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The Awakening of Malcolm X is a powerful narrative account of the activist's adolescent years in jail, written by his daughter Ilyasah Shabazz along with 2019 Coretta Scott King-John Steptoe award-winning author, Tiffany D. Jackson. No one can be at peace until he has his freedom. In Charlestown Prison, Malcolm Little struggles with the weight of his past. Plagued by nightma The Awakening of Malcolm X is a powerful narrative account of the activist's adolescent years in jail, written by his daughter Ilyasah Shabazz along with 2019 Coretta Scott King-John Steptoe award-winning author, Tiffany D. Jackson. No one can be at peace until he has his freedom. In Charlestown Prison, Malcolm Little struggles with the weight of his past. Plagued by nightmares, Malcolm drifts through days unsure of his future. Slowly, he befriends other prisoners and writes to his family. He reads all the books in the prison library, joins the debate team and the Nation of Islam. Malcolm grapples with race, politics, religion, and justice in the 1940s. And as his time in jail comes to an end, he begins to awaken -- emerging from prison more than just Malcolm Little: Now, he is Malcolm X. Here is an intimate look at Malcolm X's young adult years. While this book chronologically follows X: A Novel, it can be read as a stand-alone historical novel that invites larger discussions on black power, prison reform, and civil rights.


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The Awakening of Malcolm X is a powerful narrative account of the activist's adolescent years in jail, written by his daughter Ilyasah Shabazz along with 2019 Coretta Scott King-John Steptoe award-winning author, Tiffany D. Jackson. No one can be at peace until he has his freedom. In Charlestown Prison, Malcolm Little struggles with the weight of his past. Plagued by nightma The Awakening of Malcolm X is a powerful narrative account of the activist's adolescent years in jail, written by his daughter Ilyasah Shabazz along with 2019 Coretta Scott King-John Steptoe award-winning author, Tiffany D. Jackson. No one can be at peace until he has his freedom. In Charlestown Prison, Malcolm Little struggles with the weight of his past. Plagued by nightmares, Malcolm drifts through days unsure of his future. Slowly, he befriends other prisoners and writes to his family. He reads all the books in the prison library, joins the debate team and the Nation of Islam. Malcolm grapples with race, politics, religion, and justice in the 1940s. And as his time in jail comes to an end, he begins to awaken -- emerging from prison more than just Malcolm Little: Now, he is Malcolm X. Here is an intimate look at Malcolm X's young adult years. While this book chronologically follows X: A Novel, it can be read as a stand-alone historical novel that invites larger discussions on black power, prison reform, and civil rights.

30 review for The Awakening of Malcolm X

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bookishrealm

    YESSSS the first 5 star read of 2021! I'm so happy that it was this book. This book comes after X chronologically; however, it can be read as a stand alone. Thank you so much to FSG for providing me a copy of this book for review. All thoughts are my own. CW: use of the n-word, mistreatment of Black prisoners, physical violence, suicide, suicidal ideation, drugs, gambling, racism. "Hard to imagine a world that considers us equals when the core of our very existence is human and they don't cons YESSSS the first 5 star read of 2021! I'm so happy that it was this book. This book comes after X chronologically; however, it can be read as a stand alone. Thank you so much to FSG for providing me a copy of this book for review. All thoughts are my own. CW: use of the n-word, mistreatment of Black prisoners, physical violence, suicide, suicidal ideation, drugs, gambling, racism. "Hard to imagine a world that considers us equals when the core of our very existence is human and they don't consider us that." The Awakening of Malcolm X focuses on the portion of Malcolm X's life when he was imprisoned. The story is told in an interesting narrative where readers have the opportunity to see Malcolm reflect on events that happened prior to him ending up in prison and applying the feelings of those experiences to his current experience. While Shabazz and Jackson took a little creative liberty in how they portrayed certain events, there is so much to enjoy and learn from this story. There is an intimate portrayal of the relationship that Malcolm had with his siblings and how they worked together to make sure that Malcolm "awakened" himself to discover who he was meant to be. Shabazz and Jackson also emphasize and highlight how much Malcolm valued education. It reminded me of how my own father taught me to always value my education. I knew that Malcolm was well rounded and well read, but as a reader you really learn how invested he is in reading all sorts of books to become self-educated. I didn't even realize he was on a debate team! With Shabazz and Jackson I expected nothing but well designed social commentary. There is a clear paralleling of Black men and White men who served time. Through Malcolm's awakening he quickly learns how the world will view and treat him as a Black man. In fact, most of the conversations that take place around the incarceration of Black men are still applicable today in 2021. It was definitely difficult to read at some points; however, it's conversation that needs to continue. I'm hoping that Shabazz intends to write at least two more books that details his ongoing relationship with the Nation of Islam. While it plays a big role in the context of this book and in Malcolm's awakening process, there is a small hint at the indication of the the later fall out that Malcolm will have with Elijah Muhammad. Overall, I loveeeddddd this novel. It was easy to follow, it captures Malcolms inner monologue in a way that connects the reader to his experiences. There will be younger readers that will get a lot out of reading this book. From learning about Malcolm X, to learning about Black history (there is a mention of the 1921 Tulsa Riots), to learning about the importance of family there appears to be something for everyone. If you haven't considered reading this book, I would definitely recommend picking it up.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Skip

    Capitalizing on the success of her first book about her famous father, Ilyasah Shabazz has written a second book, with a focus on Malcolm X's years in jail. This book starts with his being found guilty for robbing houses outside Boston, ostensibly at the behest of his white girlfriend, who sings a different song in court. I thought the book was only okay because I could not tell what was truth and what was fiction since Malcolm was assassinated in February, 1965 when Ilyasah was two years old so Capitalizing on the success of her first book about her famous father, Ilyasah Shabazz has written a second book, with a focus on Malcolm X's years in jail. This book starts with his being found guilty for robbing houses outside Boston, ostensibly at the behest of his white girlfriend, who sings a different song in court. I thought the book was only okay because I could not tell what was truth and what was fiction since Malcolm was assassinated in February, 1965 when Ilyasah was two years old so she would have had no personal insight into her father's thoughts. That said, I expect she was able to read his letters and speak to her aunts, uncles and mother so that it is fairly accurate, especially his conversion to Islam and his misplaced faith in Elijah Mohammed and the Nation of Islam, a mistake that would prove fatal. I enjoyed the quotes at the beginning of each chapter. P.S. I am looking forward to reading the newest biography about this iconic, often maligned black leader, The Dead Are Arising.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lex with the Text (Alexis Sims)

    The Awakening of Malcolm X is a powerful narrative account of the activist's adolescent years in jail, written by his daughter @ilyasahshabazz along with @writeinbk. Y’all, I highly recommend this book. I finished it in one day. Book 2 of 2021. It’s a powerful narrative that centers on Malcolm as an adolescent as he explores personal tribulations of race, family, and faith. We get to see him struggle with the weight of his past, and it felt so incredibly intimate. I loved being exposed to this si The Awakening of Malcolm X is a powerful narrative account of the activist's adolescent years in jail, written by his daughter @ilyasahshabazz along with @writeinbk. Y’all, I highly recommend this book. I finished it in one day. Book 2 of 2021. It’s a powerful narrative that centers on Malcolm as an adolescent as he explores personal tribulations of race, family, and faith. We get to see him struggle with the weight of his past, and it felt so incredibly intimate. I loved being exposed to this side of him, who once was just a young Black kid living through the horrors of life around him. Unfortunately, he had to grow up quickly. Black boys don’t get to stay a kid for long. This is a well-written book that explores important issues about prison reform, our criminal justice system, and of course, race. I loved how the book showed how religion helped mold him into a man. This is a beautiful novel that will leave a big impression on you and all the teens who will one day read it. Follow me for more bookish content! https://www.instagram.com/lex_withthe...

  4. 4 out of 5

    itsnikhat

    “If you stick a knife in my back nine inches and pull it out six inches, there’s no progress. If you pull it all the way out, that’s not progress. The progress is healing the wound that the blow made.“ If we were to do a word association test right now and you asked me to associate Malcolm X with a word, I would say, ‘enigmatic’ with zero hesitation. Ever since I came across few clips of his speeches during the last year, I made it my intention to learn in depth about him and what motivated him t “If you stick a knife in my back nine inches and pull it out six inches, there’s no progress. If you pull it all the way out, that’s not progress. The progress is healing the wound that the blow made.“ If we were to do a word association test right now and you asked me to associate Malcolm X with a word, I would say, ‘enigmatic’ with zero hesitation. Ever since I came across few clips of his speeches during the last year, I made it my intention to learn in depth about him and what motivated him to grow into the strong, captivating personality that he did. As a non-American, my knowledge about Malcolm X was very basic; apart from his status as a Civil Rights Activist who reverted to Islam, I didn’t know much. The Awakening of Malcolm X is a perfect introduction to both readers like me as well as the ones who have grown up learning about this monumental figure as their history. The book covers the formative years of Malcolm X alternating between memories of his childhood and teenage years, and his time in prison. What struck me most was how intelligent he was even from a young age. Malcolm grew in a family which stressed on self-love and education, their real heritage; the evenings in his home would be spent with Malcolm and his siblings learning from their mother as she imparted various lessons using real life examples. Despite the existing racism, Malcolm grew up in a happy home and this is extremely evident from the yearning which his narration and dreams inspire. When Malcolm’s father is killed and later on his mother is sent to an institution, a sense of waywardness enters Malcolm’s life. He spends most of his teenage years indulging in illicit activities and straying away from his upbringing. Reality hits Malcolm, when he is arrested for breaking & entering and larceny, and allocated 8-10 years of jail time. “There is no better than adversity. Every defeat, every heartbreak, every loss, contains its own seed, its own lesson on how to improve your performance the next time.” During his prison years, we see a transformation take place in Malcolm. From a young man simply trying to complete his prison sentence and get back to the hustle life he knew, he goes back to his roots. Starting with just a dictionary, he begins to educate himself on various subjects. Through his eyes, we also see the cruelty that his fellow inmates are shown both in the face of judiciary that placed a sentence on their heads to the prison guards who treat them like animals. Malcolm begins to understand that being educated about the problems his people face is the only way to move forward. In this process, Malcolm is also exposed to Islam through his siblings and eventually reverts. As he begins to correspond with Elijah Muhammad, founder of Nation of Islam, his sense of faith and justice combined continue to grow, making him more firm in his beliefs. I had high hopes from this book, especially because it was written by Malcolm’s daughter, and I’m so happy to say that TAOMX not only met those expectations but also went above and beyond. This book will leave you in an electric atmosphere! Malcolm’s ache to fix the system around him, snatch back the dignity that has been taken away from him and his people, catches you like fire. It is a book filled with life lessons and gives you an intricate insight into Malcolm’s life before he began to continue with his role as an activist publicly. If you enjoy reading historical fiction, memoirs, books which challenge the state our society is in and fill you with a zeal to transform the world, this book is for you! And if you don’t fall into any of the descriptions, I would still request you to read it. Malcolm X is the kind of person whose life’s story needs to be read about. If you don’t want to jump into his autobiography right away, this would be a perfect beginning. Thank you, Colored Pages Tours for providing me with an e-ARC through NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    “If you’re not ready to die for it, take the word ‘freedom’ out of your vocabulary” LOVED this adaptation of how X evolves as a youngster to arrive at critical consciousness! Can’t wait to share with the students!!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Hana (linh_hermione)

    Thank you to Fierce Reads and Colored Pages Tours for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Malcolm X has always been a hero of mine: I read his autobiography when I was eleven, and again at sixteen, and I’ve always looked up to his incredible strength and determination. So I was absolutely thrilled that Colored Pages Book Tours have given me the opportunity to review this, a YA novelisation covering just his years in prison, the period of his life where he learned to b Thank you to Fierce Reads and Colored Pages Tours for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Malcolm X has always been a hero of mine: I read his autobiography when I was eleven, and again at sixteen, and I’ve always looked up to his incredible strength and determination. So I was absolutely thrilled that Colored Pages Book Tours have given me the opportunity to review this, a YA novelisation covering just his years in prison, the period of his life where he learned to be both Muslim and activist. The first half of the book is incredibly tough to read. The bleak hopelessness of young Malcolm’s first few years in prison, interwoven with the utter dissoluteness of his earlier Harlem life (shown in a series of flashbacks as he dreams of the events that have led him here) are absolutely devastating, particularly knowing what he was capable of and what he would eventually become. All credit to Shabazz and Jackson’s writing: his emotions – guilt and anger and helplessness – are just suffocating. A particularly visceral scene is one in which Malcolm chemically straightens his hair, fully in the knowledge that it will burn his scalp. The water pipes in his family’s Michigan home are frozen, leaving him unable to wash out the lye; his only option is to wash his hair in the toilet, and the moment is such a symbol of the degradation and pain that Black people have endured in an attempt to be accepted by white people. But the second half of the book, once he finds Islam and starts learning about the oppression of Black people (his ‘awakening’, if you will), was… nothing short of glorious. The Nation of Islam was wrong about a lot of things (as X would come to realise in later life), but this book mainly focuses on the aspects of it that did align with true Islam, particularly prayer. Seeing his twin journeys towards connecting with God, and learning about the systematic oppression of Black people, was so powerful and inspiring. Malcolm is resistant to Islam at first, and it’s desperation and hopelessness that ultimately drives him to start learning about it. His impatience to find out everything, learn the ritual prayers, practice as perfectly as he can, is almost childlike in its innocence and eagerness, and truly just made my heart so happy. For him, spreading Islam within the Black community was one and the same with his anti-racist activism, and though he’d started re-learning to read before accepting Islam, it’s his acceptance of religion that turbocharges his drive to learn about Black history and racism. Really the main focus of the book is the fact that Black people descend from a lineage of incredibly rich and developed society in Africa, and the ways in which American society is set up so as to deliberately and systematically oppress Black people. Both points are reiterated over and over, but it never feels repetitive and it hits every time (and besides, given that the target audience is young YA, for whom this could well be their first introduction to structural racism in so many words, I think the approach of really driving it home absolutely works!). I absolutely loved the messages of this book, and the way it depicted Malcolm’s thoughts and emotions in such an accessible and vivid way, and I can’t wait for more people to read it! CW: racism; n-word; Ku Klux Klan; violence; incarceration & police brutality; mention of death penalty; references to lynching; mentions of suicide & brief suicidal ideation

  7. 4 out of 5

    Shalee

    Thank you to Netgalley who gave me an eARC of this book in exchange for my honest review. The Awakening of Malcolm X is beautifully written, making the reader feel both the heartaches and losses suffered in prison, as well as the warmth of the happier memories that Malcolm looks back on. One thing I really enjoyed about this read is the research it prompted me to do on my own about Malcolm, his family, and the history of Islam. The pace of the story as a whole was a little slow for my liking, bu Thank you to Netgalley who gave me an eARC of this book in exchange for my honest review. The Awakening of Malcolm X is beautifully written, making the reader feel both the heartaches and losses suffered in prison, as well as the warmth of the happier memories that Malcolm looks back on. One thing I really enjoyed about this read is the research it prompted me to do on my own about Malcolm, his family, and the history of Islam. The pace of the story as a whole was a little slow for my liking, but overall I highly recommend The Awakening of Malcolm X!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    Excellent book for young readers interested in learning more about the early life of Malcolm X. It’s very relatable, intriguing and inspiring if you are also a follower of this gifted speaker and religious leader. 4.5 stars rounded up for author’s note and the audiobook’s interview with the author and narrator at the end.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Hoover Public Library Kids and Teens

    Explores historical threads of race, faith, and family as they weave together in the transformation of youthful, imprisoned Malcolm Little into empowered, purpose-driven Malcolm X. Written by his daughter along with the 2019 Coretta Scott King-John Steptoe award-winning author.

  10. 4 out of 5

    USOM

    (Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) TW: racism, assault, mentions of death row execution, mentions of suicide The Awakening of Malcom X asks questions about the unfairness of the injustice system, a society that looks at black men as criminals without a second glance. How the justice systems turns these men into non-human entities. How all these men need is an accusation, being in the wrong place, to have their existenc (Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) TW: racism, assault, mentions of death row execution, mentions of suicide The Awakening of Malcom X asks questions about the unfairness of the injustice system, a society that looks at black men as criminals without a second glance. How the justice systems turns these men into non-human entities. How all these men need is an accusation, being in the wrong place, to have their existence questioned. And even though slavery was abolished, they've never been free. The release of this book is even more timely considering 2020's Black Lives Matter protests that have re-incited these conversations. full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Aeris

    Highly recommend the audiobook!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dahabo Wacays

    Rating: 3.5 This book took me on a journey through Malcolm's early years. It goes back and forth from the past and present, the past showing us just how he came to be imprisoned and the present letting us into his mind and experienced at Charleston. Before reading this book, I knew little to nothing about Malcolm X's life - I had always been intrigued and wanted to educate myself and thanks to this book, a historical novel about Malcolm's early adulthood years, I have a starting point. This book h Rating: 3.5 This book took me on a journey through Malcolm's early years. It goes back and forth from the past and present, the past showing us just how he came to be imprisoned and the present letting us into his mind and experienced at Charleston. Before reading this book, I knew little to nothing about Malcolm X's life - I had always been intrigued and wanted to educate myself and thanks to this book, a historical novel about Malcolm's early adulthood years, I have a starting point. This book has opened my eyes. It's taught me so many lessons but most importantly the lesson of education. Throughout the book, Malcolm feels lost and finds solace in the power of words. He reclaims his spirit thanks to Allah and his family. The power of these relationships stood out the most to me - family is such a blessing and they serve as a means of guidance for him. His relationship with Allah was also endearing to witness, seeing as I am a Muslim reader, I was fascinated with the transformation Malcolm went, from a disgruntled, hopeless prisoner to one whose spirit and soul were free from the confines of incarceration. Not only did I see representation and the mind of Malcolm come into his own, but I also learnt a lot in terms of the Middle Passage, slavery and the impact of slavery on Black Americans following its abolishment. I have quite a few favourite quotes but one that stood out the most was: "You see, Black people all around the world endured hundreds of years of chattel slavery—they were hunted, stolen, tortured, separated from families, forbidden to read and write. There were no laws to protect us from these criminal acts, you see. And your father, he served a mighty God. He challenged us to stand up and to restore our own humanity. You must never forget that." Another quote that spoke out to me was: "If you stick a knife in my back nine inches and pull it out six inches, there’s no progress. If you pull it all the way out, that’s not progress. The progress is healing the wound that the blow made." The one thing I want everyone to take from my review is that education is a paramount tool in changing for the better. I buddy read this book with a friend and we had so many discussions about Malcolm, his experiences and his faith, as well as his second conversion to Sunni Islam. We also did rudimentary research on the NOI and I'd urge anyone who does pick up this novel to research for themselves and see Malcolm's transformation following his break from the NOI. You'll hopefully realise that some concerns in the book about NOI do come to fruition. Knowledge distinguishes us from the ignorant.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Shepard (Between-the-Shelves)

    4.5/5 stars Thank you to Farrar, Straus, and Giroux for an advanced copy of this book to review! I saw a few advertisements for it, and I was super excited to read it. It's an in-depth look at Malcolm X's young adult years, told in a way that makes his life more relatable to teenagers. While this book is a sequel, it can definitely be read on its own. We piece together Malcolm X's past with flashbacks and dreams that Malcolm has when he was in prison. His story is a familiar one; he finds books an 4.5/5 stars Thank you to Farrar, Straus, and Giroux for an advanced copy of this book to review! I saw a few advertisements for it, and I was super excited to read it. It's an in-depth look at Malcolm X's young adult years, told in a way that makes his life more relatable to teenagers. While this book is a sequel, it can definitely be read on its own. We piece together Malcolm X's past with flashbacks and dreams that Malcolm has when he was in prison. His story is a familiar one; he finds books and Islam in prison. We get to see how he transforms into the Malcolm X we're most familiar with. Overall, we get to see how rigged the system is against Black people and the way that Malcolm wants to fight against the system. In addition, it's easy to see research was done on the topic. However, this doesn't take away from the story. There is a good mix of history, personal details from Malcolm X, and just enough fiction woven in. The topic is also timely, relating to the Black Lives Matter movement that's still happening in the United States. This book would be a great addition to any classroom or library. 

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kera (featherboundbooks)

    I am going to keep this review short and simple as I feel I don't have the adequate words to surmise this book. This was incredible and eye opening to the time in Malcom X's life that I wasn't privy to previously. This follows his time in incarceration from 1946-1952 and shows the drastic differences between how black and white prisoners were treated. This follows his journey and love of devouring knowledge, his interactions with other inmates, with his siblings and his introduction into Islamic I am going to keep this review short and simple as I feel I don't have the adequate words to surmise this book. This was incredible and eye opening to the time in Malcom X's life that I wasn't privy to previously. This follows his time in incarceration from 1946-1952 and shows the drastic differences between how black and white prisoners were treated. This follows his journey and love of devouring knowledge, his interactions with other inmates, with his siblings and his introduction into Islamic culture. I would recommend this book to anyone looking to learn more about historical black figures and learn (through others' eyes) more of what was going on in his head and how he got through that time in his life. Content warnings for violence, racism, suicide, gambling and drugs.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Veronica

    Thank you to libro.fm and the publisher, I was able to listen to the ALC of this book. I found it very interesting to learn about Malcolm X and how his experience in prison awoke him to his calling in life. I knew about his legacy, but I really didn't know anything about his past before listening to this book. His calling to the Islamic religion was inspiring, but, I am upset about where his relationship with his brother Reginald, who led him to the religion in the first place, was left off. I w Thank you to libro.fm and the publisher, I was able to listen to the ALC of this book. I found it very interesting to learn about Malcolm X and how his experience in prison awoke him to his calling in life. I knew about his legacy, but I really didn't know anything about his past before listening to this book. His calling to the Islamic religion was inspiring, but, I am upset about where his relationship with his brother Reginald, who led him to the religion in the first place, was left off. I would recommend this book to high school students, especially those who are interested in Black history.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ali

    This was a really good YA look at part of Malcolm Xs life. I don't know too much about his life beyone the Denzel movie. This was well written with different timelines. It provided a YA appropriate look at the atrocities his family endured, what he survived in two prisons, and gave broader sweeping looks at what Black / African Americans were dealing with. It's a must read. I'd think at least age 12+ based on content including drugs/alcohol, race-based violence, and prison life. This was a really good YA look at part of Malcolm Xs life. I don't know too much about his life beyone the Denzel movie. This was well written with different timelines. It provided a YA appropriate look at the atrocities his family endured, what he survived in two prisons, and gave broader sweeping looks at what Black / African Americans were dealing with. It's a must read. I'd think at least age 12+ based on content including drugs/alcohol, race-based violence, and prison life.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jacinta Carter

    I enjoyed this book significantly more than Malcolm X's autobiography. The details about his time in prison and how the mistreatment of Black prisoners led him to explore the beliefs he would hold for the rest of his life were written like a story rather than just a presentation of facts, making this much easier to read. Shabazz and Jackson don't shy away from including some of the more negative aspects about Malcolm X, though, which was the best part, as they don't just present him as a perfect I enjoyed this book significantly more than Malcolm X's autobiography. The details about his time in prison and how the mistreatment of Black prisoners led him to explore the beliefs he would hold for the rest of his life were written like a story rather than just a presentation of facts, making this much easier to read. Shabazz and Jackson don't shy away from including some of the more negative aspects about Malcolm X, though, which was the best part, as they don't just present him as a perfect hero. My only complaint is that I wish they had talked more about his family and what they did while he was in prison, instead of just using them as pawns in his conversion.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Latisha

    MUST READ! I loved everything about this book and learned a lot as well. Have you ever thought about reading the dictionary and/or writing all the words listed in the dictionary? I know I have and after reading this novel, I think I will start the process this year. I love to learn and will continue to educate myself. Takeaways from the book: - Progress is healing the womb. - Sometimes you have to keep your business to your chest. SO TRUE! -When you know yourself, you can sense what type of charact MUST READ! I loved everything about this book and learned a lot as well. Have you ever thought about reading the dictionary and/or writing all the words listed in the dictionary? I know I have and after reading this novel, I think I will start the process this year. I love to learn and will continue to educate myself. Takeaways from the book: - Progress is healing the womb. - Sometimes you have to keep your business to your chest. SO TRUE! -When you know yourself, you can sense what type of character anybodys made of. ❤ The Souls of Black Folks by W.E.B. Du Bois was mentioned in this book and now I'm interested in reading it. Go check out this book if you haven't already done so

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus On the YA spectrum, this comes somewhere between X (http://msyinglingreads.blogspot.com/2...) and Betty before X (http://msyinglingreads.blogspot.com/2...) Very well researched and very timely. I very much enjoy the fact that Shabazz works with a variety of well reknowned authors on these books about her family. It gives them a perfect mix of riveting writing and personal details. E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus On the YA spectrum, this comes somewhere between X (http://msyinglingreads.blogspot.com/2...) and Betty before X (http://msyinglingreads.blogspot.com/2...) Very well researched and very timely. I very much enjoy the fact that Shabazz works with a variety of well reknowned authors on these books about her family. It gives them a perfect mix of riveting writing and personal details.

  20. 5 out of 5

    David

    8/10 What an emotianally devastating, yet gratifying to read this was. The book follows Malcom's life in prison and how he awakens for the injustice his people suffer. Following that sentiment, the narrative was amazing. Yet, the only aspect I wasn't particular fond of was the jumps in timeline. However, really worth the time this was. 8/10 What an emotianally devastating, yet gratifying to read this was. The book follows Malcom's life in prison and how he awakens for the injustice his people suffer. Following that sentiment, the narrative was amazing. Yet, the only aspect I wasn't particular fond of was the jumps in timeline. However, really worth the time this was.

  21. 5 out of 5

    JoRolle Nola

    "The Awakening of Malcolm X" is a more profound look into Malcolm X's life while in prison. The Spike Lee movie only gives you a small glimpse into his prison life. This book gives details that are enough for another movie. I highly recommend this book not only for adults but for teenagers as well. It reminds us that we are never to old or lost to change with God's guidance and help. "The Awakening of Malcolm X" is a more profound look into Malcolm X's life while in prison. The Spike Lee movie only gives you a small glimpse into his prison life. This book gives details that are enough for another movie. I highly recommend this book not only for adults but for teenagers as well. It reminds us that we are never to old or lost to change with God's guidance and help.

  22. 4 out of 5

    DEVONIA BOURGEOIS

    4.5 stars

  23. 4 out of 5

    serena

    "Hard to imagine a world that considers us equals when the core of our very existence is human and they don't consider us that." "Hard to imagine a world that considers us equals when the core of our very existence is human and they don't consider us that."

  24. 4 out of 5

    Riley Dunn

    This story needs to be read. Humanizes inmates and shines a bright and beautiful light on Malcolm X’s brilliance and resilience. The part of the story that no one ever hears. Absolutely unforgettable.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cam's Corner

    First audiobook I've ever listened to. It was amazing listening to the transformation of Malcolm Little to Malcolm X. First audiobook I've ever listened to. It was amazing listening to the transformation of Malcolm Little to Malcolm X.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Patti Sabik

    Very engaging read...honestly couldn’t put it down. Having Tiffany Jackson as co-author has much to do with that since she writes for tv and her novels jump from the page with compelling dialogue. I was glad to read in the author’s note that some liberties were taken with the story, but the authors state where and how. It is a larger-than-life tribute, but the ode definitely makes the reader thirst for more information on Malcolm X at the end. The book also highlights the penal system and juxtap Very engaging read...honestly couldn’t put it down. Having Tiffany Jackson as co-author has much to do with that since she writes for tv and her novels jump from the page with compelling dialogue. I was glad to read in the author’s note that some liberties were taken with the story, but the authors state where and how. It is a larger-than-life tribute, but the ode definitely makes the reader thirst for more information on Malcolm X at the end. The book also highlights the penal system and juxtaposes reformative justice against punitive. Historical information on the two prisons is also included in the end notes and begs further reading.

  27. 5 out of 5

    EsquiredToRead

    A good book and was interesting to read after the memoir. Jusf FYI this focuses on a very specific part of his life.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shaurya Verma

    "Hard to imagine a would that considers us equals when the core of our very existence is human and they don't consider as that." TW: nigger, suicide ideation, violence, racism, drug abuse, police brutality, gambling. 'The Awakening of Malcolm X' by Tiffany D Jackson and Ilayasah Shabazz is a narrative account of the adolescent years of Malcolm X which is inclusive of his life in prison. His emotions, thought process are all given a vivid depth which makes it all the more accessible. Instances of d "Hard to imagine a would that considers us equals when the core of our very existence is human and they don't consider as that." TW: nigger, suicide ideation, violence, racism, drug abuse, police brutality, gambling. 'The Awakening of Malcolm X' by Tiffany D Jackson and Ilayasah Shabazz is a narrative account of the adolescent years of Malcolm X which is inclusive of his life in prison. His emotions, thought process are all given a vivid depth which makes it all the more accessible. Instances of degradation of the Black community resonate throughout the narrative which make it suffocating and difficult to read. The bleak life and the hopelessness inherent in it makes his journey a tough one. He finds solace and power in books and Islam in prison and we get to see the transformation from young Malcolm into the Malcolm X we are most familiar with. "There is nothing better than adversity. Every defeat, every heartbreak, every loss, contains its own seed, own lesson on how to improve your performance the next time." The first half of the book concentrates on the naïve Malcolm who, brought up in a happy home brimming with love and education with his siblings under his mother's soothing presence, goes somewhat wayward after his father is killed and mother is forcefully sent to an institution. He is sucked deep into a dark time-loop where he indulges into illicit activities. However, in prison he witnesses the cruelty shown towards his fellow inmates and the parallel between the white and the black men in that the latter are mistreated. He is motivated to read and find out the true reason for this injustices and begins his education with reading dictionaries. He articulates his anger and his curiosity towards uplifting his community and finds that education is the key to it. Eventually he is introduced to Islam by his siblings and comes his association with Elijah Muhammad, the founder of Nation of Islam that gives a firm path to his beliefs. A narrative replete with static energy gives an insight into the troublesome life of Malcolm X and his eventual transformation into the famous public activist hell bent on gaining back the basic human rights denied to his community. It is very engaging, incredible and an eye-opening narrative brimming with the zeal of transformation and social equality into his life which might not be known to many people out there. A must read!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dina E

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for a review as part of the instagram TURN THE PAGE TOUR. This does not effect my review, which is honest and unbiased. Hello again! Today was my tour post date for the instagram Turn the Pages Blog Tour, so I figured I would write a full review on my blog. When I first heard about this book, it was immediately added to my tbr, and I was so excited to have gotten a copy to review. I went into the book not really knowing much about Malcolm X. My school ne I received a copy of this book in exchange for a review as part of the instagram TURN THE PAGE TOUR. This does not effect my review, which is honest and unbiased. Hello again! Today was my tour post date for the instagram Turn the Pages Blog Tour, so I figured I would write a full review on my blog. When I first heard about this book, it was immediately added to my tbr, and I was so excited to have gotten a copy to review. I went into the book not really knowing much about Malcolm X. My school never really mentioned Malcolm X, so all I had to go by was what I researched, which wasn’t a lot. The few things I did know really interested me in his story, so I jumped at the chance to learn more. The Awakening of Malcolm X follows Malcolm during his time in prison and includes flashbacks to his life before prison. This book was really readable and fast paced. The book was presented in a way that provided me with a lot of detail and insight into Malcolm X’s life while at the same time, not feeling like an info dump. The narrative was really powerful and easy to follow. One of my favorite parts is how we see Malcolm progress through the novel. He slowly becomes more open-minded and starts listening and taking other perspectives. I really liked to see him delving into politics and, as a former debater, it was really cool to learn that he had been a part of debate team! Another thing that was really interesting to read was the parts about the Nation of Islam. As a Muslim, I think it was really interesting to learn about Malcolm X’s discovery and embracement of Islam. I knew next to nothing about the Nation, but after reading this book, I really wanted to learn more. This book raised a lot of questions and discussions because it was so thought provoking and interesting. This book deserves to be taught in class and I really hope people pick it up, because it is definitely worth it. I highly recommend this book for anyone looking to learn more about Malcolm X and if you want to stimulate a discussion.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chris G.

    In Betty Before X, Ilyasah Shabazz successfully teamed with Renée Watson to tell about the life of Shazazz’s famous mother. The co-authors effectively recounted Betty’s childhood and teen years as they were impacted by the particular flavor of racism post World War ll. Now Shabazz, working with Tiffany D. Jackson, takes a chunk of her father’s life and factionalizes it for young readers. The aptly named Awakening introduces readers not quite ready to tackle the length and complexity of Alex Hale In Betty Before X, Ilyasah Shabazz successfully teamed with Renée Watson to tell about the life of Shazazz’s famous mother. The co-authors effectively recounted Betty’s childhood and teen years as they were impacted by the particular flavor of racism post World War ll. Now Shabazz, working with Tiffany D. Jackson, takes a chunk of her father’s life and factionalizes it for young readers. The aptly named Awakening introduces readers not quite ready to tackle the length and complexity of Alex Haley’s The Autobiography of Malcolm X to Malcolm’s time in prison during a large chunk of his twenties. Opening with Malcolm’s betrayal at his trial by the white woman who he thought was in love with him, though the despair and brutality of prison, readers see the way that prisons continue and double down on racist policies and practices. Flashbacks to Malcolm’s earlier life pave the way for Malcom’s willingness to hear what his siblings have to say about the importance of following Elijah Muhammad, connecting the teachings of the Nation of Islam with the Garveyite beliefs of their father. Malcolm’s interactions with other inmates show the anger, despair, resignation, and self-hatred that are all responses to incarceration, and these men are all part of Malcolm’s struggle to form his own identity. Although Malcolm lamented his lack of a formal education, his self-education, starting with copying the dictionary, continues to inspire and encourage. In a nice touch, the book concludes when Malcom meets Betty. Don’t miss the notes in the back that explain more about the sources; the book is especially enriched by the inclusion of family letters. I’m still struggling with how to describe books that are mostly biography but have factionalized some aspects - this excellent story is a good opportunity for teachers and librarians to have that conversation with readers. EARC from NetGalley.

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