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Superboy's world will change forever when the Legion of super-hero affairs arrives and offers him a job in the future! A new look debuts for this all-new adventure! Meanwhile, when the organization that had a hand in destroying Krypton is exposed, Superman is elected to a job he never wanted...president of Earth! Brian Michael Bendis and all-star artists continue to astonish Superboy's world will change forever when the Legion of super-hero affairs arrives and offers him a job in the future! A new look debuts for this all-new adventure! Meanwhile, when the organization that had a hand in destroying Krypton is exposed, Superman is elected to a job he never wanted...president of Earth! Brian Michael Bendis and all-star artists continue to astonish in what many are calling the best Superman story ever! Questions will be answered and destinies will be forged, all in Superman Vol. 3! Collects Superman #16-19, Superman: Heroes #1, and Superman: Villains #1.


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Superboy's world will change forever when the Legion of super-hero affairs arrives and offers him a job in the future! A new look debuts for this all-new adventure! Meanwhile, when the organization that had a hand in destroying Krypton is exposed, Superman is elected to a job he never wanted...president of Earth! Brian Michael Bendis and all-star artists continue to astonish Superboy's world will change forever when the Legion of super-hero affairs arrives and offers him a job in the future! A new look debuts for this all-new adventure! Meanwhile, when the organization that had a hand in destroying Krypton is exposed, Superman is elected to a job he never wanted...president of Earth! Brian Michael Bendis and all-star artists continue to astonish in what many are calling the best Superman story ever! Questions will be answered and destinies will be forged, all in Superman Vol. 3! Collects Superman #16-19, Superman: Heroes #1, and Superman: Villains #1.

30 review for Superman, Vol. 3: The Truth Revealed

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Wow! That's quite the bombshell Bendis drops! (view spoiler)[For those of you who can't wait to read this yourself. Superman reveals to the world that he is Clark Kent. (hide spoiler)] Bendis does this so well. I love the moment where Clark talks to the bullpen of the Daily Planet so much. I can't wait to see where this is headed. So far, we only see the good. I'm sure we'll see the repercussions soon enough. Wow! That's quite the bombshell Bendis drops! (view spoiler)[For those of you who can't wait to read this yourself. Superman reveals to the world that he is Clark Kent. (hide spoiler)] Bendis does this so well. I love the moment where Clark talks to the bullpen of the Daily Planet so much. I can't wait to see where this is headed. So far, we only see the good. I'm sure we'll see the repercussions soon enough.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sean Gibson

    “Your secret’s safe with me, Superman.” It’s a hackneyed phrase I use far too often. And now, thanks to Supes outing his own secret identity, it’s been rendered meaningless. So, thanks for that, Bendis. Now, when I say those hallowed words, I’ll need to refer to some other Superman secret. Unless he covertly subscribes to the fabled Richard Gere method of colon cleansing, I’m not sure there’s going to be anything particularly meaningful remaining. Guy’s an open book. I think we’re stuck with, “He “Your secret’s safe with me, Superman.” It’s a hackneyed phrase I use far too often. And now, thanks to Supes outing his own secret identity, it’s been rendered meaningless. So, thanks for that, Bendis. Now, when I say those hallowed words, I’ll need to refer to some other Superman secret. Unless he covertly subscribes to the fabled Richard Gere method of colon cleansing, I’m not sure there’s going to be anything particularly meaningful remaining. Guy’s an open book. I think we’re stuck with, “He doesn’t actually like his mother’s meatloaf quite as much as he says he does.” That is not a secret worth keeping safe. Putting aside the inconvenience of making a favored phrase useless, this is a solid story, though it meanders as it seeks to capture everyone’s reaction to the news, a journey that necessitates the use of a ton of different artists, which makes for some disjointed reading. Still, sufficiently entertaining enough to keep me going on to the next volume.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    So, the truth revealed. Clark Kent is Superman. It kind of seems to come out of nowhere. Granted, I missed Superman V2, but I'm sure many readers came in just for this event, so it would have been nice if the setup were in THIS story. And, it really feels like a silver-age story. All the heroes turning out to congratulate him. No real repercussions. Angry villains, but no threats to Clark's friends and family. It feels like a dream or imaginary story ... if not for the fact that we get a major m So, the truth revealed. Clark Kent is Superman. It kind of seems to come out of nowhere. Granted, I missed Superman V2, but I'm sure many readers came in just for this event, so it would have been nice if the setup were in THIS story. And, it really feels like a silver-age story. All the heroes turning out to congratulate him. No real repercussions. Angry villains, but no threats to Clark's friends and family. It feels like a dream or imaginary story ... if not for the fact that we get a major movement of the Action Comics storyline in the last few pages. And I can't imagine why this wasn't an Action Comics story. It would have been good to get the more human perspective of this, instead of the Superman comic, which always seems to have its head in the clouds. And I really hate Jon Kent being pretty much taken out of the familial storyline that Dan Jurgens invented and which made the new/old Superman so intriguing. (But that appears to be mostly the fallout of the previous volume.) With all that said, this is a decently good story. I mean, I think it'd be hard not to be given the monumental storyline. Bendis has good story beats, and there's some good interactions with family and friends. I enjoyed it. Call it 3.5 stars. But it just seems obvious this is all going to get put back in the box several years down the road, by Mephisto or the Purple Kids or whatever. I mean, it's not the first time Bendis unmasked a hero, is it?

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. They say the truth is liberating. That it is the best policy to follow. That it soothes the soul and replenishes you with life. At what cost? Individuals often egotistically judge the pertinence of the truth before sharing it with those who are concerned. They ponder the consequences of the truth and act according to their own limited understanding of its impact on others. While some remain convinced in their decision to either tell or withhold You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. They say the truth is liberating. That it is the best policy to follow. That it soothes the soul and replenishes you with life. At what cost? Individuals often egotistically judge the pertinence of the truth before sharing it with those who are concerned. They ponder the consequences of the truth and act according to their own limited understanding of its impact on others. While some remain convinced in their decision to either tell or withhold the truth, others fall in a suffocating case of regret and suffer from their decision. Would always telling the truth make for a happier world as everyone would be allowed to do what they want with what they now know? What if the truth could be harmful? Legendary writer Brian Michael Bendis continues his journey with the Man of Steel and destroys the status quo by leading Superman into doing the unthinkable: to tell his truth to the whole universe. What is Superman: The Truth Revealed about? Collecting Superman #16-19, Superman: Heroes #1, and Superman: Villains #1, this volume picks up where things were left off in The House of El story arc and begins by sending off Clark Kent and Lois Lane's son Jon Kent (Superboy) into a new chapter in his life set in the 31st century in the hopes to lead the Legion of Super-Heroes. The story then bounces back to Superman as he embraces his new role as the President of the Earth and begins to question his own values and way of life. This is where his reflection leads him to wonder about his double life as Clark Kent. How does a man who stands for the truth continue to hide the one thing that he's kept from the public eye: his human identity. This thus introduces the DC universe to a whole new reality in the midst of the Invisible Mafia and Leviathan's threats where Superman's identity is known to all. It's an odd decision to include the epilogue chapter on Jon Kent's new adventure as the introduction to this volume but it serves as an excellent reminder of one of the biggest changes in Superman's life as he once again figuratively loses his son who wishes to embrace his young adult life earlier than expected. As tough of a decision it might be to leave his loved ones and take on humongous responsibilities in a time and place that he has never known before, this remains a journey that will likely shape his legacy forever. Before his final goodbyes, his long-dreaded confrontation with Damian Wayne, his best friend who completes the Super Sons team, was a bit more than awkward than expected but remained heart-warming as we see these two have a heart-to-heart that no one would have ever truly understood beside themselves. The story then shifts back to Superman and tackles the very premise of this volume where he contemplates a question that has often been too complex to solve for any masked superhero, one that forces them to acknowledge the consequences that the revelation of their true identity could have on themselves and their loved ones. However, writer Brian Michael Bendis does an exquisitely meticulous job in handling this idea that would otherwise seem blasphemous. He covers all the angles, even those regarding the insanity of the act, which is an opinion shared by Batman, and delivers it in a composed and structured fashion. From allowing Superman to discuss and reveal it to those he cares about it first before a universal press conference to giving us insight into the Man of Steel's mind as he comes to term with the idea, there is utmost care in the execution that shows writer Brian Michael Bendis understands the character more than ever before. Although most of my appreciation for this volume goes into the main chapters tackling the grand reveal, there's no denying the flaws of this volume. The artwork unexpectedly suffers greatly from the number of artists on this volume and this mostly comes as a shock when previous volumes in the Superman or Action Comics series pleasantly kept one artist for each story arc. In this volume, for example, Superman issue #16 with the Super Sons has David Lafuente on it and he utilizes an extremely cartoon-like visual style that makes it harder to take the two heroes (Robin and Superboy) seriously. The main story is then split in a 1:2 ratio between artist Kevin Maguire and Ivan Reis, and the latter, as expected from his usual work, delivers a much more satisfying style that helps writer Brian Michael Bendis to deliver his greatest change to Superman's lore with tact and consideration. The final two issues (Heroes #1 and Villains #1) were also a bit detrimental to the overall quality of this volume. They all add incredibly short sub-plots featuring various characters and their respective reaction to Superman's unveiling of his secret identity. A couple of them manage to instigate some interesting questions on how they always felt about Superman and his actions and their new perspective on the subject now that they know that the man behind the cape is just a puny human. Of course, the two issues came with an incredible amount of variety in terms of artists as each flip of a page was almost drawn by a different artist. Some are far more impressive than others but ultimately allow no room for any form of consistency in style. With this volume, writer Brian Michael Bendis completely changes the game for heroes and villains alike. No one truly knows how to react to such a revelation and very few know what kind of trouble it could possibly bring. But that's where things get interesting and pave the way to new stories that could only be interesting to explore henceforth. Is Superman/Clark Kent ready to deal with this new life? Superman: The Truth Revealed is the collapse of the status quo as the world's most famous hero enters the spotlight forever with belief in transparency, honesty, and justice. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  5. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    The truth! AGAIN! No really. Didn't Superman just get outed like 5 years ago? But that was New 52 Supes. But people still found out he was Clark so....anyway... So now Clark decides to reveal himself personally to the world. And in doing so he expects a "nasty" reaction. But what does he get instead? Happiness? Concern? Well you'll have to read this to find out. This also finishes up the storyline with Jon saying goodbye to Damien before going with the Legion. I really enjoy when this book focus The truth! AGAIN! No really. Didn't Superman just get outed like 5 years ago? But that was New 52 Supes. But people still found out he was Clark so....anyway... So now Clark decides to reveal himself personally to the world. And in doing so he expects a "nasty" reaction. But what does he get instead? Happiness? Concern? Well you'll have to read this to find out. This also finishes up the storyline with Jon saying goodbye to Damien before going with the Legion. I really enjoy when this book focused on Lois and Clark. They're adorable together and feel like a married couple. Clark going to people most important to him before telling the public was a nice twist. Each hero reacting different to clark coming out was pretty great too. The art varies from amazing to just okay. The plotting was confusing as it looked like Superman gets his ass beat at one point then for two issues we go back days prior? Weird. Oh and Benids, I love you, but you got Damien's voice COMPLETELY wrong. His dialogue was weird. Overall though I can't help but really enjoy the majority of the book because I think Bendis writes Superman himself very well. Super enjoyable and a 4 out of 5.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Christian Zamora-Dahmen

    I'm really enjoying this run of Superman, just the same as I'm disliking the Action Comics run. Both are being written by Bendis, but this one is a bit more focused. The whole Leviathan thing in Action and several other places, has just bored me to tears. Anyway. Without spoiling anything, I love that Superman is being portrayed as an inspiring figure marked by his optimism in the face of adversity. I know this is a common place for this character, but it's well written and well played, it feels I'm really enjoying this run of Superman, just the same as I'm disliking the Action Comics run. Both are being written by Bendis, but this one is a bit more focused. The whole Leviathan thing in Action and several other places, has just bored me to tears. Anyway. Without spoiling anything, I love that Superman is being portrayed as an inspiring figure marked by his optimism in the face of adversity. I know this is a common place for this character, but it's well written and well played, it feels real and fresh. And of course, there is a BIG moment for the character in here. I wonder why it didn't get more exposure... Maybe because of the 5G event coming, that will change everything... Again... In the Heroes special there was this short story focusing on Bruce Wayne and Diana (Wonder Woman). I found that the contrast between Batman and Superman was played beautifully. As much as Batman has become so iconic where everything can be solved just because "he's Batman", I appreciate that finally his eternal darkness is shown as something that is not something anyone should aspire to. It does have it's downside. Not everything gets solved by being dark and unreachable. I know people complain that Superman is a boy-scout and that makes him dumb and such. Well. Look again. There are some qualities that are timeless. There's nothing wrong with trying to do better, to be better. And with that, I'll stop right here.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dimitra

    I'm one of the very few that have a problem with this arc... Bendis is obviously a great writer and WHEN he researches the characters he takes on his hands it feels like he understands & writes them better than anyone before. He makes bold moves that (most of the times) take the characters to another level and change the way we see comics for the better. What i'm saying is, this is a very well written book, but, i can't-for the life of me-get behind the identity reveal. I tried and i hoped he wou I'm one of the very few that have a problem with this arc... Bendis is obviously a great writer and WHEN he researches the characters he takes on his hands it feels like he understands & writes them better than anyone before. He makes bold moves that (most of the times) take the characters to another level and change the way we see comics for the better. What i'm saying is, this is a very well written book, but, i can't-for the life of me-get behind the identity reveal. I tried and i hoped he would change my mind and pov but i still find this idea -and i'm sorry for the word- stupid. It doesn't make sense to me, at all, and Bendis' commitment and quality of writing only hightlights that for me.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Iris Nevers

    [Read in single issues]

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sans

    Better than I expected!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Aggelos

    Well here Bendis's Truth works for the same reason the New 52 Truth didn't. I can't help but think that even the title of the story is deliberate, Bendis doing the story he saw immense potential in right. The organic evolution of the premise should be stated. Since The Man of Steel Bendis has been playing with the idea of lies and secrets with good-intentions turn side-ways. He used Rogol Zaar as a springboard for the real story. Clark as a leader who now has to bring earth into the larger tapest Well here Bendis's Truth works for the same reason the New 52 Truth didn't. I can't help but think that even the title of the story is deliberate, Bendis doing the story he saw immense potential in right. The organic evolution of the premise should be stated. Since The Man of Steel Bendis has been playing with the idea of lies and secrets with good-intentions turn side-ways. He used Rogol Zaar as a springboard for the real story. Clark as a leader who now has to bring earth into the larger tapestry of planetary relations. And were secret societies and lies failed, Clark has to go forth with his honesty and strength of character to unite planets with eons of confict. Conceptually, since Clark is married with a child and his parents are alive (again), the secret identity being a pathaway for Clark to a normal life is uneccessary. As the books states itself, the Daily planet being so close to Superman anyway, means that the DP will not be in any extra risks. The romance triangle has already been broken since 90s with the marriage of Lois and Clark. So the secret identity is a small price to pay (until things return to status quo) for potential great storytelling. The specials containted are written and drawn expertly, ranging from funny to heartwarming. The volume does close in a cliffhanger, which is at least annoying considering the time volumes come apart. But all in all Bendis is great at legal and crime dramas, and he brought that energy in Superman.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    Since his introduction, Superman and Clark Kent have always stood apart (divided really only by glasses, but lets not dwell on that). One being the most well known superhero of all time (in fact also the first time the term "superhero" was used) and the other being the second best reporter at the Daily Planet (behind his wife Lois Lane). This man decides that he is always trying to help empower people to stand for truth and justice, yet he himself hides a huge truth. So, in something I never tho Since his introduction, Superman and Clark Kent have always stood apart (divided really only by glasses, but lets not dwell on that). One being the most well known superhero of all time (in fact also the first time the term "superhero" was used) and the other being the second best reporter at the Daily Planet (behind his wife Lois Lane). This man decides that he is always trying to help empower people to stand for truth and justice, yet he himself hides a huge truth. So, in something I never thought would happen, Superman reveals to the world that he is Clark Kent! Bendis is a genius writer when handling this, and we get to see him interacting with his co-workers at the Daily Planet, as well as his teammates at the Hall of Justice. Other highlights: - We see the first meeting of the Super Sons since Jon got back from space. Nice to see him and Damian still able to get along, though he upset about Jon being so much taller. LOL - Superman serving as Earth's representative in the United Planets. - More plotting by Lex Luthor. (Really need to read the Year of the Villain stuff!) - A new reveal of the current owner of the Daily Planet being the head of Metropolis' Invisible Mafia. This title is really amazing right now! Strong recommend.

  12. 4 out of 5

    James

    This story line doesn't seem that necessary to me. Superman has grown past his secret identity in most cases but I guess they had to create a story for the little people in his life. I feel bad for Batman since he's been trying to emulate Superman for his entire career and now Superman has done one thing that Batman can never do which is to reveal that he is Clark Kent. From the point of view of the future or slien worlds, the name of Clark Kent means nothing or it is associated directly with Su This story line doesn't seem that necessary to me. Superman has grown past his secret identity in most cases but I guess they had to create a story for the little people in his life. I feel bad for Batman since he's been trying to emulate Superman for his entire career and now Superman has done one thing that Batman can never do which is to reveal that he is Clark Kent. From the point of view of the future or slien worlds, the name of Clark Kent means nothing or it is associated directly with Superman with no ramifications.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Darik

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I had a hard time putting into words exactly why I didn't entirely care for Brian Michael Bendis's run on Superman (other than his annoyingly redundant and space-consuming dialogue and his decompressed storyteling), and I think reading The Truth Revealed kind of cinched it for me. At its core, Bendis's run is about DISMANTLING good story dynamics. He started by immediately taking away Clark's family-- something that had been proving a new bedrock for the character's adventures since the Rebirth I had a hard time putting into words exactly why I didn't entirely care for Brian Michael Bendis's run on Superman (other than his annoyingly redundant and space-consuming dialogue and his decompressed storyteling), and I think reading The Truth Revealed kind of cinched it for me. At its core, Bendis's run is about DISMANTLING good story dynamics. He started by immediately taking away Clark's family-- something that had been proving a new bedrock for the character's adventures since the Rebirth books (thankfully, Lois was only gone for a couple of months). Then, he had the chutzpah to age up Jon Kent to a teenager all at once-- killing off the "Super Sons" team dynamic with Damian "Robin" Wayne and essentially robbing us of YEARS of possible father/son storylines. And now, his great masterstroke is to take away Superman's secret identity... a concept that has been the psychological foundation of this character since 1938. Now, I totally understand the argument that one would make to do this. After all, how can Superman stand for "truth, justice, and the American Way" if he's keeping this enormous secret all the time, right? And y'know, that WOULD be okay with me... if the man created something new and equally interesting to replace it. But in this book, Superman reveals his greatest secret to the whole world... and then nothing happens. He keeps his job. His friends all congratulate him. Nobody blows up the Daily Planet or starts taking pot-shots at Lois Lane. Somehow in this book, revealing Superman's identity has actually managed to eliminate conflict, rather than create it. And since conflict is the very heart of storytelling, the result is a story that, well... kind of sucks. Furthermore, Clark Kent (the identity) is more than just a shield of anonymity behind which he can protect his loved ones. It's also a lens by which we can come to understand Superman as a character. Whether he's supposed to be an elaborate put-on by a superbeing who's trying desperately to blend in with normal people, or whether he's Superman's actual, everyday persona and his costumed identity is the put-on, "Clark Kent" adds dimension to a hero whose adventures can very easily fall into inert hagiography. He humanizes Superman. Take Clark Kent away, and Superman is just Mr. Perfect-- the guy with the amazing jawline and perfect hair that everyone loves and whose life always goes right for him at every turn, no matter what. And no one likes THAT guy.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    I'll be honest, I was kind of dreading reading this. Superman revealing his identity isn't an easy story to write, and I don't have half the faith in Bendis I had at his prime, so I thought this was going to be a mess, but I was pleasantly surprised. It's still not fantastic, but it's nowhere near as bad as I thought it'd be. We open with four normal issues of Superman - the first brings Jon Kent back together with Damian Wayne in a Super Sons reunion, which has a big heart, but is unfortunately I'll be honest, I was kind of dreading reading this. Superman revealing his identity isn't an easy story to write, and I don't have half the faith in Bendis I had at his prime, so I thought this was going to be a mess, but I was pleasantly surprised. It's still not fantastic, but it's nowhere near as bad as I thought it'd be. We open with four normal issues of Superman - the first brings Jon Kent back together with Damian Wayne in a Super Sons reunion, which has a big heart, but is unfortunately mired in Bendis' inability to write teenage dialogue. His Robin sounds totally bonkers and nothing like he's supposed to, which makes the emotional core of the issue fail. David Lafuente's art is probably the best it's been in years though, which was a nice surprise. The next issue is the prelude to The Truth, which gives us some context as to what Superman is going to do, as well as a reaction from Lois Lane and a Year Of The Villain tie-in as well. This one's not bad, and has some gorgeous Kevin Maguire art as well. And then there's the first two issues of The Truth, with art by Ivan Reis (so it looks great, of course). This lands surprisingly well - the reactions of the Daily Planet staff are especially heartwarming, and the one page in which Supes reveals himself to Perry is superbly done. We leave off on a Mongul related cliffhanger, but this loses a bit of impact because the next two issues, Superman: Heroes and Superman: Villains, are set before that sequence. Heroes is nice - we get to expand on how the Daily Planet staff feel about Clark being Superman, and an amusing Kevin Maguire facial expression sequence of the Justice League's reactions which is what Maguire does best. Some of the smaller stories in this issue are amusing enough, but the expanded page count isn't really necessary. I did enjoy the Bruce/Diana story a lot though. Villains is less so. It doesn't focus on the villains as you'd expect it to; Lex Luthor gets an amusing two page story, and there's a Toyman bit, but most of this is a throwaway aside from the framing sequence starring Marisol Leone that furthers the Action Comics Invisible Mafia plotline. So for the most part, this kinda works. Some of it works better than others, and there's definitely a lot of padding near the back, but it could have been a hell of a lot worse, so props for that, I guess.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jaime Guzman

    I haven't felt this good reading a Superman comic since Superman for All Things. Brian Michael Bendis has brought back the Superman we all love. The honor and heroism of the character of Superman seemed to fill me with awe as I was reading the book. Bendis' writing debut in the DC universe was very underwhelming but now he seems to have the character down and I am so glad that I stuck with it. Ivan Reis' art reminds me of Neal Adams' art in his prime. Incredible dynamic and kinetic art that seems t I haven't felt this good reading a Superman comic since Superman for All Things. Brian Michael Bendis has brought back the Superman we all love. The honor and heroism of the character of Superman seemed to fill me with awe as I was reading the book. Bendis' writing debut in the DC universe was very underwhelming but now he seems to have the character down and I am so glad that I stuck with it. Ivan Reis' art reminds me of Neal Adams' art in his prime. Incredible dynamic and kinetic art that seems to keap off the page is the only way that I can describe the wonderful art that fills every page. Do not pass this one up boys & girls cuz it's a great book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Xavier Marturet

    Sometimes, someone kills Superman. This time, someone kills his secret identity. It really doesn't matter. Superman is a superheroe of DC Universe and his secret identity is Clark Kent. Just like this. As easy as you read it. I feel like that day I saw a Superman movie with a different Lois Lane: divorced and mother of a son. I repeat: It really doesn't matter. It's good to experiment arguments like this. But I don't believe the story. I know everything will return to the normal Superman all we know. Sometimes, someone kills Superman. This time, someone kills his secret identity. It really doesn't matter. Superman is a superheroe of DC Universe and his secret identity is Clark Kent. Just like this. As easy as you read it. I feel like that day I saw a Superman movie with a different Lois Lane: divorced and mother of a son. I repeat: It really doesn't matter. It's good to experiment arguments like this. But I don't believe the story. I know everything will return to the normal Superman all we know. Just like the Elseworld stories. BTW: Superman: Heroes and Superman: Villains are /were unnecessary.

  17. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    This was just an epic travesty to one of the greatest fictional characters ever created. What made Clark Kent so relevant, was that Clark Kent WAS the disguise. The glasses WERE the mask. It tapped into a basic feeling that everyone has, that I am more than what you see. I may look like a dweeb on the outside, but I'm a super person on the inside. Brian Michael Bendis just threw that all away for a cheap publicity stunt. You'd think that he'd have learned his lesson from the failure and disaster This was just an epic travesty to one of the greatest fictional characters ever created. What made Clark Kent so relevant, was that Clark Kent WAS the disguise. The glasses WERE the mask. It tapped into a basic feeling that everyone has, that I am more than what you see. I may look like a dweeb on the outside, but I'm a super person on the inside. Brian Michael Bendis just threw that all away for a cheap publicity stunt. You'd think that he'd have learned his lesson from the failure and disaster it wrought over at Marvel when they did this same thing to Spider-Man.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

    Public library copy. Outstanding talent across the board on this book, I'm not completely lost with this crossover story event, but I definitely think I'm missing pieces or have read books out of order. Not entirely my fault as I've no control in regards to order from which reserved books I get to borrow are held for me. I'm not convinced the reveal in this title will remain an ongoing publishing effort before it goes back to status quo because surely readers concerned with secret identities aren Public library copy. Outstanding talent across the board on this book, I'm not completely lost with this crossover story event, but I definitely think I'm missing pieces or have read books out of order. Not entirely my fault as I've no control in regards to order from which reserved books I get to borrow are held for me. I'm not convinced the reveal in this title will remain an ongoing publishing effort before it goes back to status quo because surely readers concerned with secret identities aren't worried about Superman and his family.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Collects Superman issues #16-19, Superman: Heroes #1, and Superman: Villains #1 Well, this is it. I heard a lot about this a while back, and I'm finally reading the volume in which... SPOILERS: ...Superman reveals his secret identity to the world. Or rather, Clark Kent reveals that he has been Superman all along. This collections shows how his friends, family, coworkers, fellow superheroes, and villainous enemies react to the news. Collects Superman issues #16-19, Superman: Heroes #1, and Superman: Villains #1 Well, this is it. I heard a lot about this a while back, and I'm finally reading the volume in which... SPOILERS: ...Superman reveals his secret identity to the world. Or rather, Clark Kent reveals that he has been Superman all along. This collections shows how his friends, family, coworkers, fellow superheroes, and villainous enemies react to the news.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    This was so messy, but there really is a good heart at the center of story. Between tackling a few different plotlines and regularly switching artists, this was kind of hard to follow at some points and I just had to keep going and assume I would understand as it went on. I really loved Superman's "coming out" and the emotion that it brought, I just wish the story had been a little tighter. This was so messy, but there really is a good heart at the center of story. Between tackling a few different plotlines and regularly switching artists, this was kind of hard to follow at some points and I just had to keep going and assume I would understand as it went on. I really loved Superman's "coming out" and the emotion that it brought, I just wish the story had been a little tighter.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Lawson

    While I have concerns that Bendis’ welcome but increasing footprint on the DC Universe is interconnecting his stories in such a way that they each individually stand less and less on their own I still love his take on Superman.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amy Freeman

    Thoroughly enjoyed this volume, the big reveal was so well done! I loved how it explored how it would affect everyone good & bad. Not entirely in love with all the artwork but the ending was brilliant, it definitely left me wanting more.

  23. 5 out of 5

    John

    Thoughtful and fun. Plus, Kent will stop lying in his articles.

  24. 5 out of 5

    RG

    4.5*...back into digging this

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    A bold move, well executed. I have not always loved Bendis’s writing, but I am loving his work on Superman.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Butcher

    I really wanted to love this. But the big reveal really doesn't feel earned but just pushed into for this volume. And the changing artists and styles feels more distracting than an homage. I really wanted to love this. But the big reveal really doesn't feel earned but just pushed into for this volume. And the changing artists and styles feels more distracting than an homage.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ming

    I enjoyed this, particularly because it wasn't a giant earth-shattering arc. I enjoyed this, particularly because it wasn't a giant earth-shattering arc.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    I have to say I really love what's going on in Superman lately. I was never much of a Supes fan, but Bendis is really pushing the barriers and I like all the revelations and ramifications of it all. I have to say I really love what's going on in Superman lately. I was never much of a Supes fan, but Bendis is really pushing the barriers and I like all the revelations and ramifications of it all.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Reading this I couldn't help but contrast with how the Other Guys handled a similar scenario during Civil War over a decade previous: Like it or lump it, that sequence set my expectations for storylines of this variety ever since so I did not find this one all that compelling or original by comparison. I'll continue reading because Superman but will manage expectations. Reading this I couldn't help but contrast with how the Other Guys handled a similar scenario during Civil War over a decade previous: Like it or lump it, that sequence set my expectations for storylines of this variety ever since so I did not find this one all that compelling or original by comparison. I'll continue reading because Superman but will manage expectations.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Adam Graham

    The Truth Revealed collects four Issues of Superman and two special issues. The first issue has a reunion between Jon and Damian as the later considers an offer to join the Legion of Superheroes. The rest of the book centers on Clark's decision to reveal his secret identity. The topic is one suited to Bendis' style as he loves to do stories with a lot of character conversations and talks from even the man on the street and this is a topic where that fits. So while the entire book is a bit pro for The Truth Revealed collects four Issues of Superman and two special issues. The first issue has a reunion between Jon and Damian as the later considers an offer to join the Legion of Superheroes. The rest of the book centers on Clark's decision to reveal his secret identity. The topic is one suited to Bendis' style as he loves to do stories with a lot of character conversations and talks from even the man on the street and this is a topic where that fits. So while the entire book is a bit pro forma in setting up the new status quo for Superman, it's still an engaging. My only complaint is the presence of the infected Supergirl in the villains issue. That was rather pointless and a reminder of how DC so badly mishandled this character. Other than that, it's a solid read.

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