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Severe loss. For Laurel Summers, those two words don’t cut it. They don’t even come close. After a car wreck kills her mother and siblings, the ghosts of her family surround her as she wrestles with grief, anger, and the fear that she won't be enough to keep her dad alive either. Fifteen-year-old Laurel Summers couldn’t tell you the last words she spoke to her mother and si Severe loss. For Laurel Summers, those two words don’t cut it. They don’t even come close. After a car wreck kills her mother and siblings, the ghosts of her family surround her as she wrestles with grief, anger, and the fear that she won't be enough to keep her dad alive either. Fifteen-year-old Laurel Summers couldn’t tell you the last words she spoke to her mother and siblings if her life depended on it. But she will never forget the image of her mother’s mangled green car on the freeway, shattering the boring world Laurel had been so desperate to escape. Now she can’t stop seeing the ghosts of her family members, which haunt her with memories of how life used to be back when her biggest problem was the kiss she shared with her best friend Hanna. After the accident, Laurel and her dad are left to pick up the pieces of their shattered lives. Her dad is struggling with his grief and depression, unable to cope with the loss of his family. He seeks a way out of his pain, leaving Laurel behind while he struggles to cope with his own mental illness. She is desperate to find a way to hold everything together again and help her father come to terms with the loss so he can come back to her. Laurel tries to make sense of her pain with the help of her grandparents, her two best friends, and some random strangers. As she struggles to understand who she is without her family, she must come to terms with the items on her List of Things Not to Talk About, learn to trust her dad again, and—on top of it all—keep her heart open to love in the wake of her immense loss, eventually learning that it’s okay to not be okay.


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Severe loss. For Laurel Summers, those two words don’t cut it. They don’t even come close. After a car wreck kills her mother and siblings, the ghosts of her family surround her as she wrestles with grief, anger, and the fear that she won't be enough to keep her dad alive either. Fifteen-year-old Laurel Summers couldn’t tell you the last words she spoke to her mother and si Severe loss. For Laurel Summers, those two words don’t cut it. They don’t even come close. After a car wreck kills her mother and siblings, the ghosts of her family surround her as she wrestles with grief, anger, and the fear that she won't be enough to keep her dad alive either. Fifteen-year-old Laurel Summers couldn’t tell you the last words she spoke to her mother and siblings if her life depended on it. But she will never forget the image of her mother’s mangled green car on the freeway, shattering the boring world Laurel had been so desperate to escape. Now she can’t stop seeing the ghosts of her family members, which haunt her with memories of how life used to be back when her biggest problem was the kiss she shared with her best friend Hanna. After the accident, Laurel and her dad are left to pick up the pieces of their shattered lives. Her dad is struggling with his grief and depression, unable to cope with the loss of his family. He seeks a way out of his pain, leaving Laurel behind while he struggles to cope with his own mental illness. She is desperate to find a way to hold everything together again and help her father come to terms with the loss so he can come back to her. Laurel tries to make sense of her pain with the help of her grandparents, her two best friends, and some random strangers. As she struggles to understand who she is without her family, she must come to terms with the items on her List of Things Not to Talk About, learn to trust her dad again, and—on top of it all—keep her heart open to love in the wake of her immense loss, eventually learning that it’s okay to not be okay.

30 review for Laurel Everywhere

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nad

    this book broke me

  2. 5 out of 5

    katie

    Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for providing an eARC of Laurel Everywhere in exchange for an honest review. After a car accident causes the death of her mom, brother, and sister, Laurel is devastated. And with her dad suffering from depression, Laurel is left to pick up the shattered pieces of her broken family. Now she can’t stop hearing the voices of the ghosts fo her family, who haunt her with the painful memories from before. After her dad tries to end his pain, he leaves Laurel beh Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for providing an eARC of Laurel Everywhere in exchange for an honest review. After a car accident causes the death of her mom, brother, and sister, Laurel is devastated. And with her dad suffering from depression, Laurel is left to pick up the shattered pieces of her broken family. Now she can’t stop hearing the voices of the ghosts fo her family, who haunt her with the painful memories from before. After her dad tries to end his pain, he leaves Laurel behind to try to heal. Laurel becomes desperate to bring things back to normal. As she copes with the loss of her family, Laurel learns that it’s okay not to be normal. Laurel Everywhere was an emotional and heartfelt story about the harrowing journey to discovering yourself and the power of love through grief. I was so sad about what happened to Laurel's family, and I wished that I could meet Tansy and Rowan and their mom in this book. It was a great representation for grief and depression, although it did not hit me as hard as I thought it would. Moynihan had a realistic concept, but performed an adequate execution. Laurel Summers, the protagonist of the book, was an interesting character, but felt one-dimensional at times. Although she says she is 15 years old, she acts younger than her age because of her impulsive and naive actions. Her voice sometimes sounds immature and childish, but at the same time resonates with the readers through her conflicting thoughts and strong emotions. Although the secondary characters were supposed to play a major role in the plot, they did not. Their personalities felt muted because they didn’t express their feelings and thoughts often, and as a result, they felt unrelatable. One thing I loved about the book was the relationships between Laurel and her friends Lyssa and Hanna. Their bond was strong, and although they sometimes fight, they are willing to die for each other. Laurel’s devotion to her friends was an important factor in helping her deal with her grief. Laurel’s relationship with her father was very relatable, and the fact that she worried so much but was caring felt very realistic. They both learn to cope in their own ways and keep going. I also enjoyed the little messages this story held within its lines, and how the characters came to accept them. Laurel learns how grief affects people differently and how sadness should never be a competition. She discovers that struggles should be shared instead of burdening one person, and though all may be dark, there will always be light. Laurel Everywhere was a meaningful but poignant story about the impacts of grief and loss, and how people rise again. The characters forge a strong connection with the readers, but there was little growth. The plot felt weak at times, and some parts just fell flat. See more reviews at thestorybooksisters.wordpress.com Find me on Instagram @the_storybooksisters

  3. 5 out of 5

    PinkAmy loves books, cats and naps

    2.5 STARS After a drunk driver kills Laurel’s mother, brother and sister, she and her father are left spiraling through grief and depression. Her dad, dealing with his own mental illness, ends up hospitalized. Laurel’s two best friends and a new therapist help her navigate her new normal. LAUREL EVERYWHERE is a beautifully written, ode to grief but it missed the mark for me. Laurel seems much younger than fifteen years old. Her feelings of grief and her father’s mental illness feel almost romanti 2.5 STARS After a drunk driver kills Laurel’s mother, brother and sister, she and her father are left spiraling through grief and depression. Her dad, dealing with his own mental illness, ends up hospitalized. Laurel’s two best friends and a new therapist help her navigate her new normal. LAUREL EVERYWHERE is a beautifully written, ode to grief but it missed the mark for me. Laurel seems much younger than fifteen years old. Her feelings of grief and her father’s mental illness feel almost romanticized, written by someone who’s imagining how a teen would react rather than someone who’s experienced or worked with adolescents going through those situations. Erin Moynihan can string together beautiful words to make gorgeous sentences. Her character development, relationships and plots read like characters, written not real relationships and creates plots not like real life. Though not a MG book, MG age, higher level readers will probably enjoy the book more YA age readers.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    I received an advanced copy of Laurel Everywhere from Ooligan Press through Edelweiss+. It's currently slated to be available for purchase on November 10th, 2020. Reading Laurel Everywhere feels like listening to a teenager's pulse. I'm a big fan of character heavy stories and Laurel Everywhere did not disappoint. Throughout the novel, protagonist Laurel narrates her life after a sudden tragedy kill her mother and siblings and land her father in a mental institution. It's a story of loss, coping, I received an advanced copy of Laurel Everywhere from Ooligan Press through Edelweiss+. It's currently slated to be available for purchase on November 10th, 2020. Reading Laurel Everywhere feels like listening to a teenager's pulse. I'm a big fan of character heavy stories and Laurel Everywhere did not disappoint. Throughout the novel, protagonist Laurel narrates her life after a sudden tragedy kill her mother and siblings and land her father in a mental institution. It's a story of loss, coping, and personal growth. I'm obsessed with the pacing and word choice of this book. More than anything I've read recently (and Laurel was the 4th book I read yesterday so that's saying quite a bit), Laurel Everywhere felt like a constant stream of thought. You could feel Laurel's anxieties and fears and eventual calms in frantic flurries of conflicting thoughts and memories that made the book extremely gripping. My main issue with the story is one that's likely unique to people in my age bracket. Laurel mentions being 15 frequently and as someone who was recently 15, her age doesn't quite feel like it matches up with her mental maturity, views on life and family, and the relationships she's forged. Laurel's interior voice definitely felt teenaged, but closer to that of a 17 year old while her spoken dialogue and impulsive actions occasionally dip closer to 13 or 12. The occasional juvenile tendencies weren't jarring because going through that level of tragedy that suddenly would likely make someone behave differently, but while the difference between 15 and 17 might seem insignificant, if you ask any teenager or anyone who's recently been a teenager, they'd likely tell you that they had a big personality shift between the ages of 16 and 17 that if feels like Laurel and her 15 year old friends have skipped ahead to. As an 18 year old who can remember being and talking to mainly 15 year olds a few years ago, the age felt like a glaring disconnect, but if you're outside of my age bracket it probably won't effect your read at all.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Erin Moynihan

    As I finish my final read through, I’m so excited for folks to meet Laurel. This one is for my family, both found and given. I hope people can find meaning in this story of grief, love, and growth.

  6. 5 out of 5

    ✫erin✫

    I am beyond glad that I choose to read this, this novel is to be released on November 10th, 2020 and I urge EVERYONE to give it a read. I would recommend this YA novel to anyone going through loss. FULL REVIEW UP ON THE BLOG!!!!

  7. 4 out of 5

    charlotte, (½ of readsrainbow)

    Maybe Dad and I will never be the same again and maybe that’s OK, because we’ll create a new normal and I’ll get mad at him for leaving me sometimes and he’ll apologize a lot and maybe we’ll never get over it, but we’ll move on, somehow. On my blog. Actual rating 2.5 Rep: lesbian mc, Black bi li, Black side characters, side character with depression CWs: family death, discussions of grief, attempted suicides of side character (inc. overdose) Galley provided by publisher This is, in all honesty Maybe Dad and I will never be the same again and maybe that’s OK, because we’ll create a new normal and I’ll get mad at him for leaving me sometimes and he’ll apologize a lot and maybe we’ll never get over it, but we’ll move on, somehow. On my blog. Actual rating 2.5 Rep: lesbian mc, Black bi li, Black side characters, side character with depression CWs: family death, discussions of grief, attempted suicides of side character (inc. overdose) Galley provided by publisher This is, in all honesty, a book which suffered because of the mood I was in, reading it. At that point, I was in the kind of slump where, no matter what you pick up, none of it grabs you. So, while this book did grow on me, I think it would have benefitted if I’d read it at another time. If you like books like Saving Francesca or Words in Deep Blue — books that talk about loss and grief, essentially — then this book is one you will definitely not want to miss. Laurel Everywhere follows Laurel, who has just lost her mother and two siblings in a car crash, and who, along with her father, is struggling to cope. The story tracks them (though primarily Laurel) as they start to come to terms with their loss, with the help of friends and family. As I said, I read this book at the wrong time, because any other time and I would have liked it a lot more. It’s well-written and almost made me cry a good few times. And yet. It’s not like I had massive issues with the book. Yes, occasionally Laurel felt a little selfish, but that’s to be expected. She is grieving after all. Genuinely about the only thing I could actually point at as being an issue was the fact that the book doesn’t use the word lesbian. It doesn’t use labels at all, in fact, so I guess that’s some kind of equality. But Laurel doesn’t like boys, says “I like girls” at least once, you would think I could get a mention of the word, right? Not so. But then, that’s a trend in YA contemporary lit. So, really, all I have to say is, if the premise of this book appeals to you, do ignore my rating and pick it up for yourself. You won’t regret it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Pineo

    Review by Lisa Pineo *I received this eARC from Ooligan Press via Edelweiss+ in return for an honest review. My ratings: * I hated it ** It was okay *** I liked it **** Really good ***** Great TW (trigger warnings): Death of family members, suicide attempt, mental illness, parental homophobia Description from the publisher: "Severe loss. For Laurel Summers, those two words don’t cut it. They don’t even come close. After a car wreck kills her mother and siblings, the ghosts of her family surround he Review by Lisa Pineo *I received this eARC from Ooligan Press via Edelweiss+ in return for an honest review. My ratings: * I hated it ** It was okay *** I liked it **** Really good ***** Great TW (trigger warnings): Death of family members, suicide attempt, mental illness, parental homophobia Description from the publisher: "Severe loss. For Laurel Summers, those two words don’t cut it. They don’t even come close. After a car wreck kills her mother and siblings, the ghosts of her family surround her as she wrestles with grief, anger, and the fear that she won't be enough to keep her dad alive either." I liked "Laurel Everywhere." I didn't love it but it was an easy read and it kept my attention. I expected it to end a few times by the time it finally did but I guess the author was trying to tie up all the loose ends. The author did a good job with character development for most of the characters but I still didn't really invested in them. Even thought I wasn't totally taken in by the novel I think the topic is important for young adults. The author wrote the grief, anger and heartache of a fifteen year old girl going through terrible loss, at the same time as regular teenage situations like a first love, very honestly and realistically. 3.5 stars

  9. 5 out of 5

    Vighnesh Muraly

    4.5 stars. This book was such a beautiful and heartfelt exploration of grief. Laurel was such a flawed character which made it so inter to be in her head. I was so connected to her and all the characters that I literally couldn’t put this book down. It was so character driven which was the main force of this story and it was wrapped up so well. This book was amazing and I can’t wait to read more from this author.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Howe

    Laurel Everywhere is the phenomenal story of 15-year-old Laurel Summers who loses everyone in her family except her dad in a tragic car accident. After abandoning Laurel alone in the woods, her father finds himself overwhelmed with his grief and he is sent to a special type of mental institute to help with his grief. With the love, help, and support of her surviving family and friends, Laurel finds a way to live with her grief, continue living her life, embrace who she is. I cannot say enough po Laurel Everywhere is the phenomenal story of 15-year-old Laurel Summers who loses everyone in her family except her dad in a tragic car accident. After abandoning Laurel alone in the woods, her father finds himself overwhelmed with his grief and he is sent to a special type of mental institute to help with his grief. With the love, help, and support of her surviving family and friends, Laurel finds a way to live with her grief, continue living her life, embrace who she is. I cannot say enough positive things about this book! From the very first line I was instantly drawn into the life and character of Laurel Summers. “Hanna is the one who finds me.” It is so mysterious and thought-provoking. Who is Hanna? Why is she finding us? Where are we? Who are we? What happened? That one single line begs you to keep reading, to find the answers. By the end of the first chapter you are so consumed with Laurel’s life and everything that she is going through, that you can’t help but love her: her quirks, her outbursts, her sense of humor - it is all so relatable and engaging. My favorite parts of this book are when some of the seriousness and the grief is broken - whether it’s through a witty comment by Lyssa or a crazy plan formulated by Laurel. These moments stick out because they are the most real and relatable - something happens, and we laugh because we can’t let our grief rule our lives. I think that anyone who has experienced any kind of grief or loss can easily relate to the emotions and underlying themes of this book, and I want to applaud Erin for the beautiful way that she addresses the sometimes conflicting feelings of grief, loss, abandonment, anger, denial, acceptance, and love. She truly did a fantastic job writing this book! This is an amazing story of love, loss, friendship, and finding yourself, and I highly recommend reading it!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bryce

    "Severe loss. Those two words don’t cut it, they don’t even get close to describing it." This book is a phenomenally heartbreaking exploration of grief and mental health. I tend not to read many books like this that center around loss, but I'm so glad I decided to give this one a try; I zoomed through this book in only a few hours and experienced so many intense emotions in that time. As someone who does not have a lot of experience with grief, especially not to the extent that Laurel deals with "Severe loss. Those two words don’t cut it, they don’t even get close to describing it." This book is a phenomenally heartbreaking exploration of grief and mental health. I tend not to read many books like this that center around loss, but I'm so glad I decided to give this one a try; I zoomed through this book in only a few hours and experienced so many intense emotions in that time. As someone who does not have a lot of experience with grief, especially not to the extent that Laurel deals with, this book gave me a real and raw look into what it might be like. I usually try to avoid thinking about losing people close to me, especially my family, but reading this book actually made me realize just how lucky I am to have them. There's nothing like reading a book like this to really snap into perspective how fragile life is and how important it is to cherish time spent with loved ones. Moynihan does a fantastic job of creating relatable and lovable characters; I grew especially attached to Laurel and immensely enjoyed reading from her perspective. Even as she struggles with losing her family, coming to terms with her sexuality and her feelings for her best friend, and forgiving her dad and the man who killed her family, she still finds love and compassion in her heart for herself and others. Although reading about Laurel's struggles in such a candid way was hard, there were so many great moments and insights from her that got me through. Moynihan's writing is beautiful and raw, and extremely impressive considering this is her debut. I can't wait to see what else she has in store for us in the future! *Note: I work for the publisher, Ooligan Press, as a student in the Book Publishing program at Portland State and received a copy for free as a result. Although I did not work on this book, I am extremely proud and excited about this release and highly encourage everyone to check it out!

  12. 5 out of 5

    iriamxx

    "Books are all just recycled letters and words strung together in different ways to make different stories." I received this book as part of LibraryThing Early Reviewers. This book was quite possibly the most heartbreaking book I have read in a while. It follows a fifteen year old girl named Laurel who has just lost her mother and two siblings in a fatal car crash. Her father is suffering from severe depression and so it is Laurel's two best friends and her grandparents who support her throug "Books are all just recycled letters and words strung together in different ways to make different stories." I received this book as part of LibraryThing Early Reviewers. This book was quite possibly the most heartbreaking book I have read in a while. It follows a fifteen year old girl named Laurel who has just lost her mother and two siblings in a fatal car crash. Her father is suffering from severe depression and so it is Laurel's two best friends and her grandparents who support her through the summer months. I really liked Laurel's character. Her narration was lyrical and made me cry repeatedly. I found this book to be a beautiful exploration of grief and it showed how different people cope in different ways. Hanna's personality reminded me a lot of myself and I found Lyssa to be uplifting and likeable. This is not the type of book that I would usually choose to read, but I'm glad I did. I did feel that Laurel seemed older than fifteen and I would have liked to see some of her experiences back at school. However, I know this story will stay with me and since I live in Scotland, I will think of it every time I see tansy growing by the side of the road.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    I received a free digital ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Laurel Everywhere follows a fifteen year old girl (Laurel) in the aftermath of the deaths of three immediate family members in a car crash. Shortly thereafter, her father disappears and is revealed to be suffering from depression. The construct of the book is excellent, but nearly all of the plot occurs in the beginning of the book. Laurel often behaves in an immature manner, exhibiting impulsive and rash behaviors I received a free digital ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Laurel Everywhere follows a fifteen year old girl (Laurel) in the aftermath of the deaths of three immediate family members in a car crash. Shortly thereafter, her father disappears and is revealed to be suffering from depression. The construct of the book is excellent, but nearly all of the plot occurs in the beginning of the book. Laurel often behaves in an immature manner, exhibiting impulsive and rash behaviors. I initially thought this would provide for a great character arc, but there wasn't really any character growth by the end of the novel. The story feels repetitive as Laurel cycles through the same reactions of grief interrupted only by impulsive decisions, and Moynihan often relies on the "telling" rather than "showing" method of writing. While younger teens with family members struggling from depression may find comfort and relate to Laurel, depression isn't explored as deeply as it could be. Older teens will likely find Laurel too juvenile to relate to. This YA novel was promising but fell short of my expectations overall.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Meg Dendler

    I may not be the right reader, and this is definitely not the right time in my life for a book that's mostly sad and depressing. I'm all for calling attention to mental health issues and have family members who struggle, but the story just didn't seem to really go anywhere. Too repetitive. And I had a hard time believing the main character was only fifteen. Decently written overall, but not one I would have kept reading if I didn't feel obligated to. I received a copy of this book for review fro I may not be the right reader, and this is definitely not the right time in my life for a book that's mostly sad and depressing. I'm all for calling attention to mental health issues and have family members who struggle, but the story just didn't seem to really go anywhere. Too repetitive. And I had a hard time believing the main character was only fifteen. Decently written overall, but not one I would have kept reading if I didn't feel obligated to. I received a copy of this book for review from the publisher through LibraryThing.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kate Stewart

    I received a copy of this book from early reviewers. This book presents a story about loss of family members due to a car accident. I enjoyed this book very much as the main character dealt with her sorrow and loss. I highly recommend this book for both adults and older teens. The author showed a great presentation of the grief experience and how the main character dealt with the radical changes in her young life. Characters are fully developed and you as a reader are invested in them. Highly re I received a copy of this book from early reviewers. This book presents a story about loss of family members due to a car accident. I enjoyed this book very much as the main character dealt with her sorrow and loss. I highly recommend this book for both adults and older teens. The author showed a great presentation of the grief experience and how the main character dealt with the radical changes in her young life. Characters are fully developed and you as a reader are invested in them. Highly recommend.

  16. 4 out of 5

    B. Goodwin

    Excellent story filled with trues and teen angst. A review will appear on www.writeradvice.com soon. Excellent story filled with trues and teen angst. A review will appear on www.writeradvice.com soon.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amelia Maness-Gilliland

    I received an ARC of Laurel Everywhere through Library Thing. Laurel Everywhere is deeply moving story that as one other reviewer noted “broke me.” Erin Moynihan delivers a story that takes the reader through life shattering grief while demonstrating a resilient hope. I love the relationships between Laurel and her friends and the very real dynamics between them. It was Laurels relationship with her father that covered the full range of emotions, it was raw and blunt while at the same time tende I received an ARC of Laurel Everywhere through Library Thing. Laurel Everywhere is deeply moving story that as one other reviewer noted “broke me.” Erin Moynihan delivers a story that takes the reader through life shattering grief while demonstrating a resilient hope. I love the relationships between Laurel and her friends and the very real dynamics between them. It was Laurels relationship with her father that covered the full range of emotions, it was raw and blunt while at the same time tender and compassionate, a lot unspoken at first then evolving to a touching honesty as they both came to terms with their shattered lives and how to move forward.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Laurel Everywhere reflects on grief and the various ways different individual choose to except lost. This book discusses tragic topics of a teenager that has to learn to live her life without her mother/siblings and help find the strength with her father spirling into a suicidal depression. The way the author uses plants to connect the family really was very interesting to me. I enjoyed the substories as well and the external support that Laurel received. Life truly sometimes is very unfair but Laurel Everywhere reflects on grief and the various ways different individual choose to except lost. This book discusses tragic topics of a teenager that has to learn to live her life without her mother/siblings and help find the strength with her father spirling into a suicidal depression. The way the author uses plants to connect the family really was very interesting to me. I enjoyed the substories as well and the external support that Laurel received. Life truly sometimes is very unfair but this story showed that even though we may cope differently we can still meet at the same point one day. Thankful for the opportunity from Librarything, Ooligan Press and Harpervia to read and review a copy of Laurel Everywhere by Erin Moynihan.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ava

    Laurel Everywhere follows the life of Laurel Summers, a 15 year-old girl who has recently lost her mother, brother, and sister in a car accident. We watch Laurel navigate her own grief, and the grief of her father, who is not entirely honest with his daughter. This novel sheds light on how different people process grief differently. Some of the most important take aways are that you cannot compare your grief to another and determine who is more sad, you cannot discount you own grief because of t Laurel Everywhere follows the life of Laurel Summers, a 15 year-old girl who has recently lost her mother, brother, and sister in a car accident. We watch Laurel navigate her own grief, and the grief of her father, who is not entirely honest with his daughter. This novel sheds light on how different people process grief differently. Some of the most important take aways are that you cannot compare your grief to another and determine who is more sad, you cannot discount you own grief because of the experiences of other, and finally, that it is okay to be happy and sad at the same time. I have a few things that really irked me about this book. First, the connotation surrounding the character Hanna did not sit well with me. Hanna represented a brilliant, knowledge hungry, independent woman that was prepared to stand up for herself and other women. Often Hanna's ideas were considered outside and almost irrational; it was a lot of "Hanna thinks this," I just felt that Laurel did not support all of Hanna's ideas on how women should be treated (with the example of Laurel's older brother Roman). The next thing was that the author told more than showed. I got a lot of details about the characters, but they still felt really one dimensional because the characters were not allowed to show their personality. I feel like this really stunted the novel. All the right ideas were there, but the execution made this book a two star book for me. I do think this is good for a younger audience: 12-15 year olds, but it is not really a book that can transcend the age grouping.

  20. 4 out of 5

    CorrieGM

    Being fifteen and losing your family is not easy. When after that your father tries to leave you, your life becomes almost unbearable. We see Laurel when she tries to cope with all this. But we see not only Laurel, we see her grandparents too and her friends, who try to help her to cope with her loss. Sometimes I 'watched' in horror what Laurel did, other times I was deeply moved by the people who tried to help her. Laurel makes mistakes, her friends, her father and grandparents make mistakes. But in Being fifteen and losing your family is not easy. When after that your father tries to leave you, your life becomes almost unbearable. We see Laurel when she tries to cope with all this. But we see not only Laurel, we see her grandparents too and her friends, who try to help her to cope with her loss. Sometimes I 'watched' in horror what Laurel did, other times I was deeply moved by the people who tried to help her. Laurel makes mistakes, her friends, her father and grandparents make mistakes. But in the end she comes to terms with her grief. 'It is OK not to be OK.' I got this book in exchange for a review. I want to thank the author for that. It has enriched my life.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Miamismartgirl09

    I received this book as part of the Early Reviewers on Library Thing. I quite enjoyed this book and thought it was a very good description of grief, mental health, and growing up. Laurel is going through the loss of her mother and siblings. The book focuses on her and her father on coming to realization of this and how to move on. I believe this would be an excellent YA novel for children who are also going through loss

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra Alonso

    Shelved to be read at a later date. I don’t think this writing style is for me; it felt a bit juvenile & the sentences were choppy. I didn’t see much of a personality in Laurel but I’m going to try picking this up again later. Thank you to LibraryThing and Ooligan Press for an ARC to review.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    I received a complimentary digital copy of this book from LibraryThing ER in exchange for an unbiased review. This is a touching emotional story about loss, grief and healing. The characters and storyline are more on level with young teens than young adults. The subject matter is serious but not inappropriate for this emerging generation. Laurel Summers is 15 years old when her mother and two siblings, Rowan and Tansy are killed in a horrific car crash. Laurel and her dad were driving in a separ I received a complimentary digital copy of this book from LibraryThing ER in exchange for an unbiased review. This is a touching emotional story about loss, grief and healing. The characters and storyline are more on level with young teens than young adults. The subject matter is serious but not inappropriate for this emerging generation. Laurel Summers is 15 years old when her mother and two siblings, Rowan and Tansy are killed in a horrific car crash. Laurel and her dad were driving in a separate car and the guilt weighs on them tremendously. They seem to go through the motions of getting through the formalities of the funeral not quite experiencing the depth of their loss. Laurel’s paternal grandparents go back to Arizona and are overwhelmed when they receive news that their son had gone missing and eventually in the hospital. Laurel’s dad decides to take her hiking but it ultimately turns traumatic when she falls into a laurel bush. She is shocked that her father continues on the path without her. She is unable to find him and is overcome with grief that her only living parent has left her. Laurel has a tremendous support system with her friends Hannah and Lyssa. The girls have grown up together supporting one another over the years. Hannah’s parents take care of her until her grandparents arrive from Arizona. When her father is eventually found confused and suicidal in the forest, he placed in the hospital where he must face his grief. Meanwhile, Laurel attempts to maneuver her emotional landscape alone. The story had a strong beginning but then seemed to lose structure and cohesiveness. There is a lot of discussion about crying and not crying and confusion over self regulation of emotions. The characters did not feel relatable to me on different levels. The sense of loss and grief and discovering how to go on can be overwhelming. Although the themes resonate with present day there seemed to be inconsistencies with the actions and intentions of the characters. For example, through all the trauma and grief her grandparents allow her to fly alone to Kentucky. She is struggling to cope with the loss of her family and feelings of abandonment when her father left her on the hiking path. The focus seems to be entirely in the father and his mental health ignoring that this 15 year old might need some counseling. Her irrational behavior is understandable given the situation and it’s uncomfortable that there is minimal guidance available to her. Ultimately, the book tells a powerful story of life and loss and moving past grief.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Although this book covers important themes — like finding happiness alongside grief, and coming to terms with who you are — it's only an okay story. The characters were distinct, the friendships were satisfying, and the emotions were powerful. The events of the story felt very realistic. But despite these strengths, the plot felt meandering and the writing itself sometimes felt a little weak. All of the characters in the novel, both living and dead, are given characteristics and personalities tha Although this book covers important themes — like finding happiness alongside grief, and coming to terms with who you are — it's only an okay story. The characters were distinct, the friendships were satisfying, and the emotions were powerful. The events of the story felt very realistic. But despite these strengths, the plot felt meandering and the writing itself sometimes felt a little weak. All of the characters in the novel, both living and dead, are given characteristics and personalities that are fun to see and follow. If they're portrayed unrealistically, it is at least unrealistic in a way that is enjoyable to read. By the end of the novel, we feel as though we know how each of them might react to something. Furthermore, it was nice to see that even when Laurel's plans went off the deep end, the story didn't follow. She may have wanted to run away to Scotland, but she didn't. She may have wanted to storm the prison, but minors can't go in alone. She may have wanted to swim with a new tattoo, but it became infected. The whimsy and chaos of Laurel's mind is firmly grounded in reality, not indulged by unresearched authorship. That being said, although the book is well-grounded and the characters fill it well, much of the story felt directionless, particularly the beginning. It felt hard to get into at first, because it was just depressing episode after depressing episode, none of them really seeming to lead anywhere. This improved as the story went on, but even still, Laurel often felt like she was going from thing to thing with only a very vague sense of which thing would come next. Beyond that, Laurel's internal dialogue and dialogue with other characters did sometime feel a little self-indulgent of the author. It felt like the kind of dialogue we all imagine ourselves having, but know we never actually would have. Perhaps this is supposed to be a symptom of grief, but it makes Laurel sound un-self-aware and childish. Overall, this book felt more meaningful than it felt interesting. It wasn't bad, it just also didn't really stand out. There was no real sense that this was a story I needed to hear, and more importantly that it was a story I needed to hear out of the mouth of this character.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    I received an electronic copy of this book as part of the LibraryThing Early Reviewers program. If I had been browsing in a bookstore, I may have picked this book up, but I almost certainly would have put it down after the first few pages. The exposition is heavy-handed and contrite, and does not evoke any emotion for me. However, since I received it as part of the early reviewers program, I kept reading in order to give it a fair review. It took almost half the book before I was interested in the I received an electronic copy of this book as part of the LibraryThing Early Reviewers program. If I had been browsing in a bookstore, I may have picked this book up, but I almost certainly would have put it down after the first few pages. The exposition is heavy-handed and contrite, and does not evoke any emotion for me. However, since I received it as part of the early reviewers program, I kept reading in order to give it a fair review. It took almost half the book before I was interested in the story. The central plot of Laurel looking for the plants her siblings are named after to give to her dad was interesting and unique, but it takes almost a hundred pages before the idea is introduced. Everything between the point where she finds out what her dad was looking for when he left and the end of the story was engaging, though -- right up until the end. I felt like the last chapter was totally unnecessary; it felt like an epilogue, and the chapter before it would have made a much more powerful ending. Overall, Laurel Everywhere was alright, but it is not a book I will likely read again, and it's not one I'd recommend to others. The narration does a lot of telling instead of showing, which doesn't leave the reader with anything to think about after they close the book and dampens the potential emotional power of some of Laurel's experiences. Likewise, all of the thematic elements are spoon-fed to the reader, to the point that the author seems to be shouting at the reader through the page.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Evelyn Jane Thorne

    Laurel Everywhere is narrated from the perspective on the main character Laurel. It follows Laurel’s journey as she navigates through her grief after the tragic loss of her mother and siblings. In the midst of her own grief, Laurel doesn’t think things can get any worse until her father starts to struggle with his mental health. Now Laurel must learn how to cope with her grief while discovering who she is in the wake of tragedy. I liked this book because I found the themes to be interesting and v Laurel Everywhere is narrated from the perspective on the main character Laurel. It follows Laurel’s journey as she navigates through her grief after the tragic loss of her mother and siblings. In the midst of her own grief, Laurel doesn’t think things can get any worse until her father starts to struggle with his mental health. Now Laurel must learn how to cope with her grief while discovering who she is in the wake of tragedy. I liked this book because I found the themes to be interesting and very relatable. At times I didn’t like some of the characters but I thought that were relatable. I’d recommend this book to teenagers because it would be suitable for that age group. I recieved an advanced copy for free, and this is my honest opinion.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Misty Blodgett

    I won this book on goodreads and was pleasantly surprised. I loved the characters and quickly became invested. The book dealt with the themes of loss, mental illness, family connections and grief in a compassionate and real manner while also making it interesting and I feel readable for middle and highschoolers who will identify with the characters. I also loved the underlying theme of sometimes we go looking for things that are right under our nose and when we get perspective it causes us to re I won this book on goodreads and was pleasantly surprised. I loved the characters and quickly became invested. The book dealt with the themes of loss, mental illness, family connections and grief in a compassionate and real manner while also making it interesting and I feel readable for middle and highschoolers who will identify with the characters. I also loved the underlying theme of sometimes we go looking for things that are right under our nose and when we get perspective it causes us to rethink our environment.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Merla Miller

    YA fiction - 15 year old Laurel loses her mother, sister and brother in a drunk driver accident. Laurel and her father were in a different car following the rest of the family. This story is how Laurel survives her grief and feelings of abandonment from her father who is suffering severe depression since the accident. Laurel leans on her best friends, one for which she has romantic feelings. This is a "one sit" book, being quite a fast read even though it is a heavy subject. The pace is steady, YA fiction - 15 year old Laurel loses her mother, sister and brother in a drunk driver accident. Laurel and her father were in a different car following the rest of the family. This story is how Laurel survives her grief and feelings of abandonment from her father who is suffering severe depression since the accident. Laurel leans on her best friends, one for which she has romantic feelings. This is a "one sit" book, being quite a fast read even though it is a heavy subject. The pace is steady, the protagonist endearing, the story thought provoking.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lep13729gmail.Com

    A coming of age book that shares the story of 15 year old Laurel who loses her mother, brother, and little sister in a car accident. How the father and daughter deal with their grief and the change in their family dynamics with the grandparents trying their best to help. I enjoyed the read and there were moments of wondering what would happen next. I recommend this book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Walleye23

    This was a free PDF for an honest review-2.5. I believe this was a YA novel. Sad story, sad characters. I liked the main character Laurel, she was forlorn, but she did it well. The story moved along quickly, it could have been quicker-lots of repetitiveness. Every once in a while it's good to read a sad story, it makes me more grateful for my wonderful life! This was a free PDF for an honest review-2.5. I believe this was a YA novel. Sad story, sad characters. I liked the main character Laurel, she was forlorn, but she did it well. The story moved along quickly, it could have been quicker-lots of repetitiveness. Every once in a while it's good to read a sad story, it makes me more grateful for my wonderful life!

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