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She Bop: The Definitive History of Women in Popular Music - Revised and Updated 25th Anniversary Edition

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Since She Bop was first published in 1995, digital downloading has transformed the music landscape. But has issue of gender inequality changed too? For She Bop, Lucy O’Brien conducted over 250 interviews with female artists and women working behind the scenes in A&R, marketing, music publishing, and production to write a groundbreaking exploration of sexism in the music in Since She Bop was first published in 1995, digital downloading has transformed the music landscape. But has issue of gender inequality changed too? For She Bop, Lucy O’Brien conducted over 250 interviews with female artists and women working behind the scenes in A&R, marketing, music publishing, and production to write a groundbreaking exploration of sexism in the music industry. Fusing many untold stories, O’Brien presents a feminist history of women in popular music, from 1920s blues to the present day. Talking to iconic artists from Eartha Kitt and Nina Simone to Debbie Harry, Poly Styrene, and Beyoncé, she charts how women have negotiated "old boy" power networks to be seen and to get their music heard. This revised edition updates that story through many fresh interviews and new perspectives. In a new introduction and additional closing chapter, O’Brien asks why, in 2020, women own just 13 percent of music publishing and are still a minority among festival headliners. She celebrates the rise of unique women such as Lizzo and Billie Eilish who are bursting through and creating new possibilities for female artists, while also looking at the struggles of artists like Kesha and Aaliyah, and wondering whether the pop industry has had its #MeToo moment. When she first wrote She Bop, O’Brien questioned the way the music press lumped female artists together under the term "Women in Rock," saying that the ultimate goal was to make that phrase redundant. Now, despite the gender inequalities that still exist, greater awareness means few magazine editors would dare to feature women in such a derogatory way. Published to celebrate the original book’s 25th anniversary—and in the year that also marks the 50th anniversary of Women’s Liberation—this new She Bop will appeal to a huge cross-section of readers, from music fans to the LGBT audience and women of all generations.


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Since She Bop was first published in 1995, digital downloading has transformed the music landscape. But has issue of gender inequality changed too? For She Bop, Lucy O’Brien conducted over 250 interviews with female artists and women working behind the scenes in A&R, marketing, music publishing, and production to write a groundbreaking exploration of sexism in the music in Since She Bop was first published in 1995, digital downloading has transformed the music landscape. But has issue of gender inequality changed too? For She Bop, Lucy O’Brien conducted over 250 interviews with female artists and women working behind the scenes in A&R, marketing, music publishing, and production to write a groundbreaking exploration of sexism in the music industry. Fusing many untold stories, O’Brien presents a feminist history of women in popular music, from 1920s blues to the present day. Talking to iconic artists from Eartha Kitt and Nina Simone to Debbie Harry, Poly Styrene, and Beyoncé, she charts how women have negotiated "old boy" power networks to be seen and to get their music heard. This revised edition updates that story through many fresh interviews and new perspectives. In a new introduction and additional closing chapter, O’Brien asks why, in 2020, women own just 13 percent of music publishing and are still a minority among festival headliners. She celebrates the rise of unique women such as Lizzo and Billie Eilish who are bursting through and creating new possibilities for female artists, while also looking at the struggles of artists like Kesha and Aaliyah, and wondering whether the pop industry has had its #MeToo moment. When she first wrote She Bop, O’Brien questioned the way the music press lumped female artists together under the term "Women in Rock," saying that the ultimate goal was to make that phrase redundant. Now, despite the gender inequalities that still exist, greater awareness means few magazine editors would dare to feature women in such a derogatory way. Published to celebrate the original book’s 25th anniversary—and in the year that also marks the 50th anniversary of Women’s Liberation—this new She Bop will appeal to a huge cross-section of readers, from music fans to the LGBT audience and women of all generations.

31 review for She Bop: The Definitive History of Women in Popular Music - Revised and Updated 25th Anniversary Edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jay Gabler

    If there's a theme spanning She Bop, it's the way women artists have always had to negotiate the lenses men see them through. With men as the music industry's perennial gatekeepers, women have rarely had the freedom to embody their own authentic selves the way men have. I reviewed She Bop for The Current. If there's a theme spanning She Bop, it's the way women artists have always had to negotiate the lenses men see them through. With men as the music industry's perennial gatekeepers, women have rarely had the freedom to embody their own authentic selves the way men have. I reviewed She Bop for The Current.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Martin Maenza

    This is a very thoroughly researched look at women in music over the past nine or so decades.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kimley

    Tosh and I discuss this on our Book Musik podcast. Respect! Women have been fighting the pop music establishment since the beginning for just a little bit… Rock ‘n’ rollers like to think they live by their own rules, outside the establishment, but women know that it’s an ol’ boys club on par with cliques of politicians and financiers. So, sisters are doing it for themselves and finding unique ways to assert their creative voices. O’Brien gives us an exhaustive look at the struggles and triumphs o Tosh and I discuss this on our Book Musik podcast. Respect! Women have been fighting the pop music establishment since the beginning for just a little bit… Rock ‘n’ rollers like to think they live by their own rules, outside the establishment, but women know that it’s an ol’ boys club on par with cliques of politicians and financiers. So, sisters are doing it for themselves and finding unique ways to assert their creative voices. O’Brien gives us an exhaustive look at the struggles and triumphs of women in the music biz since recorded music started.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stocktonian

  6. 5 out of 5

    Pisania

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alexander

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jon

  9. 4 out of 5

    Emma

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sylvia

  11. 4 out of 5

    The Quarto Group

  12. 5 out of 5

    s d

  13. 4 out of 5

    Olga Polyakov

  14. 5 out of 5

    Steven Schend

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jj

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tilly

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ciara Pollock

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dave Petkus

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kaitie

  21. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte Glanville

  22. 5 out of 5

    simon marcinkowski

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bryony Williams

  24. 5 out of 5

    Graham McCusker

  25. 5 out of 5

    cecilia

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

  27. 4 out of 5

    Danica Bansie

  28. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Maria Serrano Signes

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  31. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Estey

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