web site hit counter Sasha Masha - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Sasha Masha

Availability: Ready to download

Transgender author Agnes Borinsky deftly explores gender identity and queer romance in this heart-wrenchingly honest debut novel. Alex feels like he is in the wrong body. His skin feels strange against his bones. And then comes Tracy, who thinks he's adorably awkward, who wants to kiss him, who makes him feel like a Real Boy. But it is not quite enough. Something is missing Transgender author Agnes Borinsky deftly explores gender identity and queer romance in this heart-wrenchingly honest debut novel. Alex feels like he is in the wrong body. His skin feels strange against his bones. And then comes Tracy, who thinks he's adorably awkward, who wants to kiss him, who makes him feel like a Real Boy. But it is not quite enough. Something is missing. As Alex grapples with his identity, he finds himself trying on dresses and swiping on lipstick in the quiet of his bedroom. He meets Andre, a gay boy who is beautiful and unafraid to be who he is. Slowly, Alex begins to realize: maybe his name isn't Alex at all. Maybe it's Sasha Masha.


Compare

Transgender author Agnes Borinsky deftly explores gender identity and queer romance in this heart-wrenchingly honest debut novel. Alex feels like he is in the wrong body. His skin feels strange against his bones. And then comes Tracy, who thinks he's adorably awkward, who wants to kiss him, who makes him feel like a Real Boy. But it is not quite enough. Something is missing Transgender author Agnes Borinsky deftly explores gender identity and queer romance in this heart-wrenchingly honest debut novel. Alex feels like he is in the wrong body. His skin feels strange against his bones. And then comes Tracy, who thinks he's adorably awkward, who wants to kiss him, who makes him feel like a Real Boy. But it is not quite enough. Something is missing. As Alex grapples with his identity, he finds himself trying on dresses and swiping on lipstick in the quiet of his bedroom. He meets Andre, a gay boy who is beautiful and unafraid to be who he is. Slowly, Alex begins to realize: maybe his name isn't Alex at all. Maybe it's Sasha Masha.

30 review for Sasha Masha

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jessica | JustReadingJess

    Sasha masha is a coming of age novel focusing on gender identity. Sasha Masha was short quick read and definitely worth the time. I enjoyed reading about Alex’s struggles leading to his true identity. Alex was such an easy character to like from the beginning. I felt bad for him throughout the book. I felt like this book was a glimpse into some of the problems the transgender community faces which is a subject not brought up enough. I listened to the audiobook narrated by Agnes Borinsky and enjoye Sasha masha is a coming of age novel focusing on gender identity. Sasha Masha was short quick read and definitely worth the time. I enjoyed reading about Alex’s struggles leading to his true identity. Alex was such an easy character to like from the beginning. I felt bad for him throughout the book. I felt like this book was a glimpse into some of the problems the transgender community faces which is a subject not brought up enough. I listened to the audiobook narrated by Agnes Borinsky and enjoyed her narration. I love when the author narrates their books because the reader really gets to hear the author’s emotions. Thank you Libro.fm, Tantor Audio, and Farrar, Straus and Giroux by Sasha Masha. Full Review: https://justreadingjess.wordpress.com...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sheena

    Sasha Masha is a coming of age story exploring gender identity, sexuality, and romance. Alex doesn’t feel like a real boy until one day he realizes maybe he’s not and maybe that is okay. “Maybe I don’t feel particularly real yet I said. “Like this world is just something I have to move through until I can get to a place where I can be a real person.” The book was relatively short but I almost with it was a little longer. I’m glad books like this are being published so that trans and queen teens Sasha Masha is a coming of age story exploring gender identity, sexuality, and romance. Alex doesn’t feel like a real boy until one day he realizes maybe he’s not and maybe that is okay. “Maybe I don’t feel particularly real yet I said. “Like this world is just something I have to move through until I can get to a place where I can be a real person.” The book was relatively short but I almost with it was a little longer. I’m glad books like this are being published so that trans and queen teens get to read stories they can relate to. The book is written and narrated by the author Agnes Borinsky - I thought she did a lovely job! Thank you to Netgalley and to RB Media for the audiobook - which will be available next month (12/8/2020).

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lea (drumsofautumn)

    “It really did seem like some monstrous force was suddenly rampaging through my life. I didn’t understand it, but I knew the name: Sasha Masha.” Sasha Masha is a really moving ownvoices novel about exploring gender identity and understanding who you are. Before I go into this, I just wanna say that I will be using he/him pronouns in this review, as that is what is used throughout the entire novel and because pronouns do not necessarily equal gender, I want to respect that. I will not be “It really did seem like some monstrous force was suddenly rampaging through my life. I didn’t understand it, but I knew the name: Sasha Masha.” Sasha Masha is a really moving ownvoices novel about exploring gender identity and understanding who you are. Before I go into this, I just wanna say that I will be using he/him pronouns in this review, as that is what is used throughout the entire novel and because pronouns do not necessarily equal gender, I want to respect that. I will not be using Sasha Masha's deadname though, even though it is frequently used, as he mentions several times throughout the novel that Sasha Masha is the name he wants to be referred to as. There isn't much to say in regards to the plot of this novel but it is astounding how much was packed into this short novel. Really, in a lot of aspects it just reads like your good old coming-of-age novel, except it has the added element of Sasha Masha being trans and we follow Sasha Masha as he is figuring this out during all the other teenage experience shenanigans. “But something was wrong. There was a high wall inside of me, and it made me angry, it made me stuck; there was a self on the other side—was this, now, the thing I’d failed to see? That in my heart of hearts I wasn’t a boy after all?” I loved Sasha Masha's journey and I thought that it was very powerful and moving. There is a lot of questioning and confusion going on in Sasha Masha's inner monologue but it is so beautiful to follow him on the path to understanding his own gender identity and accepting who he is. I especially loved the way the author approached Sasha Masha realizing he is trans, where he kinda has this persona of Sasha Masha and knows that that is who he wants to be and then slowly grows into it, but also learns that that person has been him all along, he just had to make sure to really embrace that part. “I could only think of that picture, and I started to wonder whether I really just missed myself. You miss yourself? How could you miss yourself? You’re right here.” There are definitely people in Sasha Masha's life that struggle with him accepting his own identity but for the most part, he has a really wonderful support system in both old and new friends. Especially seeing the queer support system that build up around him throughout this novel was an incredibly heart-warming aspect. These people not only accept him exactly as he is but they also support his journey, both with trying to help him figure his identity out but also just being patient with him and never pushing anything. This novel also had several side-characters of colour and I very much enjoyed that there was a brief discussion about how a lot of queer riots were led by people of colour. This also introduced some discussions between a younger and older generation of queer people, which is something we so rarely get to see. “We were like two pieces of rope that had been frequently knotted; even when we were separate, our bodies held the shape of the knot we made together.” Mabel, Sasha Masha's best friend who ended up moving away, especially stands out as a side-character. Even though they can only communicate via text and calls now, Mabel is still there for all of Sasha Masha's journey and being accepting of him at all times. I loved seeing moments from their friendship in the past and seeing Mabel always being an unapologetically queer presence in Sasha Masha's life too. Their friendship is just incredibly well written and Mabel as a character within the book alone adds so much comfort. “All of a sudden I felt far away from my parents. This road might take me places they would never go.” I also found the relationship between Sasha Masha and his parents a very interesting aspect and I definitely wish we had gotten to see more of it because it was quite a complex relationship. They definitely care and worry a lot about Sasha Masha, especially as they're starting to realize that something is going on and his behaviour changes, but they're never actually there for their child to figure out the root of what is going on. Throughout the story you are definitely wondering if Sasha Masha's parents will accept him being trans. Long before he has come to the realization that he is trans, he is already wondering what his parents will think of the self-discovery journey that he is on. And I definitely liked this portrayal of Sasha Masha's relationship with his parents and thought it added an important aspect to the story. “The world was Real. This couch was Real, Murphy was Real, the light and the bookshelves and the creatures and the sounds of the city moving around me—they were all Real. Like it or not, the world is Real, and whoever we are, we are part of the world.” I definitely think that overall a lot of the aspects in this novel were kept quite brief but that is very much due to this being a very short novel too. I would've loved to see a lot of the things talked about within this story to be discussed even more. But ultimately, this showed us a glimpse of Sasha Masha's life and his journey to not only understanding their own identity but also to get more comfortable within queer spaces and understanding and connecting with other queer people. And I feel grateful to have gotten such a glimpse and I know that his story will stay with me for a while. Finishing this novel just gave me a really hopeful and positive feeling. And I know that there is lots more good things to come for Sasha Masha and people with similar journeys. After reading this story there is just such a wonderful, reassuring feeling, knowing they will find their path and people who unconditionally love and accept them. Instagram | Blog | Booktube Channel | Twitter I received an ARC through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Woodbury

    3.5 stars. I don't read that many books about coming out/transitioning anymore. They're important, but they tend to be the only thing queer writers are allowed to write about. But SASHA MASHA won me over, especially because I realized after a while that this isn't a book about a character dealing with transition. This is a story of what happens before that. It took me a little while to get a rhythm in this book, so I recommend sticking with it for a few chapters. While many trans people knew thei 3.5 stars. I don't read that many books about coming out/transitioning anymore. They're important, but they tend to be the only thing queer writers are allowed to write about. But SASHA MASHA won me over, especially because I realized after a while that this isn't a book about a character dealing with transition. This is a story of what happens before that. It took me a little while to get a rhythm in this book, so I recommend sticking with it for a few chapters. While many trans people knew their gender identity from an early age, it isn't true of all of them. And the stories we hear are so often about the group that knew that it starts to create the idea that there is only one kind of trans story. It's difficult to use my typical rules to talk about this book because so much of it is about the early stages of understanding trans identity. The main character uses he/him pronouns throughout the book and it's unclear if they will change later. I don't love using deadnames and I generally don't love it when books use them but there are certain stories it's hard to tell without them while following typical conventions. But I'll refer to him as Sasha Masha because the name is the crucial part of his identity that he constantly is able to affirm. Sasha Masha's story isn't clear. It's murky. It doesn't start with Sasha Masha being sure that he is in the wrong body or longing to be a woman. He has an opportunity for reinvention after his best friend Mabel moves away and he needs to find a new social group. Mabel is an out lesbian and it's clear that her queerness has always made Sasha Masha feel safe even if he doesn't exactly understand that yet. His sexuality is something he isn't entirely sure of yet, which is just another piece of his identity that feels unclear to him. He starts dating Tracy and is happy in the relationship until his questions about his own identity start to leave him feeling distant from everyone. Sasha Masha's lack of clarity is what makes this book so important. He is a teenager and his whole self is something he doesn't understand yet. His feeling that something is not quite right is something he's always attributed to a typical lack of self-esteem. There is nothing about him that makes the reader think they know what's coming. Instead, he gets stuck on the idea of this new name. He isn't able to verbalize to anyone what exactly it is about it that gets him. And there is no moment where he has an epiphany and now knows who he is. I loved that about it. Everything about his frustration at himself and the others in his life feels real. He doesn't think his parents will throw him out of the house, but his timid attempts to try and talk about his identity are met with amusement and condescension from his parents and just about everyone else. Except for a new friend. Sasha Masha's feelings of being lost send him to one place he feels comfortable: a queer youth center he used to go to with Mabel. And it's unsurprising that there he is able to find some space to explore who he is. There is SO MUCH for cis people, especially those who work with kids and teens, to learn from this book and this type of story. The way Sasha Masha is able to relax and learn more about himself with people who are willing to accept him however he presents himself is striking. It's not that other people in his life are unsupportive or unloving. But they demand that he be a certain person. They do not make room for him to try on something else or to withdraw while he struggles to work through it. His choice of name as "Sasha Masha" doesn't help his situation, but whenever he introduces himself this way to a queer person, they do not question it. They often recognize it as a sign to be more gentle rather than a sign to be defensive. Because of that, I forgive the book for being a little precious with its use of a queer mentor figure. So much of the book is not instructive and Sasha Masha is so in need of some help or at least some welcome space that it is something of a relief. If you, like me, have been pulling back somewhat on Trans 101 and other books about coming out, I would make an exception for this book. It is much less focused on the logistics of coming out and much more focused on how questioning your identity can feel. Especially since we have so few books for the Questioning community, this is a great one to add to Queer Teen Lit.

  5. 5 out of 5

    alleah is inactive

    TW: use of homophobic slurs (they are only ever said by queer characters reclaiming them), transphobic comments (challenged) ☆☆☆☆ | Relatable. Real. Raw. Sometimes you read a book, and there’s this part of you that can’t help but think it was written just for you. That was my thought while reading Sasha Masha. It was almost absurd how close I felt to Sasha Masha and the way this character was written. I cried several times while reading the story, and not even because it was that sad. It just felt TW: use of homophobic slurs (they are only ever said by queer characters reclaiming them), transphobic comments (challenged) ☆☆☆☆ | Relatable. Real. Raw. Sometimes you read a book, and there’s this part of you that can’t help but think it was written just for you. That was my thought while reading Sasha Masha. It was almost absurd how close I felt to Sasha Masha and the way this character was written. I cried several times while reading the story, and not even because it was that sad. It just felt so wonderful to feel like you are being seen. This story is one of the realest portrayals of identity and adolescence I’ve ever read. The pace is meandering and some might even call it slow, but I felt like it fit the story so well. There is very little plot, as this reads as more of a personal story of Sasha Masha coming to an understanding of his transness (please note that I am using he/him pronouns for Sasha Masha, as it is said in the book that he only ever goes by those pronouns, at least from what we readers can gauge) rather than a intricate story with lots of action an twists and turns. The relationships Sasha Masha forms are realistic and messy, and the feelings he has towards his parents and towards feeling “not-Real” hit home for me on SO many levels. Read the rest of my review on my blog: https://lethethereader.wordpress.com/...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Reading_ Tam_ Ishly

    DNFed. Because words used to express gay/sexuality and race irritated me. I don't care for the characters. And the writing is really haphazard. Nope. DNFed. Because words used to express gay/sexuality and race irritated me. I don't care for the characters. And the writing is really haphazard. Nope.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Thank you to Netgalley & Libro.FM for an ALC in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. Alex doesn't feel right in his body. He's never been able to put what he feels into words. But one time while playing vintage dress up with his best friend Mabel, he puts on a dress and names himself Sasha Masha. Now that Mabel has moved away, Alex is feeling even more lost. When he decides to go to the queer teen group, he decides to go as Sasha Masha, and for the first time in a long time, he Thank you to Netgalley & Libro.FM for an ALC in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. Alex doesn't feel right in his body. He's never been able to put what he feels into words. But one time while playing vintage dress up with his best friend Mabel, he puts on a dress and names himself Sasha Masha. Now that Mabel has moved away, Alex is feeling even more lost. When he decides to go to the queer teen group, he decides to go as Sasha Masha, and for the first time in a long time, he feels alive. This was a short and sweet book about a person realizing they're transgender. As Sasha surrounds herself with more people who have an idea of what she's going through, she sees what it could be like to live as her true self. I loved seeing Sasha find new friends in Andre and his friends. Having a small group of supporting friends is critical to transitioning people. The ending felt kind of abrupt to me, and I wasn't certain of Sasha's path from there. However, I loved how emotional this book was, it gave me all the feels. The only thing that I didn't like was the fact that an older gay man used a slur for gay people. Can we not?

  8. 5 out of 5

    Anjali (bookstersisters)

    I picked up this audiobook (provided by Libro.fm) on the recommendation of @zanyanomaly (on Instagram) . Sasha Masha is the coming of age story of Alex. It’s a short quick read but it kept me thinking about the story and Sasha, especially for a long long time. It begins like a usual Ya contemporary novel with a protagonist who is confused about his identity and his sexuality . It sees him trying to navigate all his contradicting feelings for Tracy, his class mate and Andre, a boy he meets by cha I picked up this audiobook (provided by Libro.fm) on the recommendation of @zanyanomaly (on Instagram) . Sasha Masha is the coming of age story of Alex. It’s a short quick read but it kept me thinking about the story and Sasha, especially for a long long time. It begins like a usual Ya contemporary novel with a protagonist who is confused about his identity and his sexuality . It sees him trying to navigate all his contradicting feelings for Tracy, his class mate and Andre, a boy he meets by chance. The author does an excellent job of translating all the confusion roiling through Alex and makes the reader empathise with him right from the start. But what made the book truly stand out was the last few chapters . Alex is like a pupa, cocooned in the expectations society places on him, trying to fit into the mold prepared for him. Throughout the book, we see his slow metamorphosis and just as we see him bursting from his chrysalis, beginning the journey towards self discovery, the book ends. It leaves you feeling full of hope, at the start of a promising dawn and I am finding myself unable to form words for how impactful that ending was. I initially rated the book 4 stars but that ending had me going back to listen again and again and over time, my love for the book just grew. Even almost a week after listening to it, I am still thinking of it and that definitely deserves a full five stars. Thank you Sai for recommending the book and Libro.fm for providing a copy of the audiobook . I highly recommend this one!!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Aly

    I always enjoy an LBGTQ story where the character has a supportive group of friends. It makes me happy that they have someone to lean on, especially if their family isn't understanding. I believe this is based on some real events the author went through, so I'm even happier she had a good circle of people. This follows Alex, a high school student who joins an LGBTQ group and begins to realize that he's not comfortable in his body. He comes up with the name Sasha Masha and starts to explore who he I always enjoy an LBGTQ story where the character has a supportive group of friends. It makes me happy that they have someone to lean on, especially if their family isn't understanding. I believe this is based on some real events the author went through, so I'm even happier she had a good circle of people. This follows Alex, a high school student who joins an LGBTQ group and begins to realize that he's not comfortable in his body. He comes up with the name Sasha Masha and starts to explore who he truly is. One of the kids in his new group, Andre, takes Sasha under his wing. Sasha starts to come to terms with how she feels and eventually accepts that she is transgender. I liked this overall, Sasha is happy at the end and has good friends. I thought the story seemed a bit too light and didn't go into enough detail. Things seemed to happen quickly and I was hoping for more insight into Sasha Masha's feelings and transition. There is also a gay slur and though it's used by a gay man in a joking way, I didn't like it. The author narrated her own book which I liked because it made it even more an #ownvoices novel. I received this audiobook from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review

  10. 4 out of 5

    River

    I don't think this will be a book for everyone, but I don't think it's trying to be. Sasha Masha is a short book where we follow a main character who is exploring gender and sexuality. The way that Sasha Masha describes their experiences will resonate a lot with trans readers, especially those who grew up feeling that they were just going through the motions of life while feeling that something is "off." The audiobook was incredibly well done, and I would definitely recommend it. I do think that I don't think this will be a book for everyone, but I don't think it's trying to be. Sasha Masha is a short book where we follow a main character who is exploring gender and sexuality. The way that Sasha Masha describes their experiences will resonate a lot with trans readers, especially those who grew up feeling that they were just going through the motions of life while feeling that something is "off." The audiobook was incredibly well done, and I would definitely recommend it. I do think that this book could have been a little bit longer. I wanted to learn more about some of the characters that were introduced, and the ending felt a little abrupt for me. *ARC provided by Netgalley

  11. 5 out of 5

    Saimon (ZanyAnomaly)

    Sasha Masha was a very quick, short read about Sasha Masha, who is figuring out his gender identity. This is not a 'coming out' story, tho. Rather, it's a look into the mind of someone figuring out what they are, when they don't quite know for sure, themselves. Sasha is confused and overwhelmed by everything around him and all he knows for sure is that he's feeling lost. The book ends way earlier than a queer trans YA book would usually end, but it leaves you with this lingering sense that this Sasha Masha was a very quick, short read about Sasha Masha, who is figuring out his gender identity. This is not a 'coming out' story, tho. Rather, it's a look into the mind of someone figuring out what they are, when they don't quite know for sure, themselves. Sasha is confused and overwhelmed by everything around him and all he knows for sure is that he's feeling lost. The book ends way earlier than a queer trans YA book would usually end, but it leaves you with this lingering sense that this is just the beginning. That Sasha's story is his own, and this is all we'll get to see of it and you'll be satisfied with that.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lu

    I received this book from NetGalley in exchange of an honest opinion. Thank you so much, Macmillan Children's Publishing Group and Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR) for the chance to read and review this book. Alex has good grades, he's a good student, a good son and friend, he's quiet, people, grown-ups like him and he's the kind and smiling kid everyone like. But he doesn't feel right in his own skin, in his own body. To complicate things, then comes Tracy, who likes him, who is cutely awkward an I received this book from NetGalley in exchange of an honest opinion. Thank you so much, Macmillan Children's Publishing Group and Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR) for the chance to read and review this book. Alex has good grades, he's a good student, a good son and friend, he's quiet, people, grown-ups like him and he's the kind and smiling kid everyone like. But he doesn't feel right in his own skin, in his own body. To complicate things, then comes Tracy, who likes him, who is cutely awkward and wants to be with him. Tracy who makes him feel more Real, but still Alex feels something is missing, something isn't right. While grappling with his identity and sexuality, trying new things, asking himself questions, he meets Andre, a gay boy who is unafraid of himself and his sexuality, who helps him understand who Alex really is. Transgender author Agnes Borinsky wrote a wonderful and intense novel about gender identity, sexuality and discovery. Told in first person, by Alex's POV, the novel is heart-wrenching and beautiful and messy. The reader follows Alex questioning himself, his sexuality, his preferred pronouns, who is or she is, how to talk with his parents and friends and so on. Mabel, his best friend, who unfortunately moved at the beginning of the novel, is a wonderful and constant presence in his life, helping and supporting Alex in understanding himself. It's thanks to her and a dress, Alex starts to question himself and who he or she is. It was intense reading about the pressure Alex feels about what people, his parents, his classmates, think he is and what he should do and be. I loved reading about Lavender Ladder, a safe place when queer people meets, with queer groups, movie nights, parties and slowly Alex is introduced in a new and wonderful world, with people just like him, ready to help him understand and process. Through friends and love, Alex slowly starts to understand his new identity and sexuality and to use the real name: Sasha Masha, a name Alex felt intensily. The way Alex thinks about Real people, people who are confident in their bodies and in what they do really hit me hard. I loved reading this book. It's very peculiar, because the reader follows Alex in his thoughts and questions, so it can be messy while he's trying to figure out himself and his sexuality and, at the same time, it's very realistic. Sasha Masha is about the beginning of a process, a slowly realizing of who Alex is, a sort of slice of life in Alex's life, while Alex struggles with questions, schools, friends, girlfriend and crushes. Reading this novel it felt like I was snooping in Alex's life, following him around and it was really heartwrenching reading him realizing the real name, identity and sexuality. It's a book about queer people, love, discovery, questioning and gender identity and it's really beautiful. "I have this theory that some people are Real People and some people are not. Real people are comfortable being themselves and don't have to think about what they want. They laugh out loud and they eat when they are hungry and they say what they're thinking not matter who is listening. And the paradox of it is that the harder you try to be Real, the deeper you know that you are not." (quote taken from the earc, so it can be subject to changes)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jay G

    Want to see more bookish things from me? Check out my Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfer... *I was given a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review* This book is extremely short, with an audiobook just over 3 hours long. It flies by quickly as you follow Alex exploring his gender identity and discovering who he truly is: Sasha Masha. I think this book will be very important for the queer community who are still in questioning, especially because th Want to see more bookish things from me? Check out my Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfer... *I was given a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review* This book is extremely short, with an audiobook just over 3 hours long. It flies by quickly as you follow Alex exploring his gender identity and discovering who he truly is: Sasha Masha. I think this book will be very important for the queer community who are still in questioning, especially because this is an own voices novel by a trans author. I liked the support system Sasha Masha finds for himself in the queer community and enjoyed following him on his journey. Unfortunately, I never really connected with his character as there isn't much plot to this, but it was a good insight into the internal struggles he was facing. Overall, a very quick read that I think will be important for many people.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Grayson

    This book spoke to me on a very personal level. Sasha's feelings and self discovery felt so much like my own. I think this is a book for trans people. Reviews from cis people about this book said they didn't connect. But as a trans person, this book was like hearing so many of my own thoughts and feelings and experiences. And the audio! I am not usually one to listen to audio books, but I really loved listening to this one. This will definitely become one of the books I give to trans teens, and I This book spoke to me on a very personal level. Sasha's feelings and self discovery felt so much like my own. I think this is a book for trans people. Reviews from cis people about this book said they didn't connect. But as a trans person, this book was like hearing so many of my own thoughts and feelings and experiences. And the audio! I am not usually one to listen to audio books, but I really loved listening to this one. This will definitely become one of the books I give to trans teens, and I will absolutely buy a copy come release!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Molly the Gemini

    Thank you to the publishers and NetGalley for an ARC of this book for an honest review. This was a beautifully written story about a teenager finding friends and an identity for himself while dealing the the typical life of an adolescent. It was a rather short read but I felt like the story was told perfectly in the length of the book. This is very much a character driven story with the plot being secondary. It works really well for the content of what is being told.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Vicky Again

    Sasha Masha is a slice-of-life story about Sasha Masha who is trying to find words, context, an idea of who Sasha Masha is. It's not a coming-out story, but more of a figuring-yourself-out story. Fans of the coming-of-age atmosphere and slice-of-life vibes of Darius the Great Is Not Okay will definitely enjoy. (I know I did.) Content Warnings: (view spoiler)[deadnaming (the story covers the time when Sasha Masha is questioning, so it's used a lot), transphobia (challenged), homophobic slurs (said Sasha Masha is a slice-of-life story about Sasha Masha who is trying to find words, context, an idea of who Sasha Masha is. It's not a coming-out story, but more of a figuring-yourself-out story. Fans of the coming-of-age atmosphere and slice-of-life vibes of Darius the Great Is Not Okay will definitely enjoy. (I know I did.) Content Warnings: (view spoiler)[deadnaming (the story covers the time when Sasha Masha is questioning, so it's used a lot), transphobia (challenged), homophobic slurs (said by queer characters in a reclamation-way) (hide spoiler)] Sasha Masha has to navigate a best friend just moving away, complicated parental relationships, a new girlfriend, and this feeling that creeps up sometimes. A feeling of discontent, of something not quite fitting. Sasha Masha finds it difficult to characterize, because how can you describe something you yourself barely even know what it is? How can you ask questions or ask for support, when you don't have the words to conceptualize it? I absolutely loved how relatable this story was. The voice was fantastic and there were so many quotable lines that teen readers will really relate to. I really loved when we Sasha Masha contemplates what makes you a "real" person, or if there truly is a line between "real" people and not "real" people. I was also a big fan of the complicated family relationship Sasha Masha has, where everything is picture perfect, but Sasha Masha still feels like something's not quite right, that Sasha Masha thinks about running away sometimes. "Maybe my life was just wasn't mine. Maybe it belonged to them [my parents]. It felt like my life would never actually be mine. My parents would keep tracking it and thinking about it and telling me what it was all about it until I got old and they got even older and one of us died." It's contemplative and you can't help but want what's best for Sasha Masha. And we get to see moments of joy--Sasha Masha finding a whole new big queer community, Sasha Masha feeling accepted, Sasha Masha being happy that something fits. But there are moments of hurt and transphobia (and generally a lot of deadnaming, because this is a figuring-stuff-out kind of story), so please make sure you're in the right headspace to read! I think Borinsky did a really great job of fitting so much in such a short story. I absolutely loved her audio narration of it (her voice is very calming!) and it really brought Sasha Masha to life. Sasha Masha may be short, but it packs a big punch. I really enjoyed listening and I'd definitely recommend to readers looking for a quick, emotive figuring-yourself-out story! Also, here's some links to some reviews by trans readers, because you really should be reading reviews by trans readers and not me! (Will update with more when I find them.) - Here's a review by Grayson, who is also on Instagram @reading_with_pride! Thank you to Libro.fm for the audiobook copy as part of the influencer program! Listened on 1.6x speed. Finally, a quick note. I chose to avoid pronouns for Sasha Masha in this review, contrary to most reviews using he/him. I am not trying to be intentionally coy about this, but I don't think it's right for me as a reader to pick pronouns for Sasha Masha, nor do I get the impression that Sasha Masha is entirely comfortable with he/him pronouns either.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    I sat down last night to do a little bit of reading. I picked up "Sasha Masha" and thought I'd read about 10% and go to bed. But this book was so short and quick that I ended up finishing it in one sitting, in two hours! Alex is a junior in high school whose best friend has recently moved away. As he begins to wonder who he'll be without his support system, he finds a new group of friend at school and at a local organization for queer teens. When he starts his first relationship and begins to fe I sat down last night to do a little bit of reading. I picked up "Sasha Masha" and thought I'd read about 10% and go to bed. But this book was so short and quick that I ended up finishing it in one sitting, in two hours! Alex is a junior in high school whose best friend has recently moved away. As he begins to wonder who he'll be without his support system, he finds a new group of friend at school and at a local organization for queer teens. When he starts his first relationship and begins to feel like something just isn't right, he begins to explore who the "Real Person" inside of him might be. This book was your typically YA LGBTQIA fare. Teenager questions identity, explores identity, comes out to friends and family to varying degrees of success, and takes one more step to becoming their true selves. As I've said before, I love to see the representation, but in 2020 these books need to have something more for me to really LOVE them. I enjoyed the read -- it was quick, easy, and straight-to-the-point. But ultimately it was so similar to previous books I've read in this genre. It's getting to the point that my own STUDENTS are begging for books with this representation where their queer identity isn't the central conflict. I'm not saying it can't BE a conflict (since in 2020, unfortunately for many teens, it is a realistic one), but to have that be the only conflict is problematic. The writing style also was too simplistic and read more like a slightly-above average teenage journal for the first half. Generally engaging story with a good plot, great representation, but not as unique and well-written as other books that tackle the same topics. I'll still recommend this book to teens who enjoy this genre.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sofi Mascaró

    *I was gifted with an early copy from the publisher and Colored Pages blog tours, thank you so much :D* I really don't know where to start... because this book literally blew me away. I didn't know I needed a book about a boy realizing he is trans and I swear this book gave me the feels 😱😱 At first I didn't know where it was going with everything it was telling, the narration seemed simple and it was kind of weird until I got used to it. And then I started paying attention to every single detail a *I was gifted with an early copy from the publisher and Colored Pages blog tours, thank you so much :D* I really don't know where to start... because this book literally blew me away. I didn't know I needed a book about a boy realizing he is trans and I swear this book gave me the feels 😱😱 At first I didn't know where it was going with everything it was telling, the narration seemed simple and it was kind of weird until I got used to it. And then I started paying attention to every single detail and was like "wow, this is really good." It really brings you inside the queer world, one I loved reading about thanks to my best friend, and it was such a refreshing thing to read about. I think this is a must read for anyone who is having doubts about themselves. Alex/Sasha Masha was a simple person but with a million thoughts going through their head that made me feel more connected to them. When I reached half the book I couldn't put it down because of their thoughts and it left me wondering "do they go through the same thing? the same questions? I hate the world for making them feel bad about themselves". And it needs to be read so then people can have an open mind and understand more about it. Until this date, I have only read Lord of Shadows that featured a trans character. Now I want to read more books with trans characters, not just because of representation, but because I really want to read more about them. I loved Sasha Masha's story, really 💜💜

  19. 4 out of 5

    elise (the petite punk)

    Thank you NetGalley for providing me with an eARC in exchange for an honest review. Sasha Masha is a story of teenage confusion and identity discovery. Alex (note: he/him pronouns are used throughout the book for this character) doesn't feel comfortable with who his is, but can't exactly pin down what it is that's wrong or missing. As he navigates a rocky relationship, confused parents, and some new queer friends, Alex starts to wonder if he's not exactly Alex: maybe he's actually Sasha Masha. Th Thank you NetGalley for providing me with an eARC in exchange for an honest review. Sasha Masha is a story of teenage confusion and identity discovery. Alex (note: he/him pronouns are used throughout the book for this character) doesn't feel comfortable with who his is, but can't exactly pin down what it is that's wrong or missing. As he navigates a rocky relationship, confused parents, and some new queer friends, Alex starts to wonder if he's not exactly Alex: maybe he's actually Sasha Masha. This is a quiet, short novel about coming to terms with sexuality and gender identity during adolescence. There's not much plot to it, but I think that works well with the fact that this story is more focused on internal processes. However, I really wanted more feel. Something about the writing style made it a bit difficult to understand how Sasha Masha was feeling--of course, one could easy guess how he was feeling, but I wanted more of his internal voice explaining what was going on in his head and heart. Overall though, this brief but realistic read had some wonderful characters and support for queer and trans teens.

  20. 5 out of 5

    sarah

    thank you to librofm for providing me with an audiobook ARC in exchange for review! this feels like a new comfort read for sure. sasha masha tells the story of a young teen coming to terms with their gender identity while stumbling through high school. it talks about young love, first relationships, queerness, and simply existing in an unkind world in such a poised and tender way. i find it rare that i want to take time out of my day to do nothing but listen to an audiobook, but sasha masha made thank you to librofm for providing me with an audiobook ARC in exchange for review! this feels like a new comfort read for sure. sasha masha tells the story of a young teen coming to terms with their gender identity while stumbling through high school. it talks about young love, first relationships, queerness, and simply existing in an unkind world in such a poised and tender way. i find it rare that i want to take time out of my day to do nothing but listen to an audiobook, but sasha masha made me want to do nothing else! content warnings for use of homophobic slurs (f slur and d slur specifically) and transphobia (challenged on page)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Loson

    Thank you libro.fm for this copy!! Loved that the author read her own book (and that it’s an own voices story), even though it wasn’t a memoir. A very fast-paced and moving story, but things happened a bit too quickly and didn’t go as deep into Sasha’s feelings as I would have liked. Overall a good debut and I’d definitely read more from Borinsky in the future!!

  22. 4 out of 5

    USOM

    (Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Tw: transphobia Sasha Masha is a story about the discomfort we feel in our bodies. The ways that memories all of a sudden make sense. All the times we've felt like we aren't being ourselves, but not knowing how to bridge that gap. How we cannot imagine a future for ourselves when the present feels so untenable. Sasha Masha is a story about self-discovery, gender and sexual identity, a (Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Tw: transphobia Sasha Masha is a story about the discomfort we feel in our bodies. The ways that memories all of a sudden make sense. All the times we've felt like we aren't being ourselves, but not knowing how to bridge that gap. How we cannot imagine a future for ourselves when the present feels so untenable. Sasha Masha is a story about self-discovery, gender and sexual identity, and friendship. To undo the lessons, norms, and rules of the world society imposes on us is no easy task. At the end of the day, to figure out the feelings we have had that separate us from these conventions, to unlearn them, to see a different possibility is even more difficult. When we are taught a language, to figure out the unspoken words, the vocabulary we don't know to describe how we feel can be daunting. Sasha Masha is a story about this journey. About the ways that a name does matter. To figure out the lines between what we think we want and what we want. There is power in the quest to find ourselves. The pieces of ourselves in the past we never recognized. full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Morelia (Strandedinbooks)

    Such a small book that carries so much with it. *CW: homophobia, homophobic slurs

  24. 4 out of 5

    Angel

    I first want to say a huge THANK YOU to Fierce Reads & Netgalley for gifting me a free e-arc in exchange for an honest review! Y'all this book was amazing. You follow Sasha Masha as he discovers his identity. This was so adorable. And such an important read. It's very quick and can be read within one sitting. I teared up a few times through this. There were so many times where I just wanted to hug Sasha Masha and tell him that everything was going to be okay. If you're looking for a quick book abou I first want to say a huge THANK YOU to Fierce Reads & Netgalley for gifting me a free e-arc in exchange for an honest review! Y'all this book was amazing. You follow Sasha Masha as he discovers his identity. This was so adorable. And such an important read. It's very quick and can be read within one sitting. I teared up a few times through this. There were so many times where I just wanted to hug Sasha Masha and tell him that everything was going to be okay. If you're looking for a quick book about LGBTQ+/Trans then I'd highly recommend you pick this one up. My only complaint is that I wish it was longer. Although, even though it was short, Agnes did an amazing job at making you fall in love with all the characters. Really good book. Please do check it out!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Thanks to the publisher for providing an early copy of the audiobook Sasha Masha in exchange for an honest review. Sasha Masha follows high schooler Alex's attempts to unravel why he's never quite felt like a he. It's short and real and wonderful, but doesn't have much there in terms of plot or characters. This is more of a story made to tell trans/dysmorphic stories instead of one that does that through one specific story and while I think it's wonderful that books like this are now able to thri Thanks to the publisher for providing an early copy of the audiobook Sasha Masha in exchange for an honest review. Sasha Masha follows high schooler Alex's attempts to unravel why he's never quite felt like a he. It's short and real and wonderful, but doesn't have much there in terms of plot or characters. This is more of a story made to tell trans/dysmorphic stories instead of one that does that through one specific story and while I think it's wonderful that books like this are now able to thrive in YA, that also means that its easy to find Sasha Masha's entire plot in dozens of more developed stories. I still really enjoyed listening to this though. Agnes Borinsky (the author) narrates it herself and she does a wonderful job of bringing her words to life.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Eli Claire

    Alex doesn’t feel like a Real Boy. Sure, he’s well-liked at school, a good student, a smiling son - but his body feels like an ill-fitting costume, he both likes and dislikes hanging out with his girlfriend, and he never knows the right thing to say. The only time he’s ever felt completely comfortable was with his best friend Mabel, but now she lives in a different state. The name Sasha Masha, a playful nickname that he and Mabel used for him, keeps coming to mind, but Alex doesn’t know what to Alex doesn’t feel like a Real Boy. Sure, he’s well-liked at school, a good student, a smiling son - but his body feels like an ill-fitting costume, he both likes and dislikes hanging out with his girlfriend, and he never knows the right thing to say. The only time he’s ever felt completely comfortable was with his best friend Mabel, but now she lives in a different state. The name Sasha Masha, a playful nickname that he and Mabel used for him, keeps coming to mind, but Alex doesn’t know what to do with that. If he doesn’t know how to name his feelings, how can he possibly figure out what they mean? Then he meets Andre, a blue-haired, unapologetically queer boy at the local youth group, and slowly but surely, Alex is having experiences that are making things click into place. Maybe he’s not a Real Boy - maybe he’s something entirely different. A lyrical, moving story of queerness and being a teenager, of finding real friends and figuring out who you are. This book left me feeling hopeful and satisfied, and I am so very happy that queer authors are writing the books they wish they’d seen as teenagers. This one was a quick read, with a unique main character and story we can all relate to one way or another. I received an advanced copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Comes out November 10th, 2020.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for an ALC of this book to review. Alex had never really felt real. All his life he's felt like he was just waiting for something else to happen for his real life to begin. But after his best friend moves away, he becomes more and more angry with life, and he has to make a choice: continue hiding as the boy he's always been, or become Sasha Masha, the person he feels he needs to be? This is an amazing ownvoices coming of age story. I loved the tone of the w Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for an ALC of this book to review. Alex had never really felt real. All his life he's felt like he was just waiting for something else to happen for his real life to begin. But after his best friend moves away, he becomes more and more angry with life, and he has to make a choice: continue hiding as the boy he's always been, or become Sasha Masha, the person he feels he needs to be? This is an amazing ownvoices coming of age story. I loved the tone of the writing and how deeply we delved into Sasha Masha's character and understanding about themself. A huge part of this book is that you can't find out who you truly are by living in your own head. You need to experience life, make decisions, and have a community to help you discover yourself. I loved that about the book and loved the queer community that Sasha Masha found! Definitely pick up this book when it comes out!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Neriah

    "All these years I'd never put the pieces together. They pointed to something that didn't make sense to me. I hid them in different corners of my memory, where I wouldn't accidentally see them together and make sense of them. But when I wasn't looking, they'd banded together and given themselves a name. Sasha Masha, they said. That's us." Thank you Colored Pages Book Tour for providing me with an e-arc through NetGalley and giving me the opportunity of being one of the bloggers on the promotion "All these years I'd never put the pieces together. They pointed to something that didn't make sense to me. I hid them in different corners of my memory, where I wouldn't accidentally see them together and make sense of them. But when I wasn't looking, they'd banded together and given themselves a name. Sasha Masha, they said. That's us." Thank you Colored Pages Book Tour for providing me with an e-arc through NetGalley and giving me the opportunity of being one of the bloggers on the promotional tour of Sasha Masha by Agnes Borinsky. This is one of those books I'm going to have a tough time writing the review over. I may or may not end up writing paragraphs of my thoughts and how much of 'everything' the book happens to be. All I can do is sit back and go through everything this reading experience turned out to be about. Here is the blurb: Alex's best friend moves out and Alex is left feeling even more wrong and strange within his own skin and self. Until his class genius, Tracy ends up being his girlfriend and who he thinks will make him feel like A Real Boy with all the dates and kisses. But it isn't quite enough. Something is missing. As Alex struggles with finding answers to what feels amiss with his identity, he finds himself in a support group for queer teens, in his locality, after trying on dresses and swiping on lipstick in the quiet of his bedroom. There, he meets a beautiful gay boy, Andre, who is unafraid to own his identity. Slowly, Alex begins to realise: maybe, he isn't Alex at all. Maybe it is Sasha Masha. With her impassioned simplicity and unabashed honesty, Agnes Borinsky debuts Sasha Masha- a soul-touching tearjerker, exploring queer identity and queer romance. Narrated in the first person, this book provides a raw insight into the life of a teenager who is about to pursue a journey of exploring one's identity and sexuality, portrayed under a realistic light. There are scenarios that are truthful and hurtful. Something that every queer person, whether trans or not, can relate to. And that includes family and close friends' part in the journey. The questions Alex poses himself, his thoughts, his confusion and his inner battles are something that comes close to home and Agnes has impressively captured that with her words. The characters: Alex's family, Mabel (his best friend), Tracy, Andre and others who play a minor but a crucial role in the story, are realistically portrayed. Readers can easily know that as much as they play a lasting role, Agnes has written them in just the right way with Alex being the primary focus. As much as I would love to know more about Alex's relationships with all the characters in detail, it just felt right that it isn't the case. I rarely stay up to read a book. It is so rare that I can actually name books that I stayed up late into the night to read. But this made me stay up late until I finished reading it. For once in aeons, I was not distracted by anything and I finished this in two hours. I found myself sniffing and crying at so many points of this read. Maybe, in the end, I cried in a good way since it ended in a genuine note of Alex beginning his journey, but throughout the read, it was not the same case. This is not just another trans story*. This is so much more: a very necessary read. I really want to read Alex's journey more but I don't think there would one. As I mentioned earlier, I don't know if I reviewed this right but all I can say with certainty that you should make sure that you add this title on your reading list because you do not want to miss out on this one. *Just another trans story: I really had to add this note but cishet's do not have the right to say that it is 'just another trans story" when they have been writing stories with repetitive tropes and themes of which some are just too bad and too embarrassing and continues to praise those books. Let us not forget how dangerously problematic some of your (cishets) tropes, themes and books are. So move a lil, you are blocking the glorious light LGBTQ+ authors and otherwise are spreading.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Berry

    3.5 stars Sasha Masha is the story of a teenager, trying to come to terms with themselves, their gender identity, and their place in the world. Big words, but a very small, personal story. This book was quiet. Thin, even. Those are often dangerous as they can cut to the flesh. This one though was like having a polite conversation with someone who just woke up and is trying to dazedly tell you about their dream. It was simplistic. Do you know the feeling, when a thought is just a mere echo of a wor 3.5 stars Sasha Masha is the story of a teenager, trying to come to terms with themselves, their gender identity, and their place in the world. Big words, but a very small, personal story. This book was quiet. Thin, even. Those are often dangerous as they can cut to the flesh. This one though was like having a polite conversation with someone who just woke up and is trying to dazedly tell you about their dream. It was simplistic. Do you know the feeling, when a thought is just a mere echo of a word, yet to become a coherent vowel or touch or sound? This is exactly how this book feels, and it’s often frustrating because you don’t know how to slow yourself to the primality of the mc’s emotional level or comprehension of themselves. The mc is a teen tinged with the melancholic banality of asking yourself existential questions. At least, we see it as banal because we don’t yet know that questioning your place in the world often masks the real question - who is that self? how do I even know there’s another me to be found, and where do I start to look for them? It only now dawns on me, how difficult it is to describe the trans experience because there’s not just one way of doing so. Well, this book tries. In certain ways, it succeeds beautifully, and in others, it creates a barrier between the questioning main character and the questioning reader. My main issue with this book is its name. When the mc decided they want to be called Sasha Masha, I had to force myself to take them seriously, and my reaction on itself bothered me to the point of constant confrontation. The name “Sasha Masha” isn’t like “Anna” or “Alice” or any other common feminine name. This choice was deliberate, and by choosing to give your mc an unusual name, you force the readers both to respect the choice the mc made, no matter how odd it may seem, and it questions what constructs to us as odd, to begin with. Both are very good threads to pick, in my opinion. On the other hand, stands the question of who is this book for. Because by calling your character a name that to many will sound like a childish singsong nickname (I called my kindergartener Rita-Pitta), you alienated them in a way, from possibly an already different experience of their own. So here stands the question - is this book made for the cis reader, who wants and needs to understand the trans experience, or is it for those who need to see themselves reflected within the pages of a book, in which case, I doubt any choice of name would have changed how big a gift this is. There was this one bit where a very peculiar character (who am I kidding? everyone and everything about this book was peculiar) started reading people for their "struggle of choice", which I found both brutal and somewhat true, but it was an odd part of the book, that felt almost unrelated to it. Like the author just needed a place to put their manifesto, and this had available space. The beauty and truth in this book, no matter its faults, lies in how it's is about finding the people and the community that can help you understand the things in yourself that are almost indescribable... because perhaps, others can describe them for you. Or just extend a very needed, friendly hand.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Maria Nolze

    ‘I have this theory that some people are Real People and some people are not. Real People are comfortable being themselves and don’t have to think about what they want.’ ✨ ⭐️ Rating 4.5/5 👱🏼‍♀️🧔🏻👩🏻👱🏽‍♂️ Meet The Characters - Alex - Mabel - Tracy - Andre The Story 📖 Alex feels like he is in the wrong body, he feels like somehow he isn’t a Real Person. His skin feels weird, he’s conscious of his big hands and something is just not right. He meets Tracy, who finds him super cute and attractive and they b ‘I have this theory that some people are Real People and some people are not. Real People are comfortable being themselves and don’t have to think about what they want.’ ✨ ⭐️ Rating 4.5/5 👱🏼‍♀️🧔🏻👩🏻👱🏽‍♂️ Meet The Characters - Alex - Mabel - Tracy - Andre The Story 📖 Alex feels like he is in the wrong body, he feels like somehow he isn’t a Real Person. His skin feels weird, he’s conscious of his big hands and something is just not right. He meets Tracy, who finds him super cute and attractive and they become a couple. Some how though something is not quite right and missing when they are together. Around the same time, Alex meets Andre, a gay boy. Andre knows what he stands for and wants, he stands up for himself and isn’t afraid. Alex is deeply impressed and through this friendship he realizes that maybe his name is not Alex, maybe it is Sasha Masha. My Thoughts 💭 This was such a moving & honest coming of age story, exploring romance & friendship, sexuality & most importantly gender identity. This novel is relatively short & I really wished it would have lasted longer. On the other hand I am impressed how much was packed into it! I especially loved the friendship thematic of the book, it was awesome to see how much support Alex got from his friend Mabel (even after she had moved away) - she was just the best! I also thought it was so wonderful how Andre came into the picture & with him, Alex gained a whole support group of more friends. I have to admit that I haven’t read many other transgender stories or books that explore themes like transitioning, so it will definitely be on my list to read more in 2021. This book ended on such a positive note and really makes one hopeful that things can be worked out if people just try to understand & respect each other! Thank you so much to Libro.FM & Tantor Audio for this #ALC which I really enjoyed! Especially the narration by author Agnes Borinsky was amazing!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.