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In this gorgeously written and spellbinding historical novel based on Pride and Prejudice, the author of The Clergyman’s Wife combines the knowing eye of Jane Austen with the eroticism and Gothic intrigue of Sarah Waters to reimagine the life of the mysterious Anne de Bourgh. As a fussy baby, Anne de Bourgh’s doctor prescribed laudanum to quiet her, and now the young woman In this gorgeously written and spellbinding historical novel based on Pride and Prejudice, the author of The Clergyman’s Wife combines the knowing eye of Jane Austen with the eroticism and Gothic intrigue of Sarah Waters to reimagine the life of the mysterious Anne de Bourgh. As a fussy baby, Anne de Bourgh’s doctor prescribed laudanum to quiet her, and now the young woman must take the opium-heavy tincture every day. Growing up sheltered and confined, removed from sunshine and fresh air, the pale and overly slender Anne grew up with few companions except her cousins, including Fitzwilliam Darcy. Throughout their childhoods, it was understood that Darcy and Anne would marry and combine their vast estates of Pemberley and Rosings. But Darcy does not love Anne or want her. After her father dies unexpectedly, leaving her his vast fortune, Anne has a moment of clarity: what if her life of fragility and illness isn’t truly real? What if she could free herself from the medicine that clouds her sharp mind and leaves her body weak and lethargic? Might there be a better life without the medicine she has been told she cannot live without? In a frenzy of desperation, Anne discards her laudanum and flees to the London home of her cousin, Colonel John Fitzwilliam, who helps her through her painful recovery. Yet once she returns to health, new challenges await. Shy and utterly inexperienced, the wealthy heiress must forge a new identity for herself, learning to navigate a “season” in society and the complexities of love and passion. The once wan, passive Anne gives way to a braver woman with a keen edge—leading to a powerful reckoning with the domineering mother determined to control Anne’s fortune . . . and her life. An extraordinary tale of one woman’s liberation, The Heiress reveals both the darkness and light in Austen’s world, with wit, sensuality, and a deeply compassionate understanding of the human heart.


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In this gorgeously written and spellbinding historical novel based on Pride and Prejudice, the author of The Clergyman’s Wife combines the knowing eye of Jane Austen with the eroticism and Gothic intrigue of Sarah Waters to reimagine the life of the mysterious Anne de Bourgh. As a fussy baby, Anne de Bourgh’s doctor prescribed laudanum to quiet her, and now the young woman In this gorgeously written and spellbinding historical novel based on Pride and Prejudice, the author of The Clergyman’s Wife combines the knowing eye of Jane Austen with the eroticism and Gothic intrigue of Sarah Waters to reimagine the life of the mysterious Anne de Bourgh. As a fussy baby, Anne de Bourgh’s doctor prescribed laudanum to quiet her, and now the young woman must take the opium-heavy tincture every day. Growing up sheltered and confined, removed from sunshine and fresh air, the pale and overly slender Anne grew up with few companions except her cousins, including Fitzwilliam Darcy. Throughout their childhoods, it was understood that Darcy and Anne would marry and combine their vast estates of Pemberley and Rosings. But Darcy does not love Anne or want her. After her father dies unexpectedly, leaving her his vast fortune, Anne has a moment of clarity: what if her life of fragility and illness isn’t truly real? What if she could free herself from the medicine that clouds her sharp mind and leaves her body weak and lethargic? Might there be a better life without the medicine she has been told she cannot live without? In a frenzy of desperation, Anne discards her laudanum and flees to the London home of her cousin, Colonel John Fitzwilliam, who helps her through her painful recovery. Yet once she returns to health, new challenges await. Shy and utterly inexperienced, the wealthy heiress must forge a new identity for herself, learning to navigate a “season” in society and the complexities of love and passion. The once wan, passive Anne gives way to a braver woman with a keen edge—leading to a powerful reckoning with the domineering mother determined to control Anne’s fortune . . . and her life. An extraordinary tale of one woman’s liberation, The Heiress reveals both the darkness and light in Austen’s world, with wit, sensuality, and a deeply compassionate understanding of the human heart.

30 review for The Heiress: The Revelations of Anne de Bourgh

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lex Kent

    This was a nice book to start 2021 off with. I’m a big Austen fan so when I heard about this book I was really excited to read it. This is a bit of a spin-off but also a companion book to Pride and Prejudice. While I’m not the biggest historic fiction reader, I love this gothic style and I thought this book fit well into Austen’s world. This book is by HarperCollins, so it’s nice to start the year reading a mainstream book that had a sapphic romance. I love seeing that and I hope I will see a lo This was a nice book to start 2021 off with. I’m a big Austen fan so when I heard about this book I was really excited to read it. This is a bit of a spin-off but also a companion book to Pride and Prejudice. While I’m not the biggest historic fiction reader, I love this gothic style and I thought this book fit well into Austen’s world. This book is by HarperCollins, so it’s nice to start the year reading a mainstream book that had a sapphic romance. I love seeing that and I hope I will see a lot more of it in 2021. This book was an interesting mix of some darkness but also hope. This time period was rough on women so while it’s a little bit hard to read at times, it’s also so rewarding to read about women being strong and taking their agency back. This book also has very interesting family dynamics including a mother who is so sure she is right, that she is so horribly wrong. You can’t help but feel awful for the main character, especially when she is trapped in a drugged state, but this is a story of the journey of her growth and you want to follow Anne on that journey. This is a slower paced book. The beginning especially feels slow as Anne narrates in her own drugged out state. Anne’s drugged induced physical and mental slowness, ends up decelerating the pace of the book for us readers too. It’s interesting to be in a first person story like that and I was surprised that the pace didn’t bother me much. It does pick up as the book goes on, and those change helps you feel, as an observer, that you truly understand the changes that Anne is going through. I think it was pretty cleverly written in this way. This is a book to be patient with, but I found it to be rewarding. As I mentioned already, there is a WLW romance. Anne is a very sheltered woman so finding out that she was a lesbian could have been this huge deal for her. I liked that Greeley played this fact down. Anne loved who she loved, and wanted to love who she loved. It was nice to see Anne just be Anne and I liked the sweet romance in the story. This is a relationship of friends to lovers and both the friendship, and later when you could tell it was turning into something more, were enjoyable and sweet to read about. This is a book I would absolutely recommend to Pride and Prejudice fans. I thought this was a well done companion piece and I’m hopeful Austen fans will agree. It is a slower book that is more about the little things, but I was quite taken with it and enjoyed it from start to finish. An ARC was given to me for a honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ceecee

    Anne de Bourgh is the heiress in question, the daughter of Sir Lewis and Lady Catherine, she will inherit Rosings Park, Kent one of the finest estates in the south of England. She is cousin to Fitzwilliam Darcy and Anne’s indomitable and controlling mother has decreed they will marry! Anne has been hooked in laudanum since she a baby as she was ‘troublesome’. Anne tells her own story. This is an homage to Jane Austen via a minor Pride and Prejudice character and yes, it reads like an Austen in t Anne de Bourgh is the heiress in question, the daughter of Sir Lewis and Lady Catherine, she will inherit Rosings Park, Kent one of the finest estates in the south of England. She is cousin to Fitzwilliam Darcy and Anne’s indomitable and controlling mother has decreed they will marry! Anne has been hooked in laudanum since she a baby as she was ‘troublesome’. Anne tells her own story. This is an homage to Jane Austen via a minor Pride and Prejudice character and yes, it reads like an Austen in that it captures the spirit of the great author in dialogue, in language, in manners as it depicts etiquette, society and social mores. There the similarities end and I’m glad that it does as this is a work of originality not a duplicate. Austen most certainly wouldn’t have written about some of the topics included here such as the effects of coming off laudanum (not pretty) and ‘female issues’ (!) which wouldn’t have even been alluded to, never mind described! This is a love story but not the kind of love of Austen’s novels envisage and this is what makes it a refreshingly modern take. The characters are excellent though not all likeable. Lady Catherine is a bully and what she does to Anne is totally inexcusable. As Anne grows into her body and fills the spaces with spirit I like her more and more. Equally likeable is Eliza Amherst and John Darcy, Anne’s cousin who is a kind and understanding man. Eliza introduces Anne to the enlightening world of books and here we see the influence of Mary Wollstonecraft on Anne’s growing independence and strength of mind. Some of the descriptions of Anne’s addiction are fantastic in their hallucinatory effects but even under the dulling impact of the drug you detect mutiny. There are some superb analogies of Anne’s before and after laudanum state which have leanings towards animism and are very clever, vivid and colourful. Overall, this is an excellent book to lose yourself in. It’s well written with a good plot line and some moments of tension especially between Anne and Lady Catherine, you almost see those flying sparks. I love the emergence of Anne from the chrysalis of laudanum to the spirited independent butterfly who flits where she wills and does a lot of good in the process. Highly recommended. With thanks to NetGalley and Hodder and Stoughton for the much appreciated arc for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I’ve lowered this to a 3.4. I solidly liked it, but the stakes just weren’t high enough. I felt that once the main character was out from under the control of her oppressive mother, it almost took on the feel of a 1980s film montage. The characters were likable, the sentences clear and upbeat, the time period well-captured, and I appreciated the dilemma of an heiress wanting to share her life with a woman despite societal expectations. But her struggles felt minimal, her desires easily won. It m I’ve lowered this to a 3.4. I solidly liked it, but the stakes just weren’t high enough. I felt that once the main character was out from under the control of her oppressive mother, it almost took on the feel of a 1980s film montage. The characters were likable, the sentences clear and upbeat, the time period well-captured, and I appreciated the dilemma of an heiress wanting to share her life with a woman despite societal expectations. But her struggles felt minimal, her desires easily won. It might have been just what I needed, but the pleasure felt more of the moment, much like a good, but not outstanding meal. No need to read Pride and Prejudice before hand, this novel stands on its own.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Katie B

    The Heiress features the character, Anne de Bourgh, who appeared in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. It's been years since I read that book so I wasn't sure if I'd be able to follow along when reading this one. Thankfully, The Heiress can easily be read as a standalone novel although I do think the reading experience will be enhanced a bit if you know the basics of the Pride and Prejudice plot ahead of time. When Anne was a baby, her doctor prescribed her laudanum. She continued taking the drug The Heiress features the character, Anne de Bourgh, who appeared in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. It's been years since I read that book so I wasn't sure if I'd be able to follow along when reading this one. Thankfully, The Heiress can easily be read as a standalone novel although I do think the reading experience will be enhanced a bit if you know the basics of the Pride and Prejudice plot ahead of time. When Anne was a baby, her doctor prescribed her laudanum. She continued taking the drug as she grew up because she was so sickly and frail. It's understood that when she is of age, Anne will marry her cousin, Fitzwilliam Darcy. (yeah, it's the 1800s, we have to roll with the whole marrying cousin thing) And of course if you read P&P, you know who Darcy ends up with instead of Anne. After Anne's father dies, she questions if the medicine she has taken for years is truly helping or hurting her. Is she meant to be confined for the rest of her life or is there a better life out there if she's brave enough for making a drastic change? I like how addiction was a part of the storyline and as a reader you feel so frustrated for Anne and want to strangle the adults who thought giving a child opium every day was a good idea. Sounds crazy but it's really not that far fetched that most people would not have a good grasp on drug addiction back in the early 1800s. The time period of the addiction as well as a child trusting the adults to take care of her made it a unique and interesting plot. One of the other neat aspects of the plot is something that is set forth pretty late in the book. To me that falls into spoiler territory so I'm not going to get into any details about it in this review. It's just another thing that made this a good read. I think most readers will find this book to be a satisfying read regardless of whether or not you are a diehard Jane Austen fan. Thank you to William Morrow for providing me with an advance copy! All thoughts expressed are my honest opinion.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Unlike every other Jane Austen spinoff I've attempted, The Heiress neither explores the same themes nor attempts to mimic the writing of the inimitable Austen. It is so, so much the better for it. Molly Greeley chooses a character from Pride and Prejudice with exactly zero spoken lines - the sickly Anne de Bourgh, daughter of Lady Catherine - and uses her to tell a story of addiction, sexuality, and ultimately self-realization. Anne, in Greeley's version of things, is sickly not through constitu Unlike every other Jane Austen spinoff I've attempted, The Heiress neither explores the same themes nor attempts to mimic the writing of the inimitable Austen. It is so, so much the better for it. Molly Greeley chooses a character from Pride and Prejudice with exactly zero spoken lines - the sickly Anne de Bourgh, daughter of Lady Catherine - and uses her to tell a story of addiction, sexuality, and ultimately self-realization. Anne, in Greeley's version of things, is sickly not through constitution but through the daily drops of laudanum (opium in alcohol) she has received since she was an exceptionally fussy baby. At age 29, she has been as a sleepwalker in her own life, observing the world from a foggy distance at best, hallucinating or dreaming while deep under the influence. Much of the first half of the book reads like an extended period of hypnagogia, that transitional, hallucinatory state between sleep and wakefulness: At night, the house breathed, and it was this that made me realize I had been hearing and feeling Rosings Park for most of my life. I remembered, when I was a child, imagining that the walls of the house were moving in and out around me, just as my own rib cage expanded and subsided with each of my breaths. It had, I knew now, been breathing the whole time; I simply had not recognized its respiration for what it was. The death of her father and a long-lost letter from a special governess puncture Anne's sleepy passivity. Acting on her first impulse ever, she heads to London ostensibly to visit her cousin but really to shake off the many forces that have power over her - the laudanum, her mother, her own physical weakness, and the narrow options her society provides to women. Neither satire nor romance, this is a female coming-of-age in which the monsters to be slain are all very human. I wasn't expecting to like Anne as a character, but I did. I appreciated her attention to the natural world even while in a drug-induced stupor, the unflinching honesty with which she sees herself and her choices, and the gradual unfurling of her personality once freed from opium. Unlike most Austen heroines, Anne has the privilege of being independently wealthy, and it's a joy to see her take full advantage of that to craft a life for herself. I think even Elizabeth Bennet might see something to envy in that. Greeley writes unobtrusively but well in her chosen time period. Usually while reading an Austen-inspired book, I'm flinching the whole time at the stilted artifice of the prose. The Heiress doesn't sound like Austen, but it also doesn't sound jarringly anachronistic. The amount of research that went into this book is clear, although it delves deeply into subjects Austen would have considered verboten: drug withdrawal, constipation (apparently a side effect of opium), menstruation, desire between women. Nothing's graphic, but nothing's elided either. Would Jane Austen be spinning in her grave? Well, probably. (At least at the part where Anne fantasizes about touching Elizabeth Bennet's well-muscled calves. Just to say - she's not half of the F/F romance in here!) But I think it's a rather grand story on its own merits with just enough overlapping characters to attract eager Austenphiles who are open to a very different view of this period. I especially liked the ending, a graceful if slightly melancholy full circle sweep of a life well-lived. Disclaimer: I won this book in a GoodReads giveaway (the first I've ever won), but I don't think it affected my judgment.

  6. 4 out of 5

    DeAnn

    4.5 Pride and Prejudice stars For fans of “Pride and Prejudice” this one will be a big hit! Featuring a side character from that story, this book puts you perfectly in the setting with characters that you root for! Anne de Bourgh starts life as a very fussy baby and the local doctor prescribes laudanum to help. As you might imagine, it is very easy to get addicted to opium and it seems shocking today that this was frequently given for all sorts of ailments! Anne doesn’t thrive because of this add 4.5 Pride and Prejudice stars For fans of “Pride and Prejudice” this one will be a big hit! Featuring a side character from that story, this book puts you perfectly in the setting with characters that you root for! Anne de Bourgh starts life as a very fussy baby and the local doctor prescribes laudanum to help. As you might imagine, it is very easy to get addicted to opium and it seems shocking today that this was frequently given for all sorts of ailments! Anne doesn’t thrive because of this addiction and seems fated to always be a sickly person. Withdrawal and those symptoms weren’t completely understood either. Fate finally intervenes though, and it was amazing to see Anne emerge and take charge of her life, escaping to her cousin’s house. Her mother seemed to be a terribly controlling woman and I never quite warmed to her. I don’t understand British inheritance rules, but luckily Anne was able to inherit her family estate and that gave her freedom to become her own person rather than be forced to marry. This newly imagined version of the P&P story was such a fun read with a few sightings of the Darcys and other characters. This was my first read from this author but I see that she has another one that is a P&P retelling. Thank you to Book Club Girl/William Morrow/Custom House for the complimentary copy to read and review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Jenner

    Molly Greeley's second novel The Heiress shows her to be one of the best young writers working today--the sheer beauty of her prose has few rivals. In reimagining the character of Anne de Bourgh from Pride and Prejudice, Greeley takes us inside a troubled, resilient and poetic mind and gives us a heroine to both sympathize with and root for. With stunningly lyrical writing, Greely elevates Austen-inspired fiction--and psychological fiction in general--onto a whole new plane. Molly Greeley's second novel The Heiress shows her to be one of the best young writers working today--the sheer beauty of her prose has few rivals. In reimagining the character of Anne de Bourgh from Pride and Prejudice, Greeley takes us inside a troubled, resilient and poetic mind and gives us a heroine to both sympathize with and root for. With stunningly lyrical writing, Greely elevates Austen-inspired fiction--and psychological fiction in general--onto a whole new plane.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Louise Wilson

    As a fussy baby, Anne de Burghs doctor prescribed laudanum to quiet her, and now the young woman must take the opium - heavy tincture every day. Growing up sheltered and confined, removed from sunshine and fresh air, the pale and overly slender Anne grew up with few companions except for her cousins, including Fitzwilliam Darcy.It was understood that Anne and Darcy would mary and combine their vast estates of Pemberley and Rosings. But Darcy does not love or want Anne. This bookis based on Jane A As a fussy baby, Anne de Burghs doctor prescribed laudanum to quiet her, and now the young woman must take the opium - heavy tincture every day. Growing up sheltered and confined, removed from sunshine and fresh air, the pale and overly slender Anne grew up with few companions except for her cousins, including Fitzwilliam Darcy.It was understood that Anne and Darcy would mary and combine their vast estates of Pemberley and Rosings. But Darcy does not love or want Anne. This bookis based on Jane Austens character Jane de Burgh, dauther of the infamous Lady Catherine. The novel follows Anne theoughout her life. Anne had been prescribed laudanum as an infant to stop her cryin and she quockly becomes addicted to it. But when Anne was twenty eight, she escapes to her cousins house and overcomes her addiction. A minor character from the original book eventually takes charge of her own destiny. This is an enjoyable read. I would like to thank NetGalley, Hodder & Stoughton and the author Molly Greeley for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    MZ

    I’m a big fan of “Pride and Prejudice” and I have read it many times, so you can imagine my delight upon hearing about this spinoff. The life story of Anne De Bourgh. In “Pride and Prejudice” Anne De Bourgh only plays a minor role, she’s portrayed as a sickly, fragile wallflower and honestly, she’s not the most interesting person……I thought! This book gives an interesting twist to her persona, describing how she was drugged on laudanum for a large part of her life. I listened to the audiobook na I’m a big fan of “Pride and Prejudice” and I have read it many times, so you can imagine my delight upon hearing about this spinoff. The life story of Anne De Bourgh. In “Pride and Prejudice” Anne De Bourgh only plays a minor role, she’s portrayed as a sickly, fragile wallflower and honestly, she’s not the most interesting person……I thought! This book gives an interesting twist to her persona, describing how she was drugged on laudanum for a large part of her life. I listened to the audiobook narrated by Ell Potter with a lovely English accent that fits this book excellently. This book describes Anne’s life from birth to death. As a baby she cried a lot and was described laudanum, her medicine, to improve her sleep. Medical ignorance and a dominant mother (Lady Catherine De Bourgh), who is so certain that Anne needs her medicine, caused a doped-up state long into adulthood. The story is told in the first person from the POV of Anne and describes her often hazy state of mind. Not knowing any better and constantly being reminded by her mother that she truly is sickly, she believes this herself. Not only her physical health suffers, but also her mental health and ability, as her teaching is being held back as well. Until her governess instills doubts in her. When finally the time comes that she takes matters into her own hands and kicks her drug addiction, she finds that she has so much to learn about society and about herself. As may be expected for this time period, and the fact that Anne is drugged up, it was a bit dark at times and the pace is rather slow, but to me this suits a book linking to this time period. I enjoyed listening to her sometimes almost poetic thoughts and seeing how she takes notice of the small things in life. The moment she starts living was also a wonder to me, seeing her grow, take responsibility, standing up for herself, and discovering her romantic feelings towards women (one in particular). There is an f/f romance in here, which is part of her life story but not the focus of the book. It’s an important part though, as it shows her struggle to fit in with society (which was not forgiving for women) and it defines the rest of her life. And the moment where Anne finally stands up to Lady Catherine De Bourgh….oh boy, it felt good :-) In short, an excellent spinoff of a classic tale. If you like “Pride and Prejudice” or books from this time period and enjoy a sapphic twist, I definitely recommend this book!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nursebookie

    Pride and Prejudice fans you will devour this amazing story of the illusive Anne, the heiress of Rosings Park Kent, daughter of Sir Lewis and Lady Catherine de Bourgh, and cousin to Fitzwilliam Darcy whom she had been promised to marry since childhood. We all know what happened to that story, as Darcy ends up marrying Lizzy Bennet as he finds his HEA. This story is the life of Anne from inception to her demise, the laudanum trance that has been forced upon her as an infant to her young adult lif Pride and Prejudice fans you will devour this amazing story of the illusive Anne, the heiress of Rosings Park Kent, daughter of Sir Lewis and Lady Catherine de Bourgh, and cousin to Fitzwilliam Darcy whom she had been promised to marry since childhood. We all know what happened to that story, as Darcy ends up marrying Lizzy Bennet as he finds his HEA. This story is the life of Anne from inception to her demise, the laudanum trance that has been forced upon her as an infant to her young adult life, and her awakening as she spends a season in London and lives her life to the fullest without restraints. The writing was exquisite and carries the same tone as Austen would write it. I am so glad to see how an obscure character got her own story in this original historical fiction I loved. Overall the story was immersive, addictive and just so amazing - historical fiction fans and Austenites will find this story a true joy. I sure did and loved it!

  11. 4 out of 5

    MaryannC. Book Freak

    Based on the classic Pride & Prejudice by Jane Austen this novel centers on one of the lesser characters of P&P, Anne De Bourgh that gives a voice and depth to her character. Born heiress to Rosings Park, Anne was always considered a sickly child, dominated by her fiercely outspoken mother Catherine, she is regularly dosed with laudanum to keep from overtaxing her delicate nature never able to play with her cousins much less converse with them. As Anne begins to grow up she knows she will one day Based on the classic Pride & Prejudice by Jane Austen this novel centers on one of the lesser characters of P&P, Anne De Bourgh that gives a voice and depth to her character. Born heiress to Rosings Park, Anne was always considered a sickly child, dominated by her fiercely outspoken mother Catherine, she is regularly dosed with laudanum to keep from overtaxing her delicate nature never able to play with her cousins much less converse with them. As Anne begins to grow up she knows she will one day marry her cousin Mr. Darcy of Pemberly, as was arranged by her mother and aunt, thus uniting two rich families and their estates. Constantly forbidden to venture or voice her own desires Anne is living in a constant stupor of unconsciousness until one day when left alone by her mother decides to forgo the laudanum, disobey and travel to London to visit her cousin and his wife. Away from her mother Anne begins to experience the heightened desires of normal life, to laugh, to feel the air, to smell the flowers and even to experience her first love. This was a well written book exploring the depth and feeling of Anne and all her first experiences leading her to finally stand on her own and take her place in the world and against her mother. A fantastic backstory to a beloved classic.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Corrie

    An extraordinary tale of one woman’s liberation, The Heiress reveals both the darkness and light in Austen’s world, with wit, sensuality, and a deeply compassionate understanding of the human heart. This was a marvelous reimagining of Anne de Bourgh’s life. Fans of Jane Austen will undoubtedly know her from Pride and Prejudice. We follow her from the cradle to the grave. Author Molly Greeley chose to tell the story in four parts. Part one being at Rosings Park, Kent, where Anne spends her first 2 An extraordinary tale of one woman’s liberation, The Heiress reveals both the darkness and light in Austen’s world, with wit, sensuality, and a deeply compassionate understanding of the human heart. This was a marvelous reimagining of Anne de Bourgh’s life. Fans of Jane Austen will undoubtedly know her from Pride and Prejudice. We follow her from the cradle to the grave. Author Molly Greeley chose to tell the story in four parts. Part one being at Rosings Park, Kent, where Anne spends her first 29 years in a laudanum-induced stupor, courtesy of her domineering mother lady Catherine de Bourgh. This is the slowest part and we almost despair for poor addle-brained Anne as life is just passing her by. The pace picks up in part two when Anne decides (on a whim) to invite herself to her cousin’s London residence. Away from her mother’s smothering influence – and the laudanum – a whole new world opens up to Anne as she is slowly blossoming into health and the woman who was always lurking under the surface. I really loved Greeley’s style. It is captivating with a dark, Gothic undertone that switches to sensual giddiness when Anne meets Eliza Amherst. Very satisfying and a must read for Regency lovers and Jane Austen aficionados. I will listen to the audio book version (available on Scribd) very soon as well. f/f Themes: Kent, Rosings Park, laudanum addiction, an arranged marriage falling through, London, going cold turkey, the hovering Mr. Watters, stolen moments with Eliza, duty calls, the emancipation of Anne. 5 Stars

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alaina

    I have received this ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. The Heiress: The Revelations of Anne de Bourgh was an interesting retelling to dive into. My love for Pride and Prejudice will continue to grow no matter what because of my love of Elizabeth and Darcy. So to go into more details about Anne's own life, well I was dying to figure out what was wrong with her and what was going to happen as well. I loved absolutely everything about Anne. At first, I was a bit skeptical because o I have received this ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. The Heiress: The Revelations of Anne de Bourgh was an interesting retelling to dive into. My love for Pride and Prejudice will continue to grow no matter what because of my love of Elizabeth and Darcy. So to go into more details about Anne's own life, well I was dying to figure out what was wrong with her and what was going to happen as well. I loved absolutely everything about Anne. At first, I was a bit skeptical because of how "sick" she was. Mostly because it seemed like the medicine that her mother, maid, nurse, and doctor were all for was definitely hurting her more than helping. It also seemed rather odd that no one in her family would step up and say something. Eventually her cousin helped out but by then it kind of seemed lame. Anne was a strong and likable character. She definitely grew throughout the book and fell in love. Of course she had to deal with a broken heart or two along the way but once she knew what she wanted - she went for it whole heartedly. This book was completely delightful and I loved devouring each and every page. I will admit though that the ending was bittersweet for me.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Danika at The Lesbrary

    I'm not a big Pride and Prejudice fan, but for some reason, I'm drawn to P&P retellings--especially queer ones. The Heiress is a Pride and Prejudice novel: not exactly a retelling, a prequel, or a sequel, it fills in the story from one of the minor characters of the book: Anne de Bourgh. In case you forgot, Anne is Mr. Darcy’s original fiancee, and Catherine de Bourgh's sickly daughter. In the original book, Anne doesn’t leave a strong impression. This novel gives her centre stage, and makes her I'm not a big Pride and Prejudice fan, but for some reason, I'm drawn to P&P retellings--especially queer ones. The Heiress is a Pride and Prejudice novel: not exactly a retelling, a prequel, or a sequel, it fills in the story from one of the minor characters of the book: Anne de Bourgh. In case you forgot, Anne is Mr. Darcy’s original fiancee, and Catherine de Bourgh's sickly daughter. In the original book, Anne doesn’t leave a strong impression. This novel gives her centre stage, and makes her a compelling and empathetic character. This is exactly the kind of excruciating historical lesbian slow burn you love to see. As Anne tries to fit into London society, she becomes fast friends with a woman who is a little too loud and boisterous for Victorians, but Anne can't pull herself away from her. Eliza introduces her to novels and takes her shopping for fashionable clothing. Soon, they are spending almost all of their time together. This is a book that fits together with Pride and Prejudice, but could also completely stand on its own. Without the references, it would still be a fascinating look at a woman who lived most of her life in a haze and the struggles of coming out of it. The last half of this book is also a beautiful, absorbing F/F romance. It manages to be both a Victorian historical novel and feature a drug addict lesbian main character with no apparent clash between those ideas! I highly recommend this for fans of historical fiction, whether or not you are a Pride and Prejudice fan. Full review at the Lesbrary.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Laurel

    Greeley's back story and continuation of the life of Anne de Bourgh, a minor character in Austen's Pride and Prejudice, is a compelling and compulsive read. I was transfixed by the tale and totally captivated by the struggles of this heroine who deserved so much more than to be remembered as Mr. Darcy's sickly marital cast-off. Austen fans will be delighted with Greeley's deft hand at creating Austenesque characters, an atmospheric Regency world, and the plotting of a story that is both believab Greeley's back story and continuation of the life of Anne de Bourgh, a minor character in Austen's Pride and Prejudice, is a compelling and compulsive read. I was transfixed by the tale and totally captivated by the struggles of this heroine who deserved so much more than to be remembered as Mr. Darcy's sickly marital cast-off. Austen fans will be delighted with Greeley's deft hand at creating Austenesque characters, an atmospheric Regency world, and the plotting of a story that is both believable and riveting.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Straddling the line between slumber and a sheltered existence, Anne de Bourgh's fragile world is shattering. To quiet her mother and the doctor's nerves, Anne is prescribed laudanum as a baby to stop her screaming. The amber droplets silence her temper but drift her into a coma-like condition. When awake, she's portrayed as a porcelain doll and shelved from life's lessons. Living in a perfumed permeance, a gutsy governess challenges Anne to look beyond her gilded cage and embrace her future. Rea Straddling the line between slumber and a sheltered existence, Anne de Bourgh's fragile world is shattering. To quiet her mother and the doctor's nerves, Anne is prescribed laudanum as a baby to stop her screaming. The amber droplets silence her temper but drift her into a coma-like condition. When awake, she's portrayed as a porcelain doll and shelved from life's lessons. Living in a perfumed permeance, a gutsy governess challenges Anne to look beyond her gilded cage and embrace her future. Readers will delight in Anne's Austin-inspired chrysalis and Chopin's Awakening. Thank you to #NetGally and the publisher for the early read in exchange for an honest review. From Kent to bustling London, Molly Greeley's #TheHeiress inspires readers to travel outside their comfort zones and beyond the pandemic's walls. While taking precautions, we need to keep living to avoid becoming shadows of our former selves. Publishing at a time when we're trapped by our fears and facing an uncertain future, Greeley's novel harnesses the power to achieve our dreams.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Finola Austin

    Haunting. In The Heiress, Molly Greeley shines a light on the darkness cloaking Anne de Bourgh, Lady Catherine's sickly daughter and Mr. Darcy's intended. The result is a novel with all the hallmarks of nineteenth-century Gothic, which doesn't shy away from "modern" ills, such as the opiate crisis, Munchausen syndrome by proxy, and homophobia. Highly recommended. Haunting. In The Heiress, Molly Greeley shines a light on the darkness cloaking Anne de Bourgh, Lady Catherine's sickly daughter and Mr. Darcy's intended. The result is a novel with all the hallmarks of nineteenth-century Gothic, which doesn't shy away from "modern" ills, such as the opiate crisis, Munchausen syndrome by proxy, and homophobia. Highly recommended.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kris - My Novelesque Life

    RATING: 4 STARS Oh my. Soooo, I thought I had this book to review for Edelweiss so I put the audio on hold. I guess I assumed that I would have requested this due to the pretty cover. No regrets though. The Heiress is about Anne de Bourgh from Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. You probably remember her mother, and Darcy's aunt, Catherine de Bourgh better. Anne does not have any "lines" in the novel, and Molly Greely gives us one fascinating theory on why she doesn't. Anne is not so much as sickl RATING: 4 STARS Oh my. Soooo, I thought I had this book to review for Edelweiss so I put the audio on hold. I guess I assumed that I would have requested this due to the pretty cover. No regrets though. The Heiress is about Anne de Bourgh from Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. You probably remember her mother, and Darcy's aunt, Catherine de Bourgh better. Anne does not have any "lines" in the novel, and Molly Greely gives us one fascinating theory on why she doesn't. Anne is not so much as sickly as she is addicted and controlled. Greeley really gives Anne her own voice and a story that is worthy of Jane Austen. I will warn you that Greely does not try to copy Austen's style, or make this a sequel. Rather Greeley, takes her own style and voice and helps Anne become a character in her own right. It's almost like seeing the back stage of a play. I am a fan of Jane Austen but Pride and Prejudice is not my favourite, so I am not sure how P&P fans feel about this story.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Louise Wilson

    As a fussy baby, Anne de Burghs doctor prescribed laudanum to quiet her, and now the young woman must take the opium - heavy tincture every day. Growing up sheltered and confined, removed fron sunshine and frrsh air, the pale slender Anne grew up with few companions except her cousins, including Fitwilliam Darcy. It was understood that Anne and Darcy and combine their vast estates of Pemberley and Rosings. But Darcydoes not love or want Anne. The book is based on Jane Austens character Anne de Bu As a fussy baby, Anne de Burghs doctor prescribed laudanum to quiet her, and now the young woman must take the opium - heavy tincture every day. Growing up sheltered and confined, removed fron sunshine and frrsh air, the pale slender Anne grew up with few companions except her cousins, including Fitwilliam Darcy. It was understood that Anne and Darcy and combine their vast estates of Pemberley and Rosings. But Darcydoes not love or want Anne. The book is based on Jane Austens character Anne de Burgh, daughter of the infamous lady Catherine. The novel follows Anne through her life. Anne had been described laudanum as an infant to stop her crying and she quickly becomes addicted to it. But when Anne was twenty eight, she escapes to her cousins house and overcomes her addiction. A minor character from the original book eventually take charge of her own destiny. This is an enjoyable read. I would like to thank NetGalley, Hodder & Stoughton for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  20. 5 out of 5

    ABookwormWithWine

    Is it failing at life if I still haven't read a Jane Austen novel? If you read The Heiress: The Revelations of Anne de Bourgh by Molly Greeley and you haven't read Pride and Prejudice yet you are probably going to miss out on some things. I have not read that book yet, and I think if I had I would have been able to appreciate this one more. However, by itself, The Heiress is still a lush and sometimes difficult read. Anne de Bourgh has got to be one of my favorite characters now, and I love the Is it failing at life if I still haven't read a Jane Austen novel? If you read The Heiress: The Revelations of Anne de Bourgh by Molly Greeley and you haven't read Pride and Prejudice yet you are probably going to miss out on some things. I have not read that book yet, and I think if I had I would have been able to appreciate this one more. However, by itself, The Heiress is still a lush and sometimes difficult read. Anne de Bourgh has got to be one of my favorite characters now, and I love the story Greeley created for her. I listened to the audiobook and really loved Ell Potter's narration. She made the prefect Anne, and really made me feel like I was a part of the story. There is nothing confusing about this novel, so I highly recommend doing audio if you like audiobooks. The Heiress is on the slow side and I did feel my attention lagging at times, but I think this is more of a "it's not you, it's me" situation. This was also a very serious read, and not a laugh-out-loud kind of story. I think the author must have spent considerable time researching and it was a very well-thought-out plot and story. I love historical fiction and was still able to enjoy this book without reading Pride and Prejudice. Greeley is clearly a gifted storyteller and I will be looking forward to reading more from her! Thank you to the publisher for providing me with an advance review copy of this book, all opinions and thoughts are my own.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mallory

    I wasn’t sure how to feel about a spin off of a great classic of literature but I liked this. I enjoyed that the author gave voice to a character who wasn’t given her own in the story she was a part of. That being said a lot of this book was hard to read as it was difficult to sit so long with such grossly abusive behavior, even if those doing it had no idea. Anne is a sickly baby prone to screaming and nothing can soothe her tears until her doctor prescribes laudanum. As dangerous as that would I wasn’t sure how to feel about a spin off of a great classic of literature but I liked this. I enjoyed that the author gave voice to a character who wasn’t given her own in the story she was a part of. That being said a lot of this book was hard to read as it was difficult to sit so long with such grossly abusive behavior, even if those doing it had no idea. Anne is a sickly baby prone to screaming and nothing can soothe her tears until her doctor prescribes laudanum. As dangerous as that would be in itself it doesn’t stop with a dose or two but becomes a necessary “medicine” that Anne takes daily sinking into the easy stupefied dream of being drugged. I wished she had gotten there faster but the story was told realistically, I just wanted her to find her life. The writing was excellent and I would definitely read more by this author.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Wether you are a fan of Jane Austen / Pride and Prejudice or not, you should give a chance on this beautiful F/F historical romance starring Anne de Bourgh, as she grows up being fed with Laudanum, orders of the doctor... Except this "cure" does a lot more harm than good to Anne who could have had a different beginning if she had been born in a time were medicine was more evolved. Unfortunately, she will become dependent to that drink and Anne will have to figure out on her own that what her fam Wether you are a fan of Jane Austen / Pride and Prejudice or not, you should give a chance on this beautiful F/F historical romance starring Anne de Bourgh, as she grows up being fed with Laudanum, orders of the doctor... Except this "cure" does a lot more harm than good to Anne who could have had a different beginning if she had been born in a time were medicine was more evolved. Unfortunately, she will become dependent to that drink and Anne will have to figure out on her own that what her family doesn't necessarily knows what is best for her. She will also learn that she has no desire for men but only for women. Her first crush was on her Governess and later on, the love of her life. This was a slow-paced book and I loved it so much. I smiled, cried and had a wonderful time listening to their story. Now, let me go grab myself a physical copy. I hope Molly Greeley has another f/f story in mind because I would love to read it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Diana Green

    I love it when a book I've eagerly anticipated turns out to be just as good as I hoped. That is certainly the case with The Heiress. About a year ago, I read Molly Greeley's first novel, The Clergyman's Wife, (which was also a Pride and Prejudice spin-off) and it became my favorite book in the genre. Now that place has been taken by The Heiress, because it not only showcases Greeley's beautiful, intelligent writing but also includes a lovely wlw relationship. I also enjoyed witnessing the protag I love it when a book I've eagerly anticipated turns out to be just as good as I hoped. That is certainly the case with The Heiress. About a year ago, I read Molly Greeley's first novel, The Clergyman's Wife, (which was also a Pride and Prejudice spin-off) and it became my favorite book in the genre. Now that place has been taken by The Heiress, because it not only showcases Greeley's beautiful, intelligent writing but also includes a lovely wlw relationship. I also enjoyed witnessing the protagonist take charge of her life. The progression felt both authentic and highly satisfying. The first third of the novel is slow, (as other reviewers have mentioned), but it paints a vivid picture of Anne's life before she manages to stop taking laudanum. The rest of the book wouldn't be nearly so successful, if the reader didn't first understand what Anne has been through. If you enjoy believable, nuanced historical fiction, (and don't need a bunch of whiz-bang action), then I highly recommend The Heiress. Even more so if you appreciate a heartwarming wlw relationship and stories of women coming into their own.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Anna Luce

    DNF 30% Once again I feel somewhat mislead by the comparisons to Sarah Waters (who happens to be a favourite author of mine). So far this P&P retelling, which focuses on Anne de Bourgh is dull indeed. By the 20% mark Anne has just turned 17 and she's twenty around the 30%. This means that so far we just get to read of her as a 'sickly' child. She overhears adults speak of her often in a dismissive manner, as they note how fragile and feeble she is. Her 'wicked' mother says time and again 'time fo DNF 30% Once again I feel somewhat mislead by the comparisons to Sarah Waters (who happens to be a favourite author of mine). So far this P&P retelling, which focuses on Anne de Bourgh is dull indeed. By the 20% mark Anne has just turned 17 and she's twenty around the 30%. This means that so far we just get to read of her as a 'sickly' child. She overhears adults speak of her often in a dismissive manner, as they note how fragile and feeble she is. Her 'wicked' mother says time and again 'time for your medicine' which happens to be laudanum. Most readers will have realised why Anne is not getting better. She has a governess, a potentially interesting character, who sadly turns out to be just as uninspiring as Anne. I guess I have a low threshold when it comes to reading about wealthy yet sickly children affected by 'mysterious' maladies. I'm sure many others will find this to be far more compelling that I did (I recognise that the writing was far from bad) but the narrative, characters, and story failed to capture this reader's attention.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Susan's Reviews

    Really well written. Anne is a drug addict, but not by choice. Her mother, Lady Catherine de Bourgh, imposes her will and her opinion on everyone. Everything must be just as she wills it. To keep her daughter Anne docile and compliant, Anne is given doses of laudanum to "calm her down." Anne's struggles to wean herself off of this powerful opiate reveals that she can be just as strong-willed as her overbearing mother. Anne slowly takes back her life, learning to fight the cowardly impulse to crin Really well written. Anne is a drug addict, but not by choice. Her mother, Lady Catherine de Bourgh, imposes her will and her opinion on everyone. Everything must be just as she wills it. To keep her daughter Anne docile and compliant, Anne is given doses of laudanum to "calm her down." Anne's struggles to wean herself off of this powerful opiate reveals that she can be just as strong-willed as her overbearing mother. Anne slowly takes back her life, learning to fight the cowardly impulse to cringe away from strife and her mother's strident disapproval. A very glum topic, indeed, but Anne is rewarded by a friendship with the unconventional Eliza that inevitably becomes something stronger than friendship. Eliza opens Anne's eyes to the possibilities of love and life outside of the traditional boundaries. This portion of the novel was by turns heartbreaking and heartwarming. The final chapter in this novel was riveting. (No spoilers here!) I am actually not a great fan of "Austen World" spin offs. When I do feel the urge to revisit favourite Austen fictional characters, I like to imagine my own happy story lines for their possible futures. For the most part, I am content to leave them to their own devices. I love to try new things and Idon't limit my horizon by choosing only this or that genre or author to devote myself to. Austen is my childhood hero, but we have so much to learn from all the really wonderful writers out there. Austen herself was a prolific reader. I like to think I'm following in her footsteps when I take a chance on NetGalley and request a book by a debut author in a genre I don't usually read. We are all creatures of habit, but I like to shake things up a bit! Keeps you young at heart! But I digress: this spin-off of Pride and Prejudice is dark (definitely nothing light and frothy here!) So, if abusive, controlling relationships, mental health issues and drug addiction are triggers for you, then this is not the book for you. For everyone else, this is a very thought provoking offshoot involving a minor character of the P & P novel. Very well written!

  26. 4 out of 5

    R.J. Sorrento

    I am a huge Jane Austen fan. I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve read Pride & Prejudice so I love to seek out Pride & Prejudice-inspired books. Usually they focus on Lizzie and Darcy (which is fine) but I was pleasantly surprised by this beautiful and haunting take on Anne de Bourgh. Anne had my sympathy from the start, with the early scenes reminiscent of the Secret Garden with the ill cousin. The book does not shy away from the misuse of laudanum by doctors of that era and how it adversely I am a huge Jane Austen fan. I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve read Pride & Prejudice so I love to seek out Pride & Prejudice-inspired books. Usually they focus on Lizzie and Darcy (which is fine) but I was pleasantly surprised by this beautiful and haunting take on Anne de Bourgh. Anne had my sympathy from the start, with the early scenes reminiscent of the Secret Garden with the ill cousin. The book does not shy away from the misuse of laudanum by doctors of that era and how it adversely affected Anne as a baby and negatively impacted her childhood. I loved the LGBTQ perspective of the story as well. Anne doesn’t have a name for how she feels but I loved witnessing her queer awakening. The WLW romance in this book is elegant and emotional all at once. By the end, I had bittersweet (but mostly happy) tears in my eyes. I highly recommend this book to all the Jane Austen devotees, anyone who cheers for the underdog, and readers who always root for the less appreciated side characters. Thank you to NetGalley and William Morrow for the eARC.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Peggy

    Review to follow.

  28. 4 out of 5

    River

    Finally! Anne de Bourgh portrayed as the lesbian she was always meant to be. If you've been looking for another queer Pride & Prejudice retelling, this might be for you. Focusing on the minor side character Anne de Bourgh, The Heiress follows Anne through her opium addiction in childhood and spans into her late twenties/early thirties as she truly experiences life for the first time. At times, this was a frustrating read- as it was intended to be! Anne's drugged complancency, her mother's strang Finally! Anne de Bourgh portrayed as the lesbian she was always meant to be. If you've been looking for another queer Pride & Prejudice retelling, this might be for you. Focusing on the minor side character Anne de Bourgh, The Heiress follows Anne through her opium addiction in childhood and spans into her late twenties/early thirties as she truly experiences life for the first time. At times, this was a frustrating read- as it was intended to be! Anne's drugged complancency, her mother's stranglehold on her daughter's life, and the sexism and homophobia of the time acted as barriers for Anne despite her immense wealth. Some characters were well fleshed out, including Anne and Catherine de Bourgh and John. With how restrained yet emotional Anne's onesided feelings for her governess/companion were, I was suprised at how underdeveloped the love interest introduced in the second half of the story felt. I suspose that as this a continuation of Pride and Prejudice, I'd hoped for something that contained more tension. Similarly, the tension in the story seemed to drop out at key moments that could have used a little more weight. I would not describe this book as a romance, but I would definitely recommend it for those that enjoy historical fiction. 3.5/5 stars

  29. 5 out of 5

    Carole (in Canada)

    "I was forever waiting, without knowing quite what it was I was waiting for." (quote from the book) In 'The Heiress', Ms Greeley takes us on an intense sensory journey of Miss Anne de Bourgh's life. Having been prescribed 'a tincture of laudanum' since infancy, you experience the languor, the lethargic weightiness the drug induces, and the poignancy of her childhood. Her life is sustained by the fairy tales her nurse tells her...offering visuals in her mind, hazed by her medication, as the drug t "I was forever waiting, without knowing quite what it was I was waiting for." (quote from the book) In 'The Heiress', Ms Greeley takes us on an intense sensory journey of Miss Anne de Bourgh's life. Having been prescribed 'a tincture of laudanum' since infancy, you experience the languor, the lethargic weightiness the drug induces, and the poignancy of her childhood. Her life is sustained by the fairy tales her nurse tells her...offering visuals in her mind, hazed by her medication, as the drug takes its inevitable path to sleep. "Memories of my early life began slow and dreamy as any of my nurse's stories. they meander like dust motes in the shafts of sunlight that came in through the nursery window." (quote from the book) This is a 'frank', fictionalized autobiography told in Anne's own words that has a gothic twist. Anne has a deep connection to Rosings Park and it is this, and eventually the words of her governess, that slowly give her the impetus to break free of her medication and her mother. And you experience it all...the withdrawal, the fear, finding her courage and love. Love that may be outside societal strictures of the time, but everyone needs someone to love. "All my life, I had been dormant as a winter tree, waiting for a spring that never came." (quote from the book) I was mesmerized by this story as if I had been drugged and was floating along with Anne on her journey. The writing is evocative, exquisite and haunting. Again, as in her debut novel 'The Clergyman's Wife', Ms. Greeley's prose pulls forth emotions and makes you 'feel'. It certainly did with me. I highly recommend this novel that explores the 'sickly' character of Anne de Bourgh who was meant from birth to be the wife of Fitzwilliam Darcy.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ida Maria

    I didn't think one could go wrong with a Jane Austen re-telling novel and well, I have been proven right. I am sooo happy faceless and sickly and all together bland Anne de Bourgh got her own 'spin off' in this. And managed not to be overshadowed by her dominating force of a mother. Charlotte Lucas got her own spin-off before, and other characters too, but Anne really deserved it. Also: anyone planning on writing something about Darcy's sister Georgiana? I would be reading that one! The opening l I didn't think one could go wrong with a Jane Austen re-telling novel and well, I have been proven right. I am sooo happy faceless and sickly and all together bland Anne de Bourgh got her own 'spin off' in this. And managed not to be overshadowed by her dominating force of a mother. Charlotte Lucas got her own spin-off before, and other characters too, but Anne really deserved it. Also: anyone planning on writing something about Darcy's sister Georgiana? I would be reading that one! The opening lines already got me, when Anne begins to tell her story in her own words: "I was not always small and sickly. When she was in a remembering mood, my nurse sometimes liked to tell me my own story." So powerful! Anne is a perceptive girl, who grew into a perceptive woman and it makes for great description and story telling. While I sometimes do regret the 'modern' tone of such re-tellings and just the lost touch of Austen-ness, this book did a great job a mimicking and yet creating something beautiful of its own accord. It reminded me a little of what the creators and story tellers of Anne with an E did to the original Anne of Green Gables story. A great spin on things, a new critical and informative take on the same time period within the same story...simply great. If you like that vibe. And believe me when I say, there are revelations in this one! The title does not lie! Wonderful! Thank you Edelweiss and HarperCollins for gifting me with an e-ARC of this book. Of course, my opinion was not positively influenced by it- I just simply loved the book.

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