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30 review for Train Happy: An Intuitive Exercise Plan for Every Body

  1. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Robbins

    I wanted to love this guide so much. I am big fan of Tally’s internet presence. The challenges to diet culture are great. I had a real wake up call in the section about fitness trackers, which made me laugh. I love the illustrations and photos including BIPOC models in bigger bodies. There’s also acknowledgement of a meaningful range of “activity” from walking to rugby to pole fitness which is nice to see. However, the plan hugely emphasises a “conventional” gym workout schedule. I was slightly t I wanted to love this guide so much. I am big fan of Tally’s internet presence. The challenges to diet culture are great. I had a real wake up call in the section about fitness trackers, which made me laugh. I love the illustrations and photos including BIPOC models in bigger bodies. There’s also acknowledgement of a meaningful range of “activity” from walking to rugby to pole fitness which is nice to see. However, the plan hugely emphasises a “conventional” gym workout schedule. I was slightly thrown to discover that a move (a walk out) which I know to be generally challenging for many people in bigger bodies or people with any joint, back-related, or balance-impacting mobility concerns is featured in the warm-up. (You do this before with every workout in her plan). The walkout is mentioned without guidance or any alternatives. Then, in the workout guides, there are inconsistent modifications and it makes the audience for Train Happy inconsistent. Many of us have been in fitness situations where we can’t do the warm-up and that puts us in a negative spin on the rest of the work. Given the volume of research Tally has done and her important work on Instagram’s fitness spaces and the book’s strap-line “an intuitive exercise plan for every body”, it seems a shame and genuinely sad that the actual exercise plans do not include a) one really basic workout for absolute beginners, which she has done on Instagram or b) a matrix of similar moves where you could swap out something that doesn’t work easily for you. A silly thing but the type is very small and pages are very densely packed. Some of the graphics and tips are brilliant but the background info is crowded out by being hard to read. Again, back on accessibility, this is really unfriendly for dyslexic readers. It makes me worry that the positive messages will just be ignored because you are overwhelmed and competitors’ books in the diet culture space are much more user-friendly.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    Well, I got this book today and already finished reading it! I found it to be an interesting, fresh, and helpful view of why exercise is a joyful not torturous experience. Though the information included is not groundbreaking, it’s presented in a logical, concise, and enjoyable format. The writer uses a conversational tone which is accessible and easy to get immersed in. It’s almost like reading an extended magazine article from “Self.” The writing style and layout is probably not for everyone ( Well, I got this book today and already finished reading it! I found it to be an interesting, fresh, and helpful view of why exercise is a joyful not torturous experience. Though the information included is not groundbreaking, it’s presented in a logical, concise, and enjoyable format. The writer uses a conversational tone which is accessible and easy to get immersed in. It’s almost like reading an extended magazine article from “Self.” The writing style and layout is probably not for everyone (is the font small or am I just getting old?) and the sprinkled emojis and “journal-type” activities were unnecessary. I liked the research that was cited, as well as excerpts from various experts in the health and wellness world. Also of note, this book is particularly aimed at women’s fitness, not that men can’t benefit from the information, but the author’s target audience is made pretty clear (if you couldn’t tell from the cover). Overall, after reading I was inspired to be easier on myself regarding food choices, and to incorporate more exercise into my life. I will say however, that the workouts included look pretty hard! I’m not sure I would start with those, but it’s helpful how they are laid out week by week and I assume they get progressively more difficult as you go. To wrap up, at its core, this book does a great job of teaching the reader to think more critically about diet and exercise culture, as well as encouraging the reader to try new ways of incorporating exercise into their life.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Dawkins

    I really enjoyed reading this book, it put my mind at ease. Although, obviously, I am not ready to start any training programmes yet. It inspired me to think about what activities I enjoy and what my goals were. IE, I love walks and walking challenges as well as yoga and competitive sports like badminton. 💪🏼 Rye’s book contains many helpful resources for the reader to explore the theories further and helpful quotes/ passages from experts in the field. This created a text that was very reassuring a I really enjoyed reading this book, it put my mind at ease. Although, obviously, I am not ready to start any training programmes yet. It inspired me to think about what activities I enjoy and what my goals were. IE, I love walks and walking challenges as well as yoga and competitive sports like badminton. 💪🏼 Rye’s book contains many helpful resources for the reader to explore the theories further and helpful quotes/ passages from experts in the field. This created a text that was very reassuring and trustworthy with theories that made a whole lot of sense. 💪🏼 I found the explanations of the different areas of exercise, their benefits and how they can be incorporated into your life very helpful. 💪🏼 But in particular I liked Rye’s messages surrounding Body neutrality, and her stance on Body Positivity is insightful and well researched. 💪🏼 All in all a great book for anyone who is feeling a bit confused and battered by the diet industry. I know once I feel rested and recovered from my pregnancy I can come back to this book and look further into the 10 week plan.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Marina

    A nice, encouraging book that asks you to embrace exercise for it's many positive benefits - NOT as a way of changing how you look. While I approved of the anti-diet, body positive sentiments, they did go on a bit long. I found the summary of the different types of exercise,and how they fit into a whole fitness plan, useful. However, I'm unlikely to follow the workout that forms a large part of the book, preferring other activities instead. A nice, encouraging book that asks you to embrace exercise for it's many positive benefits - NOT as a way of changing how you look. While I approved of the anti-diet, body positive sentiments, they did go on a bit long. I found the summary of the different types of exercise,and how they fit into a whole fitness plan, useful. However, I'm unlikely to follow the workout that forms a large part of the book, preferring other activities instead.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Shelly Spooner

    Tally brings such a refreshing view to exercise and that it isn't all about the weight loss or inch loss. This finally shows that bigger people can also be fit and that the diet industry has a lot to be accountable for. I cannot wait to try the workout plan and hopefully see my strength improve! Tally brings such a refreshing view to exercise and that it isn't all about the weight loss or inch loss. This finally shows that bigger people can also be fit and that the diet industry has a lot to be accountable for. I cannot wait to try the workout plan and hopefully see my strength improve!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nat Vit

    I wanted to really like this book as it’s so beautifully presented. However I found it’s content is very basic, nothing groundbreaking. Feels like reading a long blog post full of personal views with some facts. Would recommend if you have -never- set a foot in a Gym or done -any- exercise at all

  7. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Really interesting insight into navigating health and fitness in a society locked into diet culture. It’s changed my mindset on exercise, and seems like a great book to come back to time and time again

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ally

    I liked this book a lot, particularly applying the intuitive eating principles to training, i.e. stop torturing yourself to lose weight and find exercise that you enjoy and makes you feel good. I loved that the workout plan showed non conventional bodies ... But it was still a workout plan that people with low mobility and low strength would probably struggle with beginning, and the book did not offer ways to modify the exercises.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Wards

    I bought this book when it came out at the start of the year and read the main bulk in a day. I didn't want to review it however until I had completed the ten week work out plan. I think the concept of the book is great and I love how it looks. I think for someone trying to find exercise joyful without punishment, the first section of the book will be extremely helpful in teaching them new skills and learning from Tally's own experience of diet culture. The section on intuitive eating is also exc I bought this book when it came out at the start of the year and read the main bulk in a day. I didn't want to review it however until I had completed the ten week work out plan. I think the concept of the book is great and I love how it looks. I think for someone trying to find exercise joyful without punishment, the first section of the book will be extremely helpful in teaching them new skills and learning from Tally's own experience of diet culture. The section on intuitive eating is also excellent if this is a new concept for you. Having expert guest writers is a smart addition. I think the book could have been better laid out to make it truly accessible however, esp as the tag line is a plan for every body. There is a lot of information and it can be difficult to process. It is the first time I've ever followed a structured fitness plan, and I was able to add to it in ways thanks to suggestion of challenges (I did virtual barre classes which I never would have been comfortable enough to do before), but the plan was so structured there were no tips for people in bodies that would struggle to do some of the moves. I have had a PT in the past so am confident in modifying moves or doing something else if I wasn't able to complete what the plan suggested. I was able to have a small home workout kit with a set of dumbbells and 2 KBs, but for folk who can't get to the gym or not afford to buy equipment it may be a barrier. I loved that the plans showed different bodies completing the circuits but because of the lack of modifications I wondered if all people with those body types would be able to successfully complete the 10 weeks? There are some definite pros to the book though and I hope if Tally does another or even a refresh of this, she can add to it to increase inclusivity. I feel stronger and am absolutely delighted I managed to complete the plan, and it's encouraged me to continue to work with my body, rather than against it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Clare Nightingale

    I liked this book a lot, mostly. Basically it's in three parts, the first section talks through the author Tally's own journey to finding a mindset that suited her after developing an unhealthy relationship with her body and exercise and pulls together lots of evidence and helpful signposting in how to avoid unhealthy diet culture and adopting a robust approach to body neutrality. As a PT and fitness influencer, she talks so well and is super inclusive in her approach, bringing in quotes and con I liked this book a lot, mostly. Basically it's in three parts, the first section talks through the author Tally's own journey to finding a mindset that suited her after developing an unhealthy relationship with her body and exercise and pulls together lots of evidence and helpful signposting in how to avoid unhealthy diet culture and adopting a robust approach to body neutrality. As a PT and fitness influencer, she talks so well and is super inclusive in her approach, bringing in quotes and contributions from a range of health, fitness and mental health experts. The second section is the thinking and theory around finding exercise that makes you feel good and keeps you healthy without veering into addictive or disordered behaviour. The third section is an exercise plan which is modelled in photographs by a representative and diverse range of models, it has old fashioned posed series of photos which are supplemented by some rather simple YouTube videos. The exercise plan is not needed but I was excited to try the routines - annoyingly the book and the videos don't offer alternatives, that you can work up from and found it off-putting and less inclusive than I expected, when even in the warm up there was an exercise I found too difficult to do. The idea of the plan is week by week you can build up to routines that push you harder but I found my excitement waned when a sprinkled throughout there are things that my body cannot currently do, without suggestions of things to do instead. I will use the plan as inspiration when pulling together my own plans, but this section fell down for me. However the first two thirds are so good, I have recommended it to my swim coach to gen-up on great ways to think about inclusivity in his work and how to support the people he trains who like me, have a patchy relationship with fitness training.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sinead

    Most of this book is fantastic and is a refreshing change from the clean eating/HIIT workout books that make up most of the fitness genre at the moment. My only issue with the book is with the workouts given. There is no modifications offered so if you are very unfit or morbidly obese you may struggle. I certainly did. Which led to frustration which is the opposite feeling the book is trying to promote. I think the workouts assume some level of activity/fitness and don’t account for people that Most of this book is fantastic and is a refreshing change from the clean eating/HIIT workout books that make up most of the fitness genre at the moment. My only issue with the book is with the workouts given. There is no modifications offered so if you are very unfit or morbidly obese you may struggle. I certainly did. Which led to frustration which is the opposite feeling the book is trying to promote. I think the workouts assume some level of activity/fitness and don’t account for people that never enjoyed fitness in their life. But don’t let that stop you from getting the book. Overall it’s great and finally gives representation in fitness to women other than skinny white women, you just have to figure out modifications for yourself.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Bouchard

    3.5 - The first two parts of the book were great, talking about the pervasiveness of diet & weight loss culture and how exercise can be reframed as enjoyable rather than punishing. It was well researched and I liked the emphasis on body neutrality. But the last part was perplexing because after 200+ pages of talking about the lack of inclusivity and pressure in exercise culture, it offers a pretty standard 10 week workout plan that I think would be quite intimidating to anyone who’s felt left ou 3.5 - The first two parts of the book were great, talking about the pervasiveness of diet & weight loss culture and how exercise can be reframed as enjoyable rather than punishing. It was well researched and I liked the emphasis on body neutrality. But the last part was perplexing because after 200+ pages of talking about the lack of inclusivity and pressure in exercise culture, it offers a pretty standard 10 week workout plan that I think would be quite intimidating to anyone who’s felt left out of what exercise “should” be and “should” look like. Yes, there are diverse models demonstrating the techniques, but it almost negated the rest of the book!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Faith

    As someone who has been into fitness and working out since I was a child (for all the wrong reasons), this book is a life saving breath of fresh air. I think the sections are perfectly composed and organized to really dive into all you need to know in order to change your mindset around movement and fitness. The book is well written, expertly researched, and thoroughly emphasizes the whys and how’s of tuning into your body. I don’t know if I’ll ever use the workout guide because that’s not my vi As someone who has been into fitness and working out since I was a child (for all the wrong reasons), this book is a life saving breath of fresh air. I think the sections are perfectly composed and organized to really dive into all you need to know in order to change your mindset around movement and fitness. The book is well written, expertly researched, and thoroughly emphasizes the whys and how’s of tuning into your body. I don’t know if I’ll ever use the workout guide because that’s not my vibe right now, but that’s not really the point of the book anyways.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Pam Cummins

    I loved this book. Reading about Intuitive eating and exercise was a real eye opener and something I think everyone could do with taking on board, both in how we view ourselves and other people. Eating when we are hungry and working out because it makes us feel good, not because it helps us lose weight or gain that elusive “perfect” body shape which is defined by the weight loss and fitness industry who make millions from our insecurities. Thank you Tally for providing this much needed viewpoint I loved this book. Reading about Intuitive eating and exercise was a real eye opener and something I think everyone could do with taking on board, both in how we view ourselves and other people. Eating when we are hungry and working out because it makes us feel good, not because it helps us lose weight or gain that elusive “perfect” body shape which is defined by the weight loss and fitness industry who make millions from our insecurities. Thank you Tally for providing this much needed viewpoint.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mrs Claire Milne

    I got this book not so much for myself, as I have never been into diet culture and exercising for punishment, but to find out how I can put across a positive body image and mindset for my 13 year old daughter. She is very clued up but I am aware there is a bit of body shaming culture and want to find the alternative ago this. Tally Eye's book certainly does that. Her ethos and tips are fantastic and l love her pictures and use of real sized woman. I got this book not so much for myself, as I have never been into diet culture and exercising for punishment, but to find out how I can put across a positive body image and mindset for my 13 year old daughter. She is very clued up but I am aware there is a bit of body shaming culture and want to find the alternative ago this. Tally Eye's book certainly does that. Her ethos and tips are fantastic and l love her pictures and use of real sized woman.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Interesting perspective, I am undecided about the framework behind intuitive eating. .Enjoyed that the included workouts had a diverse group of sizes and ethnicities

  17. 4 out of 5

    pokupine

    Skimmed through the book. Might be useful for those struggling with having a healthy relationship with their bodies or newly interested in health and fitness. Otherwise, information may be too basic.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stacey Warner

    One of the best books you can read if you're pro movement and anti diet culture One of the best books you can read if you're pro movement and anti diet culture

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rhiannon Wenzel

    I liked this book! It was actually only 85 pages long and then there is a 10-week exercise regimen in the back which I’m looking forward to doing!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shelby Lentz

    I picked up this book after reading The F*ck It Diet. I think it has some great research cited and the illustrations are beautiful. I also appreciate the body diversity represented! I wasn’t necessarily looking for a new workout plan, just wanted some ideas and some inspiration from someone in the fitness industry. However, the workouts were not something I could even see myself doing if I was looking for a new way to move. The lack of modifiers is really disappointing, despite a lot of online w I picked up this book after reading The F*ck It Diet. I think it has some great research cited and the illustrations are beautiful. I also appreciate the body diversity represented! I wasn’t necessarily looking for a new workout plan, just wanted some ideas and some inspiration from someone in the fitness industry. However, the workouts were not something I could even see myself doing if I was looking for a new way to move. The lack of modifiers is really disappointing, despite a lot of online workouts offering them these days. It does not take into consideration people’s limitations. Overall, good read for the social commentary but lacking in the actual workout section.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lina Birškytė/sonciuke

    I joined the gym a year ago and I really like it. I didn't need a motivation. But this book made me realize that my motivation was wrong all the way from the beginning. I didn't realize how fitter, stronger and healthier I am since joining the gym. Because I was concentrated on my weight loss, body image and clothing size. And none of it changed since joining the gym. After reading a book I realized that I should change the reason of why I'm doing this. And now I'm enjoying my gym sessions even I joined the gym a year ago and I really like it. I didn't need a motivation. But this book made me realize that my motivation was wrong all the way from the beginning. I didn't realize how fitter, stronger and healthier I am since joining the gym. Because I was concentrated on my weight loss, body image and clothing size. And none of it changed since joining the gym. After reading a book I realized that I should change the reason of why I'm doing this. And now I'm enjoying my gym sessions even more. Because I'm focusing on having fun, and getting fitter for myself and my family. And if I'm going to loose weight at some point then it's just a nice bonus. What I really loved about this book that it doesn't have pictures of skinny and fit women like most of workout books and magazines does. It has pictures of women in all sizes and shapes. Thank you @tallyrye for changing my view. . Užsirašiau į sporto klubą prieš metus laiko ir man tikrai patinka. Motyvacijos man tikrai nereikėjo. Bet šita knyga padėjo suvokti kad mano motyvacija buvo bloga nuo pat pradžių. Aš nesupratau kad tapau tvirtesnė, stipresnė, sveikesnė per tuos metus, nes koncentravausi į tai kaip numesti svorį, pakeisti išvaizdą ir rūbų dydį. Kas per metus laiko visiškai nepasikeitė. Perskaičiusi knygą supratau kad turiu pakeisti priežastis dėl ko aš tai darau. Ir dabar aš mėgaujuosi savo treniruotėmis dar labiau. Nes susikoncentruoju į tai kaip gerai praleisti laiką sporto salėje, ir būti tvirtesniai dėl savęs ir savo šeimos. Ir jei kuriuo nors metu numesiu svorio tai bus tik papildomas bonusas. Kas man tikrai patiko šioje knygoje kad joje nėra lieknų ir užsisportavusių merginų foto kaip daugumoje knygų ir žurnalų apie sportą. Čia yra foto įvairių dydžių ir formų moterų. Ačiū @tallyrye kad pakeitė mano požiūrį.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    I have to say I love the aesthetic of this book firstly, it makes me happy to look at. I struggled to read it - I can see what it's trying to do and for the most part yes - blah blah diet culture, intuitive eating, intuitive movement seems like an interesting framing. Definitely targeted at more beginner audience I think, I struggled to get through it. Pair this with Hanne Blank's The Unapologetic Fat Girl's Guide to Exercise and Other Incendiary Acts for a more radical + accessable rethinking of I have to say I love the aesthetic of this book firstly, it makes me happy to look at. I struggled to read it - I can see what it's trying to do and for the most part yes - blah blah diet culture, intuitive eating, intuitive movement seems like an interesting framing. Definitely targeted at more beginner audience I think, I struggled to get through it. Pair this with Hanne Blank's The Unapologetic Fat Girl's Guide to Exercise and Other Incendiary Acts for a more radical + accessable rethinking of adding movement to your life.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lo Morgan

    Loved this so much!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Hooke

  25. 4 out of 5

    Courts

  26. 4 out of 5

    K

  27. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lexi

  29. 4 out of 5

    Charlie

  30. 5 out of 5

    Claire Young

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