web site hit counter Glitch Feminism - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Glitch Feminism

Availability: Ready to download

Simone de Beauvoir said “One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman.” The glitch announces: One is not born, but rather becomes, a body. The divide between the digital and the real world no longer exists: we are connected all the time. What must we do to work out who we are, and where we belong? How do we find the space to grow, unite and confront the systems of oppressio Simone de Beauvoir said “One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman.” The glitch announces: One is not born, but rather becomes, a body. The divide between the digital and the real world no longer exists: we are connected all the time. What must we do to work out who we are, and where we belong? How do we find the space to grow, unite and confront the systems of oppression? This conflict can be found in the fissures between the body, gender and identity. Too often, the glitch is considered a mistake, a faulty overlaying, a bug in the system; in contrast, Russell compels us to find liberation here. In a radical call to arms Legacy Russell argues that we need to embrace the glitch in order to break down the binaries and limitations that define gender, race, sexuality. Glitch Feminism is a vital new chapter in cyberfeminism, one that explores the relationship between gender, technology and identity. In an urgent manifesto, Russell reveals the many ways that the Glitch performs and transforms: how it refuses, throws shade, ghosts, errs, encrypt, mobilizes and survives. Developing the argument through memoir, art and critical theory, Russell also looks at the work of contemporary artists who travel through the glitch in their work. Timely and provocative, Glitch Feminism shows how the error can be a revolution.


Compare

Simone de Beauvoir said “One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman.” The glitch announces: One is not born, but rather becomes, a body. The divide between the digital and the real world no longer exists: we are connected all the time. What must we do to work out who we are, and where we belong? How do we find the space to grow, unite and confront the systems of oppressio Simone de Beauvoir said “One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman.” The glitch announces: One is not born, but rather becomes, a body. The divide between the digital and the real world no longer exists: we are connected all the time. What must we do to work out who we are, and where we belong? How do we find the space to grow, unite and confront the systems of oppression? This conflict can be found in the fissures between the body, gender and identity. Too often, the glitch is considered a mistake, a faulty overlaying, a bug in the system; in contrast, Russell compels us to find liberation here. In a radical call to arms Legacy Russell argues that we need to embrace the glitch in order to break down the binaries and limitations that define gender, race, sexuality. Glitch Feminism is a vital new chapter in cyberfeminism, one that explores the relationship between gender, technology and identity. In an urgent manifesto, Russell reveals the many ways that the Glitch performs and transforms: how it refuses, throws shade, ghosts, errs, encrypt, mobilizes and survives. Developing the argument through memoir, art and critical theory, Russell also looks at the work of contemporary artists who travel through the glitch in their work. Timely and provocative, Glitch Feminism shows how the error can be a revolution.

30 review for Glitch Feminism

  1. 5 out of 5

    Cat

    This manifesto is blurbed by Lil Miquela, which in and of itself should give the reader pause. In the chapter "Glitch is Anti-Body" Russell compares Miquela to the queer artist Kia Labeija—an HIV-positive Black and Filipino woman who practices voguing and self-portraiture—arguing that both "deploy the imaginary as a computational strategy of survival" and act as "embodiments of persistent refusal ... actively re-imagining and re-centering neoteric realities." Although Russell does briefly consid This manifesto is blurbed by Lil Miquela, which in and of itself should give the reader pause. In the chapter "Glitch is Anti-Body" Russell compares Miquela to the queer artist Kia Labeija—an HIV-positive Black and Filipino woman who practices voguing and self-portraiture—arguing that both "deploy the imaginary as a computational strategy of survival" and act as "embodiments of persistent refusal ... actively re-imagining and re-centering neoteric realities." Although Russell does briefly consider that Miquela represents "a perverse intersection of a neoliberal consumer capitalism and advocacy," she never fully engages with what this means. Nor does she fully explain why we should embrace Miquela as a model of glitch feminism. Miquela doesn't have a real body—and what? Draw it out for us please. While Glitch Feminism is an enjoyable primer on basic ideas from gender theory/cyberfeminism, it's not really offering any new ideas on its own, instead regurgitating what we can already glean from Judith Butler, Donna Haraway, etc. We already know that the border between online and offline is fuzzy, and that the Internet allows us to inhabit multiple identities, and that it perhaps lets us temporarily transcend our race, class, gender, so on. The counter-response, of course, is that surveillance and algorithms and so on enable big tech to monetize whatever identities we assume. Russell does point out that, say, Facebook adding 58 gender options isn't actually progress, but her analysis still feels too optimistic — there's not enough clarity on how we can bypass, thwart, disrupt surveillance to create our own spaces of play. I was also disappointed bc Fred Moten (whom she quotes) has written so much good stuff on "the break," "the cut" and the politics of invisibility (drawing from Ralph Ellison), all of it tied to technologies of reproduction, and she doesn't effectively incorporate those concepts to flesh out her idea of the glitch. The idea of "glitch feminism" probably felt more radical when she wrote her original manifesto but as it stands this book feels more like a rebrand of existing ideas than a genuinely new way of thinking.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Agh, this is a difficult book to review. I was hooked on the bio but the book, for me, just didn't live up to its blurb. It's less a book and more of an extended metaphor slash niche and lengthy university essay. Hats off to the writer though for writing something very unique that transgresses boundaries and genres (much like the Glitch).

  3. 4 out of 5

    José

    Really good manifesto. In "Glitch Feminism", Legacy Russell sets down the fundamentals for her theory of feminism - which is, intuitively, glitch feminism - whose aim is to break with the excessive dogmas which coerce us into categorised existence by embracing the glitch - the error which breaks with categories - and performing it extensively. The author recognises that these systems of dogmas - such as race, gender and sexuality - are both at fault for creating and a manifestation of a hierarch Really good manifesto. In "Glitch Feminism", Legacy Russell sets down the fundamentals for her theory of feminism - which is, intuitively, glitch feminism - whose aim is to break with the excessive dogmas which coerce us into categorised existence by embracing the glitch - the error which breaks with categories - and performing it extensively. The author recognises that these systems of dogmas - such as race, gender and sexuality - are both at fault for creating and a manifestation of a hierarchy of permissions to exist for those who are disenfranchised, forcing them to either give up their life or change it into a more socially conforming life. Through the book, Russell shows us numerous examples of mostly digital art done by black and/or queer artists which relate to this and demonstrate how online life is no longer dragged to the subalternity of relevance and how it becomes increasingly important to truly express ourselves as beings which seek to be free from the AFK category systems and to revolutionise our offline existence - Whitman's popular verse "(I am large. I contain multitudes.)" is here often quoted and acts as a motto to propel this plurality of online existences into a dominant plain of existence. Taking after Simone de Beauvoir, Legacy Russell claims that "one is not born, but rather becomes, a body", to signal how the right to have a body for those who are disenfranchised, to exist as an outlier in this heavily categorised society, can be reclaimed. I have not read much on cyberfeminism, but this book greatly helped me understand a few questions surrounding it and how one can use glitch feminism to break with the shackles of stereotypical existence.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Keondra Freemyn

    solid book but i had to keep reminding myself that it is a ‘’manifesto” and to not get frustrated that many ideas are not fully fleshed out. the first two chapters resonated the most and i enjoyed how Russell brought in examples from black artists and other artists of color to explore the core concepts of GF. the two major critiques i have are 1) it didn’t feel like feminism was the most accurate foundational concept for the work - feels much more focused on identity and gender more generally (i solid book but i had to keep reminding myself that it is a ‘’manifesto” and to not get frustrated that many ideas are not fully fleshed out. the first two chapters resonated the most and i enjoyed how Russell brought in examples from black artists and other artists of color to explore the core concepts of GF. the two major critiques i have are 1) it didn’t feel like feminism was the most accurate foundational concept for the work - feels much more focused on identity and gender more generally (ie resistance to a binary concept of gender) 2) the work seems to intentionally evade the commodification of identity in the virtual realm and how that influences engagement/community building/value/sense of self and limits ones ability to truly resist the systems that exist AFK. The influence and role of capitalism cannot be overlooked and i’m hopeful the author will continue to build on the ideas in this work in future writings.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nicolas Lontel

    Un bon essai/manifeste, mais qui ne m'a pas donné cet effet de changement de paradigme comme on pourrait s'attendre avec l'appellation manifeste . Une métaphore continue sur le "glitch" et comment le queer, les corps racisées et sexués viennent perturber le système, on est définitivement à la suite théorique des Halberstam et Baldwin (amplement cités comme sources), mais avec une pensée que je trouve très derridienne de l'exploration de tous les sens d'un mot dans une perspective essayistique (t Un bon essai/manifeste, mais qui ne m'a pas donné cet effet de changement de paradigme comme on pourrait s'attendre avec l'appellation manifeste . Une métaphore continue sur le "glitch" et comment le queer, les corps racisées et sexués viennent perturber le système, on est définitivement à la suite théorique des Halberstam et Baldwin (amplement cités comme sources), mais avec une pensée que je trouve très derridienne de l'exploration de tous les sens d'un mot dans une perspective essayistique (très french theory donc, peu étonnant vu l'impression nombre d'universitaires dans cette lignée). À travers l'exploration d'oeuvres, de performances, de photo, d'expériences et de vécu personnel ainsi que de théorie critiques queer, sur le gender et la racialisation , l'autrice amène un argument de perturbation nécessaire (et directement lié à l'expérience des corps) de la société. Je ne pense pas que l'autrice innove le champs, loin de là, mais elle a un bon argument central, la métaphore est bien explorée et ça fait quand même une introduction féministe très intéressante pour les réalités des corps numériques et AFK.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Joshie

    More manifesto than theory, but creative and thoughtful throughout! Is lacking a madness or disability studies perspective which is a rather significant cause for concern when so many obvious parallels exist. How are we still discussing embodiment and body politics without directly engaging with (dis)ability? Nonetheless Russell is incisive and critical in their call for feminists and queer theorists to look to the internet as a legitimate space of theory, community, and identity. Completely wor More manifesto than theory, but creative and thoughtful throughout! Is lacking a madness or disability studies perspective which is a rather significant cause for concern when so many obvious parallels exist. How are we still discussing embodiment and body politics without directly engaging with (dis)ability? Nonetheless Russell is incisive and critical in their call for feminists and queer theorists to look to the internet as a legitimate space of theory, community, and identity. Completely worthwhile as an intro text, and to familiarize oneself with how anti racist feminisms can and already do manifest digitally.

  7. 5 out of 5

    T

    Derivative

  8. 5 out of 5

    Inés Paris

    Opens up new forms without fixing them to the norm. Great food for thought!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Viola

    https://bombmagazine.org/articles/leg... Gentrification of Memory: A feminist manifesto that centers artists as the engineers of a queer and Black imagined future. Oct 29, 2020 I shouted “Yes!” at the screen. It was one of those reads. I’m talking about an early version of Legacy Russell’s Glitch Feminism (Verso) that I read on Rhizome, about seven years ago before it was a book. What caught my attention was the sharp way that Russell connects questions of race, gender, sexuality, tech, and aesthe https://bombmagazine.org/articles/leg... Gentrification of Memory: A feminist manifesto that centers artists as the engineers of a queer and Black imagined future. Oct 29, 2020 I shouted “Yes!” at the screen. It was one of those reads. I’m talking about an early version of Legacy Russell’s Glitch Feminism (Verso) that I read on Rhizome, about seven years ago before it was a book. What caught my attention was the sharp way that Russell connects questions of race, gender, sexuality, tech, and aesthetics—like sounding a magnificent chord, rather than the one-note takes that so often come out of Internet writing. On the one hand, there’s something refreshing about the kind of open access people have to share all kinds of takes. On the other, Russell is well aware of what’s lost when the dominant culture bulldozes its way into the fugitive margins where such matters were once so vitally fought out. —McKenzie Wark McKenzie Wark Your book kicks off by describing the Internet as a haven for a young, queer Black person, increasingly alienated from her own neighborhood by white gentrifiers. But I’m wondering if you think that maybe the white gentrifiers came and took those online spaces too? Legacy Russell Real talk: If we look at this question through an art historical lens, I would argue that there’s a whole portion of “net art” and “post-Internet art” dominated by non-Black, and often white, “art bros.” If we zoom out beyond the art world and look at the actual world, we see how there, too, people are quick to co-opt and gentrify queer and Black culture. By co-opting, they are shifting the circulation and vernacular movement of queerness and blackness, often with limited context or cultural citation. This changes how these legacies are centered or remembered as they travel through the mainstream. We’ve also seen a prevalence of very aggressive NIMBY [Not In My Backyard] politics online and a rise in awareness of digital redlining as people have begun to wise up to the fact that inequities on the Internet hold a mirror up to those in the world at large. It’s important to acknowledge that gentrification is a question of class and race, yes, but also of memory. MW Oh, that’s interesting. How do you think memory is gentrified? LR When places gentrify, they often render the local sites unrecognizable to the people who are from there—gentrification signifies a type of erasure and triggers a sort of cultural aphasia. Our memories become misaligned with what’s around us, and we struggle to describe what was there previously. These are the concerns the book speaks from when it talks about gentrification—that erasure, those questions of memory, and what going online allowed for in the 1990s as a means of resituating ourselves. MW I’d put that alongside what Sarah Schulman called the “gentrification of the mind,” but it’s so helpful that you add a digital dimension. LR As the Internet becomes increasingly corporatized, we face similar types of gentrification as we might away from our screens; the consolidation of conglomerates that control our digital spaces—and our data therein!—is commensurate in many ways to a major developer building a skyscraper right in the middle of a small community. Filters and algorithms mean we sometimes have to fight for our digital neighborhoods. What we think of as progress on the Internet comes with aesthetic upgrades that often cost tons of money to make and edge out competitors. This make us feel like the Internet is doing better work simply because that’s what it looks like. All this is to say I miss the days of Angelfire and GeoCities, where you came across weird things on the Internet and where dial-up made you really work for your chatroom time with strangers who would blow your mind. (laughter) MW Each section of the book engages with various artists. What are your thoughts on feminism as aesthetic? LR I’m likely falling into the very real historical bear-trap debate around these tensions, but I’m not sure I entirely agree with the conflation of “art” and “aesthetics” here. Glitch Feminism is a manifesto that centers artists as the engineers of a queer and Black imagined future. The thing that manifestos share with artists is that both are able to extend beyond the restrictions of a standard narrative. They can be ambitious and wild and experimental. They can set out new rules for things that haven’t even been built yet. They can make demands that feel impossible, but give us all something to work toward. They can throw shade unapologetically as a form of critique and as an act of care. MW I take your point about not collapsing art and aesthetics. LR The artists in the book—E. Jane, Sondra Perry, Shawné Michaelain Holloway, Victoria Sin, to name a few—are incredibly political in the work they make and the concerns they hold as they intersect with a broader feminist discourse. I included them in Glitch Feminismbecause they all make work that operates as a catalyst for change and takes on a role that extends beyond what is solely aesthetic. Their work shows us that the very underpinnings of the aesthetic as it traverses art history is deeply troubled as it models itself off of an exclusionary canon that in its supremacy prioritizes certain voices, visions, bodies, and models of beauty, over others. MW Is there a sense though that feminism, shorn of political memory, is becoming nothing but aesthetic? LR Sure, yes, there is plenty of aestheticized feminism found within what’s been called “lifestyle feminism” or “bubblegum feminism.” Often this type of aesthetic is swathed in pink and gets a bad rap for being performed but not practiced, a sort of virtue signaling in its own right. This is something else, and while of course there are artists that make this kind of work—along with people (artists and otherwise) who perform this type of politic superficially—the function of making a book like this is to hold space for those who are using their creative practice as a means of pushing feminism and art further symbiotically, as they live together and support one another. MW There are three spaces you mention throughout the book that seem available to non-white, non-masc, non-straight expression: the Internet, nightlife, and certain kinds of art practice. This reminds me a lot of Juliana Huxtable’s work, which makes an appearance. Do you think it’s possible to build out from those niches or will these always be fugitive and fleeting? LR The book is a text that seats itself within art as a form of creative expression. It’s also something that travels through my lived experience, one where the Internet, nightlife, and art have been essential. I recognize that this experience as I have lived it is one that may not be universal, although it is certainly shared across geographies and generations, which I appreciate and am grateful for. However, I don’t think that non-white, non-masc, non-straight expression is designated to live exclusively online, via nightlife, and via art—that feels decadent as a thesis and not really authentic to how this book should live in the world. I would be disappointed if this was the flat read people took away. MW Given how the art world itself redlines, maybe we have to look for aesthetic practices beyond that, but also beyond the places we expect to find it. LR The manifesto encourages us to find our range, and to take up space. Since the original essays were published in short form in The Society Pages and Rhizome in 2012 and 2013 respectively, I’ve been so lucky to hear from people who aren’t in the art world at all, or aren’t engaged with technology, that they connected with the text. For me, this makes the manifesto complete—that it can be held and housed outside of any singular site, that it can belong to those who need and want it. MW One of the glitches in the book is the interruption of the binary gender system with, let’s call them, “analog” genders. But I wonder: Is there a place in glitch feminism for us binary trans women? It seems more oriented to the nonbinary and queering of gender. LR Absolutely. My argument away from a binary is asking us all to do the work to explore what masculine/feminine and male/female mean, considering them as gendered and racialized assignments that are actually historical and complex and need to be actively reckoned with. The gender binary and how it has been weaponized as an agent within feminism is something that needs to be refused, redefined, decolonized. This is an act of love for our trans sisters who are pivotal parts of our history and community both through and beyond cyber culture. For me, it’s also an interrogation of binaries across intimacy and care, the roles we are expected to play across the binary in loving ourselves and one another. The idea that male or masc-identified people are somehow (in their definition) not supposed to engage with radical softness, or that a female or femme-identified person has to relinquish certain types of power and control in order to be claimed by “womanhood,” is bullshit. MW Yes, I think it’s helpful to move away from binarized bodies to think about social and technical relations. Much of the feminism—and critiques of it by Black women, queer women, trans women—now erased by the gentrification of memory taught us that lesson. LR Some of the most gorgeous queer relationships exist within what might be read superficially or aesthetically as a binary, but what happens in the acts of care or codes of intimacy is much more complex. These are hard things to talk about, but my hope is that we can find a way to do this work together. I’m writing from the top, bottom, and everything in between. Glitch feminism is for anyone who is looking to do that work, regardless of what pronoun you choose to use. We’re here for an expansive self, which is your right, my right, as we tear it all down and then rebuild the world. Glitch Feminism is available for purchase here. McKenzie Wark is an Australian-born writer and scholar. Wark is known for her writings on media theory, critical theory, new media, and the Situationist International. Her best known works are A Hacker Manifesto and Gamer Theory. She is professor of Media and Cultural Studies at The New School in New York City.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Malcolm

    There are whole swaths of US poetry that have passed me by, including for the most part Walt Whitman – but I do like and often rely on part of his ‘Song of Myself’ where he wrote: Do I contradict myself? Very well then I contradict myself, (I am large, I contain multitudes) usually as a self-justification and excuse for (my) persistent inconsistency. It was also the sentiment that struck me early in Legacy Russell’s fantastic disruption of the persistent binaries shaping, framing and underpinning d There are whole swaths of US poetry that have passed me by, including for the most part Walt Whitman – but I do like and often rely on part of his ‘Song of Myself’ where he wrote: Do I contradict myself? Very well then I contradict myself, (I am large, I contain multitudes) usually as a self-justification and excuse for (my) persistent inconsistency. It was also the sentiment that struck me early in Legacy Russell’s fantastic disruption of the persistent binaries shaping, framing and underpinning discussions of sex, gender, sexuality – and by implication many of our wider engagements with ontology (and then she quoted it on p19 – I was won over). Russell invokes the glitch as a moment, a site, a mode of disruption, as “an error, a mistake, a failure to function…. an indicator of something having gone wrong” (p7) but also as “a vehicle of refusal, a strategy of non-performance…. requiring us to confront the body as a strategic framework and one that is often applied towards particular ends” (pp8-9). This glitch is not a mistake, but a challenge to a system that is flawed, that contains components for whom it does not work but whom the binary body delimits in ways that are flawed. As is the case with many glitches, these are signs of systemic failure. Russell’s world is one of cultural creation, of artistic practice and (for her it seems) of curatorial assessment, evaluation and judgement. She brings that critical eye to bear on 11 moments of artist practice that remix, mobilise and encrypt gender and bodies through an array of approaches, techniques and performative styles that do not only disrupt the binaries of bodily ascription but that propose new ways of being, new modes of gendering and being (un)gendered through their insistence on refusal and their casting of light on the world in which they exist and persist. In making the case she draws on cultural codes and epistemologies of outlooks that do not distinguish ‘virtual’ from ‘real’ worlds – for instance, preferring the notion of being AFK (reviving the old notion of being ‘away from keyboard’) over the notion of IRL (‘in real life’). This allows her to explore and engage (with) much of the plasticity and malleability of outlooks that do not presume our existence as single beings, but as being containing multitudes. These are BIG ideas with challenging philosophical underpinnings all of which Russell wears lightly. In grounding her discussion in 11 moments of artistic practice she gives what might be or appear as abstract a sense of materiality, of concrete existence (in performance if nothing else) that explores a body-in-performance as a phenomenon of substance, not philosophical conjecture. In doing so, she makes those ideas accessible and engaging for more than a small cluster of fellow practitioners and thinkers (and as an author and editor of more than the occasional philosophical text, I know just how hard that can be – and in my case just how easy it is to fail!). She also adopts a tone and voice, including judicious deployment of rhetorical questions, to pose those philosophical problems clearly and in a manner directly related to the cases in question (on top of that the short chapters make it all seem less intimidating). Crucially, we’d be mistaken if we reduced this to a discussion of cyberfeminism, or xenofeminimsm, or whatever corporeal disruption seems to fit. This is a vital engagement with those times when we don’t seem in sync with the rules of the game, when we’re glitching, and makes that part of a vital strategy of political transformation. It’s a celebration of the potential of opening up new opportunities for and ways of being in and with our multitudes – and that makes it all the more valuable.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jakub Fiala

    This is not one to supersede Marx, and I don't think it was meant to be. The revolution Russell is proposing here is a lot more subtle, a lot less relevant to a rich white cis-dude (good!) and a lot more focused on intangible praxis. This book doubles up as a showcase of many amazing Artists of Colour and non-cis artists, for which I'm very grateful. A good inspiring read for people who are working out what to do with the Internet now that it's a capitalist hellscape. My only big problem with the This is not one to supersede Marx, and I don't think it was meant to be. The revolution Russell is proposing here is a lot more subtle, a lot less relevant to a rich white cis-dude (good!) and a lot more focused on intangible praxis. This book doubles up as a showcase of many amazing Artists of Colour and non-cis artists, for which I'm very grateful. A good inspiring read for people who are working out what to do with the Internet now that it's a capitalist hellscape. My only big problem with the book is that in the later chhapters, Russell discounts the overt fight against surveillance capitalists as "not the right war" (paraphrased). They claim it's enough to use the methods of glitch feminism within the platforms created by the powers of Silicon Valley, and that somehow this ought to subvert them from within. It seems Russell doesn't realise how much control Facebook has over the "revolutionary content praxis" they so generously allow to happen on Instagram. When the 20-something rich white dudes running these platforms get older, and inevitably more conservative, the glitch-feminist communities might just be erased with a single SQL command. To give up on the dream of the open web is to birth a revolution with a ball and chain.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lewis Akers

    Wouldn't have bought this book myself but was sent it as part of the Verso Subscribers club. The book is aiming to be as described, a manifesto. Its written in quite a triumphal and easy to follow way. However, although I understood the ideas they didn't resonate with me fully. I totally understood the breakdown between online & in person - how this could be emancipatory for those left behind by mainstream feminism but I don't think things are quite as fluid as the book highlighted. Interesting r Wouldn't have bought this book myself but was sent it as part of the Verso Subscribers club. The book is aiming to be as described, a manifesto. Its written in quite a triumphal and easy to follow way. However, although I understood the ideas they didn't resonate with me fully. I totally understood the breakdown between online & in person - how this could be emancipatory for those left behind by mainstream feminism but I don't think things are quite as fluid as the book highlighted. Interesting read at parts but not for me. Haven't given this a star rating as I feel neither a low star or high star really represents my feelings towards the book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    This seems to be the flavour of the month in radical and feminist circles and already in its second print run. I can see how Russell's division of existence into a digital/AFK binary resonates with so many people, especially those like myself who work entirely from home now and spend countless hours staring into a screen, performing from Zoom, but to me this is a nightmare scenario, not one to be aspired to. I would love to reclaim my body from the migraines, pain behind the eyes, stress related This seems to be the flavour of the month in radical and feminist circles and already in its second print run. I can see how Russell's division of existence into a digital/AFK binary resonates with so many people, especially those like myself who work entirely from home now and spend countless hours staring into a screen, performing from Zoom, but to me this is a nightmare scenario, not one to be aspired to. I would love to reclaim my body from the migraines, pain behind the eyes, stress related stomach cramps (thanks capitalism) rather than abandon it to cyberspace. Still, this was an interesting read, part manifesto, part art criticism, and I would recommend it to all.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Janis

    Accept this read for the ride it is, and you're halfway there. The loose ends here illustrate and exercise the freedom it challenges me to embrace. (I'll be reading it again.) Commodification wasn't overlooked so much as deliberately left on the editing floor. That particular release is exactly one of the tasks at hand, and Russell tackles it. As a work of art, a collection and fresh rearragement of what was into something new, provision of fresh perspective, this manifesto is consistent, compel Accept this read for the ride it is, and you're halfway there. The loose ends here illustrate and exercise the freedom it challenges me to embrace. (I'll be reading it again.) Commodification wasn't overlooked so much as deliberately left on the editing floor. That particular release is exactly one of the tasks at hand, and Russell tackles it. As a work of art, a collection and fresh rearragement of what was into something new, provision of fresh perspective, this manifesto is consistent, compelling, and potentially expansive.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mark Dickson

    The foundational ideas behind this book are ones that were interesting to read about, but there is way too much repetition of each point. This feels like it was an essay spread out to the length of a book. I also couldn’t get on with the decision to attempt to use technological jargon to explain ideas. As a software engineer, it would usually be explained slightly incorrectly or be too jarring a redefinition for me to actually take on what was being explained.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tania

    It is insightful, well written and exploring different tones according to the chapter. But it could be better. I feel like the 'glitch feminism' should have been explained better because I still don't understand how relevant it is the term for the book. It could have been called anything else really. Having in consideration that this is the title of the book, I feel like this is a huge thing to fail on.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Seher

    Maybe it's just me, but this was kinda boring even though it included a lot of poetry and art. The only thing I really took from it was that the world online is also a real world and the significance of AFK instead of IRL. However, I feel like this can be used as a good starting point if you want to learn more about glitch feminism.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Charlie

    Poetic, optimistic, affirming and unflinching, this manifesto is gender euphoria for me.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    A little too Pseuds Corner in style for my tastes but there's some interesting ideas - Russell's concept of the Glitch which is explored throughout is a useful tool and I also like the term AFK rather than IRL owing to the intertwined nature of our internet and 'real' lives - does our identity truly change in either space? Very internet culture heavy, found this a good sister book to Joanne McNeil's Lurking looking at the utopia of earlier internet cultures before it became overly homogenised. I A little too Pseuds Corner in style for my tastes but there's some interesting ideas - Russell's concept of the Glitch which is explored throughout is a useful tool and I also like the term AFK rather than IRL owing to the intertwined nature of our internet and 'real' lives - does our identity truly change in either space? Very internet culture heavy, found this a good sister book to Joanne McNeil's Lurking looking at the utopia of earlier internet cultures before it became overly homogenised. I'm also definitely not the target audience for this book as a cis/white/straight male

  20. 5 out of 5

    Becca

  21. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

  22. 5 out of 5

    Linh Le

  23. 5 out of 5

    Abbie

  24. 4 out of 5

    Yuan Reyes

  25. 5 out of 5

    Pippin

  26. 4 out of 5

    And Tigers And Bears!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nick 1004

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mattie Kennedy

  29. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

  30. 4 out of 5

    Genevieve

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.