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Post York

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Set in New York City after the melting of the polar ice caps, an independent loner along with his cat and only friend, navigates the flooded city as he tries to live another day. Each morning he sails in search of food, crossing paths with others from this makeshift community--from outsiders like himself to the depraved and ruthless elite--all struggling to maintain a sense Set in New York City after the melting of the polar ice caps, an independent loner along with his cat and only friend, navigates the flooded city as he tries to live another day. Each morning he sails in search of food, crossing paths with others from this makeshift community--from outsiders like himself to the depraved and ruthless elite--all struggling to maintain a sense of normalcy in a city drowned in its past. But everything changes when he encounters both a mysterious woman and a trapped blue whale. Will they be each other's salvation . . . or destruction? An eco-fiction fable of epic proportions, POST YORK is an expansion of the Eisner nominated one-shot, and includes an environmental fact sheet, and other bonus material. JAMES ROMBERGER is an Eisner-nominated cartoonist, fine artist and artist of the graphic novels 7 Miles a Second, The Late Child and Other Animals, Bronx Kill and Aaron and Ahmed. James Romberger...is in the highest horror-comics tradition.--The New York Times Book Review Romberger's art is a fine version of bony realism - his figures are so casually realistic, you can almost see the joints moving.--Entertainment Weekly James Romberger's Post York is a set of three alluvial nightmares that talk about what small changes can do in the New York we are heading to all too quickly. It makes one aspect of climate change distressingly real... it's good to see a fine artist drawing about it seriously.--Samuel R. Delany, Dhalgren and Through the Valley of the Nest of Spiders Told in a brutal use of light and shadow, this desolate tale of post-apocalypse sucker-punches you with...of all things...hope.-- Matt Kindt, Bang!, Ether, Dept.H Post York casts deep human drama against an epic canvas with wonderful artwork by James Romberger. Highy recommended.--Jeff Lemire, Sweet Tooth, Black Hammer and Old Man Logan (Post York is) beautiful on multiple levels. It shouldn't be this rare to see sequential art be so precise and open-hearted at the same time. We also shouldn't be seeing this world burn and drown, but here we are.--Ales Kot, Zero, Winter Soldier and Material


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Set in New York City after the melting of the polar ice caps, an independent loner along with his cat and only friend, navigates the flooded city as he tries to live another day. Each morning he sails in search of food, crossing paths with others from this makeshift community--from outsiders like himself to the depraved and ruthless elite--all struggling to maintain a sense Set in New York City after the melting of the polar ice caps, an independent loner along with his cat and only friend, navigates the flooded city as he tries to live another day. Each morning he sails in search of food, crossing paths with others from this makeshift community--from outsiders like himself to the depraved and ruthless elite--all struggling to maintain a sense of normalcy in a city drowned in its past. But everything changes when he encounters both a mysterious woman and a trapped blue whale. Will they be each other's salvation . . . or destruction? An eco-fiction fable of epic proportions, POST YORK is an expansion of the Eisner nominated one-shot, and includes an environmental fact sheet, and other bonus material. JAMES ROMBERGER is an Eisner-nominated cartoonist, fine artist and artist of the graphic novels 7 Miles a Second, The Late Child and Other Animals, Bronx Kill and Aaron and Ahmed. James Romberger...is in the highest horror-comics tradition.--The New York Times Book Review Romberger's art is a fine version of bony realism - his figures are so casually realistic, you can almost see the joints moving.--Entertainment Weekly James Romberger's Post York is a set of three alluvial nightmares that talk about what small changes can do in the New York we are heading to all too quickly. It makes one aspect of climate change distressingly real... it's good to see a fine artist drawing about it seriously.--Samuel R. Delany, Dhalgren and Through the Valley of the Nest of Spiders Told in a brutal use of light and shadow, this desolate tale of post-apocalypse sucker-punches you with...of all things...hope.-- Matt Kindt, Bang!, Ether, Dept.H Post York casts deep human drama against an epic canvas with wonderful artwork by James Romberger. Highy recommended.--Jeff Lemire, Sweet Tooth, Black Hammer and Old Man Logan (Post York is) beautiful on multiple levels. It shouldn't be this rare to see sequential art be so precise and open-hearted at the same time. We also shouldn't be seeing this world burn and drown, but here we are.--Ales Kot, Zero, Winter Soldier and Material

30 review for Post York

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    A short story about a young man living in a New York City flooded by melting polar ice caps. The story is told how three minor alterations could cause the story to veer in drastically different directions. I didn't think the sequential art flowed that well. It was sometimes hard to pick up was happening between the panels or the intentions of the characters in the story themselves. Received a review copy from Dark Horse and Edelweiss. all thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforem A short story about a young man living in a New York City flooded by melting polar ice caps. The story is told how three minor alterations could cause the story to veer in drastically different directions. I didn't think the sequential art flowed that well. It was sometimes hard to pick up was happening between the panels or the intentions of the characters in the story themselves. Received a review copy from Dark Horse and Edelweiss. all thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    Post York tells the story of Crosby, a young man, trying to survive a post-apocalyptic New York that has flooded because of climate change. While he tries to find food, he comes across someone elses hiding place. That person isn't there, so he quickly steals some of their food, when he is attacked by the returning owner, a woman. In self-defense he kills her, and there the story splits - we get to read another the way the story could've played out, and even a third way. I'm not entirely sure why t Post York tells the story of Crosby, a young man, trying to survive a post-apocalyptic New York that has flooded because of climate change. While he tries to find food, he comes across someone elses hiding place. That person isn't there, so he quickly steals some of their food, when he is attacked by the returning owner, a woman. In self-defense he kills her, and there the story splits - we get to read another the way the story could've played out, and even a third way. I'm not entirely sure why this splitting the narrative occurs, my best guess would be it's a sort of faint echo of our time, when we could still make better choices to avoid the worst climate change-related damage (if that is even still possible..). In the end, the story is not that interesting, it's the art that shines. Beautiful vistas of a drowned New York in stark black and white. In the back of the book we find a pretty detailed fact-based projection what will happen to New York if we keep going down the path we are. It also becomes clear that the character of Crosby is based on the artist's son of the same name. And here I found it to get a bit cringey.. Crosby, a visual artist himself, has written and recorded a rap track about the pending ecological doom, which you can find on Bandcamp. Personally, I thought it was kind of terrible, but of course your mileage may vary. (Received an ARC from Berger Books/Dark Horse Books through Edelweis)

  3. 4 out of 5

    April Gray

    So, we have three stories that are alternate versions of one story, about people living in New York City after the ice caps have melted. The constants in the stories are a young man whose only companion is his cat, who discovers someone's hideout in an old movie theater while out scavenging, the young woman that lives in said theater hideout, and a whale that becomes trapped within the city, as well as various secondary characters. Two of the stories involve the young man getting caught swiping So, we have three stories that are alternate versions of one story, about people living in New York City after the ice caps have melted. The constants in the stories are a young man whose only companion is his cat, who discovers someone's hideout in an old movie theater while out scavenging, the young woman that lives in said theater hideout, and a whale that becomes trapped within the city, as well as various secondary characters. Two of the stories involve the young man getting caught swiping canned food from the young woman's stash, with the story splitting off into two different endings, and the third story centers more on the other characters. The stories aren't bad, but they're not great either- they're okay. The art is nice; the stark black and white illustrations convey the desolation and decay of the crumbling city well. I'm not entirely sure why the narrative split into different takes, but I think it has to do with the publication history, a new ending for each publication, perhaps the author trying out alternate story lines. In the notes following the stories, we get a detailed explanation of the studies Romberger based his post-climate-change-disaster New York on, and find out the young man's character was based on the author's son. Tl;dr version: good, not great, but worth reading, with good art.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Villain E

    A quick read with great black-and-white art. Set in a flooded New York City, a loner encounters a group of young people. There are no villains, but bad things happen in the struggle to survive.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Liz

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rob Schamberger

  7. 4 out of 5

    Paul Williams

  8. 4 out of 5

    Caralen

  9. 4 out of 5

    Joey

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shaun Cordingley

  11. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  12. 4 out of 5

    Monique

  13. 5 out of 5

    Iain Ross

  14. 5 out of 5

    Steve Potter

  15. 5 out of 5

    Selena

  16. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah T.

  18. 5 out of 5

    James

  19. 4 out of 5

    Richard Wade

  20. 4 out of 5

    Angie

  21. 4 out of 5

    James

  22. 4 out of 5

    Terrance

  23. 4 out of 5

    Magnús Eliassen

  24. 4 out of 5

    Zach

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cerrig

  26. 5 out of 5

    Eva

  27. 5 out of 5

    Szymon Holcman

  28. 4 out of 5

    Colin Moon

  29. 5 out of 5

    john

  30. 4 out of 5

    Pat

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