web site hit counter Big Dirty Money: The Shocking Injustice and Unseen Cost of White Collar Crime - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Big Dirty Money: The Shocking Injustice and Unseen Cost of White Collar Crime

Availability: Ready to download

How ordinary Americans suffer when the rich and powerful break the law to get richer and more powerful--and how we can stop it. There is an elite crime spree happening in America, and the privileged perps are getting away with it. Selling loose cigarettes on a city sidewalk can lead to a choke-hold arrest, and death, if you are not among the top 1%. But if you're rich and c How ordinary Americans suffer when the rich and powerful break the law to get richer and more powerful--and how we can stop it. There is an elite crime spree happening in America, and the privileged perps are getting away with it. Selling loose cigarettes on a city sidewalk can lead to a choke-hold arrest, and death, if you are not among the top 1%. But if you're rich and commit mail, wire, or bank fraud, embezzle pension funds, lie in court, obstruct justice, bribe a public official, launder money, or cheat on your taxes, you're likely to get off scot-free (or even win an election). When caught and convicted, such as for bribing their kids' way into college, high-class criminals make brief stops in minimum security "Club Fed" camps. Operate the scam from the executive suite of a giant corporation, and you can prosper with impunity. Consider Wells Fargo & Co. Pressured by management, employees at the bank opened more than three million bank and credit card accounts without customer consent, and charged late fees and penalties to account holders. When CEO John Stumpf resigned in "shame," the board of directors granted him a $134 million golden parachute. This is not victimless crime. Big Dirty Money details the scandalously common and concrete ways that ordinary Americans suffer when the well-heeled use white collar crime to gain and sustain wealth, social status, and political influence. Profiteers caused the mortgage meltdown and the prescription opioid crisis, they've evaded taxes and deprived communities of public funds for education, public health, and infrastructure. Taub goes beyond the headlines (of which there is no shortage) to track how we got here (essentially a post-Enron failure of prosecutorial muscle, the growth of "too big to jail" syndrome, and a developing implicit immunity of the upper class) and pose solutions that can help catch and convict offenders.


Compare

How ordinary Americans suffer when the rich and powerful break the law to get richer and more powerful--and how we can stop it. There is an elite crime spree happening in America, and the privileged perps are getting away with it. Selling loose cigarettes on a city sidewalk can lead to a choke-hold arrest, and death, if you are not among the top 1%. But if you're rich and c How ordinary Americans suffer when the rich and powerful break the law to get richer and more powerful--and how we can stop it. There is an elite crime spree happening in America, and the privileged perps are getting away with it. Selling loose cigarettes on a city sidewalk can lead to a choke-hold arrest, and death, if you are not among the top 1%. But if you're rich and commit mail, wire, or bank fraud, embezzle pension funds, lie in court, obstruct justice, bribe a public official, launder money, or cheat on your taxes, you're likely to get off scot-free (or even win an election). When caught and convicted, such as for bribing their kids' way into college, high-class criminals make brief stops in minimum security "Club Fed" camps. Operate the scam from the executive suite of a giant corporation, and you can prosper with impunity. Consider Wells Fargo & Co. Pressured by management, employees at the bank opened more than three million bank and credit card accounts without customer consent, and charged late fees and penalties to account holders. When CEO John Stumpf resigned in "shame," the board of directors granted him a $134 million golden parachute. This is not victimless crime. Big Dirty Money details the scandalously common and concrete ways that ordinary Americans suffer when the well-heeled use white collar crime to gain and sustain wealth, social status, and political influence. Profiteers caused the mortgage meltdown and the prescription opioid crisis, they've evaded taxes and deprived communities of public funds for education, public health, and infrastructure. Taub goes beyond the headlines (of which there is no shortage) to track how we got here (essentially a post-Enron failure of prosecutorial muscle, the growth of "too big to jail" syndrome, and a developing implicit immunity of the upper class) and pose solutions that can help catch and convict offenders.

30 review for Big Dirty Money: The Shocking Injustice and Unseen Cost of White Collar Crime

  1. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Need another book for your post-November 2016 rage reading list? Looking for a companion to Sarah Kendzior's Hiding in Plain Sight? [https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...] Shopping for books to give to your neighbors and relatives who swear that everything's OK, and, gee, there's no reason to get upset about politics or the election or policing or law enforcement or wealth distribution (and concentration) or taxation or...? Scouring the bookstore shelves for heavily researched explanations fo Need another book for your post-November 2016 rage reading list? Looking for a companion to Sarah Kendzior's Hiding in Plain Sight? [https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...] Shopping for books to give to your neighbors and relatives who swear that everything's OK, and, gee, there's no reason to get upset about politics or the election or policing or law enforcement or wealth distribution (and concentration) or taxation or...? Scouring the bookstore shelves for heavily researched explanations for how, in the law few years, the word kleptocracy wormed its way into the common vernacular? Looking for more reasons to be angry that the rules don't apply to the wealthy, and, in the last few years, they seem more confident about what used to be more of a secret, and thus, it sure seems like there's more pigs at the trough behavior these days than there used to be? Finding yourself scratching your head and getting angry that your social media feed increasingly features coverage of poor people and black people going to jail for, say, asking for equal rights while CEO's and senior officials (in nice clothes, getting in/out of nice cars) at banks who got rich while crashing the economy and causing millions (yes, millions) of Americans to lose their homes ... or accelerated global warming ... or spawned the opioid crisis ... achieved staggering wealth, avoided jail time, and, more often than not, received multi-million dollar golden parachutes? Trying to understand how anyone believed that the recent tax cuts for the wealthy would pay for themselves (... oh, that's rich ... no, not sorry, that pun was absolutely intended) or how or why Congress thought the tax cuts were a good idea (not-a-secret: they didn't, and they didn't care, because they could get away with it, and it's what their rich donors wanted and, well, paid handsomely for)... In any event, if any of this stuff speaks to you, well, this book is for you. Sure, the author is a legal academic, but the book is entirely, easily accessible - and my sense is that it was written for the mass market. Wanna geek out? Read the voluminous end notes! Not interested in all that research? Well, fine: because the book reads like long-form journalism and commentary (and you can ignore the end notes). Heck, if you're sufficiently angry these days (like so many of us), you could easily plow through the book in one day of (at this point, unnecessary) coronavirus pandemic induced quarantine! Read it. Enjoy it. (That is, if you're into the whole rage reading thing.) And share it with a friend. Talk about it. That's the only way things are going to change. And, yes, they need to change. For a longer review (not mine), see: https://newrepublic.com/article/15936... Note: Thanks to the publisher for an electronic ARC. It's nice to be ahead of the curve, particularly since my pre-ordered hardback isn't due to arrive at my local independent bookstore until later this week.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Miguel

    There’s a simple statistic at the beginning of this book that “White Collar” crime costs victims between $300B to $800B per year, dwarfing all other street level crime. And yet Americans arm themselves to the teeth apparently to protect themselves for the latter, while not giving too much care for the former. In this book Taub outlines many instances of this type of crime mainly at the corporate level and outlines six key recommendations intended to combat this. The book itself is a bit like one There’s a simple statistic at the beginning of this book that “White Collar” crime costs victims between $300B to $800B per year, dwarfing all other street level crime. And yet Americans arm themselves to the teeth apparently to protect themselves for the latter, while not giving too much care for the former. In this book Taub outlines many instances of this type of crime mainly at the corporate level and outlines six key recommendations intended to combat this. The book itself is a bit like one that she references (Jesse Eisinger’s “The Chickenshit Club”) in documenting both many instances of corporate malfeasance and listing the many reasons that they are not being actively prosecuted. Like that book, it’s quite interesting but not necessarily what one would describe as a page turner. That’s a bit sad considering the negative effect this has on our lives. The recommendations given are admirable, but as Taub says the fact that these are viewed as victimless crimes will continue to hamper having these needed fixes becoming implemented.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Flowergarden24

    This was thankfully not very long and rather boring at times however, it very importantly displays the huge levels of corruption in government and business. There are many specific examples and some details which I wouldn't remember anyway so I hurried through them. Reading about the inequity of justice between the wealthy criminals and the regular people is exasperating. She has good suggestions on how to help clean things up. I think this is good to read to be informed about why some decision This was thankfully not very long and rather boring at times however, it very importantly displays the huge levels of corruption in government and business. There are many specific examples and some details which I wouldn't remember anyway so I hurried through them. Reading about the inequity of justice between the wealthy criminals and the regular people is exasperating. She has good suggestions on how to help clean things up. I think this is good to read to be informed about why some decisions are made at top levels and who makes them. This book should get people to pay attention, stay informed and write to politicians when red flags are up.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dylan

    Another great book to get mad at the system in which we live. Unlike groceries, this one is easily fixable and the only ones holding us back are the ones with the money. We live with rampant white collar crime that is not prosecuted, not fully investigated, and not even fully known in scope. The most shocking thing is this book is the estimated cost of white collar crime vs "street level" property crime. Astonishing and easily fixable with the proper education and funding. We can't keep letting Another great book to get mad at the system in which we live. Unlike groceries, this one is easily fixable and the only ones holding us back are the ones with the money. We live with rampant white collar crime that is not prosecuted, not fully investigated, and not even fully known in scope. The most shocking thing is this book is the estimated cost of white collar crime vs "street level" property crime. Astonishing and easily fixable with the proper education and funding. We can't keep letting them get away with it

  5. 4 out of 5

    Leanne Ellis

    This is the criminal justice angle that gets no attention! But why would it since it affects those at the top who just want to take more from the rest of us with impunity? Taub raises the point that no statistics are done on white collar crime, criminal convictions are not attempted because courts have made intent harder to prove, and definitions of corruption more strict. Why? The rich are held to a different standard than you or me - none.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Debra Robert

    White collar crime is costing us trillions of dollars. Reality strikes.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kristyn Snyder

    A wonderfully written book about greedy, disgusting people.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nathaniel

    Drag all of those white collar criminals through here. They should be prosecuted beyond the current extent of the law!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tadas Talaikis

    Success = to steal big.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    Anyone that reads a newspaper would already know all this . The author appears to have lifted headlines then raged against them Made it through 2 chapters and then got too bored to continue.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ronald Hampton

    Region fvbg by crunch fyi egg th th th fyi fyi you you fyi hi you hi hi hi hi hi hi boom hi h

  12. 5 out of 5

    Fran Caparrelli

    Clearly written with problem solving suggestions at the end.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    I was more outraged at the lawyers defending these scum than the scum themselves.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  15. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mr. Book

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rich

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dave

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer S

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jae

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  22. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  23. 4 out of 5

    David

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Colvin

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hunter

  27. 5 out of 5

    Quimby 📚📖🩰💐🦥🐘☕️📚📖

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jason Clarke

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Simon Velasquez

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.