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The Rumi Prescription: How an Ancient Mystic Poet Changed My Modern Manic Life

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A powerful personal journey to find meaning and life lessons in the words of a wildly popular 13th century poet. Rumi's inspiring and deceptively simple poems have been called ecstatic, mystical, and devotional. To writer and activist Melody Moezzi, they became a lifeline. In The Rumi Prescription, we follow her path of discovery as she translates Rumi's works for herself - A powerful personal journey to find meaning and life lessons in the words of a wildly popular 13th century poet. Rumi's inspiring and deceptively simple poems have been called ecstatic, mystical, and devotional. To writer and activist Melody Moezzi, they became a lifeline. In The Rumi Prescription, we follow her path of discovery as she translates Rumi's works for herself - to gain wisdom and insight in the face of a creative and spiritual roadblock. With the help of her father, who is a lifelong fan of Rumi's poetry, she immerses herself in this rich body of work, and discovers a 13th-century prescription for modern life. Addressing isolation, distraction, depression, fear, and other everyday challenges we face, the book offers a roadmap for living with intention and ease, and embracing love at every turn--despite our deeply divided and chaotic times. Most of all, it presents a vivid reminder that we already have the answers we seek, if we can just slow down to honor them. - You went out in search of gold far and wide, but all along you were gold on the inside. - Become the sky and the clouds that create the rain, not the gutter that carries it to the drain. - You already own all the sustenance you seek. If only you'd wake up and take a peek. - Quit being a drop. Make yourself an ocean.


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A powerful personal journey to find meaning and life lessons in the words of a wildly popular 13th century poet. Rumi's inspiring and deceptively simple poems have been called ecstatic, mystical, and devotional. To writer and activist Melody Moezzi, they became a lifeline. In The Rumi Prescription, we follow her path of discovery as she translates Rumi's works for herself - A powerful personal journey to find meaning and life lessons in the words of a wildly popular 13th century poet. Rumi's inspiring and deceptively simple poems have been called ecstatic, mystical, and devotional. To writer and activist Melody Moezzi, they became a lifeline. In The Rumi Prescription, we follow her path of discovery as she translates Rumi's works for herself - to gain wisdom and insight in the face of a creative and spiritual roadblock. With the help of her father, who is a lifelong fan of Rumi's poetry, she immerses herself in this rich body of work, and discovers a 13th-century prescription for modern life. Addressing isolation, distraction, depression, fear, and other everyday challenges we face, the book offers a roadmap for living with intention and ease, and embracing love at every turn--despite our deeply divided and chaotic times. Most of all, it presents a vivid reminder that we already have the answers we seek, if we can just slow down to honor them. - You went out in search of gold far and wide, but all along you were gold on the inside. - Become the sky and the clouds that create the rain, not the gutter that carries it to the drain. - You already own all the sustenance you seek. If only you'd wake up and take a peek. - Quit being a drop. Make yourself an ocean.

30 review for The Rumi Prescription: How an Ancient Mystic Poet Changed My Modern Manic Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    Melody Moezzi

    I'm not rating this book because I wrote it, so I'm a tad biased. Leaving this note here to welcome my readers and invite you to get in touch if you're interested in having me visit your book club in person or via video chat: https://www.melodymoezzi.com/#/contac.... I'm not rating this book because I wrote it, so I'm a tad biased. Leaving this note here to welcome my readers and invite you to get in touch if you're interested in having me visit your book club in person or via video chat: https://www.melodymoezzi.com/#/contac....

  2. 4 out of 5

    Deonna Kelli Sayed

    Melody's book is the perfect book to read right now as we are facing this unprecedented, COVID-19 moment. Why? Because her memoir writes about how to deal with despair, uncertainty, and un-knowing filtered through her study of the mystic-poet, Rumi. Melody writes through a deeply personal, often humorous, reflection as an Iranian-American feminist, a Muslim, who also lives with Bipolar Disorder. She embarks on a journey to study Rumi, in Persian, with her father. The experience is humbles her: s Melody's book is the perfect book to read right now as we are facing this unprecedented, COVID-19 moment. Why? Because her memoir writes about how to deal with despair, uncertainty, and un-knowing filtered through her study of the mystic-poet, Rumi. Melody writes through a deeply personal, often humorous, reflection as an Iranian-American feminist, a Muslim, who also lives with Bipolar Disorder. She embarks on a journey to study Rumi, in Persian, with her father. The experience is humbles her: she reads Persian at a grade school level, she is an impatient, self-centered person (these are her words, not mine), she wants things NOW. Melody, of course, is every high achieving, accomplished woman in America: she wants to control her world. Except, she can't. No one can. Through her study of Rumi, through her humorous and loving engagement with her father and her Iranian heritage, she learns to accept and find value in her own limitations. This memoir is an engaging, humorous, and insightful read with Rumi as a commentator. This book is a perfect companion to the pause button we are all having to press right now. Melody's voice is effortless, yet sincere, as she brilliantly navigates the complexities of living with mental illness and living in America as culturally hybrid feminist. Who is the book for? Everyone.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Yelda Basar Moers

    I have to applaud Melody Moezzi for being so open and candid about her mental illness. The last time I read a memoir this raw it was Glennon Doyle’s memoir Love Warrior. Moezzi has struggled with bi-polar disorder and at one point was confined to a solitary cell. She has also survived a suicide attempt. As an Iranian-American, she has become an important advocate for mental health, especially for her community. Now how does Rumi fit into all of this? In a recent struggle where Moezzi’s is left in I have to applaud Melody Moezzi for being so open and candid about her mental illness. The last time I read a memoir this raw it was Glennon Doyle’s memoir Love Warrior. Moezzi has struggled with bi-polar disorder and at one point was confined to a solitary cell. She has also survived a suicide attempt. As an Iranian-American, she has become an important advocate for mental health, especially for her community. Now how does Rumi fit into all of this? In a recent struggle where Moezzi’s is left incapacitated, her father helps her by teaching her Rumi poems and she begins to translate them. Her father is a huge devotee of Rumi and through their time together she begins to shift and change for the better. Her father’s devotion to her wellbeing is the best part of the book—it is heartfelt and heartwarming! However, in the end, what I believe rescued her was her father’s love for her and his love for Rumi rather than Rumi itself. Even when she finally visits Konya, Rumi’s holy resting place and tomb in Turkey, she is not impressed. She candidly says that she is not only bored by the mosques in Turkey, preferring to spend time with the Turkish cats instead, but that she hates mosques and all houses of worship, but especially mosques! This to me was very odd! But also bold! How many Muslims would say that without feeling it sacrilegious? There was also at most one to two pages devoted to Konya and I didn’t feel any spiritual wonder. So maybe she's trying to figure out her own spirituality. Maybe she's confused! So I’m left to wonder at the end of this book...Was she saved by Rumi or was she saved by her father’s love for Rumi? I felt her respect for Rumi, but I have to be honest with you, I didn’t feel the love! The author babbles a lot in this book, but I found it engaging. I liked her; there is something bold and sincere about her. She’s honest. She has a way with words and is a gifted writer. But there is something big missing here if this book is about Rumi— a soul, a love, a passion, and the wonder of Sufism. And I think she’s trying to figure herself out and her beliefs throughout the book, and though I enjoyed the journey, I was just left confused at times and wondering exactly what her relationship is to Islam, Sufism and Rumi. ✨ In the end, though, love did save the day! And that I guess that is what Rumi would have wanted anyhow as a prophet of love! So mission accomplished Rumi!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kerry Beth

    I won a copy of this book in a Goodreads Giveaway. Thank you! I so badly wanted to like this book, a memoir of how a 13th century poet brought the author to find meaning and life lessons. I think, when it comes down to it, I find the writing engaging and the author’s story itself inspiring - she has had to overcome many challenges I can’t even imagine to get where she is, and I do believe it’s unspeakably brave to lay herself as bare as she does. But I think my problem comes down to something she I won a copy of this book in a Goodreads Giveaway. Thank you! I so badly wanted to like this book, a memoir of how a 13th century poet brought the author to find meaning and life lessons. I think, when it comes down to it, I find the writing engaging and the author’s story itself inspiring - she has had to overcome many challenges I can’t even imagine to get where she is, and I do believe it’s unspeakably brave to lay herself as bare as she does. But I think my problem comes down to something she says her father said to her early on - it’s about finding the heart in the poetry, not learning it by heart. I found myself overwhelmed by the quantity of the poems and the quantity of words and stories that seem more transactional than anything. Where is the growth? Where is the impact and change in the author and her life that the poetry encouraged? At times, there were pearls buried within; these were quite profound and all heart - but that’s just it. They were buried. I found myself often frustrated reading because I was searching for the heart, and kept having to put the book down, sometimes for days, because I was annoyed and frustrated with it and had to come back to it later. The further I got into it, the more this happened. I would still use it as recommended reading, but with warning labels. And I’ll reread it, but instead flip to the end of each chapter and focus on the summary of poetry within it and meditate on that instead, perhaps then looking at the author’s context of any that seem to speak to me that day.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Pixie-Ann Healy

    The Rumi Prescription: How an Ancient Mystic Poet Changed My Modern Manic Life is a tonic that inspires hope and positivity—precisely the book the world needs right now. With the same humor and searing honesty that made her previous book, Haldol & Hyacinths, a compelling, un-put-down-able read, in The Rumi Prescription Melody Moezzi brings the reader smack-dab into her quest for solutions to issues that plague us all—wanting, isolation, haste, depression, distraction, anxiety, anger, fear, disap The Rumi Prescription: How an Ancient Mystic Poet Changed My Modern Manic Life is a tonic that inspires hope and positivity—precisely the book the world needs right now. With the same humor and searing honesty that made her previous book, Haldol & Hyacinths, a compelling, un-put-down-able read, in The Rumi Prescription Melody Moezzi brings the reader smack-dab into her quest for solutions to issues that plague us all—wanting, isolation, haste, depression, distraction, anxiety, anger, fear, disappointment, pride. Who knew a 13th century mystic poet would have the answers? Ahmad Moezzi did. Ahmad, Moezzi’s dad, worked with Melody to translate Rumi’s poems and reveal the simple answer to overcoming chaos and confusion. The Rumi Prescription is not merely a memoir about an author’s spiritual journey or a Persian poet. There are lessons and food for thought here about fathers and daughters, mental health, love, patience, and politics. Moezzi’s excellent writing grabs the reader immediately and never lets go. You’ll read it in one sitting, then read it again. Rumi is exactly what the doctor ordered.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Barbara White

    A stunning memoir. Filled with wisdom and humor and the occasional spark of outrage--from an Iranian-American, Muslim feminist--this book is raw and honest and beautiful. I connected with it on many levels: as a mother, as a writer, as a poetry lover, as someone who lives in the trenches with mental illness. It's the perfect read for now, a book that encourages you to slow down, breathe, enjoy the world around you, and choose hope. (As Melody's father says, "Stop rushing.") Above all, it's a fath A stunning memoir. Filled with wisdom and humor and the occasional spark of outrage--from an Iranian-American, Muslim feminist--this book is raw and honest and beautiful. I connected with it on many levels: as a mother, as a writer, as a poetry lover, as someone who lives in the trenches with mental illness. It's the perfect read for now, a book that encourages you to slow down, breathe, enjoy the world around you, and choose hope. (As Melody's father says, "Stop rushing.") Above all, it's a father-daughter story that had me wishing my own father were still alive. And the writing? Oh my.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    I enjoyed the author's memoir of her life as an Iranian-American with bi-polar disorder in the age of Trump. However, I didn't glean any deeper insights into Rumi's poetry (which I love). It might be helpful for someone new to Rumi. I enjoyed the author's memoir of her life as an Iranian-American with bi-polar disorder in the age of Trump. However, I didn't glean any deeper insights into Rumi's poetry (which I love). It might be helpful for someone new to Rumi.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kim D

    This is an incredible read. I couldn’t put it down and devoured it in two days. It left me feeling inspired and connected. It’s work like Melody Moezzi’s that changes the world. The power between these pages will leave any reader transformed. The translations of Rumi’s poetry and how to apply it to life’s hardships resonated somewhere deep within me. Read this book because it will uplift you and it will change you. The Rumi Prescription has heart, and it moved me through all of the emotions, dis This is an incredible read. I couldn’t put it down and devoured it in two days. It left me feeling inspired and connected. It’s work like Melody Moezzi’s that changes the world. The power between these pages will leave any reader transformed. The translations of Rumi’s poetry and how to apply it to life’s hardships resonated somewhere deep within me. Read this book because it will uplift you and it will change you. The Rumi Prescription has heart, and it moved me through all of the emotions, distilling an ignited spirit. I’ll keep this one close by and return to it during times I need reassurance or some light. This is a book for everyone.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Halliday

    I think “self-help” books can be wildly useful and I applaud people who read them and consequently adapt their strategies to better cope with their struggles, but in my experience, every self-help book that I open seems like it’s just a new spin on what has been said a million times over, and there really isn’t a need for more books saying the already said. What caught my attention about The Rumi Prescription was my fondness for a Rumi poem that I first heard in my hippie college days but heard a I think “self-help” books can be wildly useful and I applaud people who read them and consequently adapt their strategies to better cope with their struggles, but in my experience, every self-help book that I open seems like it’s just a new spin on what has been said a million times over, and there really isn’t a need for more books saying the already said. What caught my attention about The Rumi Prescription was my fondness for a Rumi poem that I first heard in my hippie college days but heard again several times over many years at various mental health workshops. The poem has become a staple of inspiration for shaping my perspective or giving me a focus for meditation. This was going to be a book that might teach me more about the Persian Sufi mystic Rumi, and that made me open the book. In many ways, I could have blown this memoir off as another fairly simplistic self-help book encouraging one to love themselves. As it turns out, Rumi’s poems are less poetic than I had remembered, and a few I didn’t even like. But the story of Melody Moezzi's commitment to developing her Farsi with sufficient competence to personally translate Rumi’s poem, and the poignant relationship with her both charming and annoying father that it requires, fully hooked me in. There is enough about Melody’s experience as an Iranian American, about her parents’ experiences as immigrants, and about Melody’s practice of social justice that kept me fascinated. The transparency of Moezzi and her father and their relationship warms one’s heart. The book at times reads like a mystery as we seek the outcome of her complex medical diagnoses, and travel with her through disaster and success. Rumi’s seemingly simple poems ground the narrative as Melody wisely unravels their meaning through her knowledge of language and through her personal experience. I found myself highlighting and saving many of her words, and Rumi's, that I want to remember for my own inspiration. Melody Moezzi writes with clarity, honesty, a hard-earned sage awareness, and plenty of humor. According to Melody (and her father), Rumi is about love, and my heart surely opened wider to my belief that love is ultimately the most powerful force in the world.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sayantani Dasgupta

    Loved this moving and unique memoir. Sparkling prose, terrific research, the beauty of Rumi’s verses on their own, and the author’s witty voice and take on things as varied as mosques to yoga, makes this a must read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Reneesarah

    I am really glad to see a book that focuses on Rumi written by someone of Persian heritage, who speaks Persian, and had access to consultation on translation. This book may be of some help to people who have mental health distress and would benefit by a introduction to Rumi. The author is personable, engaging, and honest. It does not read like a book of deep spirituality or academic depth. It is perhaps an introduction to Rumi for some. It also reduces Rumi's poetry to short aphorisms (or prescr I am really glad to see a book that focuses on Rumi written by someone of Persian heritage, who speaks Persian, and had access to consultation on translation. This book may be of some help to people who have mental health distress and would benefit by a introduction to Rumi. The author is personable, engaging, and honest. It does not read like a book of deep spirituality or academic depth. It is perhaps an introduction to Rumi for some. It also reduces Rumi's poetry to short aphorisms (or prescriptions). Turning Rumi's poetry into short, pithy aphorisms robs it of some of its beauty, its lyrical presence, its spiritual profoundness. It is this turning his poetry into these short phrases that is the basis of my two star review, even though I can understand why the author decided to do this.

  12. 5 out of 5

    susie

    My favorite book of 2020. I *savored* every page. Layers of meaning in Rumi's poetry were revealed to me due to the contemporary social context. Melody weaves her personal experiences and her relationship with her father between life lessons from Rumi, demonstrating each moment she felt a connection to his words. During a year that has been unforgiving, this book has invited solace into my life. Where there is treasure, snakes come round. Where there are roses, thorns abound. In the grand bazaar My favorite book of 2020. I *savored* every page. Layers of meaning in Rumi's poetry were revealed to me due to the contemporary social context. Melody weaves her personal experiences and her relationship with her father between life lessons from Rumi, demonstrating each moment she felt a connection to his words. During a year that has been unforgiving, this book has invited solace into my life. Where there is treasure, snakes come round. Where there are roses, thorns abound. In the grand bazaar of life, joy without sorrow cannot be found. This year was thorny, but this book is a rose. A healing read I'd heartily recommend to anyone and everyone who has recently been challenged by isolation, anxiety, fear, disappointment, etc.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brian Hayes

    The Rumi Prescription by Melody Moezzi Tarcher Perigee, 2020 This book a follow-on in spirit to “Haldol and Hyacinths” is a description of the author’s journey into Classical Persian, some of the world’s best poetry, the parent-child relationship, and self-discovery all the while being candid, entertaining, enlightening and inviting us to start our own journey. The book opens with the author in the grip of writer’s block and searching for a cure returns to her parents’ home in San Diego to renew h The Rumi Prescription by Melody Moezzi Tarcher Perigee, 2020 This book a follow-on in spirit to “Haldol and Hyacinths” is a description of the author’s journey into Classical Persian, some of the world’s best poetry, the parent-child relationship, and self-discovery all the while being candid, entertaining, enlightening and inviting us to start our own journey. The book opens with the author in the grip of writer’s block and searching for a cure returns to her parents’ home in San Diego to renew her acquaintance with the Sufi poets of her childhood, especially Rumi. Besides helping her with Classical Persian, her father encouraged her to look beyond the surface of the words to the meanings, often layers of meanings beneath them. The author being bipolar, and a mental health advocate, among many other things, has organized this book into a series of common diagnoses of everyday life and prescriptions from the writings of Rumi, such as; Dx: Wanting, Rx: Go to the Source; DX: Depression, Rx: Welcome Every Guest; Dx: Anxiety. Rx: Follow the Light of Your Wounds, and so on. Something this reader found very useful and apt. As a longtime reader and fan of Rumi, her translations in the book are faithful to my understanding of the poet; that Love is the most important and powerful force in the creation and the truest expression of The Infinite. This book has me digging my volumes of Rumi off the shelves for rereading. This book has made me fall in love with Melody’s writing all over again, appreciate her as a human being, even more, made me appreciate Rumi even more.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Candace H-H

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. My rating is based on my own experiences and expectations. I had hoped that this book would be a good choice for my book to show others in my book club a Muslim perspective of working through mental health and spiritual issues. However, the author’s frequent criticisms and distortions of Islamic practices really didn’t resonate with my own spiritual aims as a Muslim convert. She admits in the book that she hates mosques, would rather visit Las Vegas than go on Hajj, doesn’t pray facing the qibla My rating is based on my own experiences and expectations. I had hoped that this book would be a good choice for my book to show others in my book club a Muslim perspective of working through mental health and spiritual issues. However, the author’s frequent criticisms and distortions of Islamic practices really didn’t resonate with my own spiritual aims as a Muslim convert. She admits in the book that she hates mosques, would rather visit Las Vegas than go on Hajj, doesn’t pray facing the qibla or with a headscarf and will push herself into a men’s section in a mosque. I respect this is her own journey and admire her bringing awareness to mental health issues, especially within Middle Eastern or Muslim communities, but this book wasn’t for me.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    The Rumi Prescription initially caught my attention because of my interest in Rumi and mindfulness meditation. But I was happily surprised to connect with the book on many different levels. Her descriptions and prescriptions pertaining to human suffering are inspiring and loving and tangible. She interweaves Rumi quotes in and out of real life challenges she faces, many of which we all face. Her badass willingness to speak truth in a time of demagoguery and provincial thinking, should be an inspi The Rumi Prescription initially caught my attention because of my interest in Rumi and mindfulness meditation. But I was happily surprised to connect with the book on many different levels. Her descriptions and prescriptions pertaining to human suffering are inspiring and loving and tangible. She interweaves Rumi quotes in and out of real life challenges she faces, many of which we all face. Her badass willingness to speak truth in a time of demagoguery and provincial thinking, should be an inspiration to us all. For lovers of food and the culturally interested (and if you're not, you're really missing out), the Iranian food references had me pursuing delicious meals and recipes. The saffron and rose water ice cream is a particular favorite. As a feminist, activist, seeker and sentient being; I'd like to thank Melody Moezzi for writing this book. I hold it close.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Laurel Kerr

    The Rumi Prescription is, in addition to an inspiring memoir and a beautiful introduction to Rumi's work, a reference book. I now reference this book when I feel isolated, anxious, angry, depressed, distracted, or any of the other emotions Moezzi addresses so beautifully and helpfully in her book. Just finding the last page of each chapter and reading the translated poems for that emotion brings back the stories within the chapter, and reminds me of the antidote and why it works. This book is ch The Rumi Prescription is, in addition to an inspiring memoir and a beautiful introduction to Rumi's work, a reference book. I now reference this book when I feel isolated, anxious, angry, depressed, distracted, or any of the other emotions Moezzi addresses so beautifully and helpfully in her book. Just finding the last page of each chapter and reading the translated poems for that emotion brings back the stories within the chapter, and reminds me of the antidote and why it works. This book is chock full of love, humor, joy, and honesty. I'm buying a second one to loan out, as I plan to refer to the one I've marked up over and over.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Warner

    This book should be required reading for everyone on this planet right now. We are all experiencing elevated emotions - anxiety, fear, anger, helplessness - during our current pandemic and we need strong, wise leaders to help guide us safely to shore. Melody Moezzi's book The Rumi Prescription draws wisdom from the poetry of Rumi and provides profound, practical and universal advice for all humans as we navigate the uncertainties that come from being alive. I thoroughly enjoyed every page of thi This book should be required reading for everyone on this planet right now. We are all experiencing elevated emotions - anxiety, fear, anger, helplessness - during our current pandemic and we need strong, wise leaders to help guide us safely to shore. Melody Moezzi's book The Rumi Prescription draws wisdom from the poetry of Rumi and provides profound, practical and universal advice for all humans as we navigate the uncertainties that come from being alive. I thoroughly enjoyed every page of this book and marked up my copy with exclamation points, stars and notes, knowing it will serve as a night stand guide for years to come.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Fairley Lloyd

    I don't think there's ever a time that the lessons in this book wouldn't be applicable. Definitely a keeper (and got me interested in reading Rumi's work!) I don't think there's ever a time that the lessons in this book wouldn't be applicable. Definitely a keeper (and got me interested in reading Rumi's work!)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    I met Rumi about 10 years ago, introduced by a Benedictine nun. and I love when he pops up in my life occasionally. A random quote on FB always draws me in to ponder again the wisdom and deep insight. This book was thus a delight to win from Goodreads Giveaways. It wasn't initially fun to read. Relating to the descriptive emotions of a bipolar experience in the first chapter put me in the depths, being bipolar myself. But it did prepare me to listen to her journey through the poetry and all the I met Rumi about 10 years ago, introduced by a Benedictine nun. and I love when he pops up in my life occasionally. A random quote on FB always draws me in to ponder again the wisdom and deep insight. This book was thus a delight to win from Goodreads Giveaways. It wasn't initially fun to read. Relating to the descriptive emotions of a bipolar experience in the first chapter put me in the depths, being bipolar myself. But it did prepare me to listen to her journey through the poetry and all the guidance it provided for a more balanced, purposeful, peaceful life...lived through hard political times, prejudice, and fear. I loved meeting the author's family, especially her father, of course. It was a beautifully written story of family love, respect, and loyalty. I don't think those of us who suffer alone could find the peace and healing she found with such a loving father, husband, and home. But we can still learn from the master and try.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Fred P

    The concept had promise, but I wasn't ever drawn into the story. The author talks with her dad and has a personal epiphany through Rumi's poetry, but there's not enough Rumi, and the storytelling feels artificial. I needed the story to feel more personal., but I feel I can't relate. Might work for somebody though!. Can Rumi fix your life? The concept had promise, but I wasn't ever drawn into the story. The author talks with her dad and has a personal epiphany through Rumi's poetry, but there's not enough Rumi, and the storytelling feels artificial. I needed the story to feel more personal., but I feel I can't relate. Might work for somebody though!. Can Rumi fix your life?

  21. 4 out of 5

    Karen Libby

    Welcome every guest, No matter how grotesque. Be as hospitable to calamity as to ecstasy, To anxiety as to tranquility. Today's misery sweeps your home clean,. Making way for tomorrow's felicity. -Rumi personal narrative by an Iranian-American-Muslim about using Rumi's poetry to, among other things, "welcome the calamity that is Donald Trump and all the anxiety and disappointment it evokes, in the hopes that he will inadvertently sweep our country clean of bigotry-presumably by bringing its horrifying Welcome every guest, No matter how grotesque. Be as hospitable to calamity as to ecstasy, To anxiety as to tranquility. Today's misery sweeps your home clean,. Making way for tomorrow's felicity. -Rumi personal narrative by an Iranian-American-Muslim about using Rumi's poetry to, among other things, "welcome the calamity that is Donald Trump and all the anxiety and disappointment it evokes, in the hopes that he will inadvertently sweep our country clean of bigotry-presumably by bringing its horrifying consequences to life." Rumi advises how to avoid "incinerating in the flames of our own outrage." Set in 2016, the author describes how Persian verse guided her out of her deep disappointment with humanity and through the effort to choose love over the arrogance of righteous anger. She writes about so much more, and especially about appreciating (and applying) Rumi's verse.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    “The Beloved is not a passion we ought to pursue, but a sacred inheritance that lives within each of us, that connects us, and that—if we let it—wakes us up. In Persian, also known as Farsi, the word for poem—“shehr”*—means “song” as well. By no coincidence, Rumi’s classical Persian verse isn’t meant to be read while sitting, but rather sung while spinning. Even without music and in translation, Rumi’s words resonate across time and space, speaking to the unifying force within all of us that tra “The Beloved is not a passion we ought to pursue, but a sacred inheritance that lives within each of us, that connects us, and that—if we let it—wakes us up. In Persian, also known as Farsi, the word for poem—“shehr”*—means “song” as well. By no coincidence, Rumi’s classical Persian verse isn’t meant to be read while sitting, but rather sung while spinning. Even without music and in translation, Rumi’s words resonate across time and space, speaking to the unifying force within all of us that transcends language, culture, race, and religion.” I know Rumi is insanely popular, and I know insanely mistranslated; even so, I am always lifted on angel’s wings when I read him. The 13th century does not seem as far away when we read Rumi. Ideas and imagery transcending time and space and culture and wars. I also read Gitanjali by Rabindranath Tagore in close proximity to this, and so my mind is floating a bit in the anchors of mystical Sufi and Hindu thoughts and the longevity of the wisdom we need for the world we live in. The translations are the author’s and her fathers, and I loved them. I love the author and her father too, just filled with love for unknown people which Tagore and Rumi also venerated. Her energy and bravery is brighter than a thousand suns, and I honor the journey she has taken and the work she has done to make our planet, specifically the U.S. a better place to be. I love the idea of the short poems as prescription also; we need to practice any cure over and over to sustain it, like taking a medicine every day, and it resonates at many levels. My only disappointment is there was so much Melody and so little Rumi, and that wasn’t the book I wanted to read. There were thousands of conversations to get the point across and they just rang false unless she recorded every single conversation she had with every single person in her life; it is a literary voice that mimics fiction too closely for me, but I still really loved the book. All my love and all my respect to this beautiful book that is revolutionary for those struggling with mood disorders. “Like American transcendentalists, Sufis concern themselves only with the heart of all matters; they don’t bother with refuse. They prefer the fruit to the rind, the marrow to the bone. They believe that union with the divine isn’t exclusive to some afterlife, but that it can be achieved here and now, through abandoning one’s ego and surrendering to the Beloved within each of us. For Sufis, everything boils down to love. While others peddle in worldly trifles, trading and arguing over rotting rinds, Sufis enjoy the fruit of devotion, savoring its sweetness.” Don’t retreat, come near. Don’t lose faith, adhere. Seek the tonic nectar in the bitter sting. Go to the source of the source of your spring. Your wounds may summon the light hereto, But this sacred light does not come from you. I have spoken the language of madness, full of whys and hows and wherefores. Obsessed with reasons, I spent a lifetime knocking at this door. When at last it opened, my soul replied. All along, I had been knocking from the inside. Be it an hour or a hundred thousand years, They are one and the same, however the math appears. Patience, not haste, gets you where you belong. Slow down and heed the Beloved’s song. You went out in search of gold far and wide, But all along you were gold on the inside. Welcome every guest, No matter how grotesque. Be as hospitable to calamity as to ecstasy, To anxiety as to tranquility. Today’s misery sweeps your home clean, Making way for tomorrow’s felicity. _________________________ My preferred translation: “This being human is a guest house. Every morning is a new arrival. A joy, a depression, a meanness, some momentary awareness comes as an unexpected visitor... Welcome and entertain them all. Treat each guest honorably. The dark thought, the shame, the malice, meet them at the door laughing, and invite them in. Be grateful for whoever comes, because each has been sent as a guide from beyond.” __________________ Every storm the Beloved unfurls Permits the sea to scatter pearls. The Beloved has expanded your heart with divine light, Yet you still seek answers from outside to feel right. You are a fathomless lake, yet you complain of drought incessantly. Why settle for a puddle when you have a channel to the sea? As usual, we’re drunk with Love today. Evict your thoughts and find a song to play. Prayers and devotions come in countless shapes and sizes. Pick the ones the beauty in your soul recognizes. ___________________________________________________ Some other favorites, not in the book “There are as many ways of loving as there are people, and that wildflower variety is the great beauty of this dimension of existence.” “When you do things from your soul, you feel a river moving in you, a joy.” “You are not a drop in the ocean. You are the entire ocean in a drop.” “This moment this love comes to rest in me, many beings in one being. In one wheat grain a thousand sheaf stacks. Inside the needle’s eye a turning night of stars.” “Be like the sun for grace and mercy. Be like the night to cover others' faults. Be like running water for generosity. Be like death for rage and anger. Be like the Earth for modesty. Appear as you are. Be as you appear.” “Any state other than what you have experienced seems absurd. You have had certain visions. Before them, did not mysticism sound ridiculous? What you've been given has released you from prison, ten times! And won't this empty desert freedom you feel now someday be confining?” “There is a place where words are born of silence, A place where the whispers of the heart arise. There is a place where voices sing your beauty, A place where every breath carves your image in my soul.”

  23. 5 out of 5

    Seema Yasmin

    A stunning memoir. Melody Moezzi merges medieval poetry with modern dramas, exploring love,  politics, and mental health. Original translations of Rumi's poems are interspersed with ruminations on fatherhood, feminism, and self-care, offering insights that will change your life. I wish I could prescribe this memoir. A stunning memoir. Melody Moezzi merges medieval poetry with modern dramas, exploring love,  politics, and mental health. Original translations of Rumi's poems are interspersed with ruminations on fatherhood, feminism, and self-care, offering insights that will change your life. I wish I could prescribe this memoir.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Hillman

    Reviewed by Nosrat Makky Hillman On 08/06/2020 Melody Moezzi (Melody), has recently published her 3rd book, “THE RUMI PRESCRIPTION”. She believes and makes the case that Rumi, the 13th century mystic Persian poet, has changed her “manic life”! I believe her! There is nothing that soothes the soul and heals ills like Rumi’s Poetry. She has organized the book into ten chapters designated as: Specific diagnostic (DX)Conditions; Such as; Wanting, Isolation, Haste, Depression, distraction, Anxiety, An Reviewed by Nosrat Makky Hillman On 08/06/2020 Melody Moezzi (Melody), has recently published her 3rd book, “THE RUMI PRESCRIPTION”. She believes and makes the case that Rumi, the 13th century mystic Persian poet, has changed her “manic life”! I believe her! There is nothing that soothes the soul and heals ills like Rumi’s Poetry. She has organized the book into ten chapters designated as: Specific diagnostic (DX)Conditions; Such as; Wanting, Isolation, Haste, Depression, distraction, Anxiety, Anger, Fear, Disappointment, Wake Up, and Pride, with Specific therapy (R/) for each condition, such as: Go to the Source, Invent, Don’t Imitate., Quit Keeping Score, Welcome Every Guest, Go Beyond the Five and Six, Follow the Light of Your Wounds, Fall in Love with Love, Quit Making Yourself So Small, Wake Up, and Return to the Source!!!, with a page of translated RUMI POETRY at the end of each chapter. It was a joy and lots of fun for me to read this book. It is easy reading, including the translation of the Rumi’s poems from Persian/Farsi to English. With her sophisticated writing style and beautiful translation of Rumi’s poems, I could easily understand and enjoy both. As I was born, raised, and educated in Iran where Farsi was my mother tongue, I am a proud Rumi lover myself. I know the author personally and am familiar with her exceptional literary work, having read her two previously published books, War on Error. Real Stories of American Muslims and Haldol and Hyacinths a bipolar life. both excellent readings for us all. Melody is a very capable, extremely talented, well educated (attorney-at-law by education), and a skilled, experienced, inspiring, activist award-winning author. Melody also has been burdened by Bipolar Disorder, and she is constantly in search of a cure for her demanding mental condition! She has learned much from her many experiences in treatment by numerous specialists in the fields of psychiatry, and psychology, from appropriate therapeutic medications, talk therapy, psychotherapy, self- directed therapy, and now with THE RUMI PRESCRIPTION therapy!!! The author’s inspiration was her Rumi-loving physician father Ahmad, who encouraged her to study, learn, understand and capture the beauty of the teachings and the magic power of The Rumi’s poetry. In doing so, Melody has gained a more meaningful and stronger lifeline for herself, to become her father’s Hamdel, & Hamzeban (of the same Heart, and the same Tongue). Surely Ahmad meant for Melody to fall in love with love, and to become pleasantly addicted to Rumi’s Poetry as Ahmad did years ago! Melody followed her father’s advice to learn, internalize the poetry into her heart, her soul, and her mind, and to start translating the Rumi’s poems from Farsi to English, and write this very meaningful and fascinating book. It took her at least three years of Ahmad’s constant teaching, and Melody’s constant learning; sometimes in person, and sometimes virtually using Skype. I fell apart and became unglued, when I read that Melody the activist, was angered and disappointed by the results of a recent national election. She felt that the wrong candidate was unfairly elected. See the pages 160- 162. “I am so angry I can barely see straight. Foggy splotches of red, white, black, and blue, flood my visual field. My tears feel like they’re boiling, burning through every inch of skin, muscle, and fat, straight to the bone. Not long after, a prescription slip arrives in my mailbox, and I need it! Only Grace opens our eyes. Only Love calms fury’s cries. Though, as always, the couplet is in Persian, Ahmad has signed his name and written the following in English: “I love you. Twice a day.” I believe that: There is nothing that soothes the soul, and heals ills like Rumi’s Poetry! •On the road to enlightenment, wise, and mad are one. In the way of Love, self and other are one. For those who drink of the wine that connects souls. In their religion, Kaaba and the house of idols are one. •If you’re in love with love, don’t be bashful. Be brave and plant your flag! •Justice waters trees that bear fruit. Injustice waters thorns at the root. Bestow bounty where it belongs, no matter where it arose. Don’t just go watering everything that grows.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I have fallen in love with The Rumi Prescription: How an Ancient Mystic Poet Changed My Modern Manic Life and highly recommend reading it as an antidote to the worries and stress we face living in these turbulent times. The author, Melody Moezzi, spent a significant amount of time on translating and more importantly, figuring out how to apply Rumi’s writings to real life frustrations and distractions. As a young Iranian-American Muslim growing up in Ohio, whenever she would face trying times her I have fallen in love with The Rumi Prescription: How an Ancient Mystic Poet Changed My Modern Manic Life and highly recommend reading it as an antidote to the worries and stress we face living in these turbulent times. The author, Melody Moezzi, spent a significant amount of time on translating and more importantly, figuring out how to apply Rumi’s writings to real life frustrations and distractions. As a young Iranian-American Muslim growing up in Ohio, whenever she would face trying times her father, who was a doctor, would write Rumi’s lyrics on a prescription pad and leave them around the house for her to read. At the time she didn’t fully appreciate their meaning. It wasn’t until later in life after successfully writing some books and experiencing a creative lull that she decided to spend time with her father delving into translating Rumi’s works for herself and applying those lesson to the challenges of her every day life. Not only does the book contain some wonderful lessons, but I also felt a real connection to her and her parents. There were some tender moments and some real eye-openers for the author as she wrote this book which I found to be particularly touching. I enjoyed the way the book was arranged as well. The chapters were broken into 10 categories of human experiences such as wanting, isolation, anxiety, and disappointment to name a few, each with a prescriptive lesson based on Rumi’s poetry. What I enjoyed most about this format is that I could easily go back to any one of the sections that might apply on a particular day. This is not a book of memes and cute sayings that can sometimes come across as trite. For me, it was a starting point, and a guide to which I will return often for comfort and gentle direction. I originally decided to read this book because I knew Melody was a mental health advocate, and I have greatly appreciated her sharing so openly about her journey with bipolar illness, which has impacted some of my family members as well. After reading this book, I realize that is just one part of her beautiful story. She is compassionate about so many issues that are relevant today and is using her talent, boldness, and passion to make a positive impact in our world. The biggest takeaway from this book for me is the reminder that when all of the dogma and rituals are stripped away from all of the religions, politics, and the manmade decrees, the fundamental truth that often gets lost is the importance of LOVE in our daily lives. I think everyone could use a little Rumi right now.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kait

    This is a book that's meant to be savored. It's not meant to be read quickly bu rather meditated on and sat with. Reread, discussed, examined, and journaled about. Its a book that regularly spoke to my soul and caused my shoulders to drop and my whole body to exhale—while leaving my brain confused AF. So I read and reread and reread again until my mind caught up and I integrated the lessons into my mind-body. When I grabbed this from the librarian's display during a panicked rush to get ALL THE BO This is a book that's meant to be savored. It's not meant to be read quickly bu rather meditated on and sat with. Reread, discussed, examined, and journaled about. Its a book that regularly spoke to my soul and caused my shoulders to drop and my whole body to exhale—while leaving my brain confused AF. So I read and reread and reread again until my mind caught up and I integrated the lessons into my mind-body. When I grabbed this from the librarian's display during a panicked rush to get ALL THE BOOKS before the NYPL shut down in March 2020, I expected this to be another appropriative, white-washed, The Secret-pushing self help book. It's not. Instead its an #ownvoices exploration of coming home to yourself again and again and again. Part memoir, part self-help book, part spiritual text, the Rumi Prescription was one of the biggest surprises—and best parts—of the hellscape that was 2020. Centered on the author's study of Rumi with her father (who I want to be the BEST of freinds with), it offers an intersectional analysis of mental health, spirituality, interpersonal relationships of all kinds, and life itself. This book saved my life. Repeatedly. I returned to it on days when I just couldn't. When friendships collapsed and the world around me said that my disabled life mattered less. When my health went to shit and during those first terrifying forays to attempt to get help once the outpatient clinics reopened in NYC. Through the sirens and then hope and the second and third waves. Sometimes I read whole chapters. Sometimes I read half a page and found myself sobbing. Sometimes I returned to chapters or passages that I needed to be reminded of. I LOVE THIS BOOK. And, in a twist of fate worthy of the best romcom—I mentioned this book to a new friend (hi Susie Ghahremani!) who asked for reading recs only to discover that she and the author know one another. Melody ended up sending me my own signed copy and...yea I cried some more because these beautiful moments of connection are meant to be savored. Thank you Melody Moezzi, so so much for your medicine. I know 2020 was a sucky year for new releases, but I'm forever grateful this made I said YES to one more book (even if I couldn't stay upright walking home with my haul).

  27. 4 out of 5

    Annie Simpson

    I loved this book. It is many things, a story about a spiritual quest and a search for creative sustenance; it is also a story of moving through difficult life moments and learning to live well, becoming more resilient. And a story of identity and connecting with rich cultural lineage, and especially, the story of a daughter and a father forging a deeper relationship because she wants to learn from and share the thing he holds most dear, Rumi and his poetry. I know Melody Moezzi's writing throug I loved this book. It is many things, a story about a spiritual quest and a search for creative sustenance; it is also a story of moving through difficult life moments and learning to live well, becoming more resilient. And a story of identity and connecting with rich cultural lineage, and especially, the story of a daughter and a father forging a deeper relationship because she wants to learn from and share the thing he holds most dear, Rumi and his poetry. I know Melody Moezzi's writing through BPHope magazine but had never read one of her books, and I am so glad I chose to read this one. Her open and honest discussion of her experiences with bipolar in the book were important, as was her willingness to value and use her experiences while manic to inform her search for meaning in the world once she was more stable. But this book at heart is about two things for me, the creative process and how to sustain it especially after experiencing some success; and then the tenderness and humor with which she portrays her wonderful, thoughtful and supportive father and their relationship as it grows. I also really enjoyed hearing Rumi's poetry recited (the narration is great here) and interpreted in situations that we all come up against in life. I did also laugh in multiple places bc Moezzi has a self-reflective humor that is pretty awesome.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Levi Mclaughlin

    This book is an education. An uplifting education in spiritual practice as healing practice and the power of a life story. In The Rumi Prescription, Melody invites the reader into what might at first seem forbidding territory and makes you want to stay there. Done with great virtuosity, because this is tough stuff: accounts of suicide attempts and suicides by beloved friends, lifetime battles with bipolar and depression, and searing descriptions of American racism and Islamophobia. It's thrillin This book is an education. An uplifting education in spiritual practice as healing practice and the power of a life story. In The Rumi Prescription, Melody invites the reader into what might at first seem forbidding territory and makes you want to stay there. Done with great virtuosity, because this is tough stuff: accounts of suicide attempts and suicides by beloved friends, lifetime battles with bipolar and depression, and searing descriptions of American racism and Islamophobia. It's thrilling to witness Melody persevere through these challenges, all the while bringing to life her love for her family and the rich culture of Sufi poetry that undergirds her journey. Most touching of all is the complex, and frequently hilarious, account of her love for her father. Melody does what few writers are able to pull off: she's simultaneously irreverent and reverent, and she's utterly convincing as she maintains this wild non-duality. Highly recommended, not just for those seeking spiritual guidance, but for readers who want to know more about Islam, America, justice, injustice, and how to prevail. Such a wonderful book.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Magnani

    Melody Moezzi's The Rumi Prescription is a brilliant book. Here you will find a playful and lyrical use of language; personal and familial stories told with candor and a sense of humor; a moving portrait of a loving father-daughter relationship; and of course, ten woes common to all human beings, presented as "diagnoses" (not meant to be clinical of course) and matched to ten "prescriptions", drawn from the poetry of Rumi, to remedy them. Melody has translated many verses of Rumi for this book. Melody Moezzi's The Rumi Prescription is a brilliant book. Here you will find a playful and lyrical use of language; personal and familial stories told with candor and a sense of humor; a moving portrait of a loving father-daughter relationship; and of course, ten woes common to all human beings, presented as "diagnoses" (not meant to be clinical of course) and matched to ten "prescriptions", drawn from the poetry of Rumi, to remedy them. Melody has translated many verses of Rumi for this book. They have such beauty, accessibility, and rhyme in her renderings that one could believe they had originally been written in English, even though they weren't. Also, if you are a person of faith, or simply someone who believes in Love, you will find that this book speaks to universal truths among faiths. It has been said that there is a "golden thread of truth in all faiths"; Melody plays this thread like a string of a fine violin, encouraging us to find the "gold on the inside" that all of us have, whatever our beliefs may be. There is much to appreciate in this book. If you feel curious at all about it, it is well worth a look.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    At the surface, this book is about what we can learn from Rumi, the 13th-century Persian poet, to help us navigate the modern world. And Rumi certainly has much to offer us with his focus on love as the central source of meaning in human lives. But really, this book is about the author's relationship with her father Ahmad, who is passionate about Rumi's poetry and has a verse at the ready for any challenging life circumstance. If Rumi's Beloved is God, Melody's Beloved is her father. And reading At the surface, this book is about what we can learn from Rumi, the 13th-century Persian poet, to help us navigate the modern world. And Rumi certainly has much to offer us with his focus on love as the central source of meaning in human lives. But really, this book is about the author's relationship with her father Ahmad, who is passionate about Rumi's poetry and has a verse at the ready for any challenging life circumstance. If Rumi's Beloved is God, Melody's Beloved is her father. And reading and translating Rumi's poetry brings them even closer together. The book features the author's original translations of Rumi's poetry. Here are a few of my favorites. You went out in search of gold far and wide, But all along you were gold on the inside. Wherever streams go, life grows. Wherever tears go, mercy flows. Seek the tonic nectar in the bitter sting. Go to the source of the source of your spring.

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