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The World's Greatest Detective must try to inhabit the mind of a murder victim to solve a case--without filling the empty grave next to those of his parents. Can Batman imagine the life of a corpse with a half-eaten face without dying himself? A man was murdered, and the Batman is in his head--and he knows how it happened. All he has to do now is survive his own deduction. Wa The World's Greatest Detective must try to inhabit the mind of a murder victim to solve a case--without filling the empty grave next to those of his parents. Can Batman imagine the life of a corpse with a half-eaten face without dying himself? A man was murdered, and the Batman is in his head--and he knows how it happened. All he has to do now is survive his own deduction. Warren Ellis and Bryan Hitch, one of the most legendary creative partnerships of the modern age, reunite in this tale about life, death and the questions most are too afraid to ask. Collects The Batman's Grave #1-12


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The World's Greatest Detective must try to inhabit the mind of a murder victim to solve a case--without filling the empty grave next to those of his parents. Can Batman imagine the life of a corpse with a half-eaten face without dying himself? A man was murdered, and the Batman is in his head--and he knows how it happened. All he has to do now is survive his own deduction. Wa The World's Greatest Detective must try to inhabit the mind of a murder victim to solve a case--without filling the empty grave next to those of his parents. Can Batman imagine the life of a corpse with a half-eaten face without dying himself? A man was murdered, and the Batman is in his head--and he knows how it happened. All he has to do now is survive his own deduction. Warren Ellis and Bryan Hitch, one of the most legendary creative partnerships of the modern age, reunite in this tale about life, death and the questions most are too afraid to ask. Collects The Batman's Grave #1-12

30 review for The Batman's Grave: The Complete Collection

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gianfranco Mancini

    I'm in the minority here, but I just loved these 12 issues long miniseries from Warren Ellis and Bryan Hitch, something halfway between Nolan's cinematic/realistic Batman, sometimes I just could hear Hans Zimmer's theme in my mind, and an hard-boiled detective tv show. I think Ellis nailed for good the essence of the Caped Crusader as World's Greatest Detective here, cutting away some iconic elements of the character like the usual bat-family/villains freakshow cast of supporting actors while kee I'm in the minority here, but I just loved these 12 issues long miniseries from Warren Ellis and Bryan Hitch, something halfway between Nolan's cinematic/realistic Batman, sometimes I just could hear Hans Zimmer's theme in my mind, and an hard-boiled detective tv show. I think Ellis nailed for good the essence of the Caped Crusader as World's Greatest Detective here, cutting away some iconic elements of the character like the usual bat-family/villains freakshow cast of supporting actors while keeping a nice Gary Oldman based Gordon and just best depiction ever of good old Alfred Pennyworth as a funny, cynical, David Noven reborn. Maybe 12 issues were too much for this apparently meandering storyline with so many silent brutal fight scenes filled pages, but Hitch's stellar artworks were 100% eye-candy for me, so that's just ok for me. Probably not best Dark Knight comic-book ever, but if you are in the mood for reading a non-canon crime/detective tale with strong Christopher Nolan's movies trilogy vibes, just check it out. And I think that abrupt and unexpected circular ending, open to more than one interpretation, was a real cherry on cake at last. Excelsior.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Gotham’s latest nutter is a Power Rangers-cosplayer calling himself Scorn and he’s got an army because he’s a Batman villain. Which means Batman gotta punch ‘im. For twelve bloody issues! I mostly love Warren Ellis’ books (the man himself - ehh, not so much, particularly in light of recent, um, things), and, while he’s written some Batman comics in the past, he’s never tackled a full-length storyline before, so I was excited to see him teaming up with Bryan “Never Met a Dutch Angle I Didn’t Like Gotham’s latest nutter is a Power Rangers-cosplayer calling himself Scorn and he’s got an army because he’s a Batman villain. Which means Batman gotta punch ‘im. For twelve bloody issues! I mostly love Warren Ellis’ books (the man himself - ehh, not so much, particularly in light of recent, um, things), and, while he’s written some Batman comics in the past, he’s never tackled a full-length storyline before, so I was excited to see him teaming up with Bryan “Never Met a Dutch Angle I Didn’t Like” Hitch for this 12-issue maxiseries, The Batman’s Grave. And it’s underwhelming, mostly quite boring stuff, unfortunately! The story itself turns out to be wholly unremarkable. Scorn is just another ordinary dude with conveniently absurd hi-tech/training, for no other reason than plot, with a grudge against the GCPD. He’s a character we’ve seen Batman face a hundred times before (normally he’s called Deadshot). Batman’s journey to finally punch Scorn doesn’t warrant 12 issues - but I’m sure DC knew that combining Ellis and Hitch with Batman meant that they could string along fans for that long, so they did. They were right but still, up yours DC. Which is why Hitch is given free reign to draw numerous extended fight scenes that add little-to-nothing to the overall story but certainly add to the page count! Watch Batman fight nobodies like the Eater of Faces, Colonel Sulphur, Dr Karl Helfern’s Scorn goons, more Scorn goons in Arkham Asylum, Scorn himself a couple times, and more Scorn goons. Throw in tons more splash pages, lots of pointless dialogue, and pages like an entire page of Batman walking past a bus stop because his Batmobile got blowed up. The book is essentially 80% filler for what is a feeble, instantly forgettable story. Ellis tosses in a lot of convoluted elements like hypnotic drugs and serial killer murders and the takeover of Arkham but it’s just loud nonsense to distract you from the nothing-to-it plot and the villain’s eye-rollingly flat motivations. No idea why this is called “The Batman’s Grave” either - like a lot of this book, it fails to connect to anything halfway meaningful. That said, I liked the way Ellis wrote Batman’s thought processes for getting into victims’ heads and he wrote the funniest Alfred I’ve read in some time. Some of the lines that made me laff: Bruce: You work in the manor all day and you spend all night in the cave. How do you even do that? Alfred: I am habitually ripped to the gills on very fine cocaine, sir. Bruce: I may not buy people out of a life of crime, but I’ve been developing that approach. Alfred: Because I have nagged and shamed you. Bruce: No. Alfred: I have owned you, sir. Confess it. Bruce: I should call the police and tell them there’s a shot man on my floor and the butler did it. Alfred: Sir. Young master. You wouldn’t grass on faithful old Alfred to the rozzers, would you? Not ALFRED. (slurps whiskey) The scene where Alfred shoots an intruder with rubber bullets is great, especially when Alfred keeps returning to shoot the unconscious intruder again and again to make sure he doesn’t get up! Hitch draws him like David “Pink Panther” Niven too which is perfect. Hitch’s art is brilliant as it usually is. While too much of the book is extended wordless fight scenes between Batman and whichever easily-defeatable foe is standing in front of him, they’re well choreographed and great to see. It’s just I don’t think people want to see so much of this when they pick up a Batman book - they want something to read, not half a book full of Batman fight scenes! The excessive Dutch angles are a weird stylistic choice and some of the designs for Batman’s gadgets are awful. In one scene he’s flying what looks like a robot’s turd (made up of wheels and lights) and the Bat-hound drones looked horrendous! While the art is good and Ellis’ wit translates well through Alfred, The Batman’s Grave is overall an overlong, bloated, meandering, and completely unmemorable book - a disappointing effort from such a talented creative team.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Logan

    An okay read. Was interested in this series, for a while and now that I have finished it I'm a bit mixed on it. What Ellis does very well, is balancing the action with the dialogue. Each issue is structured very well in that you get a cool fight scene, and then some dialogue between Bruce and Alfred. The vibe of the series also reminded me alot of the Telltale batman game, in the similar suit and tech Bruce uses. The art was okay overall, there were times I liked it and other times it was just ok An okay read. Was interested in this series, for a while and now that I have finished it I'm a bit mixed on it. What Ellis does very well, is balancing the action with the dialogue. Each issue is structured very well in that you get a cool fight scene, and then some dialogue between Bruce and Alfred. The vibe of the series also reminded me alot of the Telltale batman game, in the similar suit and tech Bruce uses. The art was okay overall, there were times I liked it and other times it was just okay. I think mainly how Bruce and Alfred are drawn was a bit weird and muddy. The Batmobile was very cool though! Other then that the series was dragged out a bit too long, as I feel this was like 6 issue mini, in terms of the story, but it got doubled to 12. And the ending was a bit weird and anti-climatic I feel. Overall it's okay series, but not something I recommend going out now and reading.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Sarcastic killing machine with a taste for booze and blow and without two f*cks to give is my new favorite iteration of Alfred. And the rest of the story is good too.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shaun Stanley

    The Batman's Grave collects issues 1-12 of the series written by Warren Ellis and art by Bryan Hitch. Batman must enter the mind of a killer who is targeting people connected to Gotham's Justice Department Plot wise, we have had this story a dozen times. Hell, it very similar to Christopher Nolan's Dark Knight. The story is actually fairly forgettable (and shouldn't have been longer than 8 issues), but there are some real treasures in this book. Firstly, Batman and Alfred's relationship in this b The Batman's Grave collects issues 1-12 of the series written by Warren Ellis and art by Bryan Hitch. Batman must enter the mind of a killer who is targeting people connected to Gotham's Justice Department Plot wise, we have had this story a dozen times. Hell, it very similar to Christopher Nolan's Dark Knight. The story is actually fairly forgettable (and shouldn't have been longer than 8 issues), but there are some real treasures in this book. Firstly, Batman and Alfred's relationship in this book is perfect with Alfred stealing every scene he appears in. Alfred is hands down the best part of this book. It is worth reading solely for this charming British butler. Second of all, I really liked the way it was presented how Batman gets into the mind of the killer and how he investigates a crime scene. It takes the extra steps that so many Batman stories skips of Batman doing some mysterious Crim scene sample sourcing and instantly solving the crime. Third, Batman gets his ass handed to him numerous times. I like when Batman has to struggle against his foe. He shouldn't be unbeatable in hand to hand combat. What makes him stand out is his resolve to keep going and find a way to either win or to fight another day. Fourth, this book strips away the Batfamily and Rogue Gallery giving you a much smaller scale story that doesn't have to juggle a ton of characters and relationships. Very refreshing. And finally, the art is great. Bryan Hitch gets to showcase Batman in a ton of fights and that is a real treat for the reader. This isn't the best Batman book. Not even close. But I did like a lot of things presented here. I would recommend this book to Bat fans. I questioned even getting the book due to Ellis's recent accusations but I thought I would give it a shot because of the other creators and to separate the art from the artist.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Davide Saladino

    Interessante opera di decostruzione orchestrata dal solito schietto Ellis. L'autore applica la sua solita "pulizia" degli elementi di contorno per narrare l'essenza del personaggio, senza interferenze esterne. Il ritmo della narrazione richiama quello delle serie tv, quasi cinematografico. Consigliato. Interessante opera di decostruzione orchestrata dal solito schietto Ellis. L'autore applica la sua solita "pulizia" degli elementi di contorno per narrare l'essenza del personaggio, senza interferenze esterne. Il ritmo della narrazione richiama quello delle serie tv, quasi cinematografico. Consigliato.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    A shockingly disappointing volume from Ellis. He tries to write The Long Halloween, but it's just long. I mean, you have to give Ellis points for trying to do something new, and not just offering up another Joker or gangster story when he turned back to Batman's early years. And, it's got a nice modern feel to it, and a really terrific take on Alfred, who should get his own comic. But Ellis plays the old game of small-crimes leading to a big mastermind, which rarely goes well, and even less so her A shockingly disappointing volume from Ellis. He tries to write The Long Halloween, but it's just long. I mean, you have to give Ellis points for trying to do something new, and not just offering up another Joker or gangster story when he turned back to Batman's early years. And, it's got a nice modern feel to it, and a really terrific take on Alfred, who should get his own comic. But Ellis plays the old game of small-crimes leading to a big mastermind, which rarely goes well, and even less so here when some of the small crimes were deliberate misdirection. And the big criminal has super plot immunity, basically doing whatever he wants until he's taken down at the end of issue #12. Finally, Ellis heavily depends on his artist, sometimes plotting out pages and pages of dialogueless action, which makes big parts of this book a quick and shallow read. This was intriguing enough to keep reading, especially with Ellis' cliffhangers, and it read quickly. But it's not going to be a classic.

  8. 5 out of 5

    GojiGizmo89

    A New classic. Some of the best Batman and Alfred interactions ever written. A compelling mystery, psychological drama, and balls out action story all rolled into one.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Has its fair share of Ellisisms & a few false notes, but overall a really interesting take on Batman. I mostly love the ideological disagreements it posits between Batman, Alfred, Jim Gordon, Gotham City PD, & Jeremiah Arkham. I love how corrupt, brutal, & at a cross-purposes w/ Gordon it portrays GCPD as, something I hope future Bat comics take up. Also, a great, surprisingly subtle, & minor use of Cornelius Strik, one of the most macabre minor Bat rogues. Hitch's art is tremendous, especially i Has its fair share of Ellisisms & a few false notes, but overall a really interesting take on Batman. I mostly love the ideological disagreements it posits between Batman, Alfred, Jim Gordon, Gotham City PD, & Jeremiah Arkham. I love how corrupt, brutal, & at a cross-purposes w/ Gordon it portrays GCPD as, something I hope future Bat comics take up. Also, a great, surprisingly subtle, & minor use of Cornelius Strik, one of the most macabre minor Bat rogues. Hitch's art is tremendous, especially in the action scenes, & Ellis is adept at getting out of Hitch's way & letting his layouts silently carry the action.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anubhav

    Dig the visceral action sequences, ably penned by the great Bryan Hitch illustrating many of his trademark widescreen comics panels. The story has some bright spots, but overall a disappointing venture given the calibre of the now-cancelled writer involved. I hope Ellis can redeem himself and return, he's a writer I admire and it would be a shame if his career ended with this whimper of a book. Dig the visceral action sequences, ably penned by the great Bryan Hitch illustrating many of his trademark widescreen comics panels. The story has some bright spots, but overall a disappointing venture given the calibre of the now-cancelled writer involved. I hope Ellis can redeem himself and return, he's a writer I admire and it would be a shame if his career ended with this whimper of a book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Duvall

    Not a bad story, but it’s one of the most decompressed comics I’ve read in years. It’s not an exaggeration to say this could’ve been half as long without losing a single plot point. Bryan Hitch is always great for big action sequences, though, so at least the padding looks nice.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jan Andersen

    After reading Batman's Grave, I simply don't what to make of it. The first half left me quite disappointed, the second half was better than the first half, and the finale was somehow disappointing as well. Sure the explosions were there but the big confrontation really fizzled out. Bryan Hitch on illustrations is breathtaking, he can really impress me, even to this day. Kevin Nowlan is inker on some issues, with or without him it is still perfect. Over the years Hitch has impressed with his disti After reading Batman's Grave, I simply don't what to make of it. The first half left me quite disappointed, the second half was better than the first half, and the finale was somehow disappointing as well. Sure the explosions were there but the big confrontation really fizzled out. Bryan Hitch on illustrations is breathtaking, he can really impress me, even to this day. Kevin Nowlan is inker on some issues, with or without him it is still perfect. Over the years Hitch has impressed with his distinct hyper-detailed style on Stormwatch, Authority, Ultimates, JLA, JLA: Heaven's Ladder, Fantastic Four, Captain America: Reborn, Justice League (volume 3), Age of Ultron and Hawkman. But this is what I expect of him, and while this is more of that, I'm still somehow left if not disappointed, then just not that overwhelmed. It might be me being used to this level of details and big explosions, but it just seem a bit more of the same without the same punch. And I think this is due to Warren Ellis' writing. Overall the writing is too Warren Ellis, Batman and especially Alfred both talk like Ellis. While it works on other characters in titles as Authority, Planetary, Transmetropolitan, Nextwave and even Hellblazer, it just reads off on Batman. I know he has a style and tone but Batman and Alfred is not this bitter and cynical. He has written Batman before without going overboard like this. In #11 Bruce and Alfred have a talk, reading more like the way it should be between the two, with Alfred worrying for Bruce. Writers like Grant Morrison, Jeph Loeb and even Scott Snyder and Tom King all have very distinct styles and tones as well, but they still keep inside the voice of a character. This is more like Frank Miller on All Star Batman and Robin. Sure Miller showed off his voice in Dark Knight Returns, but this reads like Miller going all in. Finally I get the feeling, I have seen this villain before. Scorn and his Scorn Army comes across as a Wrath and Prometheus, with some Dark Knight movie Joker and Bane thrown in. The design by Hitch also looks quite bland, and could be Architect, Talon or any other armored Batman villain. In the end I still feel Batman's Grave deserves a 3 of 5 rating. The first few issues would be 2 of 5, while the middle becomes 3 and even 4, and the finale a mere 2. It's not something I will look back upon or pick up from time to time.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    Este libro fue verdaderamente entretenido. Sin embargo, tengo mucho del equipaje del universo de DC y eso me hace cuestionar por qué no aparecen otros personajes para ayudar a Batman con todos los héroes que tiene Ciudad Gótica. Con eso fuera del camino, esta es una sólida historia de Batman que pone a prueba su capacidad física y cuestiona la existencia de Batman. Pero como dije, he leído otras historias de Batman y esta pregunta no es tan nueva después de leer Dark Knight Returns o Whatever Ha Este libro fue verdaderamente entretenido. Sin embargo, tengo mucho del equipaje del universo de DC y eso me hace cuestionar por qué no aparecen otros personajes para ayudar a Batman con todos los héroes que tiene Ciudad Gótica. Con eso fuera del camino, esta es una sólida historia de Batman que pone a prueba su capacidad física y cuestiona la existencia de Batman. Pero como dije, he leído otras historias de Batman y esta pregunta no es tan nueva después de leer Dark Knight Returns o Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader que también cuestiona a Batman como concepto. Con eso dicho, lo que buscaba de este trabajo lo encontré con una ejecución impecable. Ellis ya tiene el ritmo de los cómics cuál memoria muscular y como tal, ese ritmo lo hace ágil de leer. Por un momento me molestó el Alfred que se pasaba el tiempo hablando de los dolores que ocasiona el capitalismo, pero luego de un tiempo me acostumbré al estilo de sarcasmo que Ellis le dió. Y me reí mucho con más interacciones entre él y Batman. Las escenas de acción fueron montadas de manera excelente, Ellis con su dirección siempre le da una energía cinematográfica a sus secuencias y esto no fue excepción. El trabajo detectivesco de Batman brilla como nunca lo he visto antes, pero que tiene mucho sentido, ya que su forma de mirar la justicia es a través de la perspectiva de la víctima, lo cual encaja perfectamente con su origen. Mi único inconveniente con estos libros de prestigio, es que no se arriesgan con estilos de dibujo más elásticos y dinámicos. Y siento que es algo que me gustaría ver en los libros de Ellis. Es digno de ponerlo al lado de otras grandes historias de Batman como Year One y Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chris Thompson

    The Batman’s Grave excels in its portrayal of its hero, Batman, and Alfred (the villain is much less interesting). Batman’s life is certainly not glamorous, even when he is the billionaire Bruce Wayne. Rather than fraternize with women, as many movies portray, Bruce is portrayed as a workaholic. Even at home he is working, and he is constantly on call. Alfred is equally hardworking. In fact, the man never seems to sleep - he’s the one who wakes up the Batman when emergencies arise. But all of th The Batman’s Grave excels in its portrayal of its hero, Batman, and Alfred (the villain is much less interesting). Batman’s life is certainly not glamorous, even when he is the billionaire Bruce Wayne. Rather than fraternize with women, as many movies portray, Bruce is portrayed as a workaholic. Even at home he is working, and he is constantly on call. Alfred is equally hardworking. In fact, the man never seems to sleep - he’s the one who wakes up the Batman when emergencies arise. But all of this work takes a toll. Alfred is an alcoholic, and Bruce is constantly battered and bruised. In one scene he collapses in the shower as scenes of violence committed against him flash through his mind. And then Alfred alerts him to a new emergency. Batman will only rest when he’s in his grave. Yes this is a bit on the long side, and it’s hard to keep up with the many plot developments, but it is in the attention to detail, and the artwork, where this excels. I wish future Batman movies would include this version of Alfred.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Garrett

    Weird. This has a lot going for it, with Ellis & Hitch - one of the most celebrated collaborations in comics - and a 12-issue run. With the power behind it, you can feel it jump up and move like a rally car, but the race is hard and long, and while it does finish, it's more of a limp than a leap by the time it arrives. It ends abruptly, but perhaps deliberately so, and seems rushed by the end. If that is by design, it leaves me cold a little bit. Alfred in this is perhaps the best version of Alf Weird. This has a lot going for it, with Ellis & Hitch - one of the most celebrated collaborations in comics - and a 12-issue run. With the power behind it, you can feel it jump up and move like a rally car, but the race is hard and long, and while it does finish, it's more of a limp than a leap by the time it arrives. It ends abruptly, but perhaps deliberately so, and seems rushed by the end. If that is by design, it leaves me cold a little bit. Alfred in this is perhaps the best version of Alfred ever, stealing every scene he's in. The villain has an interesting background, but his actual reveal and execution are a little blah, with the side antagonists being far more of the Gotham we've come to expect. The moral ambiguity that Ellis brings to Batman is perfect, and he pulls the awe out of the Bat's relationships with those around him, replacing it with critical respect.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Brad Smith

    Ellis and Hitch continue to prove their tenacity as a duo. Ellis’ dialogue (especially from Alfred and Jim Gordon) hits in a way that sheds new light to their characters in a way not seen since Loeb or Miller. Hitch creates stunning multi page splashes of action that rival any of his large sweeping team books and Knowlan & Sinclair add depth and gradient to all of those illustrations. This is prestige Batman at its roots that anyone can read. There is no extended bat family or years of canon you Ellis and Hitch continue to prove their tenacity as a duo. Ellis’ dialogue (especially from Alfred and Jim Gordon) hits in a way that sheds new light to their characters in a way not seen since Loeb or Miller. Hitch creates stunning multi page splashes of action that rival any of his large sweeping team books and Knowlan & Sinclair add depth and gradient to all of those illustrations. This is prestige Batman at its roots that anyone can read. There is no extended bat family or years of canon you need. Just knowledge of the boy who survived his parents murder in crime alley. If you enjoy well contained Batman stories like year one, long Halloween and Court of the owls - this definitely fits into a similar mold.

  17. 5 out of 5

    John Funderburg

    The art is interesting, and the story was engaging for the first couple of issues, but it didn't really gain momentum after that. This may read better as a collected volume. The choice to have long fight scenes with no action sounds was also an odd choice. Some of this felt like a silent movie. Maybe that's just me... The art is interesting, and the story was engaging for the first couple of issues, but it didn't really gain momentum after that. This may read better as a collected volume. The choice to have long fight scenes with no action sounds was also an odd choice. Some of this felt like a silent movie. Maybe that's just me...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    Yet another grim and violent Batman story with lots of property damage. Two things elevate this to three stars instead of two: the excellent Bryan Hitch artwork and Alfred’s dialogue, which a little jarringly points out the absurdity and moral confusion of Batman’s career while Alfred otherwise remains as loyal and enabling as ever.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Elton

    Probably one of the last things I’ll read by Ellis. Mostly just came for Hitch’s artwork.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bob Behers

    What a fantastic Batman story, with super artwork to match. And yes, Alfred's character is out standing as Bruce's foil! Wht can't we have more Batman collections of this level? Love it! What a fantastic Batman story, with super artwork to match. And yes, Alfred's character is out standing as Bruce's foil! Wht can't we have more Batman collections of this level? Love it!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    This Alfred is one of my all-time favorite Alfreds. So full of sass.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Josh Newhouse

    Dark and well-drawn, cinematic... could have been tightened to 8 issues and last issue felt rushed and unfinished with an open and ambiguous ending.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Wirth

  24. 4 out of 5

    Igor Toscano

  25. 4 out of 5

    Federico

  26. 5 out of 5

    Piers Fetters

  27. 4 out of 5

    Terry

  28. 5 out of 5

    Grant Phillips

  29. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Matkovic

  30. 5 out of 5

    OTIS

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