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Black Canary: Breaking Silence

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THE HANDMAID’S TALE meets the DC universe in this breathtaking, thrilling origin story of Black Canary. Her voice is her weapon, and in a near future world where women have no rights, she won’t hesitate to use everything she has to fight back. Dinah Lance was seven years old when she overheard the impossible: the sound of a girl singing. It was something she was never meant THE HANDMAID’S TALE meets the DC universe in this breathtaking, thrilling origin story of Black Canary. Her voice is her weapon, and in a near future world where women have no rights, she won’t hesitate to use everything she has to fight back. Dinah Lance was seven years old when she overheard the impossible: the sound of a girl singing. It was something she was never meant to hear—not in her lifetime, and not in Gotham City, taken over by the Court of Owls. The sinister organization rules Gotham as a patriarchal dictatorship, all the while spreading their influence like a virus across the globe. Now seventeen, Dinah can’t forget that haunting sound, and she’s beginning to discover that her own voice is just as powerful. But singing is forbidden—a one-way stop to a certain death sentence. Can she balance her father’s desire to keep her safe, a blossoming romance with mysterious new student Oliver Queen, and her own desire to help other women and girls rise up and finally be heard? And will her voice be powerful enough to destroy the Court of Owls once and for all?


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THE HANDMAID’S TALE meets the DC universe in this breathtaking, thrilling origin story of Black Canary. Her voice is her weapon, and in a near future world where women have no rights, she won’t hesitate to use everything she has to fight back. Dinah Lance was seven years old when she overheard the impossible: the sound of a girl singing. It was something she was never meant THE HANDMAID’S TALE meets the DC universe in this breathtaking, thrilling origin story of Black Canary. Her voice is her weapon, and in a near future world where women have no rights, she won’t hesitate to use everything she has to fight back. Dinah Lance was seven years old when she overheard the impossible: the sound of a girl singing. It was something she was never meant to hear—not in her lifetime, and not in Gotham City, taken over by the Court of Owls. The sinister organization rules Gotham as a patriarchal dictatorship, all the while spreading their influence like a virus across the globe. Now seventeen, Dinah can’t forget that haunting sound, and she’s beginning to discover that her own voice is just as powerful. But singing is forbidden—a one-way stop to a certain death sentence. Can she balance her father’s desire to keep her safe, a blossoming romance with mysterious new student Oliver Queen, and her own desire to help other women and girls rise up and finally be heard? And will her voice be powerful enough to destroy the Court of Owls once and for all?

30 review for Black Canary: Breaking Silence

  1. 4 out of 5

    Claude's Bookzone

    CW: (view spoiler)[Death of loved ones, violence, suppression of women (hide spoiler)] Well it took a while to get there but I ended up enjoying the last section. In a futuristic Gotham, where the superheroes are long gone and women have been silenced, Dinah seeks the power to bring true justice back to the city. This was a really really slow burn. There was a lot of wondering and talking about the wonderings and slow unveilings of truths that span the first half of this book. The action doesn't r CW: (view spoiler)[Death of loved ones, violence, suppression of women (hide spoiler)] Well it took a while to get there but I ended up enjoying the last section. In a futuristic Gotham, where the superheroes are long gone and women have been silenced, Dinah seeks the power to bring true justice back to the city. This was a really really slow burn. There was a lot of wondering and talking about the wonderings and slow unveilings of truths that span the first half of this book. The action doesn't really ramp up until the last quarter. I thought the world building was good but a little bit under developed. Given that Dinah sought to overthrow the controlling regime it warranted a bit more detail. The last quarter definitely saved this from iminent twodom. A solid addition to this series. I am also going to have to say that in my opinion, the books in this series featuring female superheroes are so much more engaging than the others. Just saying.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sana

    HOLY YES, A BLACK CANARY ORIGIN STORYYYY. Set in a near future Gotham City where singing is forbidden? DAMN Also, apparently the author 'was a teen pop singer. Now, she’s collaborating with the producers behind Christina Aguilera and Lady Gaga, and plans to release original songs featured in BLACK CANARY as singles on iTunes' Plus, that cover is clearly Jen Bartel's doing eeeep Source HOLY YES, A BLACK CANARY ORIGIN STORYYYY. Set in a near future Gotham City where singing is forbidden? DAMN Also, apparently the author 'was a teen pop singer. Now, she’s collaborating with the producers behind Christina Aguilera and Lady Gaga, and plans to release original songs featured in BLACK CANARY as singles on iTunes' Plus, that cover is clearly Jen Bartel's doing eeeep Source

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kenzie The Dragon Queen

    What did you say? A Black Canary origin story featuring the Court of Owls and Oliver Queen? I simply must have it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Viola

    Black Canary getting a DC Icons novel? It's what she deserves. gif credit: summers-roberts.tumblr.com And the premise is Dinah using her voice for social change and empowering women sounds fantastic. Can't wait to read this! Also look at the cover! Black Canary getting a DC Icons novel? It's what she deserves. gif credit: summers-roberts.tumblr.com And the premise is Dinah using her voice for social change and empowering women sounds fantastic. Can't wait to read this! Also look at the cover!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Marwa Abdulla

    This was corny af. I get that Black Canary’s powers are tricky to incorporate into a somewhat realistic plot, but c’mon! You’re telling me that the worst thing a patriarchy can take from women is music and their ability to sing!!!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Yursa Tahir

    Simply brilliant. A powerful, compelling story about women getting back their place in the society. And Dinah Lance & Oliver (Ollie) Queen being the endgame??? Haaaaaa takes me back to the Arrow TV show days. I kept imaging Stephen Amell as the Green Arrow and Cassidy being Black Canary. Overall it was a really solid read. The plot was gripping, the setting was Gotham city, the bad guys were Court of Owls, i mean c'mon. Not only the main characters but the side characters were also pretty solid Simply brilliant. A powerful, compelling story about women getting back their place in the society. And Dinah Lance & Oliver (Ollie) Queen being the endgame??? Haaaaaa takes me back to the Arrow TV show days. I kept imaging Stephen Amell as the Green Arrow and Cassidy being Black Canary. Overall it was a really solid read. The plot was gripping, the setting was Gotham city, the bad guys were Court of Owls, i mean c'mon. Not only the main characters but the side characters were also pretty solid i-e Barbara Gordon (the freaking Batgirl), Sandra Wu (Lady Shiva), Chester Cobblepot (the Penguin), (The Birds of Prey) I mean daammmnnnn. I want more books from DC Icon series because there are plenty more icons that deserve to have a story of their own.

  7. 4 out of 5

    The Dreamcatcher

    Dear Friend, My first post of the year, featuring a read I waited for months to release!! I'm such a canary fan after Arrow!! I present Black Canary: Breaking Silence by Alexandra Monir @alexandramonir . I loved this one sooooo muchhhhhh. I went in with only one expectation- to see the Black Canary take the spotlight, and not see her sidelined. And damn, was I rewarded!! 🥺 This is the 5th installment in the DC Icons series- giving us a fresh new origin story about our favourite heroes. (You may rem Dear Friend, My first post of the year, featuring a read I waited for months to release!! I'm such a canary fan after Arrow!! I present Black Canary: Breaking Silence by Alexandra Monir @alexandramonir . I loved this one sooooo muchhhhhh. I went in with only one expectation- to see the Black Canary take the spotlight, and not see her sidelined. And damn, was I rewarded!! 🥺 This is the 5th installment in the DC Icons series- giving us a fresh new origin story about our favourite heroes. (You may remember my post about Catwoman Soulstealer from earlier!) Some funfacts: • This is a fantastic piece of dystopian feminist superhero literature. • The women of Gotham City were silenced under the patriarchal rule of the court of owls. All of them lost the ability to sing. Imagine a world with none of your favourite female singers😨. But, then one girl- our heroine Dinah Lance, in the darkness of the patriarchal ball, manages to sing!! The singer also becomes public enemy no.1, lmao😂(although they didn't know she was the singer) • The Book features a number of songs and original lyrics written by the author herself. And to get us a more submerging experience, the author even recorded the main song from the book!!! It's called The Black Canary Sings and is through and through, a feminist anthem! And The Canary cries in the finale, oh my godddd. Black Canary rules. I can ramble on and on about how much I loved it!!! 🥺🥺 Love Always, @the.dreamcatcher._ #BlackCanaryBreakingSilence #catwomansoulstealer #wonderwomanwarbringer #batmannightwalker #alexandramonir #supermandawnbreaker #dcicons #dccomics #superheroes #blackcanary #dinahlance #batgirl #breakingsilence #laurellance #saralance #dinahdrake #Bookstagram #readersofinstagram #readersofig #reading #arrow #oliverqueen #greenarrow #miasmoak #ya #feminist #dystopian #batwoman #ladyshiva #gotham https://www.instagram.com/p/CJgkJdqgO...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kaitie

    I wanted to like this, I really did. For transparency, DNF at about 30%. I will attempt to edit if I end up going back to it. Let me preface this by saying I was actually really hyped to read this book, especially when I saw positive reviews on Twitter. I am a huge Dinah fan, and own 90% of her appearances in print, have a ridiculous amount of her merch, run accounts about her, and read everything she’s involved in. I have been waiting for a good Dinah story for a while now. I bought the book last I wanted to like this, I really did. For transparency, DNF at about 30%. I will attempt to edit if I end up going back to it. Let me preface this by saying I was actually really hyped to read this book, especially when I saw positive reviews on Twitter. I am a huge Dinah fan, and own 90% of her appearances in print, have a ridiculous amount of her merch, run accounts about her, and read everything she’s involved in. I have been waiting for a good Dinah story for a while now. I bought the book last night and read most of it before bed, where I slept on my thoughts. A non spoiler summary is that this book is a Black Canary meets Handmaids Tale, set while Dinah is still a minor. Yeah, that’s exactly as bad as it sounds, fortunately it appears to stray from the graphic sexual assault in those texts and instead leans on graphic misogyny (police brutality included) and oppressive, patriarchal systems in Gotham. Of which Dinah’s long time comic lover Oliver, is a card carrying member. Her father, Barbara Gordon, and others play a part. Let’s start with the pros: - Barbara Gordon as Oracle - Lady Shiva The cons: - Everything else, I wish I was lying - The choice to make the Court of Owls into Gilead's leadership - Oliver Queen - Creating a plot where your LGBT characters literally live in hiding. Woo representation - Not SPOILERS AHEAD! (view spoiler)[Each chapter has me wishing I could have been the editor on this book, in which case I would have asked Alexandra if she was deliberately writing Breaking Silence in hopes that a cease and desist from Margaret Atwood’s lawyers and publishers would arrive by registered mail days after release. The plot, including near exact lines, seem to have been lifted from the Handmaids Tale book and television show script. Narratively using this as a plot in a comic story in 2020 is an absolutely bonkers decision, even for DC writers, and especially gross since this writing appears to cater to a younger audience. (Who now, more than ever, need and deserve uplifting stories.) Women have significantly less rights in this Gotham, they’re virtually breeding tools (as Dinah mentions multiple times) who have had their ability to own businesses and to sing stripped away by the Court of Owls. Why singing, you ask? Because Dinah Lance loves to sing (this is 81% of her characterization so far, the other 19% is rebelling), and how can we possibly have conflict if the baddies decision to punish all the rebellious women wasn’t something that directly affects our leading lady and few others. Dinah is about sixteen or seventeen, in high school with two barely fleshed out friends who were described in 1-3 words. Her father is nothing like the man we know, more of a hollow, broken GCPD employee who lost his wife ten years ago, after she lost her business to the Court of Misogynists and had to reopen under his name. Lady Shiva is made into part tutor part hidden trainer in this universe, where she imparts lessons like “do nothing if you can run” and is the quest giving NPC without a quest. Oliver Queen is the same age as Dinah, stripped of all of his best qualities and leaning on the Arrow-esque playboy partier take that makes him seem like every other vapid bad boy that doesn't capture anyone's attention. Aside from the name and his budding affection for Dinah, so far he shares nothing with his comic counterpart in the way of personality. Despite that, he somehow appeals to her immediately upon entering the room (despite not originally, many of the comics). Barbara Gordon is described as pretty, wheelchair, older, redhead, wheelchair, and member of the oppressive system, despite being a victim of it? Not sure about Dinah's internal monologue here, but she should probably know not to blame other women since she says multiple times that women are oppressed (once every 2 pages or more). It's not her worst characterization, especially not while Batgirl of Burnside exists, but I'm left wishing she was the same or similar age as Dinah, since their friendship is my favorite part of the Birds of Prey. Anissa Pierce and Grace Choi are Dinah's godparents, and it's mentioned that they have been forced into hiding because this world is anti LGBT. Please god stop giving us LGBT oppression stories, please. I just got to the part where Dinah received an envelope from Old Barbara Gordon, and foolishly thought this would lead into a plot, but it's just partial song lyrics that Dinah adds to despite admittedly never having written a song before with a weird addition as to how Dinah Drake and Babs were best friends instead? Odd choice to sub the era of friendships. Also see last chapters, where she was given sheet music only to lead to a chapter where she was punished for it, so there's no hint this'll go anywhere. The storytelling is extremely simple. Very limited descriptions, extreme repetition of the world and Dinah's love of singing (to the point of annoyance), little to no worldbuilding that isn't 17 classes where teachers describe things we've already discussed in earlier chapters, and a very odd decision to use the Court of Owls for this? If anything, it reads more like a choice Ras Al Ghul or another villain would make. This book would have benefitted from: - a new ORIGINAL concept - heavier editing - for the author to read more of Dinah's comic appearances - for the author to have read about the Court of Owls and other Gotham rogues - for Dinah and Babs to have been similar ages (older or younger, but similar) - and for Oliver to have been introduced later on The writing style itself is not beyond salvation, but the rest needs a ton of work. (hide spoiler)] I don’t have anything personal against Alexandra Monir, and I really hate having to be so negative about this, but the truth is what I read of this book would have overwhelmed me as a depressed lesbian teen who loves Black Canary. The entire first third is a slog of harm, hurt, and oppression. The only bright spots are supposed to be with Oliver, who is a member of this oppressive regime by nepotism, that Dinah likes without even knowing him. I have read many, many pieces of fanfiction much better than this by young adult DC fans, teens and DC adults. Girl power stories do NOT require dystopian misogynistic systems to overcome to be good. Dinah Lance, and by extension the Birds of Prey, are badass women with a lot to overcome without the injection of this kind of world. And even if there is no other way to proceed but this kind of dystopian setting, at least create your own narrative that doesn’t include robbing it off older and inarguably greater works that make your introduction to DC fans feel like an off pitch, rejected American Idol cover of Whitney Houston hits.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    I loved this! The comps - Handmaid's Tale meets the DC verse - are spot on. This is everything you love about Dinah - her passion, her willingness to go all out for her friends and community, and her romance with Ollie. Definitely one of the best in the series and my only complaint is wanting more! I loved this! The comps - Handmaid's Tale meets the DC verse - are spot on. This is everything you love about Dinah - her passion, her willingness to go all out for her friends and community, and her romance with Ollie. Definitely one of the best in the series and my only complaint is wanting more!

  10. 4 out of 5

    FanFiAddict

    Rating: 7.0 / 10 Thanks to the publisher and author for an advance reading copy of Black Canary: Breaking Silence for review consideration. This did not influence my thoughts or opinions. Monir’s origin story for the most powerful voice in the DC Universe is, at times, thrilling and exhilarating, while also being truly heartfelt and extremely personal. The fact that the author took direct inspiration from her Iranian roots during the 1979 revolution brings an extra element to the story that gives Rating: 7.0 / 10 Thanks to the publisher and author for an advance reading copy of Black Canary: Breaking Silence for review consideration. This did not influence my thoughts or opinions. Monir’s origin story for the most powerful voice in the DC Universe is, at times, thrilling and exhilarating, while also being truly heartfelt and extremely personal. The fact that the author took direct inspiration from her Iranian roots during the 1979 revolution brings an extra element to the story that gives it new wings to soar on. While I am was not familiar with the DC Icons series up to this point, I did see big names attached to it when I was originally contacted with this opportunity. Names like Bardugo, Maas, and Lu tend to intrigue even the most casual of readers so I had to see what the series was all about. I’m also not the most well-rounded individual when it comes to the DC Universe, not having grown up reading the comics and only really being interested in the Batman films over the years. Having picked up and read Black Canary: Breaking Silence, it shows that I have a ton more to learn about the universe as a whole (especially about Lance, Queen, and the Court of Owls). I will say this: YA is still a hit or miss genre for me. I can definitely get behind characters, enjoy solid world-building, and tear through pages of intense action, but romance bogs down my pace immensely. The love interest bits of YA novels tend to just, well, bore me to tears and it was no different here. Lance and Queen’s glances started early on and continued well into the end, and while I get that it works for a majority of audiences, it just isn’t my thing. Having said that, the story was definitely built around their relationship, alongside Dinah’s friendships and family, so I could look past the teenage drama to enjoy a solid story. While I am probably not the intended audience for this novel or the rest of the series, I thought Monir did a wonderful job bringing Lance to life, and I really enjoyed learning her backstory. I also really need to get the lowdown on the Court of Owls because those Talons are not to be messed with. Q&A with the Author 1. Tell me a little bit about yourself (i.e. growing up, schooling, etc) I grew up in Marin County, the suburbs outside of San Francisco, and fell in love with books from the second I discovered them: basically, before age 2! English and Creative Writing were always my favorite subjects, along with Drama, and my childhood was filled with books, writing my own stories for friends and family, and performing in school plays and community theater. Basically, I was all about literature and the arts! 2. What sort of career were you pursuing prior to writing? I was equally fixated on writing and performing in elementary and middle school, but in my freshman year of high school, I wrote my first song- and from there, I spent the rest of my teens completely focused on becoming a recording artist. I wrote and recorded many songs and got to spend my 17th and 18th summers opening up for pop stars like O-Town, which was surreal. But as much as I love music, there was a lot I didn’t love about the recording industry, so when I sold my first book at 23, I was very happy and relieved to find a place where I felt much more at home, which was publishing. a. Do you still have a full-time job outside of being an author? I am a full-time author! But I still write and record music on the side and love incorporating music into my books. 3. When did you start writing? When did you start writing seriously? I started scribbling stories in notebooks at age 6 and then typing them up and sending them to friends and family at around 8. Years later, when I was immersed in the recording industry at 16, I came up with a TV series idea about a young singer trying to make it, and from there I wrote a proposal and started pitching it around LA a year or so later. While that project never sold, it led to me getting my first literary agent and some other really integral industry relationships. 4. How do you combat writer’s block, or do you simply not acknowledge it? I don’t get writer’s block so much as I just get stumped on what should happen next in a story or scene, at which point it always helps to take a break and consume other media unrelated to what I’m working on, something that just gets me feeling inspired and excited to create again. I remember when I was feeling stuck with THE LIFE BELOW, a sci-fi sequel I published in 2020, watching the Battle of Winterfell episode from Game of Thrones totally revitalized me! The two were wildly different genres, but seeing something that impressive onscreen had me itching to get back to my computer. 5. Who are some of your writing influences? I read a lot of the classics growing up and when I was starting out as a writer, and two that made a big impact on me were Daphne du Maurier and Edith Wharton. Nowadays, I’m very inspired by the YA fantasy geniuses Sarah J. Maas and Dhonielle Clayton. 6. Did you read growing up? If so, what genres really struck you? Oh, yes! I read pretty much everything I could get my hands on, and was particularly fond of two totally different genres: historical fiction and contemporary teen fiction, like the Sweet Valley books. It’s the Gemini in me! 7. Tell me about your writing process. Has it changed over the years? I think the biggest change is that I now actually have a specific process, rather than just sitting down and letting myself write freely. As my books have grown more complex, I’ve found outlining to be really crucial. The last book I wrote without a game plan was THE GIRL IN THE PICTURE (published in 2016), which I am really proud of, but that was also when I realized how stressful it was to face a blank page every day while drafting. I wrote a very detailed outline for THE FINAL SIX, my 2018 book that followed, and that’s been my process ever since- though I still start out free-writing the first couple of chapters before outlining, to get myself into the story and make sure this is an idea I definitely want to spend a year or longer with! 8. Can you tell the audience a little bit about Black Canary: Breaking Silence? BREAKING SILENCE is my original take on the DC superhero Black Canary, and it’s set in a near-future Gotham City where a patriarchal dictatorship known as the Court of Owls rules over them all. Under the Court, women have been stripped of their power and their rights–including the power to sing, which is something 17-year-old Dinah Lance wants to do more than anything in the world. So when she discovers a secret power within her own voice, it sets her world ablaze- and leads to a whole new alter ego. The book is filled with action/adventure, twists and turns, original music, and a dash of romance with Oliver Queen- who comic book fans know as the Green Arrow! 9. What was it like writing your grandmother into the story? It was incredibly meaningful for me, and made this book feel like my most personal novel to date. My grandmother was tragically taken from us too soon, so I never got to meet her, but I’ve always felt connected to her, and I know she was with me in spirit while I was writing this. 10. Tell me about how the story was directly inspired by your roots amidst the 1979 Iranian Revolution. I was born long after the Revolution, once my parents had escaped to the U.S., but it still had a formidable impact on my life. My parents did an amazing job of instilling my brother and me with our culture and history, and they were very honest with us about the trauma of the Revolution and their escape, so it was always there in the background of my life. When it was first suggested to me that I would be a good fit to write a Black Canary story, I immediately imagined a world where women and girls are forbidden to sing, and how Dinah Lance could be a beacon of hope in an oppressive patriarchy. The reason I thought of that is because of what happened after the Iranian Revolution, when women could be jailed for singing publicly. It’s a cruelty that exists to this day there, and something I wanted to wrestle with on the page. 11. How did your time as a former teen pop singer/songwriter help you bring Dinah Lance to life? I think my former teen pop singer life was crucial to me writing Dinah’s story. It allowed me to write three original songs into the book, but also to tap into those feelings I experienced when I was her age and when life felt so intense that words alone weren’t enough to express myself with, I had to put it into song. 12. What are you working on now? It’s been a year of getting to write my dream characters- first with Black Canary, and then I recently signed with Disney to write a historical fantasy YA about Princess Jasmine!! It comes out in Fall 2022, so I’m about to dive into work on that manuscript! 13. Do you have any book recommendations for the audience? Maybe something you have read recently? My favorites of 2020 were SUCH A FUN AGE by Kiley Reid in adult fiction, and LOBIZONA by Romina Russell in YA. Both are absolutely amazing!

  11. 4 out of 5

    AudiobookFiend

    First off, what a sensational cover! I picked it up just for that, and Monet I knew it was a DC Icons book, I was sold. ⚖️ Plot: This was great coming of age superhero story for the younger generation of fans. While my perfect cup of tea is Warbringer and Soul Stealer, I enjoyed it none the less. Some really insightful inclusions of themes that we should all consider and care about. 🗺 World: Being so attached to music myself, I cannot imagine a world where dining is prohibited. This was very well First off, what a sensational cover! I picked it up just for that, and Monet I knew it was a DC Icons book, I was sold. ⚖️ Plot: This was great coming of age superhero story for the younger generation of fans. While my perfect cup of tea is Warbringer and Soul Stealer, I enjoyed it none the less. Some really insightful inclusions of themes that we should all consider and care about. 🗺 World: Being so attached to music myself, I cannot imagine a world where dining is prohibited. This was very well portrayed and realistically portrayed throughout the book. I only wish the villains were developed a little more to instill their threat and fear in us. 💑 Characters: Dina is delightful! A truly inspiring modern day teen hero we could all aspire to be. One more, I wish the other characters were elaborated upon more so we could truly differentiate between them but that’s always a issue with a book this size.

  12. 4 out of 5

    CR

    I was very scared about reading this one as I haven't really cared for the others in this series. But this one OMG!!! I fell hard for it!! I could not put it down and I need more! I should have known that this was going to be good because I die hard loved The Final Six!! If you are a lover of Black Canary and the DC universe well then check out this one because Monir made this one come alive and it sucked me in! I was very scared about reading this one as I haven't really cared for the others in this series. But this one OMG!!! I fell hard for it!! I could not put it down and I need more! I should have known that this was going to be good because I die hard loved The Final Six!! If you are a lover of Black Canary and the DC universe well then check out this one because Monir made this one come alive and it sucked me in!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nursebookie

    Such an amazing origin story and enjoyed this one a lot!! Great fun reading this one!

  14. 5 out of 5

    K.E. Radke

    Being on top only means you can fall. But you need to remember to get back up again. Dinah's secret wish is to sing, but women rights have been limited under the new regime the Court of Owls. The mayor stole their singing voices, breaking their will to fight back. Superheros are from the past. But Dinah's determined to keep the small parts of music she can find, an illegal act, punishable by death. But when she's pushed to her limit and can't stay silent toward the injustice againt women any longe Being on top only means you can fall. But you need to remember to get back up again. Dinah's secret wish is to sing, but women rights have been limited under the new regime the Court of Owls. The mayor stole their singing voices, breaking their will to fight back. Superheros are from the past. But Dinah's determined to keep the small parts of music she can find, an illegal act, punishable by death. But when she's pushed to her limit and can't stay silent toward the injustice againt women any longer. She just might find a voice louder than the Court of Owls victim's screams.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Marjo

    ALEXANDRA MONIR WROTE A BOOK ABOUT BLACK CANARY AND NOBODY TOLD ME???

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chandra Claypool (WhereTheReaderGrows)

    "The Handmaid's Tale meets the DC universe..." SOLD! To be honest, I'm not a huge fan of The Handmaid's Tale (or the sequel... zzzz) but to revamp it into the DC world? My curiosity got the best of me. Now, I'm not tooooooo familiar with the DC world outside of what I know from movies and very little research when I would want to deep dive every once in a while (which wasn't very deep tbh) but it was fun to recognize some of the names from this universe and to learn about Black Canary (who I rea "The Handmaid's Tale meets the DC universe..." SOLD! To be honest, I'm not a huge fan of The Handmaid's Tale (or the sequel... zzzz) but to revamp it into the DC world? My curiosity got the best of me. Now, I'm not tooooooo familiar with the DC world outside of what I know from movies and very little research when I would want to deep dive every once in a while (which wasn't very deep tbh) but it was fun to recognize some of the names from this universe and to learn about Black Canary (who I really had zero familiarity with). Gotham is now ruled by the Court of Owls and they have killed all superheroes in their sleep. Women have little to no rights and marginalized communities are in hiding. Now, I read somewhere that the author brings inspiration from her Iranian background w/re to the Iranian Revolution (also called Islamic Revolution) into this story, which is very interesting. But back to Dinah, our Black Canary... The story starts off fairly slow and ramps up towards the final quarter.. and while I found some things didn't *quite* make sense, who doesn't love women empowerment and having their voices heard? But don't forget this is also a YA novel so hello insta love... lots of looks and thoughts and well... you get the gist. And this felt familiar within that genre but with DC characters (which I am A-OK with). I may not be quite the right audience but I wanted to dive into this world and see what Monir was bringing to the table with this origin story. I did enjoy it but I do think I may need to learn more about this world to appreciate it a bit more. Entertaining? Yes. I loved the message within and if you like your YA with a superhero? Here's your book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Blue

    Want to see more... Bookstagram Website This was cute and I love the world but the characters and pacing of the book fell really sort for me But stunning cover right?!?! Want to see more... Bookstagram Website This was cute and I love the world but the characters and pacing of the book fell really sort for me But stunning cover right?!?!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mandy

    3.5/5 Engaging alternate origin story. Loved the Handmaid’s Tale-like plot! Check out my full review at Forever Young Adult.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    I grew up heavily influenced by comic book characters, and I can easily express that I wish this novel had come out back when I was growing up. Dinah Laurel Lance is the daughter of Black Canary, who traditionally (depending on the universe) continues or even works besides her mother. In this tale, it follows the path that all of the heroes (*most of the heroes) were slaughtered or incapacitated by the Court of Owls. It's thrilling and exciting, and features one of my largest hero crushes next t I grew up heavily influenced by comic book characters, and I can easily express that I wish this novel had come out back when I was growing up. Dinah Laurel Lance is the daughter of Black Canary, who traditionally (depending on the universe) continues or even works besides her mother. In this tale, it follows the path that all of the heroes (*most of the heroes) were slaughtered or incapacitated by the Court of Owls. It's thrilling and exciting, and features one of my largest hero crushes next to Superman and Wolverine, Green Arrow / Oliver Queen. This novel had it's moments where it felt a bit cliché, but it did a good job at bringing intrigue and enjoyment as well. I really loved every moment. As someone who grew up having to argue my knowledge of superheroes to even be acknowledged as a fan, I found a small home within this novel. Dinah Laurel Lance is the perfect strong-willed female superhero for pre-teen/teen girls if you ask me. (Pre-Teen Warning: Kissing [with hints of desiring more] / sexualization of outfits)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lila

    This was one of the worst books I’ve read in a while. It played at being feminist, but stank of white feminism and far too much on-the-nose symbolism. It was clumsy and cringe-y, and a disappointment for such a cool super hero. It wanted to be The Handmaid’s Tale and ended up a horrible imitation.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Melrose's

    I was fortunate enough to listen to an advance copy of this amazing origin story of the Black Canary. I am not well informed with DC heroes and I only knew Black Canary through the movie of Harley Quinn's which is Birds of Prey. This story is about Dinah Drake in her senior year in Gotham City where superheroes no longer exist, Batman has long died and women has no rights and worse no voice, figuratively speaking they have no say but to abide the laws established by the Court of Owls. The Court o I was fortunate enough to listen to an advance copy of this amazing origin story of the Black Canary. I am not well informed with DC heroes and I only knew Black Canary through the movie of Harley Quinn's which is Birds of Prey. This story is about Dinah Drake in her senior year in Gotham City where superheroes no longer exist, Batman has long died and women has no rights and worse no voice, figuratively speaking they have no say but to abide the laws established by the Court of Owls. The Court of Owls are made of generations of family with wealth, influence and led by men and they created a force to defeat superheroes which are Talons vicious creatures with sharp claws and are bloodthirsty. The only issue I had with the story would be the romance and I know the canon relationship between Green Arrow and the Black Canary I would likely prefer if this was solely centered with the women fighting back to regain their voices or just Green Arrow supporting Dinah and they have these key moments together and did not start with the instant love-y cliché. Nonetheless, it finishes strong and the message was clear, timely and relatable. There were moments in the story where I feel suffocated and enrage with the restrictions and ideas shoved down into women and they expect women to just stay silent and obedient which is insane. This was such a good read and audiobook!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Makayla Woods

    This was definitely the best DC Icons book out of the five for me. I know these characters like the back of my hand and was in love with the way they were portrayed! I was even surprised with some of their appearances. (Like the Birds of Prey!!! 😍) Dinah and Oliver were amazing together. They are a power couple who play off each other's strengths. (And are my favorite Superheros! 😍) This book taught me to love my voice and I used it all last night with my friends! (They couldn't get me to shut u This was definitely the best DC Icons book out of the five for me. I know these characters like the back of my hand and was in love with the way they were portrayed! I was even surprised with some of their appearances. (Like the Birds of Prey!!! 😍) Dinah and Oliver were amazing together. They are a power couple who play off each other's strengths. (And are my favorite Superheros! 😍) This book taught me to love my voice and I used it all last night with my friends! (They couldn't get me to shut up! 😂) Also I would pay money to see Dinah and Michele from Timeless have a karaoke night! From August 2020: I am literally screaming!!! I was hoping the DC Icon series would be expanded!!! Black Canary is one of my favorite superheroes, and Alexandra Monir wrote one of my favorite books, Timeless!!! And Oliver Queen is going to be in it!!! I'm in love already!!!😍😍😍 Shut up, and take my money I'm in!!!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Paschal

    **3.5 Stars** Being a huge superfan of Batman and all things Gotham, I found Black Canary to be an interesting homage to the original Batman story (with a few great head nods to the original players I especially enjoyed- Penguin, I'm looking at you!). This was set years in the future after all the masked crusaders of Gotham either died of old age or were murdered by the new dark rulers- The Court of Owls. Under their regime, people can't leave Gotham, and times basically resorted to women being s **3.5 Stars** Being a huge superfan of Batman and all things Gotham, I found Black Canary to be an interesting homage to the original Batman story (with a few great head nods to the original players I especially enjoyed- Penguin, I'm looking at you!). This was set years in the future after all the masked crusaders of Gotham either died of old age or were murdered by the new dark rulers- The Court of Owls. Under their regime, people can't leave Gotham, and times basically resorted to women being second class citizens with no opportunities or a voice- and I mean that literally since a drug was created to rid women of the ability to sing. Teenager Dinah refuses to conform to this idea of what her life is, even when it means that she is now targeted by the Court and under close scrutiny to be the perfect meek woman- something that is in her blood to disobey. I appreciated Dinah and her battle to fight against suppression, she was formidable in her own way even before she decided to fight back physically. I liked how the concept of voices and songs were enough to change the tide and cause the downfall of oppression- with a message that speaking up can fight wrongs. I also really loved seeing teen Oliver McQueen show up by her side (cough cough Arrow anyone??) to help in the battle. There were a lot of important messages and Batman references to make this a solid installment in the Teen DC world. All that being said, I struggled a little bit getting into the story and connecting to the characters. I liked the plot, but felt like all the people were just a little too flat for me to really root for and empathize with and there were some loose threads throughout the entire book that never came to anything that really bother me with a standalone story (I love my books wrapped up with a pretty bow). Overall I was not 100% invested in the book (which could be on me and the reading funk I have been in) so if you love all things DC/Gotham and a female taking back her voice then pick this read up!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carly O'Connell

    I'm a sucker for a fight scene at a fancy ball. If you are too, you might want to check this book out. I've been wanting to get into comic books, but since I mostly listen to audiobooks, I haven't read as many as I would like. This novel series focused on DC comic characters is a great way to get to know the characters, their powers, and their stories in a different medium. I think this book would be enjoyable both for DC novices like me, and more educated comic nerds. This book takes place after I'm a sucker for a fight scene at a fancy ball. If you are too, you might want to check this book out. I've been wanting to get into comic books, but since I mostly listen to audiobooks, I haven't read as many as I would like. This novel series focused on DC comic characters is a great way to get to know the characters, their powers, and their stories in a different medium. I think this book would be enjoyable both for DC novices like me, and more educated comic nerds. This book takes place after the death of Batman and many of his contemporaries. Gotham City is now under the control of The Penguin's descendants and a cohort of rich and powerful men called the Court of Owls. They rule with an iron patriarchal grip, denying certain career paths and activities to women. They even released a serum into the air during their takeover that caused all women to lose the ability to sing. Now, Dinah Laurel Lance, daughter of the original Black Canary, must rediscover her voice and use it to take back Gotham City. Other superheroes that play a role in this story with which you might be familiar are the Green Arrow, Oracle, and Lady Shiva. There is also a romance between Dinah and Oliver Queen. Oliver is the new kid at school, having just moved from California to live with his uncle in Gotham upon being orphaned by his parents. He's from one of those old, rich families that are buddy-buddy with the Court of Owls. But Dinah can't thinking Oliver may be different from the rest of his set. When their high school is invited to attend the Patriarch's Ball, honoring the Court of Owls and their triumph over democracy and caped crusaders, Dinah wants nothing to do with it. But as one of the Court's golden boys, Oliver is one of four boys selected to lead the opening dance and he must choose a girl to be his date. He chooses Dinah, throwing all her plans to keep her head down to the wind.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alisha Carderella

    3.5⭐️ As a child, Dinah Lance was able to hear a girl singing, and it was something that has stayed with her all of her 17 years. It’s also something she has never heard again. No one has. Singing is only one of the things females are forbidden to do now that the Court of Owls controls Gotham City. Their influence is spreading across the globe, but not without being met by those willing to stand up to them. The Resistance is growing as well, and suddenly Dinah must to choose to sit back and do no 3.5⭐️ As a child, Dinah Lance was able to hear a girl singing, and it was something that has stayed with her all of her 17 years. It’s also something she has never heard again. No one has. Singing is only one of the things females are forbidden to do now that the Court of Owls controls Gotham City. Their influence is spreading across the globe, but not without being met by those willing to stand up to them. The Resistance is growing as well, and suddenly Dinah must to choose to sit back and do nothing or risk everything & use her voice to help defeat the Court before they go too far. I’m a sucker for a super hero origin story, so was excited to dive into this one. This book started out so strong, with fantastic world building- setting up the world Dinah is living in. The message of finding your voice was very powerful and woven through the entire book- and not just because that’s Dinah’s super power (tho it was almost a little too much at times. We get it. No need to keep saying it over and over). It did eventually start to feel like a typical dystopian YA novel- insta love and all. That particular aspect was disappointing because I loved Oliver’s character. So much mystery and intrigue surrounded him, the insta love felt unnecessary, but there was so much going on, I didn’t get hung up on it. The character development was great as well. I especially loved the bond shown between Dinah and her father, Larry. There is so much grey area with them. Both lying, being sneaky, and thinking they’re doing what is right. Their struggles were just A+. I would have liked to see more of Dinah’s friend Ty’s struggles. His family’s story was very abrupt. The ending wrapped up too nice and neat for me- but that doesn’t mean I disliked it. This was a solid story with a great message. *Thank you to Booksparks for providing me with an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest and voluntary review.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sophia Dyer • bookishly.vintage

    Thank you Booksparks and Random House for this gifted book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. Man, did this book blow me away! As soon as I heard about this book I knew I wanted to read it, then to be included in this tour felt like such perfect timing, and I am so glad I ended up enjoying it. I have not read the other DC Icons stories, they do look like they can be read as standalones, as there are references to the past but none of the superheroes seem to interact with o Thank you Booksparks and Random House for this gifted book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. Man, did this book blow me away! As soon as I heard about this book I knew I wanted to read it, then to be included in this tour felt like such perfect timing, and I am so glad I ended up enjoying it. I have not read the other DC Icons stories, they do look like they can be read as standalones, as there are references to the past but none of the superheroes seem to interact with one another. Dinah Lance is fed up with all the propaganda and lies she is fed everywhere she turns, only knowing the truth because her father (Detective Lance) has told her. She takes self defense classes in secret and has a closet full of contraband, wishing she had the voice to make change happen. This all takes place in the near-future after Batman has died of old age and the Court of Owls has taken over, stripping women of their singing voices through The Silencing, and relegating them to the role of 50's housewife. After a new kid at school shows up, Oliver Queen, everything changes and secrets spill and Dinah realizes her voice has a lot more power than she would think. I felt so inspired reading this book, and kept thinking "hell yeah" every time Dinah did something noteworthy (which happened often). She is such a brave character and wise beyond her years, mainly due to her mothers death, and she is not afraid to call people out for being wrong even when she gets in trouble for it. A lot of the characters in this are ones seen in the DC universe, so if you read the comics or watch the shows you have a general idea of who these people are "normally." Since this takes place while Dinah and Oliver are in high school, some of the characters play different roles than you may be used to (or not, I have not read the comics). While there is a little action here and there, most of the action comes toward the end of the book. And man, is it action packed! I loved every moment of it, and I could not put the book down because I did not want to be pulled away from it! The ending was so well done too, and it would be easy to see this one book turn into a Black Canary series of its own. I enjoyed the authors writing style and use of actual song lyrics woven without (instead of just stating "she started singing" the author said that and then included lyrics), which has now put the author on my radar and I will look out for her other books. Overall, this book was very inspiring and action packed, and I loved the authors take on Black Canary. The world building felt very plausible, especially because nobody ever talks about what life would be like if all superheroes disappeared, so it is an interesting take on the narrative. This book was a page turner from page one, and I absolutely devoured it. So glad I picked it up!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Esosa

    3.5/5 stars I’m a huge fan of comics, DC comics in particular so I was beyond excited to receive a copy of Black Canary: Breaking Silence from booksparks. Black Canary is one of my favourite DC superheroes. She's a badass, a martial arts supreme and that canary cry? Yass. In Breaking Silence Alexandra Monir tells the origin story of Black Canary in a way that I think is perfect for middle grade kids. In this origin story, Gotham City is completely different from what we normally know it to be. Bat 3.5/5 stars I’m a huge fan of comics, DC comics in particular so I was beyond excited to receive a copy of Black Canary: Breaking Silence from booksparks. Black Canary is one of my favourite DC superheroes. She's a badass, a martial arts supreme and that canary cry? Yass. In Breaking Silence Alexandra Monir tells the origin story of Black Canary in a way that I think is perfect for middle grade kids. In this origin story, Gotham City is completely different from what we normally know it to be. Batman is dead and gone, and superheroes haven’t existed for a long time now. The evil mayor Cobblepot has been reigning over the city of Gotham and has essentially created a world where women and girls literally have no voices. All women have been stripped off the ability to sing or listen to music; their movements and activities are pretty much controlled; and they simply don’t have the same freedom or privileges as the men/boys around them. Seventeen year old Dinah Lance is unsatisfied with a life and a world where women can’t be who they want to be. She is struggling to hide her secret love for music and more than anything she wants to be able to sing. In this story we see Dinah slowly find her voice and become the hero she was born to be, the Black Canary. Overall this story teaches young girls about the power of their voices and the difference they can make when they use it. I really enjoyed seeing a young Oliver Queen and Dinah Lance team up - it was super cute and overall a very wholesome read!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Sevier

    I REALLY wanted to give this book a higher rating... Black Canary is one of my FAVORITE DC characters. From the witty banter with love interest Oliver Queen to her badass motorcycle riding, leather wearing, swearing, full on 'give no fucks' attitude. Her character has long been a feminist icon in my mind. She doesn't care about sexualizing herself, and her voice is her weapon. The metaphors there aren't exactly subtle. BUT, this book really didn't satisfy me as far as her story. First there I REALLY wanted to give this book a higher rating... Black Canary is one of my FAVORITE DC characters. From the witty banter with love interest Oliver Queen to her badass motorcycle riding, leather wearing, swearing, full on 'give no fucks' attitude. Her character has long been a feminist icon in my mind. She doesn't care about sexualizing herself, and her voice is her weapon. The metaphors there aren't exactly subtle. BUT, this book really didn't satisfy me as far as her story. First there was a HUGE suspension of belief needed that in this timeline somehow the League of Assassins was overrun by the Court of Owls... ushering in an era of a patriarchal autocratic society where women have LITERALLY been stripped of their voices. Then, muscling my way around that suspension of belief... the book was too short. There was NO TIME given to anything. The plot, the character development, the romance between her and Oliver, her training, etc. The book started off really strong but was forced to end too quickly. Nothing was fully developed, well rounded, or even tied up appropriately. Also, can we just talk about the random ass zombie apocalypse thing that happened in the last like... three chapters. Why even add that as a plot point? Just for the emotional 'they have my mom's dead body' thing? Also, the character death that happened was glossed over because again... not enough time for anything. Super disappointing. I wish this was longer and had the opportunity to fully realize the plot. Lots of potential but doesn't deliver.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Under the Covers Book Blog

    I was so excited to read this book! First, I’ve wanted to continue reading this series but somehow I keep forgetting to. And second because the Black Canary is not necessarily one of the most commonly featured superheroes and I couldn’t wait to see how this story would be twisted. If you’re looking for a young adult that features some very relevant modern day issues and twists them into the story of this dystopian world, I think you’ll enjoy this one. Very Handmaid’s Tale! And while the concep I was so excited to read this book! First, I’ve wanted to continue reading this series but somehow I keep forgetting to. And second because the Black Canary is not necessarily one of the most commonly featured superheroes and I couldn’t wait to see how this story would be twisted. If you’re looking for a young adult that features some very relevant modern day issues and twists them into the story of this dystopian world, I think you’ll enjoy this one. Very Handmaid’s Tale! And while the concept of this book and the “world building” was what kept me reading, I wanted the characters to be fleshed out just a bit more. They felt one dimensional and we didn’t get to explore them as much as I was hoping. It started out really great and I got invested so I definitely would’ve liked to see more character development. Still, this was an entertaining and fast read and I’ll certainly be on the lookout for more books from this author Reviewed by Francesca ❤ ♡ Don't want to miss any of our posts? Subscribe to our blog by email! ♡ ❤

  30. 5 out of 5

    Abbie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was a fun one. We see a 16 year old Dinah Lance take on the Court of Owls after the Silencing and the fall of all heroes. This is a book about feminism and equality. It gave me a lot of Handmaid's Tale vibes! However, the reason it's not getting 5 stars from me is that it's a bit slow. There's a lot of chapters of Dinah dreaming for a better world. It takes half the book for anything thrilling to occur that points towards the characters taking action against the Court. Also, the Oliver Quee This was a fun one. We see a 16 year old Dinah Lance take on the Court of Owls after the Silencing and the fall of all heroes. This is a book about feminism and equality. It gave me a lot of Handmaid's Tale vibes! However, the reason it's not getting 5 stars from me is that it's a bit slow. There's a lot of chapters of Dinah dreaming for a better world. It takes half the book for anything thrilling to occur that points towards the characters taking action against the Court. Also, the Oliver Queen in this book spent like a month on the island and suddenly is an amazing shooter--so much of his character comes from his time on the island and I feel like this book treated his time there like summer camp. —low key I don’t think Dinah needed a man... I'm also in disbelief that a 16 year old , barely trained in comparison, could defeat the Court but Batman and a bunch of other heroes couldn't. this book left me with a lot of questions about the past that I would love to see explored--like how was Barbara Gordon (Oracle) the only hero to survive.

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