary rescue beacon, and one day soon, it’s going to activate, and then her dreams of saving all the worlds and adventuring among the stars will finally be possible. Tina’s legacy, after all, is intergalactic—she is the hidden clone of a famed alien hero, left on Earth disguised as a human to give the universe another chance to defeat a terrible evil. But when the beacon activates, it turns out that Tina’s destiny isn’t quite what she expected. Things are far more dangerous than she ever assumed. Luckily, Tina is surrounded by a crew she can trust, and her best friend Rachel, and she is still determined to save all the worlds. But first she’ll have to save herself. Buckle up your seatbelt for this thrilling sci-fi adventure set against an intergalactic war from international bestselling author Charlie Jane Anders.

30 review for Victories Greater Than Death

  1. 4 out of 5

    Miranda Reads

    Tina has spent her entire life knowing that she would leave this earth - permanently. Because she's secretly an alien. She's technically a clone of a brilliant alien commander who passed away unexpectedly. Tina longs for her new life to begin and when her internal beacon lights up - she's ready. She's transported to the wild world of aliens, spaceships and intergalactic wars - but what can one teenage semi-human do against all that? (Apparently - when you download your previous self's memories Tina has spent her entire life knowing that she would leave this earth - permanently. Because she's secretly an alien. She's technically a clone of a brilliant alien commander who passed away unexpectedly. Tina longs for her new life to begin and when her internal beacon lights up - she's ready. She's transported to the wild world of aliens, spaceships and intergalactic wars - but what can one teenage semi-human do against all that? (Apparently - when you download your previous self's memories...a lot). Essentially she assembles a crew of brilliant human minds from teenagers who wouldn't be missed (the lonely, the beaten, the forgotten) and together they seek to outsmart and outdo the hoard of alien warships. I'm so disappointed cause I was SOO looking forward to this one too. I loved the concept and that cover is divine. But the actual book didn't pan out at all. To put it frank - this book felt a bit messy. I think it's mostly cause the cast of characters was SO bloated. Honestly, I was grateful when someone died purely because there was one less name to remember. I think if the characters had less shallow of personalities? Or if there were less of them in general? I might have been able to hold them in my head better. Plus, I couldn't distinguish what words were alien names vs alien species vs weird human names vs alien planets vs futuristic tech, which ultimately made me just throw up my hands in defeat and soldier through the book without memorizing people or places or things. I was frustrated by the way the book dealt with real, serious issues. Essentially, issues were brought up (like abuse or neglect) and then minorly dealt with before the main character moved on to the next issue (think bandage over a gaping wound). Also, I felt like the main character was given so many "Mary Sue" qualities that I had a hard time warming to her - she literally just downloads memories from her former-self and then spends the whole book going, "ahh yes. a Goobleflorf. Such a rare species of Kandkand. Truly an expert in Flying Peanutfific Aerial Combat." Even her struggles didn't feel real - it was more of a "oh, will I ever live up to other people's expectations?" rather than real, honest issues. Ultimately, this one had some good qualities but it wasn't for me. I received a free copy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. YouTube | Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Snapchat @miranda_reads

  2. 4 out of 5

    Charlie Jane Anders

    Victories Greater Than Death is my first young adult novel, and it's my tribute to Star Wars, Doctor Who, Steven Universe and all the other space epics I love. (And if you pre-order it and submit your receipt, you can get a free enamel pin and also some gorgeous art prints!) VICTORIES is about Tina, a teenager who can't wait to leave home and grab her dreams with both hands, but meanwhile she's stuck... waiting. Until one day, destiny calls! Tina's best friend is Rachael, an artist who just wants Victories Greater Than Death is my first young adult novel, and it's my tribute to Star Wars, Doctor Who, Steven Universe and all the other space epics I love. (And if you pre-order it and submit your receipt, you can get a free enamel pin and also some gorgeous art prints!) VICTORIES is about Tina, a teenager who can't wait to leave home and grab her dreams with both hands, but meanwhile she's stuck... waiting. Until one day, destiny calls! Tina's best friend is Rachael, an artist who just wants to hide away and draw cool cartoons. Their friendship is the heart of the book. But there's a monster, who killed her once before, and he's the most beautiful man who ever lived--except he's a cold-hearted mass murderer. The good news? Tina gets a posse. They ALL HAVE EACH OTHER'S BACKS and they travel through the cosmos righting wrongs and standing up to genocidal monsters. And there's a teenage girl named Elza who annoys the shit out of Tina. Until, umm... they stop annoying each other so much. <3 These misfits become a family and they go thru endless scrapes together. But they're on an epic quest to find an ancient weapon, and time is running out! Luckily, they make lots of friends and meet friendly aliens! People die, but also Tina has to face up to the high cost of violence. In the end, Tina can't do it alone, because she's not a Chosen One. She's part of a Chosen Family.

  3. 4 out of 5

    R

    This was a science fiction young adult book that reminded me a little of Star Trek/ Doctor Who/Star Wars/Raiders of the Lost Ark. It had uniquely descriptive aliens and humanoids working with and against each other as they used the best brain power available to secure the mysterious and seemingly dangerous Talgan stone before the Compassion Fleet found it. The Compassion was the antithesis of what the name implied. They were led by the ruthless Marrant who was once a part of the peacekeeping for This was a science fiction young adult book that reminded me a little of Star Trek/ Doctor Who/Star Wars/Raiders of the Lost Ark. It had uniquely descriptive aliens and humanoids working with and against each other as they used the best brain power available to secure the mysterious and seemingly dangerous Talgan stone before the Compassion Fleet found it. The Compassion was the antithesis of what the name implied. They were led by the ruthless Marrant who was once a part of the peacekeeping force of the Royal Fleet and close friend of its commander, the very popular and heroic Captain Thaoh Argentian. Unfortunately, she died, but her DNA was used to clone her. This clone, Tina, took on the form of a human, hidden within the people of earth and away from Marrant’s sights, until she came of age, or in her case, her inner beacon summoned the Royal Fleet to her known location. The Royal Fleet needed their skillful leader back to locate the Talgan stone and deal with the ever evil Marrant, who wanted to see her die again. I loved the diversity of the characters who were from many different parts of this planet and outer space.They always introduced themselves by their name followed by their preferred pronoun. Their genders, forms, and languages were all different, but there was a language translator to help communicate easily. There were many battle scenes including one that involved the total obliteration of an entire planet. Death followed Marrant in his quest to find that stone. One simple touch by him liquified his enemy, but also placed hateful thoughts into the minds of the friends that witnessed this death. So instead of mourning the loss of a friend/colleague their thoughts were filled with degrading memories of them. The one aspect I always looked forward to throughout the story was the creative greeting and response to each other in different situations. One such example was when Tina and the brightest teenage recruits from Earth boarded the ship and the captain greeted them with, “Welcome aboard the Indomitable. Happy memories and bearable regrets.” Tina responded with, “Clever guesses and educational mistakes.” Another greeting example was when the possibility of death was imminent, “Raised glasses and last dances.” Replied with, “Bright memories and warmth in the dark.” This added to the uniqueness of their communication and interaction with each other. The story was creatively written and engaging. Even though it’s a YA story, and written accordingly, I think most science fiction readers will find it interesting. An ARC was given for an honest review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Celia McMahon

    A huge thanks to Edelweiss and Tor Teen for the e-arc. This was my first book by Charlie Jane Anders, and it won't be my last. I haven't read such a refreshing sci-fi in a long time. With a cross between Space Balls, and Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, this tops my favorite YA books ever. Tina is a clone, living on Earth and awaiting the day when her beacon would summon her back to space. But when the day comes, she finds herself hunted by a monster as she tries to escape Earth. The beginning fel A huge thanks to Edelweiss and Tor Teen for the e-arc. This was my first book by Charlie Jane Anders, and it won't be my last. I haven't read such a refreshing sci-fi in a long time. With a cross between Space Balls, and Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, this tops my favorite YA books ever. Tina is a clone, living on Earth and awaiting the day when her beacon would summon her back to space. But when the day comes, she finds herself hunted by a monster as she tries to escape Earth. The beginning felt so separate from the rest of the book. The setup was great, don't get me wrong, but the real story happens when Tina and her friend Rachel recruit Earthlings to help fight off a sadistic rebellion called the Commission. While she slowly regains the memory of the former captain she was cloned from, she discovers how far she's willing to go to save the galaxy. With the brief synopsis out of the way, let me get to the meat of this story: the characters. I adored the different species Tina meets and her interactions with them. Every one of them was unique and stood apart from one another. Rachel resonated with me in that she is an introvert with tenancies to shut down after too much social interaction. I cared about everyone the crew members. I rooted for them. This was the most fun I've had reading a book in 2020. There is so much going on in this book, but it's so easy to understand. We jump from planet to planet, battle to battle with ease. Ander's writing style sucks you right in. GOD, I LOVED ALL THE PRONOUNS. Aliens greet each other by introducing themselves by name and pronoun and it's so refreshing. There is so much diversity in this book, and the first YA I've ever read when the love interest is trans. Anders touches upon some heavy issues such as depression, anxiety, and discovering who you are as a person. It felt real, and raw in a story where aliens blow different colored bubbles to signify how they feel. :D I cannot get over how fantastic this book was. have you seen the cover? Are you looking at it right now? Scroll up, and come back to me...ok, you've taken a closer look, and ARE YOU NOT AMAZED? I cannot wait to see this sitting on my bookshelf. I'm already getting together my bookstagram props to make this book SHINE Find me on Insta at @celiamcmahonreads

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    2.5 stars I wanted to love this book so badly! A YA Sci-fi Space Opera with a Queer romance in it? I couldn't ask for more. But unfortunately, I didn't enjoy this book very much and it was a little bit of a chore to be honest. The only thing that managed to grab my attention was the relationship between Elza and Tina but that's it. It took me a while to get through it and it's probably because I didn't really care about the plot... so yeah. I'm disappointed but I'm sure you can enjoy it a lot mor 2.5 stars I wanted to love this book so badly! A YA Sci-fi Space Opera with a Queer romance in it? I couldn't ask for more. But unfortunately, I didn't enjoy this book very much and it was a little bit of a chore to be honest. The only thing that managed to grab my attention was the relationship between Elza and Tina but that's it. It took me a while to get through it and it's probably because I didn't really care about the plot... so yeah. I'm disappointed but I'm sure you can enjoy it a lot more than me! Victories Greater Than Death follows Tina, a young alien on Earth raised by a woman after being left to her care. Tina is actually the clone of a really important/famous heroine that died to save her people. The 'good' aliens are hoping to be able to put her memories back into Tina but things aren't going to go down like planned. There's also an evil alien called "Marrant" which means Funny in french... probably because he likes to laugh while killing people. (Thank you for letting me read and review an ARC via Netgalley)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alaina

    I have received this ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Wow. I loved absolutely everything about Victories Greater Than Death. I'll even admit that I geeked out once I got the actual book from NetGalley. It also doesn't hurt that each and every character was so god damn lovable either. I mean, even the ones I met for like two seconds some how wormed their way into my heart. In it you will meet Tina and find out that she's a clone of some amazing Captain that sacrificed herself t I have received this ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Wow. I loved absolutely everything about Victories Greater Than Death. I'll even admit that I geeked out once I got the actual book from NetGalley. It also doesn't hurt that each and every character was so god damn lovable either. I mean, even the ones I met for like two seconds some how wormed their way into my heart. In it you will meet Tina and find out that she's a clone of some amazing Captain that sacrificed herself to save a bunch of people. So just to have that much weight on the top of her shoulders.. well she just doesn't know what to do with her life. Then again, she knew that she was not from Earth and that some day she would have to leave the planet she grew up on. Other than that, you will meet a bunch of different characters. The diversity was insane and the one thing that made me so damn proud/happy was that they would state their name AND then their pronoun. This just made the book unique in my eyes because we don't always get that and it's kind of like a huge guessing game (that everyone will fail). After meeting everyone, they were on a wild ass ride/adventure. Honestly, so much happened and it was a lot of fun to read all about it. Besides the adventure, this book dives into so many topics that are real and make you pay attention to every little thing that is happening. Again, I loved it all and I'm so happy that I got the chance to dive into this. In the end, that cliffhanger just about killed me. Waiting will be the death of me but I seriously need the next book STAT!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Landice (Manic Femme)

    Initial thoughts: This book was action packed, incredibly queer, and so much fun! Victories Greater Than Death isn’t even out til April and I already need Book 2 immediately, LOL. Update (1.3.21): I wanted to close out 2020 on a high note with a fun read, and man, did this book deliver! Victories Greater Than Death is Charlie Jane Anders' YA debut (out April 13th). It was a wild, enjoyable ride from start to finish, with a diverse cast of unique, well developed characters that I absolutely adored Initial thoughts: This book was action packed, incredibly queer, and so much fun! Victories Greater Than Death isn’t even out til April and I already need Book 2 immediately, LOL. Update (1.3.21): I wanted to close out 2020 on a high note with a fun read, and man, did this book deliver! Victories Greater Than Death is Charlie Jane Anders' YA debut (out April 13th). It was a wild, enjoyable ride from start to finish, with a diverse cast of unique, well developed characters that I absolutely adored! ⠀ ⠀ I was going to try and keep this review ~*~professional~*~ but I think that would actually be a disservice to the book, so: You know that one TikTok video where the creator says "the only requirement I have for a book is that it's gay and it slaps"? Victories Greater Than Death is extremely gay and it slaps so hard! ⠀ ⠀ Some things I loved about Victories Greater Than Death: ⠀ • A universe so queernorm that the standard introduction/greeting includes sharing your pronouns (including normalized neo-pronouns)⠀ • Found family (in space!!!) with a diverse cast of both human and alien characters ⠀ • Adorable friends to lovers romance with a trans girl love interest (would absolutely die for Elza, my brilliant, cynical hacker queen)⠀ ⠀ I would especially recommend picking this one up if you enjoyed Once & Future, because Victories Greater Than Death brings the same sort of fun, chaotic “space is gay” vibes to the table! ARC Note: Massive thanks to Tor Teen for sending me this ARC! All opinions my own. Let's be friends! Bookstagram | Booktube | Book Blog | Twitter

  8. 5 out of 5

    Althea

    3.5/5 Stars This book has almost everything I could want in a YA sci-fi novel – a diverse cast of characters, found family dynamics, vivid worldbuilding and a sweet sapphic romance – and it’s even compared to Star Wars and Doctor Who (although I think that it is much more like I Am Number Four and Star Trek!). As soon as I dived into the novel I was drawn in by Charlie Jane Anders’ fun and witty prose and I was excited to delve further into the sci-fi world that she has created. But, I quickly fo 3.5/5 Stars This book has almost everything I could want in a YA sci-fi novel – a diverse cast of characters, found family dynamics, vivid worldbuilding and a sweet sapphic romance – and it’s even compared to Star Wars and Doctor Who (although I think that it is much more like I Am Number Four and Star Trek!). As soon as I dived into the novel I was drawn in by Charlie Jane Anders’ fun and witty prose and I was excited to delve further into the sci-fi world that she has created. But, I quickly found some little issues in the book, which grew to be much larger, and sadly this book just didn’t fully click with me. Starting with the positives, though – I really loved the diversity that we had in the book! The main character, Tina, is queer and doesn’t label her sexuality (though she does say that she is attracted to people regardless of their gender) and the love interest is a Black Brazilian sapphic trans girl! As for the side characters, we have a queer Black British guy, a Chinese guy and an Indian girl. Aside from that, there are two characters that I also read as neurodivergent, particularly Rachel who (as an autistic reader), I read as being autistic! Whether or not this was the author’s aim with the character, I really enjoyed how she was characterised! Another thing I loved about the representation in the book was the positive angle that it takes towards fat people – there is no suggestion that being fat is bad, and instead shows it in a very positive light, showing the advantages of it, and I was so unbelievably happy to see that included, even if it was only briefly mentioned! Furthermore, the characters stated their pronouns (including neopronouns) when introducing themselves which, although slightly clunky at times, was a really great addition! One tiny nitpick I have with the rep (though this may have been dealt with in the finished copy) is that Yiwei was referred to using his full name – Wang Yiwei – several times throughout the book, whereas the other characters weren’t, and to me it felt like perhaps the author didn’t fully realise that Wang is his surname and by using his full name in a really conversational manner felt super clunky. Something else I really enjoyed was the worldbuilding! It was so obvious that Charlie Jane Anders took time to fully develop this vibrant and sprawling sci-fi universe, even down to the tiny details, and for someone who’s not a sci-fi reader, this just made the story all that more engaging! I can see why, for some readers, that the worldbuilding might be too heavy, as there are a lot of different alien races, but for me, it was definitely a plus! The book was also just fun! I’ve already mentioned that the author’s writing style was fun and witty, but it was just so gripping and really drew me into the story. At times I do think it read on the younger side of YA, but that was far from being a problem, as it offered a certain lightheartedness among all the heavier topics that were discussed. Speaking of said heavier topics, I’m going to segue into the aspects of the book that didn’t grab me as much. The book tackles some interesting topics, such as eugenics and colonisation, which mirrored our own world at times, though I couldn’t help but feeling that they were dealt with far too quickly and not in enough depth. For example, the topic was brought up to the main character but the book never divulged how this affected the planet or people in question, and it was swept under the rug so that we could have another action scene, only to be forgotten about by the end of the chapter and maybe only briefly mentioned again near the end of the book. This happened with other aspects of the book, too, particularly regarding Tina finding out more about the hero that she was cloned from. She finds out something about her ‘past’ that upsets her, and is something that would definitely take an emotional toll on you, and by the end of the chapter she was over it. Furthermore, the book felt simultaneously under-developed and info-dumpy! Starting with the under-developed side, we have the side characters. I really could not tell you anything more about Yiwei than that he likes to play music and has a cute wee robot that he programmed, and as for Keziah…absolutely nothing! There was meant to be this whole found family aspect between the ‘Earthlings’ and I just didn’t feel it. Tina rarely interacted with the two male characters and my favourite trope felt like it was nowhere to be seen. Then there’s the sapphic relationship…oh boy! I was really excited about the relationship, as there are so few sapphic relationships with trans characters in YA, but I was sorely let down. There was no chemistry between Tina and Elza at all, as well as absolutely no yearning. It was like halfway through the book the author had flipped a switch and Tina was all of a sudden in love with Elza (and don’t get me started on the I love you not five minutes after they got into a relationship). It was just so underwhelming and I didn’t feel anything for the characters or their relationship (this also goes for the relationship between two side characters that just came out of nowhere). And onto the info-dumpy part of the book! When Tina boards the ship, she goes through a really simple procedure to try and have the famous space hero’s memories given ‘back’ to her, but instead just ends up with all of the information that she knew, but none of it relating to her past or her home planet. So, Tina all of a sudden has all this information about the ship, about intergalactic politics and different alien races. And she loves to flaunt it! Everything about her getting all of this information felt so unnatural and convenient to driving the plot forwards. And when Tina told the other humans about a certain thing, it was info-dump central! I quickly found myself getting the alien characters’ names muddled up and I did feel a wee bit overwhelmed with all the information we were getting about some of the people and places. Overall, though, this was a really fun read and I think that lovers of YA sci-fi will absolutely adore this book! The book was witty and the diversity was a real highlight, and I’ll definitely be picking up the sequel to find out what happens next! Thank you to Netgalley and Tor Teen for the eARC copy in return for an honest review! Want more sapphic books? You can find me here: Book Blog | Twitter | Instagram

  9. 5 out of 5

    fang

    rep: bi/pan mc, trans fem bi/pan li, indian sc, poc sc's, non binary sc's I really wanted to enjoy this book but the style is very abrupt, there's too many info-dumps, and i don't care about the characters because we're thrust into the action scenes before we can form any attachments to them. A ton of non-distinct side characters are introduced very fast and I couldn't keep track of the cast. The plot of retaining someone else' memories sounded interesting at first, but information kept appearing rep: bi/pan mc, trans fem bi/pan li, indian sc, poc sc's, non binary sc's I really wanted to enjoy this book but the style is very abrupt, there's too many info-dumps, and i don't care about the characters because we're thrust into the action scenes before we can form any attachments to them. A ton of non-distinct side characters are introduced very fast and I couldn't keep track of the cast. The plot of retaining someone else' memories sounded interesting at first, but information kept appearing when it was convenient for the plot which I found boring. I did like everyone introducing themselves with their pronouns and some of the dialogue was funny, the budding enemies to lovers intrigued me but whenever I started to get interested, the tone changed or the scene ended and we were back to uninteresting plotlines.

  10. 5 out of 5

    USOM

    (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) TW: racism, transphobia, eugenics, mentions of abuse in past Victories Greater Than Death is an immersive SF adventure that balances rich characters and an action packed plot. While the action explores ethical questions about fighting for the greater good, being a hero, and the cost of sacrifice, the characters were my favorite element. Anders is able to bring life and detail to e (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) TW: racism, transphobia, eugenics, mentions of abuse in past Victories Greater Than Death is an immersive SF adventure that balances rich characters and an action packed plot. While the action explores ethical questions about fighting for the greater good, being a hero, and the cost of sacrifice, the characters were my favorite element. Anders is able to bring life and detail to every single one of them, no matter if we only hear a few lines from them. Seriously. I am so shocked and thrilled by the level of character development and description. Even though I didn't agree with all of Tina's decisions, because of the level of development, I could understand her completely. One of my favorite elements of Victories Greater Than Death, besides the immense character development, was Tina's character. She is struggling with trying to be someone she's not. Trying to live up to a legacy she has no connection to, to a person she can never be. So committed to being a hero, to being the best, to living up to people's expectations, she makes questionable choices. She thinks she has to be tough and not show any weakness, but Tina has to realize that she can only ever be herself. That all that fighting against it is wearing her down. full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Charlie Marie

    Just, wow! What a flipping fun ride! Full RTC. Many thanks to Tor Teen & NetGalley for providing an ARC in exchange for an honest review!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maggie Tokuda-Hall

    this book SLAPS read it for: wildly cool aliens, kids coming into their own, a cast of characters that will feel like your friends, and A D V E N T U R E

  13. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    Space adventures are so much fun! I had a really fantastic time reading Victories Greater Than Death, it resonated with me for several reasons. Growing up, my favorite stories were adventures and survival stories. I loved it when the main character fought against obstacles and triumphed over adversity. But for me, most of these stories had a male protagonist. Not all, but most. I call these characters ’knights’ because they were always brave, self-sacrificing and had hearts for helping people. I Space adventures are so much fun! I had a really fantastic time reading Victories Greater Than Death, it resonated with me for several reasons. Growing up, my favorite stories were adventures and survival stories. I loved it when the main character fought against obstacles and triumphed over adversity. But for me, most of these stories had a male protagonist. Not all, but most. I call these characters ’knights’ because they were always brave, self-sacrificing and had hearts for helping people. I put myself into these roles in my imagination to the extent that I dreamed adventure dreams. But even in my dreams the knight was male. Tina is actually one of the closest characters I’ve read who thinks like I do. She’s got a military mind, appreciates teamwork and understands chain of command, but also has an open mind and values creatives. She feels a strong sense of responsibility to take care of her people, with a tendency to over-commit and sacrifice her own needs. She’s strong, but also vulnerable. I love her growth and how she both comes into her own path (outside of any clone destiny) and figures out there’re more options to handling conflict than killing or dying. It’s really nice to read a non-stereotyped military character. I was reminded, while reading, of A Long Way to a Small Angry Planet, where characters are introduced and we find out about the many ways people can come from different cultures and environments, but with basic civility, are still able to get along. In VGTD, pronouns are given when introductions are made, and permission is asked when people want to touch. I thought it was organic to the story enough that even though the word choices still seemed a bit strange to me, I didn’t feel like I was being hit over the head with it. It is my firm belief that when we can change the language we use, we change our world. We change minds. This is a great step forward into normalizing a way of speaking that develops inclusive thinking. Final thoughts: - Big ‘YES’ to brave, female knights! Give girls a real hero to dream about! - Wonderful, thoughtful diversity of characters - Fast-paced action with a menacing villain and a deeper, mysterious threat to safety that feels relevant to issues confronting us today Thank you to #Netgalley and Tor Teen for letting me read a free digital advanced copy in exchange for my honest review. #VictoriesGreaterThanDeath

  14. 4 out of 5

    Heather Jones

    Thank you to Tor Teen for giving me a free digital galley of this book in exchange for feedback. Tina has always known she's destined to leave the planet. Her mother has told her about the day the aliens left her, a normal-looking baby, to be raised in anonymous safety until the day when she comes of age and her beacon glows to call the spaceship to come take her home - and also alerts the enemy to come and find her first. But that bit is only the start, and the real story involves Tina, her best Thank you to Tor Teen for giving me a free digital galley of this book in exchange for feedback. Tina has always known she's destined to leave the planet. Her mother has told her about the day the aliens left her, a normal-looking baby, to be raised in anonymous safety until the day when she comes of age and her beacon glows to call the spaceship to come take her home - and also alerts the enemy to come and find her first. But that bit is only the start, and the real story involves Tina, her best friend Rachael (artist, introvert, homeschooler), and a team of the smartest teen nerds on earth as they try to save the galaxy from The Compassion, which is a lot less nice than the name would make it sound. This book is exciting and well written, but more than that, it has so much heart! It's about found family and mutual support and personal identity and misfit, awkward, and queer teenagers are going to love it. I've read Anders's adult fiction, which is rich and complex, and challenging and was worried her style wouldn't translate well to a YA book, but she really pulled off the transition to a different audience, neither talking down to hear readers nor over their heads.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dom

    DNF @ 52%. This was one of my most anticipated YA releases of 2021 and perhaps those expectations contributed, but I just couldn’t gel with this novel. I did appreciate the diversity and I sincerely think this might still be a great read for a younger teen audience (13-15ish). However, between a disbelief in the initial premise and setup, a lack of characterization in favor of myriad descriptions of random alien races, and taking away the action and space oriented parts of sci-fi I typically enj DNF @ 52%. This was one of my most anticipated YA releases of 2021 and perhaps those expectations contributed, but I just couldn’t gel with this novel. I did appreciate the diversity and I sincerely think this might still be a great read for a younger teen audience (13-15ish). However, between a disbelief in the initial premise and setup, a lack of characterization in favor of myriad descriptions of random alien races, and taking away the action and space oriented parts of sci-fi I typically enjoy, this wasn’t the novel for me. Thank you to Tor and NetGalley for an advance copy in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alli

    4.5 stars - All the queer, normalizing sharing pronouns, epic space battles, self discovery, random pop culture references. It's all here. Advanced copy from the publisher via Edelweiss+ 4.5 stars - All the queer, normalizing sharing pronouns, epic space battles, self discovery, random pop culture references. It's all here. Advanced copy from the publisher via Edelweiss+

  17. 5 out of 5

    laur gluchie

    I have received a digital Advance Reader’s Copy of this book through NetGalley. This has not affected my rating in any way.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    3 stars. I think this book may have oversold itself a little bit by comparing itself to Doctor Who and Star Wars. Brief synopsis: an alien clone raised as a human girl for her own protection from enemies awaits the day her beacon will go off to signal her return to the stars as well as when she can begin being tracked/located by alien enemies. At the start of the action of the book, the beacon goes off. I was hoping that Charlie Jane Anders may have employed the elevated prose of her adult works 3 stars. I think this book may have oversold itself a little bit by comparing itself to Doctor Who and Star Wars. Brief synopsis: an alien clone raised as a human girl for her own protection from enemies awaits the day her beacon will go off to signal her return to the stars as well as when she can begin being tracked/located by alien enemies. At the start of the action of the book, the beacon goes off. I was hoping that Charlie Jane Anders may have employed the elevated prose of her adult works to transcend the YA boundary here, but I fear that she may have instead decided to go the opposite route and pander to teens. Much of this felt rushed and angsty and I would have so much more enjoyed savoring an elaborate and beautiful new science fiction world. This one feels a little haphazardly stitched together at times, with rough transitions, pacing difficulties, and out-of-place turns of phrase. That having been said, it was a lot of fun and I rather enjoyed having a trans woman as the lead love interest. The characters are diverse and while still mostly one dimensional, this is something I hope the author can ameliorate in the next installments. The world building is interesting (not to mention wonderfully positive to have a universe in which it's not unusual to introduce yourself with preferred pronouns and to always ask permission before touching another individual) and I look forward to its expansion as well.

  19. 4 out of 5

    a.

    This ARC was generously provided by Netgalley! The book follows Tina, an alien clone brought to earth and raised by a human adoptive mother. She also has a human best friend, formerly from school, Rachael. Tina, her mother, and Rachael are all aware that one day, a beacon in Tina’s chest will begin to go off, and at that point she will begin to be hunted by a group of aliens. Once the beacon finally activates, she gets whisked into a world that is both everything and nothing like she’d hoped. tldr This ARC was generously provided by Netgalley! The book follows Tina, an alien clone brought to earth and raised by a human adoptive mother. She also has a human best friend, formerly from school, Rachael. Tina, her mother, and Rachael are all aware that one day, a beacon in Tina’s chest will begin to go off, and at that point she will begin to be hunted by a group of aliens. Once the beacon finally activates, she gets whisked into a world that is both everything and nothing like she’d hoped. tldr up front: I enjoyed the book, though there were some issues that kept it from being one of the greats in my opinion. I’m excited to see where the story goes from here in the sequels! 3.5 stars Let’s talk about the positives first: I really enjoyed the sci-fi setting that Anders created, a diverse universe that feels original and full of life, with interesting technology to boot. The characters who get a focus are done well, particularly Tina, Rachel, and Elza. Bringing on the human characters is a nice way to keep the story grounded as we learn about all these alien races and technologies. Anders worked with several sensitivity readers during the writing of the book, and it (to my eyes, at least) shows; the cultures depicted in the book all seem to be done so with respect, but as I’m a white American there very well may be some things that slip through the cracks. Anders does a neat trick with the plot point of giving memories back to Tina, as this allows her to explain things that we as readers wouldn’t know about the world to her human friend Rachael, while still saving twists that should have been remembered for later in the story. The prose, when not straying towards the bit I mention in the negatives section later, is frequently beautiful. The idea of the greetings is one of my favorite examples (e.g. one character says “Wild voyages and unexpected beauty” in greeting, the other character says “safe arrivals and haunting memories” in response), though the way Anders describes aspects of her universe is also greatly enjoyable. Now unfortunately I have to get to the parts I didn’t like as much: The writing style felt a bit pandery to an imagined YA audience to me at times (lines such as “an involuntary cry of pure WTF”), which ended up taking me out of the story every time it popped up. I’m not sure if it’s because I’m older than the intended audience or if this type of thing is common with YA novels. Either way, not a deal-breaker, just something that bugged me a bit when it popped up! Since there are so many characters, the characters other than the couple that get main focus are a bit flat and two dimensional, and never really get to have personalities other than “this is my one interest”. I also wish a bit more focus was given to the alien characters, as the human characters are the ones given most of the backstory opportunities. Hopefully the other characters get expanded on in future sequels! The book is on the shorter side, which means transitions between scenes can occasionally seem disjointed or rushed. Sometimes it cuts at what you would assume is halfway through a visit to a planet and jumps back to everyone on the ship after everyone’s done and getting ready for the next task, sometimes after a chapter break you get dumped into the middle of an action scene; this is clearly an intentional decision from the author, it just didn’t end up working too well for me.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Persephone

    Thank you Netgalley and Tor Teen for providing me with a free e-arc in exchange for an honest review. I absolutely loved Charlie Jane Anders's debut novel All the Bird in the Sky so when I heard that she wrote YA Science fiction I had to read it. The story begins on Earth but it expanses throughout the entire galaxy and includes a strong cast of diverse characters. I enjoyed the vast diversity of the characters, both human and alien, but I especially liked how Anders effortlessly fits everyone's p Thank you Netgalley and Tor Teen for providing me with a free e-arc in exchange for an honest review. I absolutely loved Charlie Jane Anders's debut novel All the Bird in the Sky so when I heard that she wrote YA Science fiction I had to read it. The story begins on Earth but it expanses throughout the entire galaxy and includes a strong cast of diverse characters. I enjoyed the vast diversity of the characters, both human and alien, but I especially liked how Anders effortlessly fits everyone's pronouns into the story. In some parts, I feel like the reader was provided too much information but with some editing, this book has the potential to go from good to great book. What you can expect from this book is a fast-paced plot, inclusivity, queer romance & strong friendships. I'm very much looking forward to reading the finished version of the book. I can’t wait to see how the story continues and what will happen next to our beloved characters. If you like YA books and/or want to try reading science fiction then this is just the right book for you. However, if you've liked previous books by this author but you only read adult science fiction then this book may not be for you. This book is primarily targeted toward the younger readers (YA) unlike the two previous books by this author which are mostly adult.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    Oohhh this is kind of giving me a (general) sorta Seven of Nine vibe! Sign me the F UPPPP!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)

    You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight Victories Greater Than Death is an incredibly creative and thoughtful novel. It captured my attention from the start, as I immediately felt for both Tina and her mom. As we begin the story, the reader is informed that Tina is not long for this world. In fact, she was literally made for another world, from another world,  here to bide her time until her home planet comes to retrieve her. You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight Victories Greater Than Death is an incredibly creative and thoughtful novel. It captured my attention from the start, as I immediately felt for both Tina and her mom. As we begin the story, the reader is informed that Tina is not long for this world. In fact, she was literally made for another world, from another world,  here to bide her time until her home planet comes to retrieve her. Frankly, that is a lot to dump on a young woman, but here we are. Since she's grown up on Earth, obviously humans are all she knows. Her mom is so incredibly caring and loving, and her best friend Rachel is equally awesome. I was so happy Tina had these supports her whole life, I can't imagine how she'd have made it otherwise!  But alas, the time comes, and her people come a-calling. Tina goes from typical teen to space warrior (or rather, tries to/is supposed to) in a matter of actual minutes. And that is where things really take off. Tina finds that she has some general knowledge of the universe and the various groups in it, but has no personal knowledge, like she was supposed to. So she's basically winging it. Right off the bat, Tina has to make some big moral decisions and figure out who she can trust.  The group she eventually ends up riding through the universe with includes Rachel, who kind of got brought along as an accident and decided to stay, as well as some Earthen teens, and various high ranking soldiers/experts. I adored the cast of characters! They were so wonderfully diverse, and very well developed.  Also very well developed? The world! I really enjoyed how much innovativeness and creativity the author very clearly poured into the story. It was undoubtedly unique, and I had such a fun time learning all the nuances of the universe (and especially of the villain- as bad as he was, the whole story was wildly entertaining as well).  The plot moves pretty quickly, and I enjoyed it throughout. There were a few moments that were perhaps a little... easy for Tina, which is probably the only downside for me.  Bottom Line: So wildly creative with an entertaining and lovable cast of characters, this was a definite win! 

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ana W

    Thank you to Tor Teen for giving me a free digital galley of this book in exchange for an honest review. This is a YA SciFi novel. A teenage girl, named Tina, is waiting for her destiny to begin. She knows she is the clone of an important commander from and alien planet and she is waiting to rejoin her mission. Once she has rejoined her spaceship, she finds herself in the middle of a rollicking space adventure that is full of friends, surprises and danger. Before leaving the area around Earth th Thank you to Tor Teen for giving me a free digital galley of this book in exchange for an honest review. This is a YA SciFi novel. A teenage girl, named Tina, is waiting for her destiny to begin. She knows she is the clone of an important commander from and alien planet and she is waiting to rejoin her mission. Once she has rejoined her spaceship, she finds herself in the middle of a rollicking space adventure that is full of friends, surprises and danger. Before leaving the area around Earth the spaceship recruits a diverse group of teenagers from Earth to complete the crew. Tina and the other Earthlings become a supportive friend group with a little love mixed in. Through Tina’s eyes, readers get to meet an array of fascinating species of aliens each with their own quirks. It doesn’t take long before Tina and her friends are training for life aboard the spaceship and volunteering for dangerous missions. There was a lot of great writing in this book and I especially loved the formal greetings that were always just right for every situation! I will warn readers that this book does take a while to pick up pace. Things don’t really get exciting until Tina leaves Earth. It is worth getting through the first few chapters because the rest of the story is a seriously fun read. I have read books by Charlie Jane Anders before. I love her work because of the originality of her stories, so I was excited to read this book. Victories Greater Than Death lived up to my expectations - it both surprised and entertained me. I look forward to the second book in this duology.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Holly (The GrimDragon)

    "I have a ball of starlight inside me. A globe, containing a billion bright pinpricks. It's always been there, since I was a baby--but lately I've been chewing up the inside of my own mouth waiting for it to burst out of me. Sometimes I feel all these little suns whirling, like they're getting ready to emerge from the hollow of my collarbone." Thanks to Tor Teen for sending me a copy of Victories Greater Than Death, Charlie Jane Anders YA debut! Ooh, how I wanted to love this! I mean.. when you've "I have a ball of starlight inside me. A globe, containing a billion bright pinpricks. It's always been there, since I was a baby--but lately I've been chewing up the inside of my own mouth waiting for it to burst out of me. Sometimes I feel all these little suns whirling, like they're getting ready to emerge from the hollow of my collarbone." Thanks to Tor Teen for sending me a copy of Victories Greater Than Death, Charlie Jane Anders YA debut! Ooh, how I wanted to love this! I mean.. when you've got a comparison of Star Wars meets Doctor Who, but make it hella queer.. YES PLEASE ALL OF THIS!! Unfortunately, despite exploring many topics that I'm passionate about and love reading, I just can't seem to get into CJA's writing, as much as I absolutely *want* to. This will more than likely be my third and final book that I read of hers. Which is to say, Your Mileage May Vary, of course.

  25. 4 out of 5

    EP

    I wish I could say that I liked this book. I have loved Charlie Jane Anders other works, so I was very excited for this book. It was a young adult sci-fi book set in space. Right up my alley. Unfortunately, the book read very slowly. I will admit, I struggle when there are too many characters, locations, and other various "things" I have to keep track of (e.g. space ships) introduced, and I spend so much time re-reading to figure it out, that the book then feels tedious. I think in this regard i I wish I could say that I liked this book. I have loved Charlie Jane Anders other works, so I was very excited for this book. It was a young adult sci-fi book set in space. Right up my alley. Unfortunately, the book read very slowly. I will admit, I struggle when there are too many characters, locations, and other various "things" I have to keep track of (e.g. space ships) introduced, and I spend so much time re-reading to figure it out, that the book then feels tedious. I think in this regard it felt more like classic sci-fi, very heavy on the science vs a lighter young adult book. I believe this also led to my unease with the book because I was never sure where it was going. Maybe Ander's point? Maybe with some editing, the book will tighten up and feel more streamlined. I also wish there was more relationship building with Tina's close friendship with Rachael. What I loved: use of pronouns throughout the book, very seamlessly. Diversity of characters, via skin color, gender, gender identity, sexuality, ethnicity, planet of origin. I am sure I am missing something, but it was beautiful cast of characters, and I loved the inclusiveness! I rated it as a 2.5 stars, but that's just based on my personal preference, but I definitely think there are those that will love this book!

  26. 5 out of 5

    elhyza

    Thank you to Tor Teen for sending me a physical arc along with an e-arc via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I really wish I ended up liking this a lot more, take my opinion with a grain of salt because personally this book wasn't for me. Space opera adventures along with the found family trope has been repetitive and this book didn't particularly bring anything new to the table. I found the writing very mediocre with its cheesiness and info dumpy, though I was grateful for the short c Thank you to Tor Teen for sending me a physical arc along with an e-arc via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I really wish I ended up liking this a lot more, take my opinion with a grain of salt because personally this book wasn't for me. Space opera adventures along with the found family trope has been repetitive and this book didn't particularly bring anything new to the table. I found the writing very mediocre with its cheesiness and info dumpy, though I was grateful for the short chapters, it just felt very early 2000s bad fanfic-esque. If it wasn't for all the cursing, I think this book overall felt like it could've been catered more towards middle grade level. I was just bored throughout a majority of the story, things sped up in the last 100 pages and got more exciting I'll give it that. Other things I did appreciate though was the representation and incorporation of inclusivity of gender expression and language with how everyone was able to understand each other. Also extra star because my heart swooned with the f/f romance, it felt like insta-romance at first and with unnecessary conflicts happening between them but as the story progressed their development got a lot better and they were so cute. The friendships, romance, and realizing one's self worth was definitely what got me through this book, but overall most of the concepts were intriguing but the execution was a let down.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jenni

    OK, so let me start by saying that this was adorable. YA is definitely not my thing and I have a ton of criticism ready to go after this paragraph, but first and foremost, if I was a young teen reading Scifi, I would be so happy to have this. I love Charlie Jane Anders and I think she's set up something lovely here. Unfortunately, Anders has dumbed down her charming prose in favor of something that feels at times like a parody of tumblrspeak. Maybe this tested well and it's what teens like! Howe OK, so let me start by saying that this was adorable. YA is definitely not my thing and I have a ton of criticism ready to go after this paragraph, but first and foremost, if I was a young teen reading Scifi, I would be so happy to have this. I love Charlie Jane Anders and I think she's set up something lovely here. Unfortunately, Anders has dumbed down her charming prose in favor of something that feels at times like a parody of tumblrspeak. Maybe this tested well and it's what teens like! However, I was hoping for something more akin to The City In the Middle of the Night, which could've been accessible to teens as it was, without any compromise. I don't know who is failing her here, but I felt that she made her world/prose/book lesser in pursuit of a younger audience, when that didn't need to happen. That aside, there were some issues with pacing and exposition dumps that weren't my favorite. The cast is super inclusive and I loved that our heroes had relatable mental health issues, and that they spent an appropriate amount of time grappling with adjusting to suddenly being humans in space. The world building was fun and I liked the repeated interrogation of the Royal Army's motives and behaviors. I'll continue to check out everything that Anders writes, I'll pick up a copy of this for my niece when its released for sure.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Peter Baran

    I didn't check before reading this but as acknowledged in the Afterword and is pretty obvious from about five pages in this is an everything bar the kitchen sink bit of YA sci-fi, and for an author so steeped in the current Sci-fi scene, is a well studied bit of wish-fulfilment. Not just within the text, where great galactic battles are fought by a smart diverse set of Earth teens, but also as a metatext, what makes this kind of novel tick. And whilst CJA happily plays in in sandbox of gender ex I didn't check before reading this but as acknowledged in the Afterword and is pretty obvious from about five pages in this is an everything bar the kitchen sink bit of YA sci-fi, and for an author so steeped in the current Sci-fi scene, is a well studied bit of wish-fulfilment. Not just within the text, where great galactic battles are fought by a smart diverse set of Earth teens, but also as a metatext, what makes this kind of novel tick. And whilst CJA happily plays in in sandbox of gender expression, sexualities and neuro-diversity, what this book is actually about is imposter syndrome. And so she brazenly plays with a Chosen One narrative being well aware of the flaws of such narratives: our heroine is the reincarnation of a great space captain, hidden on Earth and ready to be rescued but unfortunately her memories are never properly restored. So can she match up to who she is supposed to be, lead the kids who she feels responsible for, and save the galaxy? I had forgotten how giddy the stakes in a book like this can get, this is a "only you can save the galaxy" story, and is done with plenty of elan. Nearly all of my niggles with it are probably answered with it being YA, some of the relationships, particularly the romantic ones, are telegraphed massively and much of the alien creation is like getting a Russian and putting moss on them. There is a huge range of alien species mentioned, described in a few terms and left alone - which is fine, its not about them - but the imagination does show strengths which are not being stretched here. With all the gung-ho wish fulfilment fun going on, those galaxy ending stakes never quite convince. On the other hand, the alien weapon which not only destroys someone, but also makes everyone hate the dead person is absolute genius in a book like this, fear of death can be overcome but for a teenager fear of people also thinking bad things about you tops it all. Victories Greater Than Death is much less complicated than I expected it to be, even when its YA credentials were laid out to me. Whilst I think it absolutely succeeds in doing what Anders set out to do, the only real kinks in the formula are cosmetic. (OK, she does at least dodge chapters of sorting hat selection games which makes this better than most YASF). It does manage to meld a pulp and YA sensibility whilst laying out its identity politics in a matter of fact way (all the aliens offer gender pronouns, everyone asks for consent before touching each other). Its lots of fun, and if a success I can certainly see a return to this Universe. But its not really for me, and I wanted a bit more to chew on. [Netgalley ARC]

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lata

    Tina Mains not only has the hopes of her former comrades to fulfill as the clone of an inspiring and seriously tough ship captain and fighter, but she also has her own desire to make a difference in others’ lives. Which, until her alien destiny comes calling, along with a murderous guy and his henchpeople, has been to protest injustice and inequality wherever she can in her home on Earth. Once in space on a ship captained by one of original Tina’s friends, with her current best friend Rachel (who Tina Mains not only has the hopes of her former comrades to fulfill as the clone of an inspiring and seriously tough ship captain and fighter, but she also has her own desire to make a difference in others’ lives. Which, until her alien destiny comes calling, along with a murderous guy and his henchpeople, has been to protest injustice and inequality wherever she can in her home on Earth. Once in space on a ship captained by one of original Tina’s friends, with her current best friend Rachel (who was caught with teen Tina when said destiny arrived), teen Tina discovers the stakes are not just personal: countless other alien races are at risk of eradication (by the murderous creep). After recruiting a few teen geniuses from earth, Tina, Rachel, the new teens, and the whole crew are on a race to find a mysterious doodad with an unknown ability. All the Earth teens need to learn new skills and learn to work with each other and the experienced crew, while somehow thwarting the murderous creep. The peril and danger are high and constant, and there’s tension amongst the teens, as they get to know one another and are pursued by the creep. This is an entertaining, snappy, fast-moving space opera with a likeable teen protagonist and equally likeable teen geniuses. It also deals with some heavy duty stuff like identity, living up to others’ hopes, bigotry, and genocide. There’s less melodrama amongst the teens than I expected, and instead believable friction as the stakes are revealed to be really high, with terrible outcomes for failure. I loved, and I mean loved, each of the teens, and how they slowly bonded despite the many, scary things happening around them. I also loved the amount of diversity amongst the teens and the aliens, as well as a funny reference to a particular Star Trek episode. There is also a nice subversion of the usual trope where the amnesiac becomes the glorious warrior and loves it. And damn, I want to be able to fly a ship like Damini, or reconfigure the hull like Kizhei or listen to music played by Yiwei. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Haider

    3.5 stars Tina Mains was told by her mother at a young age that she wasn't human and was in fact the clone of a decorated alien hero... a clone that was genetically modified to look like a human. When her embedded interstellar rescue beacon goes off, Tina and her best friend Rachel find themselves thrown into an epic adventure on a ship staffed with a crew of humanoids from various planets. They are trying to stop the baddies from their evil goal. They decide to recruit some fellow, brilliant tee 3.5 stars Tina Mains was told by her mother at a young age that she wasn't human and was in fact the clone of a decorated alien hero... a clone that was genetically modified to look like a human. When her embedded interstellar rescue beacon goes off, Tina and her best friend Rachel find themselves thrown into an epic adventure on a ship staffed with a crew of humanoids from various planets. They are trying to stop the baddies from their evil goal. They decide to recruit some fellow, brilliant teens from Earth to help them on their mission. This was an action packed YA adventure with a truly diverse cast. The teens were from various races, genders, LGBTQ etc. The starship crew was also very into introducing themselves with preferred pronouns. This was a fun read with great messages for teens about staying true to themselves and caring for others. This is the first in a new series from author Charlie Jane Anders, who also wrote All the Birds in the Sky, which I read earlier this year. This book may appeal to fans of Anders along with fans of Becky Chambers. I am looking forward to the second book in this series. What to listen to while you read... Under the Moon by Claptone Are You Even Real? by James Blake The Key to Life on Earth by Declan McKenna Space Song by Beach House Tranz by Gorillaz Is it True by Tame Impala Another Life by Jadu Heart Thank you to the publisher for the review copy.

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