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The Girl Who Was Convinced Beyond All Reason That She Could Fly

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In a rusted unnamed city full of five-dollar hotels and flea markets, a young homeless girl named Eggs is trying to make her way in the world. She's shy and bold at the same time, and wary of strangers, but she is convinced beyond all reason that she can fly. And fly she does, from rooftop to rooftop, from chimneys to phone wires; she scurries up the sides of buildings, and In a rusted unnamed city full of five-dollar hotels and flea markets, a young homeless girl named Eggs is trying to make her way in the world. She's shy and bold at the same time, and wary of strangers, but she is convinced beyond all reason that she can fly. And fly she does, from rooftop to rooftop, from chimneys to phone wires; she scurries up the sides of buildings, and sneaks into secret lairs. Eggs is a loner but she makes two friends: Grack, who sells 100 different kinds of hot dogs from his bicycle cart, and Splendid Wren, a punk rocker whose open window Eggs came crashing through one night. Both Grack and Splendid Wren try their best to protect her, but Eggs meets her match when on a cold night she swoops onto a rooftop and steals a warm jacket belonging to Robin, a neighbourhood baddie with anger management issues. Can Eggs elude his wrathful revenge? Beguiling and otherworldly, The Girl Who Was Convinced Beyond All Reason That She Could Fly is a fevered dream about a young girl's flights of fancy in order to survive, and to thrive. Ages 14 and up.


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In a rusted unnamed city full of five-dollar hotels and flea markets, a young homeless girl named Eggs is trying to make her way in the world. She's shy and bold at the same time, and wary of strangers, but she is convinced beyond all reason that she can fly. And fly she does, from rooftop to rooftop, from chimneys to phone wires; she scurries up the sides of buildings, and In a rusted unnamed city full of five-dollar hotels and flea markets, a young homeless girl named Eggs is trying to make her way in the world. She's shy and bold at the same time, and wary of strangers, but she is convinced beyond all reason that she can fly. And fly she does, from rooftop to rooftop, from chimneys to phone wires; she scurries up the sides of buildings, and sneaks into secret lairs. Eggs is a loner but she makes two friends: Grack, who sells 100 different kinds of hot dogs from his bicycle cart, and Splendid Wren, a punk rocker whose open window Eggs came crashing through one night. Both Grack and Splendid Wren try their best to protect her, but Eggs meets her match when on a cold night she swoops onto a rooftop and steals a warm jacket belonging to Robin, a neighbourhood baddie with anger management issues. Can Eggs elude his wrathful revenge? Beguiling and otherworldly, The Girl Who Was Convinced Beyond All Reason That She Could Fly is a fevered dream about a young girl's flights of fancy in order to survive, and to thrive. Ages 14 and up.

30 review for The Girl Who Was Convinced Beyond All Reason That She Could Fly

  1. 5 out of 5

    Whispering Stories

    Book Reviewed on www.whisperingstories.com A young girl given the name Eggs because of her only T-shirt with Eggs written on the front is convinced that she can fly. She soars between rooftops and up the side of buildings. One day she catches the eye of Grackle McCart who runs the family hotdog business selling 100 different types of hotdogs. Eggs and Grackle become friends, but Grackle wants them to have more of a friendship than just Eggs soaring around his cart each day so he takes her back to Book Reviewed on www.whisperingstories.com A young girl given the name Eggs because of her only T-shirt with Eggs written on the front is convinced that she can fly. She soars between rooftops and up the side of buildings. One day she catches the eye of Grackle McCart who runs the family hotdog business selling 100 different types of hotdogs. Eggs and Grackle become friends, but Grackle wants them to have more of a friendship than just Eggs soaring around his cart each day so he takes her back to his apartment. Eggs doesn’t like being indoors and so she zooms off and soon ends up crashing into the window of Splendid Wren a punk rocker. The two become firm friends. When Eggs ends up taking local bully, Robins, jacket, she is in serious trouble as he wants to teach her a lesson about taking other people’s stuff. The Girl Who Was Convinced Beyond All Reason That She Could Fly is marketed as a graphic novel but it’s not like ones that I have read before (or the copy I had wasn’t like others). The full-page illustrations we on separate pages to the writing, where others I have read have the text and illustrations merged. However, I can’t say this took anything away from the story. The book is unusual. Not only because it is about a girl who could ‘fly’ but the whole plot was unusual though at times it felt a little disjointed. The book is twelve chapters long and my own personal thoughts are that it is too long. It sometimes felt like the author had a ton of ideas to go into the book and decided to add them all. The characters were intriguing and Eggs was a character that is used to being on her own and doesn’t trust others easily nor does she understand how to get along with people fully in a friendship capacity. I didn’t find her a likeable person but then I didn’t dislike her either, I didn’t have any feelings towards her. The illustrations are jagged and dark but they work well with the plot which is a tale of friendship, survival, homelessness, and self-respect. The book is very urban and perhaps the younger generation may understand and appreciate the book far more than I did. If you enjoy books that are a few steps away from the norm and include a plot that you will never have read before and is a little wacky then this is the book to try.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Madeline (The Bookish Mutant)

    Thank you to Edelweiss+ and Arsenal Pulp Press for giving me this eARC in exchange for an honest review! Though rather short, The Girl Who Was Convinced Beyond All Reason That She Could Fly was a treat to read. Whimsical, humorous, and unique, this novel is one to look out for, a delightful romp across city rooftops. Eggs was such a precocious character, and I loved tagging along on her adventures across the city. Grack and Wren were likewise humorous, and paired well with Eggs’ chaotic, misfit na Thank you to Edelweiss+ and Arsenal Pulp Press for giving me this eARC in exchange for an honest review! Though rather short, The Girl Who Was Convinced Beyond All Reason That She Could Fly was a treat to read. Whimsical, humorous, and unique, this novel is one to look out for, a delightful romp across city rooftops. Eggs was such a precocious character, and I loved tagging along on her adventures across the city. Grack and Wren were likewise humorous, and paired well with Eggs’ chaotic, misfit nature. Their friendship and willingness to take Eggs under their wing(s) (no pun intended…wait, would that be considered a pun? Beats me…) made for a lovely story to read. Lamb’s writing was as unique as the characters–it had an almost matter-of-fact tone to it, while still being wonderfully whimsical and witty. I’m not sure if Sybil Lamb is British or not, but either way, the writing is packed with classic, British humor, sure to please fans of Monty Python–or to get them started on such media. Needless to say, this book got a laugh out of me several times. There wasn’t too much “action,” per se, until the last 80% of the novel, and honestly, that perfectly fit with the story. It wasn’t meant to be a serious adventure–it’s more of a cheerful romp, than anything, a very feel-good sort of story. The ending, without spoiling anything, was bittersweet, but beautifully poignant. The synopsis on Goodreads says that it’s suitable for ages 14+, but I’d say that it would be suitable for some younger ages (though not too young) as well; aside from the aforementioned action scene, I can only remember one mild swear, and not much else that would scar someone younger than 14. The Girl Who Was Convinced Beyond All Reason That She Could Fly could be enjoyed by preteens, young adults, and adults, in my opinion. All in all, a delightfully odd novel that stands out in the YA genre. 4 stars!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Theo Hummer

    An inspired fable about true friendship; independence; fitting in while standing out; imagination and belief in the impossible. Although it's not a graphic novel exactly, the text does interact heavily with Lamb's highly detailed, stylized illustrations of a rickety post-industrial landscape peopled by wonderfully weird characters. Beyond how fun and wacky the book is--it spoke straight to my heart, y'all. The kids* in your life need this book (and probably you need it, too). *It's being marketed An inspired fable about true friendship; independence; fitting in while standing out; imagination and belief in the impossible. Although it's not a graphic novel exactly, the text does interact heavily with Lamb's highly detailed, stylized illustrations of a rickety post-industrial landscape peopled by wonderfully weird characters. Beyond how fun and wacky the book is--it spoke straight to my heart, y'all. The kids* in your life need this book (and probably you need it, too). *It's being marketed as 14+, but depending on your kid, I think it could work for readers much younger than that.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Erikka

    This was awful. Like. What even was this? It sounded like a story one of my students would write. But, like, not one of my good students. Like a kid who wrote a story the night before it was due because they need the average grade to continue playing football. It read like the works of Francesca Lia Block, which is so not a compliment from me. And the art is hideous. Just...hideous. Like, garbage pail kid hideous.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Pop Bop

    Flutter By Butterfly This light and airy fable flutters about touching on this and that in a charming but subtly muscular fashion. Our heroine won't ever come to ground, and she spends her days flitting about the city, always watching and occasionally interacting with others, but only on her own terms. Can she really fly, does she just think she can fly, or does she just always fall sideways? Well, that's the real question isn't it. Eggs is our heroine, (which I think is a great joke on "Bird" as Flutter By Butterfly This light and airy fable flutters about touching on this and that in a charming but subtly muscular fashion. Our heroine won't ever come to ground, and she spends her days flitting about the city, always watching and occasionally interacting with others, but only on her own terms. Can she really fly, does she just think she can fly, or does she just always fall sideways? Well, that's the real question isn't it. Eggs is our heroine, (which I think is a great joke on "Bird" as a name). She sort of has a friend in Grack the hot dog vendor, (Grackles are famed for stealing hot dogs from little kids at picnics) and in Splendid Wren, (another joke?), a burnt out hippie case. But she won't be pinned down, and resists even being understood. Things happen, but not in a very linear or plot-like fashion. The book could be longer or shorter; more things could happen, or fewer. It could end the way it does, or differently. It's a little sad, and a little hopeful, and mostly lost, but partly found. Along the way we touch on friendship, street life, urban culture, homelessness, shelter from the storm, survival, burning out, waking up, and how many different hot dogs there can be. The book left me with little in terms of an overall impression. I recall bits, and scenes, and odd lines of narrative or dialogue. The tone is rueful and, perhaps, bemused, but with a sly and knowing underlying sense of humor. As to the art, I wasn't in love with the style, but I get the reasoning behind it. It's a little jaggy, with all of the characters having a touch of that old R. Crumb lumpiness. Very urban, outsider, and edgy, it looks like it came off some abandoned warehouse walls. The story here is set in a vaguely close, worn out, and claustrophobic urban space, so the stylistic choice made sense. The upshot is that I'd approach this more as long form free verse poetry than as a narrated tale, but that form allowed for a dreamy and yet still rigorous flight of fancy. This was a refreshing and thoughtful find off the usual track, and all the better for it. (Please note that I received a free advance will-self-destruct-in-x-days Adobe Digital copy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    In an unnamed city, a homeless girl named Eggs spends her time flying and exploring. When she becomes a regular at Grackle McCart’s hot dog bicycle cart, which sells 100 types of hot dogs, Grack and Eggs become fast friends. Eggs flys fliers for his hot dogs all over town, bringing him business galore, and in exchange she hangs out with Grack whenever she wants and gets free hot dogs. Eggs also makes friends with a loner hippie girl named Splendid Fairy Wren, who teaches Eggs about gardening and In an unnamed city, a homeless girl named Eggs spends her time flying and exploring. When she becomes a regular at Grackle McCart’s hot dog bicycle cart, which sells 100 types of hot dogs, Grack and Eggs become fast friends. Eggs flys fliers for his hot dogs all over town, bringing him business galore, and in exchange she hangs out with Grack whenever she wants and gets free hot dogs. Eggs also makes friends with a loner hippie girl named Splendid Fairy Wren, who teaches Eggs about gardening and shows Eggs her collection of picture books and talks about her job making knitted socks. Then one day, after a run-in with a terrible bully named Robin, Eggs disappears. Will Grack and Wren be able to track down their amazing flying friend? The Girl Who Was Convinced Beyond All Reason That She Could Fly is an extremely quirky tale. It’s short for starters, and it felt like the pacing rushed a lot of the nuance of forming friendships and the experiences of homelessness. With more storytelling, I could see this becoming something even closer to novel length with realistic detail, well-rounded characters, and a more concrete plot. The artwork also had a strange and unique style, which for me bordered on distracting to the point of pulling me out of the story entirely. Altogether there’s something of the extreme inventiveness of Shel Silverstein in this story, but magnified outside of poetry into a tale that scrambles to stay upright and find some relatable plot points and characters within its very few pages. It doesn’t feel quite right to market this as a young adult story, because there is some necessary follow-through on character backstory that is completely missing, and the story really raises more questions than it answers. I was intrigued, but having completed this story so quickly I don’t believe I’ll return to it again. Thank you to Arsenal Pulp Press for providing a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Marta Pona

    Meet Eggs, the girl who could fly. As an eccentric character with peculiar beliefs and unthinkable survival skills, Eggs accentuates the life of the homeless. As the story unfolds, Eggs' ability to fly takes centre stage to her lack of a home and family. The reader is directed to focus on Eggs' awkwardness among people, lack of social skills and childish mentality. Yet as the story unfolds, we realize Eggs represents the marginalized and the destitute. Where is Eggs to learn these expected behav Meet Eggs, the girl who could fly. As an eccentric character with peculiar beliefs and unthinkable survival skills, Eggs accentuates the life of the homeless. As the story unfolds, Eggs' ability to fly takes centre stage to her lack of a home and family. The reader is directed to focus on Eggs' awkwardness among people, lack of social skills and childish mentality. Yet as the story unfolds, we realize Eggs represents the marginalized and the destitute. Where is Eggs to learn these expected behaviours if thrown to the street to fend for herself? She learns her survival skills from the surrounding nature. I must admit, it was difficult to follow the story at first. Lamb takes a few chapters to develop the characters at the expense of the story. However, the fact that there is so much written about the characters offers opportunities for reflection and discussion in a book club setting. And for this reason, I think this would be a good fiction book for middle-grade literature circles. Although the book is targetting readers aged 14 and up, I think many 11 and 12 year-olds would relate to the story, as well. The phenomenal illustrations provide an added touch to the idiosyncrasy of the book. Flipping through the pages while reading, they reminded me of the movie, "Adam's Family Values", a twist of darkness alongside humour. Thank you to Arsenal Pulp Press for a free ebook in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I’m..... not entirely sure what I just read. Eggs is a homeless girl who thinks she can fly, her feet never touching the ground and she spends her days scaling buildings and soaring between them. Along the way she develops a friendship with a boy who runs a hotdog cart and a girl who knits socks and they accept each other just as they are. Paired with Lamb’s story is her artwork, which is just as quirky as the text. But it felt like readers are dropped into the story half way through and mid sen I’m..... not entirely sure what I just read. Eggs is a homeless girl who thinks she can fly, her feet never touching the ground and she spends her days scaling buildings and soaring between them. Along the way she develops a friendship with a boy who runs a hotdog cart and a girl who knits socks and they accept each other just as they are. Paired with Lamb’s story is her artwork, which is just as quirky as the text. But it felt like readers are dropped into the story half way through and mid sentence and then abruptly pulled out again.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Another beautiful urban fantasy story from the legendary Sybil Lamb. Beautiful characters, like junkyard dogs who learn how to be friends and also start a skateboard gang. Between the illustrations and the wild imagery of the story, my head is swimming. This is the perfect gift for any kid but especially kids who might wonder more than average.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Janessa

    Popsugar Reading Challenge 2020: A book by an author with flora or fauna in their name I almost feel guilty for disliking this as much as I do. But the art style really wasn't for me, and I think the overall story had potentially to be much better than what it actually is. Sucks. Popsugar Reading Challenge 2020: A book by an author with flora or fauna in their name I almost feel guilty for disliking this as much as I do. But the art style really wasn't for me, and I think the overall story had potentially to be much better than what it actually is. Sucks.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alexina

    Review forthcoming.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kael Sharman

    I love the discussion of friendship in this book and the illustrations!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amilcar

  14. 5 out of 5

    Angela

  15. 5 out of 5

    Abby

  16. 5 out of 5

    Casey Plett

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sybil Lamb

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eftihia S.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Emma Johnson

  20. 5 out of 5

    Allison Gravel

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jess

  22. 5 out of 5

    K.Rose

  23. 4 out of 5

    Willow Dee

  24. 4 out of 5

    Maria Chiquinha

  25. 5 out of 5

    Judy

  26. 5 out of 5

    gwendolen

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lysa

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jennie

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jolene Saint

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kate Hargreaves

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