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The dream of a queer separatist town. The life of a gay and Jewish Nazi-fighter. A gender reveal party that tears apart reality. These are the just some of the comics you'll find in this massive queer comics anthology from The Nib. Be Gay, Do Comics is filled with dozens of comics about LGBTQIA experiences, ranging from personal stories to queer history to cutting satire ab The dream of a queer separatist town. The life of a gay and Jewish Nazi-fighter. A gender reveal party that tears apart reality. These are the just some of the comics you'll find in this massive queer comics anthology from The Nib. Be Gay, Do Comics is filled with dozens of comics about LGBTQIA experiences, ranging from personal stories to queer history to cutting satire about pronoun panic and brands desperate to co-opt pride. Brimming with resilience, inspiration, and humor, an incredible lineup of top indie cartoonists takes you from the American Revolution through Stonewall to today's fights for equality and representation. Featuring more than 30 cartoonists including Hazel Newlevant, Joey Alison Sayers, Maia Kobabe, Matt Lubchansky, Breena Nuñez, Sasha Velour, Shing Yin Khor, Levi Hastings, Mady G, Bianca Xunise, Kazimir Lee, and many, many more!


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The dream of a queer separatist town. The life of a gay and Jewish Nazi-fighter. A gender reveal party that tears apart reality. These are the just some of the comics you'll find in this massive queer comics anthology from The Nib. Be Gay, Do Comics is filled with dozens of comics about LGBTQIA experiences, ranging from personal stories to queer history to cutting satire ab The dream of a queer separatist town. The life of a gay and Jewish Nazi-fighter. A gender reveal party that tears apart reality. These are the just some of the comics you'll find in this massive queer comics anthology from The Nib. Be Gay, Do Comics is filled with dozens of comics about LGBTQIA experiences, ranging from personal stories to queer history to cutting satire about pronoun panic and brands desperate to co-opt pride. Brimming with resilience, inspiration, and humor, an incredible lineup of top indie cartoonists takes you from the American Revolution through Stonewall to today's fights for equality and representation. Featuring more than 30 cartoonists including Hazel Newlevant, Joey Alison Sayers, Maia Kobabe, Matt Lubchansky, Breena Nuñez, Sasha Velour, Shing Yin Khor, Levi Hastings, Mady G, Bianca Xunise, Kazimir Lee, and many, many more!

30 review for Be Gay, Do Comics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Maia

    I got this book in advance of it's August release date because I am one of the contributors :) It's a wonderful collection of short pieces, most previously published on The Nib, a few of which were commissioned new for this volume. I had read probably half of them or so in the past, but the ones that stood out on this pass included Hazel Newlevant's "Queer Uprisings Before Stonewall"; "Queerness has always been part of life in the middle east" by an anonymous author; "Decolonizing Queerness in t I got this book in advance of it's August release date because I am one of the contributors :) It's a wonderful collection of short pieces, most previously published on The Nib, a few of which were commissioned new for this volume. I had read probably half of them or so in the past, but the ones that stood out on this pass included Hazel Newlevant's "Queer Uprisings Before Stonewall"; "Queerness has always been part of life in the middle east" by an anonymous author; "Decolonizing Queerness in the Philippines"by Trindad Escobar; "When You're Invisible in Pop Culture" by Bianca Xunise and Sage Coffey; "The Homophobic Hysteria of the Lavender Scare" by Kazimir Lee and Dorian Alexander; "Livejournal Made Me Gay" by JB Brager; "It's all for the Breast" by Alexis Sudgen; "Witch Camp" by Melanie Gillman; "The American Revolution's Greatest Leader was Openly Gay" by Josh Trujillo and Levi Hastings; and "The Wonderfully Queer World of Moomin" by Mady G, who also illustrated the beautiful cover.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Maia

    I got this book in advance of it's August release date because I am one of the contributors :) It's a wonderful collection of short pieces, most previously published on The Nib, a few of which were commissioned new for this volume. I had read probably half of them or so in the past, but the ones that stood out on this pass included Hazel Newlevant's "Queer Uprisings Before Stonewall"; "Queerness has always been part of life in the middle east" by an anonymous author; "Decolonizing Queerness in t I got this book in advance of it's August release date because I am one of the contributors :) It's a wonderful collection of short pieces, most previously published on The Nib, a few of which were commissioned new for this volume. I had read probably half of them or so in the past, but the ones that stood out on this pass included Hazel Newlevant's "Queer Uprisings Before Stonewall"; "Queerness has always been part of life in the middle east" by an anonymous author; "Decolonizing Queerness in the Philippines"by Trindad Escobar; "When You're Invisible in Pop Culture" by Bianca Xunise and Sage Coffey; "The Homophobic Hysteria of the Lavender Scare" by Kazimir Lee and Dorian Alexander; "Livejournal Made Me Gay" by JB Brager; "It's all for the Breast" by Alexis Sudgen; "Witch Camp" by Melanie Gillman; "The American Revolution's Greatest Leader was Openly Gay" by Josh Trujillo and Levi Hastings; and "The Wonderfully Queer World of Moomin" by Mady G, who also illustrated the beautiful cover.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Danika at The Lesbrary

    Be Gay, Do Comics is an anthology with more than 30 contributors, all discussing some aspect of queer life. This was a refreshingly diverse and thought-provoking collection. Most anthologies in this vein that I've read have played it pretty safe: they've usually been very white, and mostly focused on gay cis men, with the overarching message being one of acceptance. Be Gay, Do Comics covers a wide range of topics from a lot of different voices, including many artists of color and trans artists, Be Gay, Do Comics is an anthology with more than 30 contributors, all discussing some aspect of queer life. This was a refreshingly diverse and thought-provoking collection. Most anthologies in this vein that I've read have played it pretty safe: they've usually been very white, and mostly focused on gay cis men, with the overarching message being one of acceptance. Be Gay, Do Comics covers a wide range of topics from a lot of different voices, including many artists of color and trans artists, and includes comics about queer liberation and resisting assimilation. It's hard to speak about an anthology like this in a cohesive way, because they are all so different: in art style, tone, topic, and identity. Overall, I really enjoyed it. Although as always there were some comics I liked more than others, there weren't any that I felt were weak. It's a great opportunity to be exposed to a lot of different artists as well. This is one I would happily recommend. It's not focused specifically on lesbians and bi women, but there is definitely sapphic representation. I'm happy to see that queer anthologies are expanding to be a little more challenging and diverse than they were just a handful of years ago.  Full review will go up at the Lesbrary September 1st.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Humorous, painful, fascinating. This anthology covers a lot of ground, coming around most frequently to gender identity, especially in the autobiographical pieces. But there are histories of the Lavender Scare, Pride flag, and queer uprisings; biographies of Gad Beck, Tove Jansson, and Baron von Steuben; and oodles more about haircuts, birth control, Log Cabin Republicans, and Jussie Smollett. Stories range from one to ten pages in length, with around 40 writers/artists contributing. Unlike a lot Humorous, painful, fascinating. This anthology covers a lot of ground, coming around most frequently to gender identity, especially in the autobiographical pieces. But there are histories of the Lavender Scare, Pride flag, and queer uprisings; biographies of Gad Beck, Tove Jansson, and Baron von Steuben; and oodles more about haircuts, birth control, Log Cabin Republicans, and Jussie Smollett. Stories range from one to ten pages in length, with around 40 writers/artists contributing. Unlike a lot of anthologies of this size, the subject matter is consistently interesting and the stories are consistently well done.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bogi Takács

    Short nonfictional comics about QUILTBAG+ topics: personal narratives, educational strips, etc. I read them with interest, even though I'd already been familiar with a bunch of these from back when they'd been posted online. I personally found the comics which focused on non-Western countries the most interesting, and would have loved an entire volume on that topic, not just a handful of pieces. Maybe a next one? It was a bit sad that with all the excellent personal narratives, there was only one Short nonfictional comics about QUILTBAG+ topics: personal narratives, educational strips, etc. I read them with interest, even though I'd already been familiar with a bunch of these from back when they'd been posted online. I personally found the comics which focused on non-Western countries the most interesting, and would have loved an entire volume on that topic, not just a handful of pieces. Maybe a next one? It was a bit sad that with all the excellent personal narratives, there was only one intersex story and it was a purely educational one with interviews (generally if you pay attention to intersex activism - and you do, right?! right?! -, you probably heard all that from the original people who made those arguments). I felt this could have been commissioned better: reach out to those activists and pair them with artists to let them tell their own stories. That could also be a whole anthology :) One of my bigger issues was that the adaptation to print was quite thoughtless. Very small text in multiple comics, details lost, low-contrast text boxes from the RGB -> CMYK conversion; overall the end result was sometimes hard to read. This brings me to my second issue, namely that with all the emphasis on intersectionality, there was very little about disability. But if there was, maybe someone, SOMEone would have said, "look, this needs to be readable in print too". I also felt that even though there were a wide range of body shapes depicted, there was surprisingly little discussion of fatness and queer fat activism. Overall this was an interesting read, when I could actually read it... On occasion I was frustrated by the points some of the authors made, but I think that's highly realistic, I disagree with fellow queer people all the time and it can get frustrating too :D ____ Source of the book: Lawrence Public Library

  6. 5 out of 5

    Grace W

    (c/p from my review on TheStoryGraph) It's hard to rate an anthology. I loved most of these but a few didn't hit with me. I think it's great to see these works collected because this is the kind of thing I would have loved to have had when I was a child growing up queer and reading comics. For the most reason I really enjoyed reading this. It also made me cry a few times SO THERE IS THAT TW for this book include: homophobia, transphobia, racism (c/p from my review on TheStoryGraph) It's hard to rate an anthology. I loved most of these but a few didn't hit with me. I think it's great to see these works collected because this is the kind of thing I would have loved to have had when I was a child growing up queer and reading comics. For the most reason I really enjoyed reading this. It also made me cry a few times SO THERE IS THAT TW for this book include: homophobia, transphobia, racism

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jena

    Actually 2.5/5 BUT HEAR ME OUT Be Gay, Do Comics is a collection of stories about queer experiences from queer authors/artists, ranging from covering history to everyday situations. There's a nice balance in this in terms of both art styles and storytelling, so readers are bound to find at least one comic they enjoy. I didn't have any complaints with the content of this book, and I settled on a 3/5 because like all anthology collections there were some comics I enjoyed more than others. Now, I rea Actually 2.5/5 BUT HEAR ME OUT Be Gay, Do Comics is a collection of stories about queer experiences from queer authors/artists, ranging from covering history to everyday situations. There's a nice balance in this in terms of both art styles and storytelling, so readers are bound to find at least one comic they enjoy. I didn't have any complaints with the content of this book, and I settled on a 3/5 because like all anthology collections there were some comics I enjoyed more than others. Now, I read the physical version of this and I have to say that visually, these were some of the hardest comics to actually physically read that I've ever encountered. I think the crux of the issue is that most of (if not all) of these comics appear to be designed with digital in mind. The problem is, there's often too many panels squashed into one page in this physical version. As a result, the text on a lot of these is INCREDIBLY small. There was actually a pretty sizeable number of comics I just simply couldn't read between the small font size and brightly-colored backgrounds. I felt like my rating needed to reflect this by knocking off half a star. As great as this collection is, I can't ignore the layout issues. I should mention that I do wear glasses, so if you have perfect vision and have no difficulty at all reading small text (or own a magnifier) you may not run into those issues.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    I love how queer this anthology is: lots of trans content, discussion of community and politics, history, memoir, body image-- really a great range of topics and creators. The colors are gorgeous throughout. My only complaint is that in some of the comics, the text is very small and difficult to read. Content notes: some images of needles. Discussion of anti-queer oppression.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Megan Sanks

    Really fun and insightful! Learned a lot, and am happy to learn that "Be gay, do crime" was created by queer prisoners. Really fun and insightful! Learned a lot, and am happy to learn that "Be gay, do crime" was created by queer prisoners.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    This compilation of queer comic artists was an absolute delight to read. It was organized perfectly, the heavier comics were separated out so by the end of reading it I walked away inspired and hopeful and educated on some important history. *I received an eARC copy of this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. My thanks to IDW Publishing for the opportunity to read and review in advance of publication.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Chris Arnone

    I really enjoyed this. 40 LGBTQIA writers and artists telling the whole rainbow of stories, their own and others. Many of them are straightforward testimonies, but not all. Great art and presentation. I was sad there was only one intersex story in the whole collection. #netgalley #begaydocomics

  12. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    This is a modge-podge of different things; a mixture of queer history and personal stories from a slew diverse queer comic artists. I liked getting a history of the LGBT community, intermixed with authors talking about what being queer/trans means for them. Where we've been, how far we've come, and how far we still have to go. Highly recommend for those who are interested in LGBT history and experience, but aren't necessarily drawn to text. Be Gay, Do Comics contains historical events and people y This is a modge-podge of different things; a mixture of queer history and personal stories from a slew diverse queer comic artists. I liked getting a history of the LGBT community, intermixed with authors talking about what being queer/trans means for them. Where we've been, how far we've come, and how far we still have to go. Highly recommend for those who are interested in LGBT history and experience, but aren't necessarily drawn to text. Be Gay, Do Comics contains historical events and people you may not have heard of before. Some stories you'll definitely wish were longer than a couple pages. ARC recieves from Netgalley and IDW for an honest review.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    I received an ARC through NetGalley from IDW Publishing. This compilation features 40 LGBTQ+ comic artists/writers. A true collection of perspective and inclusion. So many voices and the perfect balance of biographical, historical, and political content. A really engaging read and tons of fantastic art to compliment. Highly recommended.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Karissa

    A lovely and powerful anthology of comics by and about LGBTQ+ people. There is such a diversity of subjects, tones, and art styles represented. Many readers will find experiences to resonate with in here. Also Sasha Velour (drag race superstar) is a contributor and her comic is stunning.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    My favorite parts of this collection were the ones that came from non-Western perspectives and emphasized colonialism's effect on today's homophobia and transphobia. There were some stories I was more invested in than others, but that's kind of how it goes for these things. There were also more than a few spelling errors, so this kind of balances out being messy with having heart. My favorite parts of this collection were the ones that came from non-Western perspectives and emphasized colonialism's effect on today's homophobia and transphobia. There were some stories I was more invested in than others, but that's kind of how it goes for these things. There were also more than a few spelling errors, so this kind of balances out being messy with having heart.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Emilia P

    Brutal 3 star review! :0 I have been purposefully reading gay content for yay, 20 years now (geez) and ... this is fine! There's a lot of great stuff. There's a lot of unique perspective, a good blend of history, a fair amount of racially diverse content, but...it felt a bit too loosely structured to be a hard keeper. Like -- this felt like Queerness 250-level content. Which, great, but a big shiny book that's fairly light reading maybe could be a little bit more reader-directing. Or maybe I am a Brutal 3 star review! :0 I have been purposefully reading gay content for yay, 20 years now (geez) and ... this is fine! There's a lot of great stuff. There's a lot of unique perspective, a good blend of history, a fair amount of racially diverse content, but...it felt a bit too loosely structured to be a hard keeper. Like -- this felt like Queerness 250-level content. Which, great, but a big shiny book that's fairly light reading maybe could be a little bit more reader-directing. Or maybe I am an old person and this is just how the kids do it these days in series-of-tweet like bursts of information and personal experience. But uh, also, pick it up! It's a great intro to a number of great cartoonists, and the extremely mighty and high-energy power of THE NIB. (Ok I'm going to give it 4 stars for the algorithm. :P)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    So proud to have supported this on Kickstarter! From being powerful and empowering to just being fun and silly, the stories in this anthology cover A LOT of ground. Everything in here is good, but a couple really got my attention. Sam Wallman's fascinating A Covert Gaze at Conservative Gays, discussing the phenomenon of conservative gays. Like my best friend from high school. Back then I was way too closed-minded for him to come out to me so we couldn't have a real relationship then. But now tha So proud to have supported this on Kickstarter! From being powerful and empowering to just being fun and silly, the stories in this anthology cover A LOT of ground. Everything in here is good, but a couple really got my attention. Sam Wallman's fascinating A Covert Gaze at Conservative Gays, discussing the phenomenon of conservative gays. Like my best friend from high school. Back then I was way too closed-minded for him to come out to me so we couldn't have a real relationship then. But now that I’ve grown and learned and have striven to become a better person, we can’t have a relationship because he’s a right-wing brainwashed person, sharing the most far-fetched and obscure right-wing conspiracy theories. Like, remember when Pelosi plotted with those dudes to attack the White House with missiles during the Trump administration? *sigh* And I had heard of The Lavender Scare (on the heels of the Red Scare), but didn’t know the details. I felt like I could relate to I Am More Than My Chromosome by Elisabet Rún. But then I have been focused on the fucked up gender binary the last few years. Totally worth a read!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shelby Gordon

    This book is full of representation, yet it’s always never going to be a full representation of the queer community... I don’t think any work can be. I loved this, but there was one piece (found in the middle) that goes against full liberty of a person’s right to choose. Of course, the writer shouldn’t be apologetic and maybe it’s a good thing it was included.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Julien

    I love the Nib. I'll get that out of the way right now. So, when I saw there was going to be a collection of Nib comics specifically focusing on LGBT topics, I was over the moon, and this collection didn't disappoint. It has something for everyone, incisive political commentary, interesting queer history, and personal reflections. I especially love the the ones written by nonbinary people about their experiences. As a nonbinary person, it makes me feel seen and less alone. It was also cool learn I love the Nib. I'll get that out of the way right now. So, when I saw there was going to be a collection of Nib comics specifically focusing on LGBT topics, I was over the moon, and this collection didn't disappoint. It has something for everyone, incisive political commentary, interesting queer history, and personal reflections. I especially love the the ones written by nonbinary people about their experiences. As a nonbinary person, it makes me feel seen and less alone. It was also cool learning a bit about histories I didn't know beforehand, especially the other protests leading up to the Stonewall Riots. This book is great and has a really cool variety of art styles and perspectives from different folks. I would definitely recommend this for anyone interested in LGBTQ perspectives with a bit of snark and heart. FTC disclosure: I received this book from the publisher through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    "Be Gay, Do Comics" is an anthology of the history and culture of queer identities throughout the world as represented in a comic format by various cartoonists and artists. The topics are wide-reaching and cover everything from the history of LGBT riots to feelings of exclusion from the community by certain identities. Comics are included addressing the vastness of the gender spectrum transmen/ transwomen and non-binary identities. Homosexuality is obviously covered but so is asexuality, bisexua "Be Gay, Do Comics" is an anthology of the history and culture of queer identities throughout the world as represented in a comic format by various cartoonists and artists. The topics are wide-reaching and cover everything from the history of LGBT riots to feelings of exclusion from the community by certain identities. Comics are included addressing the vastness of the gender spectrum transmen/ transwomen and non-binary identities. Homosexuality is obviously covered but so is asexuality, bisexuality, and the general term queer. This anthology has very effectively taken a topic that can feel overwhelming (the culture and history of an entire community) and broken it down into easily digestible, entertaining, and eminently relatable pieces. Though this anthology clocks in at around 250 pages, which is long for anything in this format, it doesn't feel long. It keeps you interested by keeping pieces just long enough to tell their story without going overboard in explanation. The changing art styles due to the different artists also contribute to the feeling that each piece is a separate work rather than a single, continuous march through history. Some of the pieces were heartfelt, some were sad, all were relatable, and a few were extraordinarily well rendered. My personal favorite piece in the collection was Sam Wallman's "A Covert Look at Gay Conservatives," which not only breached a new topic for me but was also drawn in a way that was gripping, easy to read, and impressive. I recommend this for anyone who wants to learn more about the history and the culture of the LGBT community in a way that feels easy to manage.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    The collected works from more than 30 LGBTQIA+ creators, Be Gay, Do Comics explores everything from body image issues and the futility of pronouns, to queer history and the important movements and figures whose bold action shaped the queer diaspora to this day. This anthology of comics collects own voices stories, satire, and mini histories that help describe the vibrant queer community of activists, artists, parents, educators and so many other incredible people. This anthology is fantastic! It The collected works from more than 30 LGBTQIA+ creators, Be Gay, Do Comics explores everything from body image issues and the futility of pronouns, to queer history and the important movements and figures whose bold action shaped the queer diaspora to this day. This anthology of comics collects own voices stories, satire, and mini histories that help describe the vibrant queer community of activists, artists, parents, educators and so many other incredible people. This anthology is fantastic! It’s a relatively fast read, despite a hefty 250 page-count absolutely stuffed with personal stories and incredible information. As with any collected works, the art styles, tone, and storytelling varies wildly between each piece; they’re not collected into any specific groupings either, the stories just run gorgeously right into the next piece, and the next, until suddenly the book is over. I really enjoyed all the pieces, each voice contributes to the comic collection in some tangible, important way. Be Gay, Do Comics is a great collection for anyone hoping to read more about LGBTQIA+ experiences and simultaneously be introduced to a multitude of talented writers, artists, and creators.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Be Gay, Do Comics is an anthology of comics collected and edited by Matt Bors. It is an illustrated anthology takes readers through queer history and identity. For the most part, I rather like most if not all of these contributions. Be Gay, Do Comics is a wonderful collection of comic shorts. Culled from the web-comics site The Nib, this bright LGBTQ anthology features an international roster of millennial and Gen-Z contributors, offering fresh takes on gender, politics, historical LGBTQ heroes, Be Gay, Do Comics is an anthology of comics collected and edited by Matt Bors. It is an illustrated anthology takes readers through queer history and identity. For the most part, I rather like most if not all of these contributions. Be Gay, Do Comics is a wonderful collection of comic shorts. Culled from the web-comics site The Nib, this bright LGBTQ anthology features an international roster of millennial and Gen-Z contributors, offering fresh takes on gender, politics, historical LGBTQ heroes, and more. Each artist effectively uses humor to lighten sometimes weighty subject matter. Meanwhile, other pieces examine facets of the queer umbrella. Like most anthologies there are weaker contributions, but Be Gay, Do Comics may be an exception. It is far from perfect, but it comes rather close. Many entries stand out as truly great works of art, and the collection as a whole will entice readers to savor and explore it again and again. All in all, Be Gay, Do Comics is an utterly delightful and expansive collection of queer voices and truths.

  23. 4 out of 5

    James

    Honestly, did not like the book. The representation was very narrow with a heavy focus on non-binary identities. For someone who is a transgender (or gay), this isn't a satisfying, uplifting, or positive read. A lot of the comics were negative against trans masculine people (and especially trans masc bodies). Trans women were erased/invisible for the most part. I don't understand how such bad representation ends up in print. A lot of the text was inaccessible for readers with lower visual acuity. Honestly, did not like the book. The representation was very narrow with a heavy focus on non-binary identities. For someone who is a transgender (or gay), this isn't a satisfying, uplifting, or positive read. A lot of the comics were negative against trans masculine people (and especially trans masc bodies). Trans women were erased/invisible for the most part. I don't understand how such bad representation ends up in print. A lot of the text was inaccessible for readers with lower visual acuity. In many places in the book, the text was unusually small, blurry, and low contrast. I have read enough graphic novels to know that they don't have to be like this. Readable text is possible! The text is also rife with spelling mistakes that appear to be unintentional? Editing might have helped. Overall, skip it. Mostly unenjoyable. Recommended instead: First Year Out: A Transition Story by Sabrina Symington.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Merossy

    So this book is excellent. It’s an anthology of work from 40 different contributors and I think important reading for most adults. The segmented graphic format makes some of the more intense topics easier to digest while still conveying that emotion first hand. In some places I gasped out aloud. There’s something I love about #ownvoice graphic works especially. So much is said with colour, shape and design on every page that you couldn’t get from a text only piece. The writing and artwork in thi So this book is excellent. It’s an anthology of work from 40 different contributors and I think important reading for most adults. The segmented graphic format makes some of the more intense topics easier to digest while still conveying that emotion first hand. In some places I gasped out aloud. There’s something I love about #ownvoice graphic works especially. So much is said with colour, shape and design on every page that you couldn’t get from a text only piece. The writing and artwork in this book are personal and powerful. I especially enjoyed the art of Mady G and am excited to see they authored A Quick and Easy Guide to Queer and Trans Identities (which I picked up at the same time). The only minor flaw here is the printing. The contrast and colouring of a few pieces was not great... one example is an illustrated map where it was impossible to tell the difference between two shades of purple, and I didn’t think that was the point the map was making.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel

    ARC given by NetGalley for Honest Review What an AMAZING collection of queer stories. I was blown away by "Be Gay, Do Comics" for it's amazing collection of authors and artists, as well as the stories that were told! Seeing some of my favorite comic artist (such as Archie Bongiovanni) depict such meaningful and heartfelt experiences was incredible. This graphic novel is informative, inclusive, and rich with diversity and emotion. I learned many new things about queer communities, movements, and l ARC given by NetGalley for Honest Review What an AMAZING collection of queer stories. I was blown away by "Be Gay, Do Comics" for it's amazing collection of authors and artists, as well as the stories that were told! Seeing some of my favorite comic artist (such as Archie Bongiovanni) depict such meaningful and heartfelt experiences was incredible. This graphic novel is informative, inclusive, and rich with diversity and emotion. I learned many new things about queer communities, movements, and lives that I never knew about (even though I'm a very active queer community member)! This book is perfect for the lqbtq book lover, someone who is wanting to learn more, and places that need more lbgtq recourses (libraries, schools, shelters, etc...). I cannot recommend this ENOUGH! I'm ordering it for my libraries collection today!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This graphic novel is incredibly important. It is a safe space for members of the LGBTQIA+ to share their coming of age and coming of gender stories. A few entries also provide background about LGBTQIA+ folx through history and around the world. Part of the reason that this book is so important is that it lets all readers know that they don't need to be ashamed of who they are or afraid of who they're not. Breaking down the gender binary and stigmas that exist surrounding who people love is neces This graphic novel is incredibly important. It is a safe space for members of the LGBTQIA+ to share their coming of age and coming of gender stories. A few entries also provide background about LGBTQIA+ folx through history and around the world. Part of the reason that this book is so important is that it lets all readers know that they don't need to be ashamed of who they are or afraid of who they're not. Breaking down the gender binary and stigmas that exist surrounding who people love is necessary. It's more important to remember that we are all people. We need to believe folx when they say who they are and the experiences that they've endured. By placing this book in my high school classroom library, I hope that it will provide a safe space and perhaps even some guidance along my students' journeys. Overall, 5 out of 5 stars.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Denise (ramblingoutloud)

    This was an absolute treasure to read. The collection of history mixed with personal stories, humor mixed with seriousness. We get lots of different voices and views, that shows that being queer and part of the LGBTQ+ community isn't just one experience fits all. I loved reading this, getting to be educated in both facts and feelings. The stories are short and some you will wish to get to know more. But that's the tragedy and charm of antholgies. Recommend this to all. (Thank you, Netgalley and ID This was an absolute treasure to read. The collection of history mixed with personal stories, humor mixed with seriousness. We get lots of different voices and views, that shows that being queer and part of the LGBTQ+ community isn't just one experience fits all. I loved reading this, getting to be educated in both facts and feelings. The stories are short and some you will wish to get to know more. But that's the tragedy and charm of antholgies. Recommend this to all. (Thank you, Netgalley and IDW Publishing for the ARC - these thoughts are, of course, my own take away from the book) 5 of 5 out of the box squares / Denise

  28. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    This was a really interesting book because it gave some great insights into the lgbtqia history especially from around the world that people might not know. And showed beautiful examples of how sexuality and gender identity can be looked at and eventually accepted and what we as a society can do to help move that needle along two more Acceptance in our own community and throughout the world. I did know some of the history but I was still surprised, at learning new things about lgbtqia movements. This was a really interesting book because it gave some great insights into the lgbtqia history especially from around the world that people might not know. And showed beautiful examples of how sexuality and gender identity can be looked at and eventually accepted and what we as a society can do to help move that needle along two more Acceptance in our own community and throughout the world. I did know some of the history but I was still surprised, at learning new things about lgbtqia movements. The artwork was beautifully done from the 30 different artist and you've got a great sense of Storytelling from each one of them true their words and their illustrations.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlyn Lawrence

    I'm trying to get more into more anthology works, and what better one than this when you've decided to start 2021 by reading more and more LGBT works? I knew I would learn a lot about different cultural expectations and representations of gay people, but I didn't realize until I was reading a handful of stories that I would learn about how other people dealt with the same/similar feelings as myself. A great read through I'll have to go back and look over again! Even though not every story or art I'm trying to get more into more anthology works, and what better one than this when you've decided to start 2021 by reading more and more LGBT works? I knew I would learn a lot about different cultural expectations and representations of gay people, but I didn't realize until I was reading a handful of stories that I would learn about how other people dealt with the same/similar feelings as myself. A great read through I'll have to go back and look over again! Even though not every story or art style was my thing, there is something to appreciate about the diversity of the contributors and how there is something for everyone I imagine in this anthology.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kazue Sohma

    This is a wonderful compilation of funny, sad, hopeful, inspirational, and thought-provoking comics. I particularly loved the comics that highlighted parts of history that are often ignored or intentionally suppressed. These were heartrending while also filling me with a rightful indignation to exact change in my own community. I also enjoyed learning about how people perceived their own queer identities and how they came to love and value themselves. This book is a wonderful read for anyone wan This is a wonderful compilation of funny, sad, hopeful, inspirational, and thought-provoking comics. I particularly loved the comics that highlighted parts of history that are often ignored or intentionally suppressed. These were heartrending while also filling me with a rightful indignation to exact change in my own community. I also enjoyed learning about how people perceived their own queer identities and how they came to love and value themselves. This book is a wonderful read for anyone wanting to learn more about queer people around the world, past and present.

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