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An Almost Zero Waste Life:Learning How to Embrace Less to Live More

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Author Megean Weldon, aka The Zero Waste Nerd, gently guides you on an attainable, inspirational, mindful, and completely realistic journey to a sustainable living lifestyle with tips, strategies, recipes, and DIY projects for reducing waste—presented in one approachable, beautifully designed, and illustrated guide. What is zero waste living? Although the practice has been Author Megean Weldon, aka The Zero Waste Nerd, gently guides you on an attainable, inspirational, mindful, and completely realistic journey to a sustainable living lifestyle with tips, strategies, recipes, and DIY projects for reducing waste—presented in one approachable, beautifully designed, and illustrated guide. What is zero waste living? Although the practice has been around for generations out of necessity, it is making a comeback as concerns grow about the fate of our environment. To put it simply: it is attempting to send no waste to landfills. Although you may have read or heard about “zero waste,” “sustainable,” or “green” living, the concept can sometimes seem too complicated, the author’s tone a bit self-righteous, or riddled with advice geared for people with 5 acres of land in the country with dreams of raising livestock and homesteading. This is not that book. Can a “regular” person do this? Absolutely! Zero waste isn’t necessarily about zero, but more about changing or altering the way we see the world around us, how we consume, and how we think about waste. It’s about making better choices when we can, and working to reduce our overall impact by reducing the amount of packaging and single-use plastics we bring into our life. Focusing on the positive, An Almost Zero Waste Life presents simple ways to reduce waste in every aspect of your life: Cleaning: Recipes for natural cleaners and how to ditch paper towels for good. Meal plans: Weekly menus and recipes for zero waste meals that use bulk pantry staples. Shopping: How to shop zero waste at big chain stores and ways to reduce food packaging. Bathroom: Sustainable beauty routine. Recycling: Ingenious ways to repurpose old clothing and how to recycle small metals, like razor blades. Compost: The basics of composting. And much more! An Almost Zero Waste Life will change the way you see the world around you, how you consume, and how you think about waste for a healthier planet and happier you.


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Author Megean Weldon, aka The Zero Waste Nerd, gently guides you on an attainable, inspirational, mindful, and completely realistic journey to a sustainable living lifestyle with tips, strategies, recipes, and DIY projects for reducing waste—presented in one approachable, beautifully designed, and illustrated guide. What is zero waste living? Although the practice has been Author Megean Weldon, aka The Zero Waste Nerd, gently guides you on an attainable, inspirational, mindful, and completely realistic journey to a sustainable living lifestyle with tips, strategies, recipes, and DIY projects for reducing waste—presented in one approachable, beautifully designed, and illustrated guide. What is zero waste living? Although the practice has been around for generations out of necessity, it is making a comeback as concerns grow about the fate of our environment. To put it simply: it is attempting to send no waste to landfills. Although you may have read or heard about “zero waste,” “sustainable,” or “green” living, the concept can sometimes seem too complicated, the author’s tone a bit self-righteous, or riddled with advice geared for people with 5 acres of land in the country with dreams of raising livestock and homesteading. This is not that book. Can a “regular” person do this? Absolutely! Zero waste isn’t necessarily about zero, but more about changing or altering the way we see the world around us, how we consume, and how we think about waste. It’s about making better choices when we can, and working to reduce our overall impact by reducing the amount of packaging and single-use plastics we bring into our life. Focusing on the positive, An Almost Zero Waste Life presents simple ways to reduce waste in every aspect of your life: Cleaning: Recipes for natural cleaners and how to ditch paper towels for good. Meal plans: Weekly menus and recipes for zero waste meals that use bulk pantry staples. Shopping: How to shop zero waste at big chain stores and ways to reduce food packaging. Bathroom: Sustainable beauty routine. Recycling: Ingenious ways to repurpose old clothing and how to recycle small metals, like razor blades. Compost: The basics of composting. And much more! An Almost Zero Waste Life will change the way you see the world around you, how you consume, and how you think about waste for a healthier planet and happier you.

30 review for An Almost Zero Waste Life:Learning How to Embrace Less to Live More

  1. 4 out of 5

    Briar's Reviews

    An (Almost) Zero-Waste Life gives some reasonable and realistic expectations and suggestions on eliminating waste. I like that this book didn't start off with the shame game. We all see that game being played on social media, by those special people (and typically Moms... lets be honest) who believe they are better than everybody else. This book gives tips and advice, but doesn't force the idea on the reader. I truly can respect books like this. Give me ideas and make me want to be better, don't An (Almost) Zero-Waste Life gives some reasonable and realistic expectations and suggestions on eliminating waste. I like that this book didn't start off with the shame game. We all see that game being played on social media, by those special people (and typically Moms... lets be honest) who believe they are better than everybody else. This book gives tips and advice, but doesn't force the idea on the reader. I truly can respect books like this. Give me ideas and make me want to be better, don't shame me into it! This book also points out that while we're saying zero-waste, it's really low-waste (honestly, zero-waste is very hard - don't give yourself a standard you can't reach immediately!). The tips provided are for newbies like me: we're all trying our best to do better in the world yet don't have all of the information. Simple suggestions like using what you have and start now with new non-one-use-plastic collections, wear out those plastics instead of throwing them out, eliminating clutter and finding reusable options are all provided to the reader. There's suggestions for the kitchen, how to compost, home made make-up, holiday items and other useful ideas for all parts of your life. It's like a one stop shop for the low waste newbies. There's also recipes so if you like to cook then there's some awesome options in here for you! Seriously, this book feels like it has everything. The design of the book is what really caught my eye initially and let me enjoy it more. The title cards for each chapter was beautifully designed - bright, eye catching and full of patterns. The little things like that really get to me as a reader. My final positives: the 30 day challenge. It's wicked smart and worth a try! And references. Ah, this business student just LOVES references (seriously - that's a lot of hard work putting this book together! Respect!). My biggest con of this book is that I recommend slowly eating away at it (pun intended, by the way). There's so much good information packed in this book that it's hard to absorb all at once. I almost felt over-whelmed (which is totally a good thing. We need smart books like this!). Four out of five stars. Thank you NetGalley and Quarto-Publishing Group - Rock Point for this magnificent read that was truly helpful and insightful.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Denise

    A great introductory guide on how to reduce your waste. Beautiful design and fun illustrations make this book that much more entertaining to read. I especially liked the gift guide in the holiday section, and the final chapter that included a numbered challenge list with manageable steps to take to reduce waste in your own life. This book was organized and efficient, and included many recipes and DIY's to help get you started. I would recommend this to anyone just starting to get in to more sust A great introductory guide on how to reduce your waste. Beautiful design and fun illustrations make this book that much more entertaining to read. I especially liked the gift guide in the holiday section, and the final chapter that included a numbered challenge list with manageable steps to take to reduce waste in your own life. This book was organized and efficient, and included many recipes and DIY's to help get you started. I would recommend this to anyone just starting to get in to more sustainable practices, however much of the advice would be redundant to those already in the midst of going zero waste. Still a perfect book to have on hand, even just for the recipes and concise lists to skim through. eARC provided via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rachel (Kalanadi)

    I'm getting really tired of zero waste and low impact living books that give you lots of tips, but have no list of resources. They just say "google places that do X thing, and make sure to do your research!" Okay... but if the author has actually been doing this, they should have specific recommendations, right?* Sigh.... (And don't give me this BS about a single toothpaste recipe made with baking soda, because who the hell really wants that in their mouth. I've yet to find anyone who's recommen I'm getting really tired of zero waste and low impact living books that give you lots of tips, but have no list of resources. They just say "google places that do X thing, and make sure to do your research!" Okay... but if the author has actually been doing this, they should have specific recommendations, right?* Sigh.... (And don't give me this BS about a single toothpaste recipe made with baking soda, because who the hell really wants that in their mouth. I've yet to find anyone who's recommended Davids toothpaste, which is U.S. made, organic, and comes in metal tubes. Perfect if you're going plastic-free and/or want to recycle the metal!) Overall this is another average zero waste book that has a few new sections (baby and pets - not super applicable to me) but isn't much different from other resources. I was hoping that because the author lives in the Midwest (the big unsexy, uncool part that's usually forgotten, lol**), it would address things like the lack of large farmer's markets and how many zero waste resources, like community recycling and composting, literally don't exist here. Also, is it just my community, or all the bulk bins disappearing in grocery stores because of the pandemic? Yeah. So it's super frustrating right now when 90% of the advice is "buy in bulk with your own containers!". For all my griping, this DID have a few tips and nuggets that I liked, and it's a pretty, well-packaged book that'll inspire you. And I mostly read zero waste books because I need that kick of inspiration and motivation so I'll do things like buy that stainless steel freezer safe container now that I've used up my old prepper's stash of gallon plastic bags... *I get that the point is to drive readers to websites and blogs where the real recommendations and affiliate links are. I'm just feeling snarky because I've wasted a lllllot of time googling stuff while reading zero waste books. **I'm allowed to say this because I live in that big unsexy, uncool zone that everyone forgets.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lorilin

    This was a fun little book to read. I know we’re all stress buying crap we don’t need right now—or at least I was before I finally told myself to rein it in... So AN ALMOST ZERO WASTE LIFE was a timely reminder to first use what you have, and then make more responsible and sustainable choices in the future. Will I be making my own toothpaste? Probably not. But I’ve already switched to non-plastic floss in a glass container and a bamboo toothbrush, so that’s a start. And I think that’s what I like This was a fun little book to read. I know we’re all stress buying crap we don’t need right now—or at least I was before I finally told myself to rein it in... So AN ALMOST ZERO WASTE LIFE was a timely reminder to first use what you have, and then make more responsible and sustainable choices in the future. Will I be making my own toothpaste? Probably not. But I’ve already switched to non-plastic floss in a glass container and a bamboo toothbrush, so that’s a start. And I think that’s what I like most about the book—that it emphasizes baby steps and embraces imperfection. This isn’t an all-or-nothing process. It’s about taking whatever small steps you can now to move toward a more earth-friendly lifestyle. There are so many good tips in here that even if they don’t ALL work for you, there’s no doubt that SOME will. Definitely worth a read!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    This book is perfect for people who are just getting into a zero waste life as it starts with the basics. As someone who has dived deep into the life of an environmentally conscious individual I found this was a bit simplified for me. Very much a “if you don’t want waste don’t make waste” vibe, which is great...but living a zero waste life is much more than just that. We also have to remember that every person is in different circumstances and might not be able to afford or have access to a farm This book is perfect for people who are just getting into a zero waste life as it starts with the basics. As someone who has dived deep into the life of an environmentally conscious individual I found this was a bit simplified for me. Very much a “if you don’t want waste don’t make waste” vibe, which is great...but living a zero waste life is much more than just that. We also have to remember that every person is in different circumstances and might not be able to afford or have access to a farmers market or bulk food store (which seemed to be Megan Weldon’s solution to everything.) That being said I still thought this read was easy and very cute and quirky! Loved all the recipes and meal prep menus that were included. I will definitely be trying the homemade makeup! :)

  6. 5 out of 5

    June

    We are different people than we were in 2019. Like the generation that survived the Great Depression, I'm not sure we'll ever really get over the pandemic-inspired germophobia that has emerged. I can't imagine shaking anyone's hand ever again. So some of the suggestions here don't exactly fit in our current world--cleaning with baking soda and old toothbrushes or eating family style out of a big pot. But there are a lot of other good ideas here--some you might recognize from your Depression-era We are different people than we were in 2019. Like the generation that survived the Great Depression, I'm not sure we'll ever really get over the pandemic-inspired germophobia that has emerged. I can't imagine shaking anyone's hand ever again. So some of the suggestions here don't exactly fit in our current world--cleaning with baking soda and old toothbrushes or eating family style out of a big pot. But there are a lot of other good ideas here--some you might recognize from your Depression-era relatives' habits, even. Thanks to the publishers and NetGalley for a digital ARC for the purpose of an unbiased review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anjana

    I have to admit I went into this book with a bias. The past couple of years, I have been on the constant lookout for ideas to alter my regular habits to make a difference (environmentally). Since I had time on my hands, I looked up a lot of small things and a couple of big changes that I could implement.  I have been dragging a cart full of glass bottles to a zero-waste store to refill my soaps and bulk groceries. I have switched to soapnut for my regular laundry and with all of this, I am well v I have to admit I went into this book with a bias. The past couple of years, I have been on the constant lookout for ideas to alter my regular habits to make a difference (environmentally). Since I had time on my hands, I looked up a lot of small things and a couple of big changes that I could implement.  I have been dragging a cart full of glass bottles to a zero-waste store to refill my soaps and bulk groceries. I have switched to soapnut for my regular laundry and with all of this, I am well versed in this lifestyle even if I do not use all that information in my daily life. I am only describing all this in detail only because this knowledge meant there was little that was new in this one. This is a useful book for those beginning this journey. It lists ideas in beneficial ways that will stick to your mind and ease the transition. It has recipes for some do-it-yourself products which eliminate waste by repurposing it as well as finer details on reducing waste in general. All in all, it has good ideas but quite a few of them are already well practised by many. Those who are just thinking about investing time and effort into reducing waste (like a friend I spoke to last weekend mentioned wanting to do) will find this as a simple and helpful push in the right direction. I received an ARC thanks to NetGalley and the publishers but the review is solely based on my reading experience and my prior knowledge of the Zero-waste lifestyle.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lizzy Wizzy

    If I’m honest, I was underwhelmed by this book... despite my deep interest in the subject, I was not the target audience here. My main qualm was the lack of detail throughout. A few examples: Why is plastic something we should avoid? How did it develop into the massive global waste crisis that it is today? When talking about low-waste practices at the grocery store, what do you do if you come equipped with your mason jars all tared out but at the register the cashier can’t or won’t subtract that If I’m honest, I was underwhelmed by this book... despite my deep interest in the subject, I was not the target audience here. My main qualm was the lack of detail throughout. A few examples: Why is plastic something we should avoid? How did it develop into the massive global waste crisis that it is today? When talking about low-waste practices at the grocery store, what do you do if you come equipped with your mason jars all tared out but at the register the cashier can’t or won’t subtract that weight after they’re full of product? Essentially I feel like the message was positive but overall way too oversimplified, and too many of the details got glossed over completely. The author makes a point early on of stating that “it’s not about being fancy, it’s about being resourceful”, and yet the stylization of the book focuses so heavily on its Pinterest-perfect idealized zero-waste lifestyle photos. I felt there was way too much disconnect here: I’m being encouraged to cut up my old ratty t-shirts to use as un-paper towels and then right next to that paragraph I see a perfectly styled glamour shot of some commercial-grade bamboo cutlery, a commercial-grade zero waste “starter kit”, and a perfectly matching set of fancy glass food storage containers. The photography here feels way too fancy for the overall message of the book. I think this would be a nice resource to use as an introduction to low waste thinking to someone who fits into a pretty specific demographic: mothers who have a limited level of climate-related issues on their radar, with disposable income, who are driven by trends, fads, and online lifestyle blogs. (Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with an advance e-reader copy to review! These are my own opinions and were not influenced by the publisher.)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rebekka Steg

    An excellent introduction to zero waste, with many (realistic) steps both big and small. Megean Weldon is good about reminding you that every step you take matters, and you don't need to take them all at once. She covers every room of the house, and specific areas such as kids, travel, pets etc. At the end of the book is a great 30 day challenge, although it is a bit repetitive if you have read all of the book (but it would serve as an excellent reminder). My one criticism is that Weldon really d An excellent introduction to zero waste, with many (realistic) steps both big and small. Megean Weldon is good about reminding you that every step you take matters, and you don't need to take them all at once. She covers every room of the house, and specific areas such as kids, travel, pets etc. At the end of the book is a great 30 day challenge, although it is a bit repetitive if you have read all of the book (but it would serve as an excellent reminder). My one criticism is that Weldon really doesn't consider people who aren't able-bodied. While she is good abut recognizing that not everyone can do everything, I would really have liked her to recognise that a lot of the suggestions in the book are only an option for people with certain privileges such as being able-bodied, living in areas where it is safe to cycle, having a local zero waste shop etc. All in all I do highly recommend it though, take what you can use and leave the rest. *I received a free copy through Netgalley, but the review is my own opinion.*

  10. 4 out of 5

    Blakeley

    When it comes to a An Almost Zero Waste Life, I think it presents zero waste in a simple and beautiful way. The books aesthetic is cute with bright colors and is well put together. I would easily put this on my shelf displayed for all to see. I live in Portland, Oregon which is all about zero waste and sustainability. So when I saw this book, I had to read it! For anyone starting out zero waste, this book is a helpful guide on how to approach zero waste in each part of your life. Home, pets, hol When it comes to a An Almost Zero Waste Life, I think it presents zero waste in a simple and beautiful way. The books aesthetic is cute with bright colors and is well put together. I would easily put this on my shelf displayed for all to see. I live in Portland, Oregon which is all about zero waste and sustainability. So when I saw this book, I had to read it! For anyone starting out zero waste, this book is a helpful guide on how to approach zero waste in each part of your life. Home, pets, holidays. For those that already keep a zero waste lifestyle, this one really isn't for you. But anyone just starting out, definitely pick this one up and make those small changes that will make a huge impact!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I was familiar with most of the information covered or I would have rated this book higher. It is a good book for people trying to get started reducing their waste. She did include a couple recipes that I may try: homemade blush and dry shampoo. The author includes 30 challenges to reduce waste which are a good kick starter. She also includes two weeks of meal plans with recipes.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Reigber

    Such a great book for people who are beginning their zero waste journey. I found many helpful tips and tricks that I will implement into my life! 5/5

  13. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

    There was actually a lot of good things in this book I hadn’t thought much about yet. I liked her inclusion of steps to take at the holidays, and how to talk to family about gifts/meals, etc. There were more recipes than I was expecting, and I just skimmed through those, as I already have some in my back pocket that I regularly use. But it’d be good for someone who’s introduction to zero waste is this book. On hoopla, the ebook formatting was meh, but illustrations looked cute.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cathy Geha

    An Almost Zero Waste Life by Megan Weldon Learning How to Embrace Less and Live More Looking for ways to minimize your waste and make the earth a better place for all? This book definitely has many ideas to help you whether you are a novice or have already been working on this for awhile. Sure, I have seen many of the ideas before and even started to collect ideas but this book has most of those ideas in one place simplified and easy to understand. Not all of the ideas will be useful to everyone b An Almost Zero Waste Life by Megan Weldon Learning How to Embrace Less and Live More Looking for ways to minimize your waste and make the earth a better place for all? This book definitely has many ideas to help you whether you are a novice or have already been working on this for awhile. Sure, I have seen many of the ideas before and even started to collect ideas but this book has most of those ideas in one place simplified and easy to understand. Not all of the ideas will be useful to everyone but any little change any person makes will improve the environment for everyone. What I liked: * The recipes for everything from cleaning products to makeup * Ideas on how to cut down waste in the kitchen * Gift ideas including how to wrap items without paper * Use of cloth and recycling of cloth for many purposes * The layout and design of the book * The many ideas collected in one resource * That the book covered issues like parties, holidays, children, pets, housekeeping and more in regard to decreasing waste. * The nonjudgmental way the subject was presented What I did not like: * Knowing that many of the ideas will not be easy for me to implement where I live * That this information arrived when I am in lockdown during a pandemic Did I enjoy this book? Yes Would I recommend it to others? Yes Thank you to NetGalley and Quarto Publishing Group – RockPoint for the ARC – this is my honest review. 4.5 Stars

  15. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    I received this copy via Net Galley and I absolutely loved it. I follow Meagan on Instagram already so I knew kind of what to expect. I won’t pretend I live a perfect waste free life; but I do try my best to live with intention and live a lower waste lifestyle. I loved that I didn’t feel like I was a failure if I didn’t do these things, the suggestions were friendly and I feel excited to reduce even more. I don’t go big on gifts, I tend to thrift shop and really think about products, do I need t I received this copy via Net Galley and I absolutely loved it. I follow Meagan on Instagram already so I knew kind of what to expect. I won’t pretend I live a perfect waste free life; but I do try my best to live with intention and live a lower waste lifestyle. I loved that I didn’t feel like I was a failure if I didn’t do these things, the suggestions were friendly and I feel excited to reduce even more. I don’t go big on gifts, I tend to thrift shop and really think about products, do I need them or can I get this used ? We can all stand to learn ways to reduce all of the things we use, the plastic and garbage we consume. Thanks Net Galley.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra

    3.5* Having read a few of these zero-waste guides, they can begin to feel repetitive especially for people who've already implemented some changes. Pros to Weldon's book - no shaming- she acknowledges that truly zero waste is unattainable, options for different lifestyles (apartment living vs rural), a wide variety of recipes and actionable 30 step plan. Cons- she doesn't go into why/how these changes make a difference and there's a lack of discussion about working for change beyond individual c 3.5* Having read a few of these zero-waste guides, they can begin to feel repetitive especially for people who've already implemented some changes. Pros to Weldon's book - no shaming- she acknowledges that truly zero waste is unattainable, options for different lifestyles (apartment living vs rural), a wide variety of recipes and actionable 30 step plan. Cons- she doesn't go into why/how these changes make a difference and there's a lack of discussion about working for change beyond individual consumer habits.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cristie Underwood

    The author wrote not only an extremely useful resource for those that want to live a zero waste life, but stresses the importance of not being too hard on yourself if you don't utilize all of the steps The approach of knowing that every little thing done makes a difference and that all of these small steps do make a big impact. I found this to be inspiring and will be utilizing tips from this! The author wrote not only an extremely useful resource for those that want to live a zero waste life, but stresses the importance of not being too hard on yourself if you don't utilize all of the steps The approach of knowing that every little thing done makes a difference and that all of these small steps do make a big impact. I found this to be inspiring and will be utilizing tips from this!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Karley Essington

    I learned so much from the book. It's crazy how much waste happens in everyday life and how easy it is to avoid. I got so many ideas on how to change my life for the better while saving money AND helping the planet. Some of the material felt repeated but it was full of great ideas! I learned so much from the book. It's crazy how much waste happens in everyday life and how easy it is to avoid. I got so many ideas on how to change my life for the better while saving money AND helping the planet. Some of the material felt repeated but it was full of great ideas!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kitten Kisser

    I am always looking for ways to reduce my footprint on the earth. Going Zero Waste has always seemed pretty daunting & downright impossible. Seeing blog posts where said blogger shows a photo of one years worth of waste for a family of four & it fits in a jar. Um, what? How? Seriously, how? This question coming from me, an eco farmer who has been living a pretty sustainable life for well over a decade. But even I haven't figured out how to create no garbage whatsoever. This book by Megean Weldon I am always looking for ways to reduce my footprint on the earth. Going Zero Waste has always seemed pretty daunting & downright impossible. Seeing blog posts where said blogger shows a photo of one years worth of waste for a family of four & it fits in a jar. Um, what? How? Seriously, how? This question coming from me, an eco farmer who has been living a pretty sustainable life for well over a decade. But even I haven't figured out how to create no garbage whatsoever. This book by Megean Weldon is much more realistic & as a result, optimistic. As the beginning of the book title says, "An almost zero waste life". Key word, almost. Finally someone who isn't going to say anyone can do the impossible by creating no garbage. Okay, wait. Yes, you could live naked in some secluded place, sort of like an animal. Maybe dig in garbage for stuff, but don't ever throw out said garbage. Hunt & forage for your food, etc. So, in theory, yes, we could go zero waste, but lets keep it realistic shall we? Running around naked is against the law nearly everywhere. Being homeless is generally frowned upon & really, who doesn't enjoy the comforts of home. Electricity, plumbing, being protected & cozy? Rather than be judgemental or just make the reader feel like a jerk who simply isn't trying hard enough, Megean gives the reader lots of wonderful ideas to try to implement in order to reduce waste. She even frees us by saying, being zero waste is impossible. Thank you Megean! For my own life, I am already implementing many of the suggestions in this book. I've had years to work on it after all. Some of the very suggestions now given by Megean were utilized at one point or another, but eventually given up on due to practicality. This doesn't mean what I have given up on wont be perfect for someone else. We are all individuals with unique personalities & lifestyles. The idea is to figure out what works for you. Megean makes sure to point out that you don't just do it all at once. That's not realistic. Think in baby steps. When you run out of something, rather than buy the same something, replace it with something that is zero waste or as close to it as possible. For example, replace your paper towels with rags. Not rags that you buy, but real rags from clothes you no longer wear for whatever reason. I prefer to cut up only clothing made from natural materials (& as a result try to buy only natural clothing), but anything will do. Then launder the rags & use over & over. Nothing to buy, nothing to add to the landfill. The bonus is, by reducing your footprint, you also reduce your spending. Zero Waste living is very much like Living Simply or Living With Less. In keeping with a smaller footprint, even this book by it's design & materials follows the ideas behind the Zero Waste movement. I always found it a bit hypocritical to write books of this type only to use toxic highly polluting materials to create the book. Oh the irony. Not only is this book super useful, it's adorable & "green". Out of the the 10 or so books my bibliophile self ordered in the past month or so, this is hands down my favorite & a real keeper, earning it a permanent spot on my shelf.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Janis Hill

    I would like to thank Quarto Publishing Group - Rock Point for providing me with a free – temporary – electronic ARC of this book, via Netgalley. Although I’m auto-approved with them, the decision to read this book is my choice and any reviews given are obligation free. For those of you keep track of when I read something, vs when I post the review – I’ve just finished reading this book last week! ‘An Almost Zero Waste Life’ was an interesting and informative read. My family and I have been moving I would like to thank Quarto Publishing Group - Rock Point for providing me with a free – temporary – electronic ARC of this book, via Netgalley. Although I’m auto-approved with them, the decision to read this book is my choice and any reviews given are obligation free. For those of you keep track of when I read something, vs when I post the review – I’ve just finished reading this book last week! ‘An Almost Zero Waste Life’ was an interesting and informative read. My family and I have been moving towards a more zero waste lifestyle for some years now, so this isn’t a new topic for me. But I did love how Ms Weldon is of a similar mindset to us when it comes to zero waste. Which is: do what you can when you can. Zero Waste shouldn’t be seen as a fad where you need to throw out everything “bad” (plastics, etc) and immediately replace it with high end “good”. It’s not about being a minimalist… though you can sort of become one. It’s about looking at what you use, as a consumer, and how you get rid of the waste your consumerism creates. Oh, and I hate to break it to you, but we’re ALL consumers. And I think this whole attitude of “do what you can, when you can” really clicked with me and made the book an enjoyable read. We’re all perfectly imperfect… but as long as we try to improve on lessening our waste, and ensuring we try to become more conscious and responsible consumers, we can do this. ‘An Almost Zero Waste Life’ isn’t judgy, preachy, or trying to get you to join some clique set. It is down to earth, open and honest, and speaks to the reader as an equal. THIS is what we need in resource books like this! What I also love about ‘An Almost Zero Waste Life’ is it tries to cover EVERY aspect of our lives – warts and all, so to speak. The chapters go from room to room in a typical household, and covers items some people might not have thought of being an issue… even those usually unmentionable ones, like *gasp* “feminine hygiene” items. And, as those who follow my blog know, I’m a cloth pad wearer, I’m very pro reusable products like this, and yes I DO openly talk about menstruation products and their effect on our environment. So I really do love that Ms Weldon tries to cover EVERYTHING. Throughout the book there are handy hints and tips to help encourage the reader to replace wasteful shop bought products with homemade. This includes many recipes for household items such as cleansers, soaps, make-up, beauty products, and then some. What is great is the book doesn’t demand you make them, or sound judgy if you don’t… instead it has a great light and easy attitude of “hey, if you’d like to try and make this item, here’s a few ideas”. No pressure, no sales gimmicks, no brand names. Just some helpful hints, recipes, and ideas. Now, I want to say that I feel ‘An Almost Zero Waste Life’ has everything covered from house, clothes, shopping, food, babies, pets, seasonal moments, travel, etc… But I’m sure there would be someone who spots something they feel is missing. So, instead I will say it is an extremely comprehensive resource book that tries to cover everything, and one I feel does a pretty amazing job. At the end of the book there is a great 30 day challenge to help to and ease the reader (and their household/ family) into a more zero waste lifestyle. Each day is just one more basic step on how to change our habits. Again, there is no pressure, gimmicks, or brand name dropping. Just some encouraging ideas to help the reader on their way. AND, geeky book nerd moment, I love the fact that the last part of the book is a list of reference material pointing to other books and places to help the reader learn more about specific subjects – all touched upon within ‘An Almost Zero Waste Life’. The formatting was good – very easy to read, follow and jump to from the front index, or read from cover to cover. I loved the style and graphics too, my sort of “thing” and so I feel the formatting and layout were done well, as they help attract the reader to the subject, and encourage them to read on. Would I recommend this book to others? What do you think? ;-) Of course I would! Yes, okay, so I’m a bit biased as I’ve been trying to become more zero waste for over a decade now. But I really do find ‘An Almost Zero Waste Life’ an incredibly thorough reference book to help others take a similar approach to life… without being a heavy, hard to read, burden of a book. So, if you’re serious at wanting to improve not only your own life, but that of your house, family, and the environment – I highly recommend this book to you. Would I buy this book for myself? You know, as critical as I am of buying/ owning books of late (eBooks and paper books), I think I would like to have an eBook copy of ‘An Almost Zero Waste Life’ in my Kindle library. I think it is a very useful resource book and, even though I know a lot my own zero waste living tips and tricks, I can still see myself wanting to turn to a copy of this book to try and gain new ideas for every days consumerism. The only reason I haven’t bought a copy of the eBook already is it would cost me over $30 AUD on Amazon Australia right now. And, yes, I find it a great practical guide and all… but I also have a budget, and paying over $30 AUD for an eBook has never been in my budget. So I’ll just have to wait for a special sale day, or for the exchange rate to improve. I’m not just someone striving towards a zero waste lifestyle, but I’m frugal with it. ;-) In summary: A very comprehensive, and useful, handbook to those seeking a more zero waste lifestyle.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    There are some good tips in this book - some seem like common sense (like not using paper plates or napkins in your home), but I did appreciate a lot of the suggestions. I took a lot of pictures of the pages to refer back to since I borrowed it from the library. :) I do wish there had been suggestions for sustainable products/companies. Yes, I can research, but sometimes the internet is misleading and it would be nice to have some proven products to replace some of the disposables in our lives.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    There’s nothing new and groundbreaking in this book, but I appreciate her “this is a process and no one has it perfect” approach, as well as her ideas. If you’ve been on the zero waste journey for long, you have probably come across most of this information before, but this is definitely a delightful presentation of it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Christa Van

    I don't know why I have a weakness for books like this. I've read several and keep requesting them. There really isn't anything new to hear about buying less stuff, recycling, avoiding packaging or choosing the easiest to recycle option. Weldon encourages simplifying your diet to reduce waste. That might make sense. For me, if nothing else, the pandemic taught me I have quite a dependence on paper products. Weldon wants me to use rags and wash them but I can't see myself managing my cat's withou I don't know why I have a weakness for books like this. I've read several and keep requesting them. There really isn't anything new to hear about buying less stuff, recycling, avoiding packaging or choosing the easiest to recycle option. Weldon encourages simplifying your diet to reduce waste. That might make sense. For me, if nothing else, the pandemic taught me I have quite a dependence on paper products. Weldon wants me to use rags and wash them but I can't see myself managing my cat's without paper towels…and lets not even talk about getting rid of toilet paper. Still, several interesting alternatives here and why do we pay so much for cleaning chemicals that are dangerous to our health and the environment?

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bobbiann Markle

    Very good. Hundreds of practical ideas for reducing your environmental impact. Includes recipes for a few foods, cleaners, makeup. No guilt for anything you can’t manage right now.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Kokes

    An Almost Zero Waste Life was written by Megean Weldon. This is a great beginner book for those that would like to live a greener lifestyle. It is full of helpful tips, tricks, recipes, and statistics in order to arm readers with ways to reduce waste in their daily lives. My Thoughts: I started my journey along a greener path last year. I had implemented several of the author’s suggestions previously. I am definitely not an expert by any means, but I was able to nod in agreement with many of these i An Almost Zero Waste Life was written by Megean Weldon. This is a great beginner book for those that would like to live a greener lifestyle. It is full of helpful tips, tricks, recipes, and statistics in order to arm readers with ways to reduce waste in their daily lives. My Thoughts: I started my journey along a greener path last year. I had implemented several of the author’s suggestions previously. I am definitely not an expert by any means, but I was able to nod in agreement with many of these ideas. However, there were still quite a few things I had not thought about in regards to waste. This book was a good reminder of how much more I could be doing. I liked the author’s soft approach to beginning the process-use up what you have, don’t just throw it away and create more waste. Then, do better next time. I definitely agree with this approach, and it helps make the ideas seem more manageable too. Already I have purchased a reusable coffee filter (something I did not even know existed), and copied down some recipes I would like to try. I found this to be a very helpful book, and an easy read. I would recommend it to anyone looking to create less waste in their lives. I would like to thank Quarto Publishing Group for providing me with a free digital copy of this book in exchange for my review. Thank you!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Helpful, but some of this advice is to vague. Buddy leftover turkey scraps? What? How? Where? The stuff that needs to be explained, like statements like that, need to be fully explained to newcomers to the movement. Cute, but I wouldn't buy it. Helpful, but some of this advice is to vague. Buddy leftover turkey scraps? What? How? Where? The stuff that needs to be explained, like statements like that, need to be fully explained to newcomers to the movement. Cute, but I wouldn't buy it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Emily Carlyn

    The book highlights each room in your house and how to become more sustainable. It also touches on holidays and life events. It’s very down to earth and easy to understand!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Anna Fogt

    This book provided a lot of practical ways to reduce trash in your life. I already do a handful but a great list to continue on my journey of reducing trash. She also has a blog which is a nice way to keep updated and get tips.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Julie Anna

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️.75 Note: I was given an e-ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. An (Almost) Zero-Waste Life is a how-to guide on reducing the waste produced in your home. Separated into chapters on each category in your home (and outside of it), Weldon starts by listing all of the single-use products that can be replaced with longer-term products. Additionally, she shares recipes, mini-guides, and tips to reduce waste, save money, and simplify living. I’ve been resear ⭐️⭐️⭐️.75 Note: I was given an e-ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. An (Almost) Zero-Waste Life is a how-to guide on reducing the waste produced in your home. Separated into chapters on each category in your home (and outside of it), Weldon starts by listing all of the single-use products that can be replaced with longer-term products. Additionally, she shares recipes, mini-guides, and tips to reduce waste, save money, and simplify living. I’ve been researching zero-waste content and making swaps for almost a year now. That being said, I was interested in what more I could learn from An (Almost) Zero-Waste Life. There’s a lot covered that you may already know if you’ve been doing this for a while, such as reusable bags and jars, solid, package-free products and using cloth in place of single-use products. However, Weldon does share a lot of tips, recipes, and ideas that I have yet to come across. Something in particular I noticed about An (Almost) Zero-Waste Life is the amount of emphasis Weldon makes on keeping things simple. Especially in terms of things like cleaning products (that she shares recipes for) – the fewer, the better. Having fewer options is certainly helpful and I’m glad to see her make these points with some of her choices. The only thing I thought could have been improved was the emphasis on the above. Weldon starts with her zero-waste content, then jumps in. However, I know that a lot of people struggle to adapt to many zero-waste swaps. There are bits and pieces throughout this book about how this lifestyle can simplify your life (see above). But as someone that doesn’t know much and has some interest, these changes can be overwhelming. People that make these changes out of their love for the environment adapt easily. But for those that are skeptical, I think more emphasis on the reasons for transitioning (and how it would help in particular) would cater well to that audience. Overall, I found An (Almost) Zero-Waste Life to be a very helpful guide. This has some good reference material that I know I’ll be looking back on in the future. Find more of my reviews here: http://julieannasbooks.com/ ❤

  30. 5 out of 5

    Malligal

    Two years ago, a friend and I became obsessed with lowering our trash output. We spent a lot of time discussing options and ways to reduce our household waste. She was determined to live a waste free summer. I was less determined, but very supportive of her goal. When I saw An (Almost) Zero-Waste Life, I decided it was about time to explore a waste-free lifestyle again. Weldon decided to embark on a zero-waste lifestyle after walking through her neighborhood, cleaning up trash as an Earth Day pro Two years ago, a friend and I became obsessed with lowering our trash output. We spent a lot of time discussing options and ways to reduce our household waste. She was determined to live a waste free summer. I was less determined, but very supportive of her goal. When I saw An (Almost) Zero-Waste Life, I decided it was about time to explore a waste-free lifestyle again. Weldon decided to embark on a zero-waste lifestyle after walking through her neighborhood, cleaning up trash as an Earth Day project. She expected to fill a small bag, instead she filled multiple trash bags, which helped to kick-start her hard look into her waste lifestyle. An (Almost) Zero-Waste Life is an amazing beginners guide to transitioning into a zero-waste lifestyle. The book is filled with great information about non-wasteful alternatives in all areas of the house. It also has great tips for incorporating zero-waste into your holidays, your life with children, shopping and travel. Honestly, even though An (Almost) Zero-Waste Life was filled with great information and a ton of awesome recipes to help you along your zero-waste path, it did all seem a little overwhelming. I don’t think that has anything to do with Weldon’s book. It more has to do with the fact that we’ve been trained to go for convenience and changing that mindset is going to take work. Sometimes even hard work. I think the way to combat that would be to use the 30 step challenge that Weldon included. (A great tool, btw!) I’m going to try to pick one step per month and work on trying to implement that one change per month. Maybe I can even get my friend to join in on the challenge. If you’ve been toying with making some changes to your environmental impact, I’d highly suggest giving An (Almost) Zero-Waste Life a read. There are going to be things you’re not going to want to try, but I can guarantee that you’ll at least find a few ideas you’ll be excited to get working on! I received a free e-copy of An (Almost) Zero-Waste Life from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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