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Evoking the sights, sounds, and tastes of contemporary life, the poets in HOME explore the intimate world of everyday life, its agonies and delights. A glass shatters in a neighbor’s sink followed by the stomping of “little feet”; a woman falls asleep on the shoulder of a man she doesn’t know on an airplane; and a man passes his time smoking alone a café, observing the cha Evoking the sights, sounds, and tastes of contemporary life, the poets in HOME explore the intimate world of everyday life, its agonies and delights. A glass shatters in a neighbor’s sink followed by the stomping of “little feet”; a woman falls asleep on the shoulder of a man she doesn’t know on an airplane; and a man passes his time smoking alone a café, observing the charge of activity all around him. The worlds these poets traverse are not devoid of politics, wars, and global migrations, and yet by taking the minutiae of everyday life as their subject they remind us of the need to periodically turn inward and find meaning in the specific and deeply personal. Featuring work by Iman Mersal (Egypt), Samer Abu Hawwash (Palestine), Ines Abassi (Tunisia), Fadhil al-Azzawi (Iraq) and others, this second book in the Calico Series introduces readers to contemporary voices from across the Arabic-speaking world that are sorely underrepresented in the United States. Beautifully rendered into English by some of today’s leading Arabic translators, these poems are presented alongside their Arabic originals in a bilingual collection that celebrates language and its power to transform even the most familiar surroundings into enchanting landscapes for us to inhabit, if just for a moment.


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Evoking the sights, sounds, and tastes of contemporary life, the poets in HOME explore the intimate world of everyday life, its agonies and delights. A glass shatters in a neighbor’s sink followed by the stomping of “little feet”; a woman falls asleep on the shoulder of a man she doesn’t know on an airplane; and a man passes his time smoking alone a café, observing the cha Evoking the sights, sounds, and tastes of contemporary life, the poets in HOME explore the intimate world of everyday life, its agonies and delights. A glass shatters in a neighbor’s sink followed by the stomping of “little feet”; a woman falls asleep on the shoulder of a man she doesn’t know on an airplane; and a man passes his time smoking alone a café, observing the charge of activity all around him. The worlds these poets traverse are not devoid of politics, wars, and global migrations, and yet by taking the minutiae of everyday life as their subject they remind us of the need to periodically turn inward and find meaning in the specific and deeply personal. Featuring work by Iman Mersal (Egypt), Samer Abu Hawwash (Palestine), Ines Abassi (Tunisia), Fadhil al-Azzawi (Iraq) and others, this second book in the Calico Series introduces readers to contemporary voices from across the Arabic-speaking world that are sorely underrepresented in the United States. Beautifully rendered into English by some of today’s leading Arabic translators, these poems are presented alongside their Arabic originals in a bilingual collection that celebrates language and its power to transform even the most familiar surroundings into enchanting landscapes for us to inhabit, if just for a moment.

39 review for Home

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jenny (Reading Envy)

    "...I want my room to expand to contain all my many books or for a fit of madness to strike me so I will burn them..." -Saadiah Mufarreh, translated by Allison Blecker While not all the poets in this collection are female, a considerable number of both poets and translators are, so I wanted to read it during Women in Translation Month. A wide range of poets in country of origin, all are shown in English on one page and Arabic on the other. All newly translated and published by Two Lines Press as part "...I want my room to expand to contain all my many books or for a fit of madness to strike me so I will burn them..." -Saadiah Mufarreh, translated by Allison Blecker While not all the poets in this collection are female, a considerable number of both poets and translators are, so I wanted to read it during Women in Translation Month. A wide range of poets in country of origin, all are shown in English on one page and Arabic on the other. All newly translated and published by Two Lines Press as part of their Calico Series. I got this a little bit early because I subscribe to this press; it comes out September 8.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    I really love what Two Lines is doing with their new Calico series. This wonderful poetry collection drawn from sources all over the Arabic speaking world is a revelation. Thought-provoking and absolutely gorgeous. I also love that they show the original language text on each facing page, with the translated work on the other side. I'm awestruck by what translators can do. I really love what Two Lines is doing with their new Calico series. This wonderful poetry collection drawn from sources all over the Arabic speaking world is a revelation. Thought-provoking and absolutely gorgeous. I also love that they show the original language text on each facing page, with the translated work on the other side. I'm awestruck by what translators can do.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    A stunning and diverse collection of Arabic poetry - all of the contributors have wonderfully talented and unique voices. Beautiful.

  4. 5 out of 5

    fridayinapril

    "6 I want another earth I can conceal in my chest whenever I want to leave the house without an abaya. 7 I want a tree that sings, a sparrow that makes a truce with the wind, a sea that writes its memoirs each dawn, and a passport that is accepted at all airports." Saadiah Mufarreh translated by Allison Blecker • Home is a bilingual poetry collection by Two Lines Press from their calico series. Each section of the collection is dedicated to one poet from the Arab World. It is like little snippets into th "6 I want another earth I can conceal in my chest whenever I want to leave the house without an abaya. 7 I want a tree that sings, a sparrow that makes a truce with the wind, a sea that writes its memoirs each dawn, and a passport that is accepted at all airports." Saadiah Mufarreh translated by Allison Blecker • Home is a bilingual poetry collection by Two Lines Press from their calico series. Each section of the collection is dedicated to one poet from the Arab World. It is like little snippets into the poet's unique style and voice. It speaks of the diversity and talent of contemporary Arab poets and the brilliant translators who took on the task to translate these poems into English. • Perhaps it is because I can read and understand both languages, but reading them side by side I felt as if each word resonated in my head like a siren's song leading me from a page to another into unknown territories I was more than happy to explore. • If you enjoy poetry or just want to delve into this written medium, I wholeheartedly recommend this collection. • ~ #fridayinaprilbookreviews

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dree

    This volume has poems in Arabic and their English translations on facing pages. Which is interesting, because even single-word and short lines with the same word don't match in the Arabic, which obviously means some thing about tense and structure and word order. Some of these are excellent, as in any anthology. My favorite was by Saadiah Murfarreh (Kuwait). Other standouts for me were Flying by Iman Mersal (Egypt) and The Key by Ines Abassi (Tunisia). Many (but not all) of these poems have a con This volume has poems in Arabic and their English translations on facing pages. Which is interesting, because even single-word and short lines with the same word don't match in the Arabic, which obviously means some thing about tense and structure and word order. Some of these are excellent, as in any anthology. My favorite was by Saadiah Murfarreh (Kuwait). Other standouts for me were Flying by Iman Mersal (Egypt) and The Key by Ines Abassi (Tunisia). Many (but not all) of these poems have a consistent theme of war--whether it be fear, uncertainty, prison camps, loss (of life or land).

  6. 4 out of 5

    Matt Brown

    beautifully designed little collection with some great poems

  7. 4 out of 5

    Anna (Bailed to go to Storygraph! Username: acweber)

    So impressed and moved by everything about this little book -- the layout, the excellence of the translations, the chorus of these voices.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Drew

    A terrific collection of a swath of poetry new to the English-speaking world. I adore this 'Calico' line from Two Lines and look forward to many more discoveries like this one and THAT WE MAY LIVE. A terrific collection of a swath of poetry new to the English-speaking world. I adore this 'Calico' line from Two Lines and look forward to many more discoveries like this one and THAT WE MAY LIVE.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Cetra

    Showcasing voices from all over the Arabic-speaking world, this collection was just gorgeous. The translated poems are presented alongside with their original Arabic, & the translations were really beautifully done. Anyway, this comes out September 8, 2020 & I can’t wait to grab a hard copy for myself. Each of these poems were really striking & just felt so familiar. The collection is an extremely short read, & really lifts up voices that we don’t see a lot of in the US. I think it’s a great way Showcasing voices from all over the Arabic-speaking world, this collection was just gorgeous. The translated poems are presented alongside with their original Arabic, & the translations were really beautifully done. Anyway, this comes out September 8, 2020 & I can’t wait to grab a hard copy for myself. Each of these poems were really striking & just felt so familiar. The collection is an extremely short read, & really lifts up voices that we don’t see a lot of in the US. I think it’s a great way to dip your toe into Arabic poetry, from so many different countries. Thank you to Two Lines Press and Edelweiss for providing me with an e-galley in exchange for my honest review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ama Kwarteng

  11. 5 out of 5

    M

  12. 4 out of 5

    Two Lines Press

  13. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chad Felix

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tobias

  16. 5 out of 5

    WndyJW

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nw23

  18. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

  19. 4 out of 5

    Darla

  20. 4 out of 5

    Luuq

  21. 5 out of 5

    John

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kaileigh

  23. 4 out of 5

    Edmundo Mantilla

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine V

  25. 4 out of 5

    Síor

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Reading Stewardess

  27. 4 out of 5

    Indran Fernando

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tom

  29. 5 out of 5

    Em

  30. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  31. 5 out of 5

    Letitia D'Souza

  32. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Key

  33. 5 out of 5

    James Huynh

  34. 4 out of 5

    Liza Aguilar Serrato

  35. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  36. 4 out of 5

    Niamh

  37. 5 out of 5

    Leo

  38. 4 out of 5

    A.C.

  39. 4 out of 5

    Sydney Erin

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