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Young Justice, Vol. 3: Warriors and Warlords

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New York Times bestselling author Brian Michael Bendis continues his hit series Young Justice! This collection kicks off with Young Justice searching for Conner Kent as Superboy finds himself trapped in Skartaris, home of Warlord! To rescue him, the team enlists backup—in the form of Sideways, Spoiler, Aqualad, and Arrowette! This leads Impulse on a journey of self-discover New York Times bestselling author Brian Michael Bendis continues his hit series Young Justice! This collection kicks off with Young Justice searching for Conner Kent as Superboy finds himself trapped in Skartaris, home of Warlord! To rescue him, the team enlists backup—in the form of Sideways, Spoiler, Aqualad, and Arrowette! This leads Impulse on a journey of self-discovery throughout space and time, uncovering some shocking truths! Plus, date night gets dangerous for Drake and Spoiler! Collects Young Justice #13-20.


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New York Times bestselling author Brian Michael Bendis continues his hit series Young Justice! This collection kicks off with Young Justice searching for Conner Kent as Superboy finds himself trapped in Skartaris, home of Warlord! To rescue him, the team enlists backup—in the form of Sideways, Spoiler, Aqualad, and Arrowette! This leads Impulse on a journey of self-discover New York Times bestselling author Brian Michael Bendis continues his hit series Young Justice! This collection kicks off with Young Justice searching for Conner Kent as Superboy finds himself trapped in Skartaris, home of Warlord! To rescue him, the team enlists backup—in the form of Sideways, Spoiler, Aqualad, and Arrowette! This leads Impulse on a journey of self-discovery throughout space and time, uncovering some shocking truths! Plus, date night gets dangerous for Drake and Spoiler! Collects Young Justice #13-20.

30 review for Young Justice, Vol. 3: Warriors and Warlords

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Eight pointless issues as this series goes nowhere. The back claims Earth shattering revelations for Conner Kent and Bart Allen. Instead we get a bunch of malarkey about other universes that only raises more questions without answering anything. Tim Drake's time as Drake mercifully ends shortly into this book. That's one of Bendis's all time worst ideas to have a superhero go by his last name as his superhero name. That's some secret identity you're trying to protect there Tim. Young Justice has Eight pointless issues as this series goes nowhere. The back claims Earth shattering revelations for Conner Kent and Bart Allen. Instead we get a bunch of malarkey about other universes that only raises more questions without answering anything. Tim Drake's time as Drake mercifully ends shortly into this book. That's one of Bendis's all time worst ideas to have a superhero go by his last name as his superhero name. That's some secret identity you're trying to protect there Tim. Young Justice has turned into some of Bendis's worst writing in years. DC thankfully put the series out to pasture. The first several issues tag team John Timms and Michael Avon Oeming on art. It couldn't be more jarring. Oeming does not belong in the normal DC universe. His art is terrible (in this. He's much more suited for books like Powers), especially when you're flipping back and forth between him and John Timms. Eventually Scott Godlewski comes in and rights the ship on art chores.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    And just when I thought it couldn't get any worse. Bendis throws Superboy into Skartaris, because he doesn't have anything better to do. STAR Labs are suddenly evil again, sure. And then there's some vague handwavey explanations about continuity that don't make any sense, Bart has a freak out, and we end on a series of one and done stories that don't wrap up anything at all and feel entirely throwaway. This book has been directionless from the get-go. Bendis set out to explain why these characters And just when I thought it couldn't get any worse. Bendis throws Superboy into Skartaris, because he doesn't have anything better to do. STAR Labs are suddenly evil again, sure. And then there's some vague handwavey explanations about continuity that don't make any sense, Bart has a freak out, and we end on a series of one and done stories that don't wrap up anything at all and feel entirely throwaway. This book has been directionless from the get-go. Bendis set out to explain why these characters are back together and how, and failed at that. We know next to nothing about Jinny Hex or Teen Lantern, and they're characters Bendis himself created to be in the book. Tim Drake changed costume and codename, but the fan backlash was so bad that it lasted all of about four issues (seriously, being poop brown and going by Drake when he has a secret identity is just bad on so many levels). The only thing saving this from a dreaded 1 star rating is the fact that we actually got a consistent art team. Scott Godlewski pencils the final six issues with hardly any assistance, and there's only one example of Bendis throwing one of his artist friends a bone by giving Michael Oeming something to do during the Skartaris stuff, so Bendis reined himself in on that one as well. I've never been so happy to see a book end, and given that this has so many characters in it that I love, that makes me feel really sad.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Scratch

    This tried its best to make do with the crummy situation Young Justice was forced into with the awfulness of the New 52. They tried to cover the concept of a "crisis" in as vague a manner as they could, especially in light of the fact continuity still hasn't been fully fixed since "Rebirth." Still, it was nice to watch a team of young heroes show some camaraderie, and nice to watch Bart and Connor go through some existential crises. Spoiler and Wonder Girl both had nice rebelling-against-authori This tried its best to make do with the crummy situation Young Justice was forced into with the awfulness of the New 52. They tried to cover the concept of a "crisis" in as vague a manner as they could, especially in light of the fact continuity still hasn't been fully fixed since "Rebirth." Still, it was nice to watch a team of young heroes show some camaraderie, and nice to watch Bart and Connor go through some existential crises. Spoiler and Wonder Girl both had nice rebelling-against-authority moments, and to a lesser extent so did Teen Lantern. Some important questions were raised, but not resolved. At one point Superboy asked Bart where he lived, and whether he even had a home. Bart did not truly answer, and honestly, this deserves an answer. Bart then interacted with Barry Allen, who accepted his presence at face value, when really Bart is particularly impossible. Barry Allen should not be back. I miss the status quo from the 90s and early 2000s where Barry Allen had seemingly "died" in the Crisis on Infinite Earths, but actually had gone to live in the distant future, where he had twin children. Bart is his grandkid born in the future. With Barry Allen back and living in the present, Bart doesn't make any sense anymore. When is Barry going to travel into the distant future and raise his children? This volume made a big deal about how Superboy was born in a previous version of the universe and shouldn't exist anymore, but that origin is even more true for Bart, by my reckoning. This was pleasant, but not the greatest book ever. And thank God Tim Drake is over his "Drake" phase. Phew.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Christian Zamora-Dahmen

    This book seriously needed some direction at first. Even when this set got started with the remains of the Superboy arch, the whole thing was all over the place. But in the end it found a pace and started to bring in some interesting stories, not just chunks of it. And then it was over... Bendis is one of those writers that can be real good, or just lead you nowhere. His creative mind is fantastic, but when they give him too much room, he just gets nowhere. And on the other side, when his work ha This book seriously needed some direction at first. Even when this set got started with the remains of the Superboy arch, the whole thing was all over the place. But in the end it found a pace and started to bring in some interesting stories, not just chunks of it. And then it was over... Bendis is one of those writers that can be real good, or just lead you nowhere. His creative mind is fantastic, but when they give him too much room, he just gets nowhere. And on the other side, when his work has to be limited to a certain set of issues, he does wonders. It wasn’t really a surprise that this book ended so nicely, when it took him ages to get anywhere. I guess the notice of the book getting cancelled finally forced him to focus. It’s bitter-sweet, you know. Young Justice was finally becoming a series to look forward to, and then it was over.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    This is probably the best volume of the new Young Justice. (So it's a shame to see it cancelled.) Oh, Bendis makes the cast too big, and this means previously great characters like Jinny get very little attention. But there are some great issues with Conner in Skartaris and a nice team-up between Tim and Spoiler. And a mish-mash of an attempt to explain why the missing YJ members have returned to post-FP reality. (And boy is that continuity more of a mess than ever, especially the part where Supe This is probably the best volume of the new Young Justice. (So it's a shame to see it cancelled.) Oh, Bendis makes the cast too big, and this means previously great characters like Jinny get very little attention. But there are some great issues with Conner in Skartaris and a nice team-up between Tim and Spoiler. And a mish-mash of an attempt to explain why the missing YJ members have returned to post-FP reality. (And boy is that continuity more of a mess than ever, especially the part where Superman doesn't remember Conner, despite the fact that he's supposed to be Pre+Post-FP Clark.) Anyway, this rates perhaps 3.5 stars, but I've rounded up for the nostalgia factor.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Young Justice: Warriors and Warlords picks up where the previous volume left off, collecting the last eight issues (Young Justice #13–20) of the 2019 on-going series and collects six stories: "Warlord", "The Emancipation of Bartholomew Allen", "The NOW", "Spoilers", "God and Monsters", and "Final Justice". "Warlord" is a two-issue storyline with a finale (Young Justice #13–15) has Kon-El as Superboy trapped on Skartakis where he meets Travis Morgan as Warlord where they battle against Green Manal Young Justice: Warriors and Warlords picks up where the previous volume left off, collecting the last eight issues (Young Justice #13–20) of the 2019 on-going series and collects six stories: "Warlord", "The Emancipation of Bartholomew Allen", "The NOW", "Spoilers", "God and Monsters", and "Final Justice". "Warlord" is a two-issue storyline with a finale (Young Justice #13–15) has Kon-El as Superboy trapped on Skartakis where he meets Travis Morgan as Warlord where they battle against Green Manaleeshi with a kryptonite sword. Meanwhile, back on Earth, Young Justice tries to rescue Superboy and to take on S.T.A.R. Labs. Cissie King-Jones as Arrowette, Jackson Hyde as Aqualad, Stephanie Brown as Spoiler, Derek James as Sideways, Miguel Montez, Summer Pickens, and the Wonder Twins joined the Young Justice team. The next five stories are one-issue long: "The Emancipation of Bartholomew Allen" (Young Justice #16), which stars Bart Allen as Impulse and Kon-El as Superboy going against Harley Quinn and Mirror Master. "The NOW" (Young Justice #17) has the Young Justice teaming up with Justice League. "Spoilers" (Young Justice #18) has Stephanie Brown as Spoiler and Tim Drake as Drake going against Cluemaster – Stephanie Brown's father. "God and Monsters" (Young Justice #19) centers on Cassandra Sandsmark as Wonder Girl as she battles Poseidon. Finally "Final Justice" (Young Justice #20) has the entire Young Justice team battling against Red Tornado as they made their new home base in Happy Harbor. Brian Michael Bendis (Young Justice #13–20) and David Walker (Young Justice #13–17, 19–20) penned the entire trade paperback. For the most part, it is written rather mediocrity well. Two main problems with this trade paperback: a large cast of characters – it is too big to adequately explore each character and the story seems rather directionless. Bendis and Walker tried to consolidate all the characters from the Wonder Comics pop-up imprint and unsuccessfully at that. Scott Godlewski (Young Justice #15–20), Michel Avon Oeming (Young Justice #13–14, 18), John Timms (Young Justice #13–15), and Mike Grell (Young Justice #13) penciled the trade paperback. Since Godlewski was a major penciler, the artistic flow of the trade paperback flowed exceptionally well. As for issue that Godlewski did not pencil, there were too many pencilers in an issue as the different pencilers took section of the issues, which disturb the artistic flow. Overall, this Young Justice series is written and constructed rather moderately overall. It started out rather strong as the team formed rather quickly to save earth from the inhabitants of Gemworld. It quickly went downward after the first storyline. The problem being that the team is too big and not enough time is spent on characters that Bendis have created. Furthermore, trying to shoehorn every teenaged hero in the Wonder Comics pop-up imprint (Naomi, Dial H for Hero, and Wonder Twins) into the team seemed too quick of an affair. All in all, Young Justice: Warriors and Warlords is a mediocre conclusion to an equally mediocre series.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ronald

    After reading reviews of this volume I was concerned it would just be more of the same. I was surprised to find a somewhat coherent story that covered several issues. A bunch of the story was told from the speedsters point of view so it was a bit disorganized. I actually enjoyed Connor's visit to the mystical magical warlords world. I would go so far to say that Bendis did not write these stories as the credits state, these were stories told in a most traditional fashion. I'm kind of sorry to se After reading reviews of this volume I was concerned it would just be more of the same. I was surprised to find a somewhat coherent story that covered several issues. A bunch of the story was told from the speedsters point of view so it was a bit disorganized. I actually enjoyed Connor's visit to the mystical magical warlords world. I would go so far to say that Bendis did not write these stories as the credits state, these were stories told in a most traditional fashion. I'm kind of sorry to see the series end now. I guess if I had to complain I would say there were now to many active characters in the book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Paul W.

    Surprising guest stars made this one more fun. The story took some nice twists and turns as well, and I found myself enjoying it more than I expected to. It is a bit crowded but still nice. I wish there were more room for character development without devoting an entire issue to a single character. But Bendis does a good job.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Was there a point to this? Also, I feel confused. Crossover comics are so disruptive, plus I think this was referencing one of DCs world changes? That, plus waaaaay too many characters, and this was just a mess of nothing.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anyeliz

    This was really enjoyable and kind of cute as well. In this final installment, we also witness some heartwarming conversations about friendship and our place in the multiverse.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Paxton Holley

    These Young Justice books by Bendis are so much fun. I love the group of heroes. But issue 20 seems to be the end. Are they starting a new book? They just got the group together.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rob Schamberger

    A really fun book, and don’t we need more fun nowadays?

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Nooooo! I did not know this was the last one until I got to the end.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Adam Graham

    This book collects the final eight issues of Young Justice. The plot with Superboy in the last volume is taken care of in the previous volume and then we get a bunch of individual issues that fill in continuity. Overall, this wasn't bad. The art was pretty consistent and the stories had some interesting moments, but this didn't go anywhere and it was a little frustrating that a big defining for the team happened outside the book I was reading. This was okay, but I hope Young Justice returns with This book collects the final eight issues of Young Justice. The plot with Superboy in the last volume is taken care of in the previous volume and then we get a bunch of individual issues that fill in continuity. Overall, this wasn't bad. The art was pretty consistent and the stories had some interesting moments, but this didn't go anywhere and it was a little frustrating that a big defining for the team happened outside the book I was reading. This was okay, but I hope Young Justice returns with a bit more focus.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Justin Blair

  16. 5 out of 5

    Connor

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mario Rojas

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael DeLong

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ben Dorris

  20. 4 out of 5

    July

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jasper

  22. 4 out of 5

    RJ Wood

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nathaniel

  25. 5 out of 5

    Callum

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chris Galdieri

  27. 5 out of 5

    James

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  29. 5 out of 5

    Remy's Dad

  30. 4 out of 5

    Steven

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