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London, 1889. In a city still reeling from the depredations of Jack the Ripper another killer arises. Stalking the West End and Marylebone and striking at a seemingly unconnected group of victims, the murderer leaves fear and confusion in his wake. Mr. Sherlock Holmes, Dr. John Watson, and Inspector Lestrade face a case like no other they have yet faced. A case that will l London, 1889. In a city still reeling from the depredations of Jack the Ripper another killer arises. Stalking the West End and Marylebone and striking at a seemingly unconnected group of victims, the murderer leaves fear and confusion in his wake. Mr. Sherlock Holmes, Dr. John Watson, and Inspector Lestrade face a case like no other they have yet faced. A case that will leave each of them changed and bring personal danger as they race against a mounting death toll to bring down the Molly-Boy Murderer.


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London, 1889. In a city still reeling from the depredations of Jack the Ripper another killer arises. Stalking the West End and Marylebone and striking at a seemingly unconnected group of victims, the murderer leaves fear and confusion in his wake. Mr. Sherlock Holmes, Dr. John Watson, and Inspector Lestrade face a case like no other they have yet faced. A case that will l London, 1889. In a city still reeling from the depredations of Jack the Ripper another killer arises. Stalking the West End and Marylebone and striking at a seemingly unconnected group of victims, the murderer leaves fear and confusion in his wake. Mr. Sherlock Holmes, Dr. John Watson, and Inspector Lestrade face a case like no other they have yet faced. A case that will leave each of them changed and bring personal danger as they race against a mounting death toll to bring down the Molly-Boy Murderer.

30 review for Sherlock Holmes and the Molly-Boy Murders

  1. 4 out of 5

    vibha

    Obtained a free copy in exchange for an honest review by Booktasters on Twitter Sherlock Holmes and the Molly-Boy murders by Margaret Walsh is set in 19th century London. This book is indeed a treat for those who love Sherlock Holmes . There is a serial killer out there roaming freely and killing people or rather Trans people in a brutal manner. Sherlock and Dr. Watson along with inspector Lestrade should find the killer before he wrecks more havoc. The author has done her homework about Victoria Obtained a free copy in exchange for an honest review by Booktasters on Twitter Sherlock Holmes and the Molly-Boy murders by Margaret Walsh is set in 19th century London. This book is indeed a treat for those who love Sherlock Holmes . There is a serial killer out there roaming freely and killing people or rather Trans people in a brutal manner. Sherlock and Dr. Watson along with inspector Lestrade should find the killer before he wrecks more havoc. The author has done her homework about Victorian London and it really shows in the book. Writing through Watson's point of view just like the original series is something I really appreciated. The rather dry humor of Dr. Watson and his relationship with Sherlock Holmes was portrayed very nicely. The writing style was neat and the vivid description of the scenes added more beauty to the book. Forensic details were noteworthy and it didn't feel like too much. The main reason I loved this book is because of the fact that the author showed her feminist side here. The references of how women were not allowed to vote or how a man dressed as a woman was being laughed at. Being a transgender was such a rare incident back then that most people didn't even know it was real. But as the story goes on characters started accepting them and also stopped viewing women as dumb and weak. I would totally recommend it to all the Sherlockians!!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Been along time since I read a Sherlock Holmes novel, I am reading this as the author is a long time Goodreads friend. We share a love of Holmes and Watson. I discovered Holmes by watching basil rathbone films as a kid getting on for 40years ago. This is a lovely and worthy addition to Sherlockian or Holmesian World, you will not get any spoilers from me in my reviews so read away. Good strong storyline, Margaret has really done her historical research about Victorian London as the details really Been along time since I read a Sherlock Holmes novel, I am reading this as the author is a long time Goodreads friend. We share a love of Holmes and Watson. I discovered Holmes by watching basil rathbone films as a kid getting on for 40years ago. This is a lovely and worthy addition to Sherlockian or Holmesian World, you will not get any spoilers from me in my reviews so read away. Good strong storyline, Margaret has really done her historical research about Victorian London as the details really show up in the book. She has also captured Watson style of writing created by ACD writing the original stories So highly recommended to all my Goodreads friends on here. 4.5 stars.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Felice Saint Julien

    Just when you thought it was safe to walk the streets of London again at night on the heels of being terrorized by Jack the Ripper, another vicious killer arises in a stream of provocative murders. The author Margaret Walsh does not waste time and takes you straight into a gruesome journey with the one and only Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson to solve a mystery and catch a killer. I especially loved the dry humor of Dr. Watson and the dialogue and insight into the relationship between the him and Just when you thought it was safe to walk the streets of London again at night on the heels of being terrorized by Jack the Ripper, another vicious killer arises in a stream of provocative murders. The author Margaret Walsh does not waste time and takes you straight into a gruesome journey with the one and only Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson to solve a mystery and catch a killer. I especially loved the dry humor of Dr. Watson and the dialogue and insight into the relationship between the him and Sherlock Holmes. I felt like I was watching a black and white movie on the silver screen rather than reading a book; thanks to the smooth writing style and descriptions that painted every scene so vividly, or should I say chapter? I was particularly impressed with how the forensics were so smartly detailed. If you are looking for a good old fashioned murder mystery with a modern twist, then you will enjoy Sherlock Holmes and the Molly-Boy Murders.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rajesh

    The legend of Sherlock Holmes has inspired plenty of authors adding to the series and as a long time fan of Holmes (having read the complete works more than once) I try to read some of these. With The Molly Boy Murders. Margaret Walsh picks up a theme which Sir AC Doyle would probably steered away from. The serial killer here is somewhat along the lines of Jack the Ripper but is targeting transgenders. The motive seems to be inexplicable and the case seems to be a hopeless one given the lack of c The legend of Sherlock Holmes has inspired plenty of authors adding to the series and as a long time fan of Holmes (having read the complete works more than once) I try to read some of these. With The Molly Boy Murders. Margaret Walsh picks up a theme which Sir AC Doyle would probably steered away from. The serial killer here is somewhat along the lines of Jack the Ripper but is targeting transgenders. The motive seems to be inexplicable and the case seems to be a hopeless one given the lack of clues. But Holmes, ably assisted by Watson and Lestrade get to work on it with Mycroft active on the sidelines. I am really glad the author did not invoke the "Moriarty" bogey to develop the story. The "irregulars" are there of course and a couple of them play prominent roles in the story. There is a slightly different look on the relationships between the leading characters and both Sherlock and Mycroft have been shown with a slightly more humane element. All in all the story is well developed. The writing style is not very close to Doyle's but if every writer wrote Holmes mysteries in the exact cloned style then it would be no fun. The story is well developed, the suspense is kept well hidden and the series of events make you read on. The book also touches on the socio-political scenario existing then, things like voting rights for women and the social status of transgenders. Will definitely be reading some other Holmes books by the author.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Adrian Deans

    “I am far too selfish to make a good husband. Why should I inflict that on an honest woman?” I was amazed at Holmes’ openness with me. We had not spoken like this before. * * * This was a tiny excerpt from The Molly Boy Murders that neatly encapsulates the essence of the story. Margaret Walsh’s foray into the world created by Conan Doyle but updated to include a more intimate relationship between Holmes and Watson and numerous modern sensibilities was fast paced, entertaining and faithful enough t “I am far too selfish to make a good husband. Why should I inflict that on an honest woman?” I was amazed at Holmes’ openness with me. We had not spoken like this before. * * * This was a tiny excerpt from The Molly Boy Murders that neatly encapsulates the essence of the story. Margaret Walsh’s foray into the world created by Conan Doyle but updated to include a more intimate relationship between Holmes and Watson and numerous modern sensibilities was fast paced, entertaining and faithful enough to the essence of Sherlock Holmes to let her get away with the presentism. And there was lot of that: Holmes as a champion of women’s rights; the rights of those with paraphilias; concern for the poverty and even the literacy of the lower orders; Lestrade as the champion of the rent boys; and the police as heroes of the London mob, all continuing the tradition of mildly humorous and modernist treatments such as The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes’ Smarter Brother and The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes. The only jarring note was Lestrade commenting that a female impersonator and suspected homosexual was not committing any crime as far as he knew. Those prosecuting Oscar Wilde around about the same time would surely have known both the crime and the very harsh sentences typically handed down. But even that may have been a presentist joke, that was slightly lost on me. Also slightly odd for a Holmes case was the level of contribution made by others such as the usually bumbling and flummoxed Lestrade and Watson to the unfolding deductions – which was a refreshingly democratic approach. The one thing that did let the book down was the editing. It could really have benefited from another firm-handed pass, but the interesting ideas and fast pace added up to solid entertainment and that is always what I mostly want.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Apurva Khadye

    Margaret Walsh tried to walk in shoes of sir Arthur Conan Doyle's shoes and does not disappoint us. I have read all Sherlock Holmes books by Doyle and had little doubts reading another one from different author. Having said that I thoroughly enjoyed it. Just after the dread of Jack the ripper Londoners believe it is safe to walk out side again but boy they are wrong. There are two boys found murdered with their bodies mutilated and Inspector Lestrade calls Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson to as Margaret Walsh tried to walk in shoes of sir Arthur Conan Doyle's shoes and does not disappoint us. I have read all Sherlock Holmes books by Doyle and had little doubts reading another one from different author. Having said that I thoroughly enjoyed it. Just after the dread of Jack the ripper Londoners believe it is safe to walk out side again but boy they are wrong. There are two boys found murdered with their bodies mutilated and Inspector Lestrade calls Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson to assist him in solving the murder. Initially what appears to be serial killing turns out something more sinister and premeditated. I liked how the themes of trans people and women's rights explored in this novel which is set in Victorian society. Though it's not totally dissimilar from what we see today. Novel is masterfully written. We get to see more humane side of Sherlock and Mycroft. It almost was like watching BBC Sherlock. Easy to read and comprehend. Murderer, turned out to be whom I have suspected but still it kept me engrossed throughout. #BookwithApurva

  7. 5 out of 5

    Divya Mahajan

    Sherlock Holmes and the Molly Boy Murders by Margaret Walsh is an interesting read for Sherlock Holmes fans. She has tried to maintain the style of Arthur Conan Doyle and succeeded to a fair extent bit also added her own unique touch to the plot that blends in so nicely that it seems natural transition. One thing I liked more was though Sherlock was one in focus at all times , even other characters were given prominence in a subtle way and their characterization brings a lovely flavor. Though th Sherlock Holmes and the Molly Boy Murders by Margaret Walsh is an interesting read for Sherlock Holmes fans. She has tried to maintain the style of Arthur Conan Doyle and succeeded to a fair extent bit also added her own unique touch to the plot that blends in so nicely that it seems natural transition. One thing I liked more was though Sherlock was one in focus at all times , even other characters were given prominence in a subtle way and their characterization brings a lovely flavor. Though the story belongs to those times but still is relevant in these times as it touches many sensitive topics in a gentle manner and puts some strong messages across. I am a big fan of Sherlock Holmes and Arthur Conan Doyle ; I have all the Sherlock Holmes stories and also The Lost World . But I would suggest to give this story a fair chance by not comparing the two writers and I believe your craving for more Holmes stories will be satisfied. A very good book to read Thank you @BookTasters for this wonderful read

  8. 4 out of 5

    Francie

    I enjoyed this Sherlock Holmes mystery so much. Ms. Walsh brought me along with Sherlock and Watson with her very descriptive details. I almost smelled the crumpets with butter. The story examined the world of "molly" boys and the struggle to live in a world that does not understand or tolerate difference. I think most readers will enjoy this fast paced mystery with Sherlock and Watson leading the investigation. I enjoyed this Sherlock Holmes mystery so much. Ms. Walsh brought me along with Sherlock and Watson with her very descriptive details. I almost smelled the crumpets with butter. The story examined the world of "molly" boys and the struggle to live in a world that does not understand or tolerate difference. I think most readers will enjoy this fast paced mystery with Sherlock and Watson leading the investigation.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Terri

    Total disclosure, I know the author, but that author knows I value my integrity when I review on Goodreads and if I hate something or don't like something, I'm going to say it. I'll try and say it constructively (these days I do, maybe I didn't in my first few years on GR when I was a young ingenue), but say it I will. I have never read any Sherlock Holmes fan fiction or pastiche, although I have read a couple Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - the gent who wrote the original characters and built the world Total disclosure, I know the author, but that author knows I value my integrity when I review on Goodreads and if I hate something or don't like something, I'm going to say it. I'll try and say it constructively (these days I do, maybe I didn't in my first few years on GR when I was a young ingenue), but say it I will. I have never read any Sherlock Holmes fan fiction or pastiche, although I have read a couple Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - the gent who wrote the original characters and built the world that inspired it all. The movies, tv series', clubs, fashion, pastiche and fan fiction. It's not really my thing and yet I could follow along with this story perfectly well. I would say you don't have to be a Sherlockian to enjoy it. The themes are a guaranteed winner for the cultural climate. Current with the 21st century zeitgeist, with LGBTQ+ minorities represented as well as such things as Corset fetish. This no doubt gives the book a fresh feel for Sherlockians and those of these minorities that are under-represented in historical mystery. The author has excelled at capturing the voices you expect from Sherlock & Co. I think because she is a dedicated Sherlockian herself, she has long had these voices in her head and now she has an outlet to get them out for others to listen to. I do have a couple of little niggles to confess. Editing. It needs a good one. It is loaded with errors (grammatical not historical). The other niggle is that at times, the story did become about Sherlock and Watson's relationship and daily interactions and not about the Molly Boy Murders. I wish it could have kept more on the suspense at times. But maybe because this is a book targeted to Sherlock fans, it is de rigueur to spend time away from suspense, and burrow down into the relationships between Sherlock, Watson and company.

  10. 5 out of 5

    May

    Enjoyed this book immensely!! I have not read any of the original Sherlock Holmes novels, but I didn’t need to. This author skillfully wove known details of Holmes, Watson and Victorian London into her own mystery. Well done, Margaret!!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kyla

    Disclaimer: I received a free copy in exchange for an honest review. Author Margaret Walsh describes herself as a writer of pastiches (pastiche = an artistic work in a style that imitates that of another work, artist, or period) of Sherlock Holmes stories. Having read “Sherlock Holmes and the Molly Boy Murders” I think she underestimates herself. She manages to capture the original author’s characters and style almost too well to be called merely an “imitation.” She channels the master well, a ta Disclaimer: I received a free copy in exchange for an honest review. Author Margaret Walsh describes herself as a writer of pastiches (pastiche = an artistic work in a style that imitates that of another work, artist, or period) of Sherlock Holmes stories. Having read “Sherlock Holmes and the Molly Boy Murders” I think she underestimates herself. She manages to capture the original author’s characters and style almost too well to be called merely an “imitation.” She channels the master well, a talent I appreciate as a lifelong Sherlockian myself. Having read all the original Arthur Conan Doyle Holmes stories, repeatedly, it was an absolute delight to find new Holmes stories to savor. That this one has every bit of the richness of character, plotting and detail as the originals is absolutely breathtaking. It was so good to be back in those comfy rooms at 221B Baker Street, sipping Mrs. Hudson’s fine tea and hearing the details of the latest puzzle to be presented to Mr. Holmes. All our favorite characters make an appearance. Inspector Lestrade takes a prominent place in the story, which is set at some time after Holmes’ return from his apparent death at Reichenbach Falls (The Final Problem) and shortly after the murders of Jack the Ripper in Whitechapel, London, before the Hound of the Baskervilles affair. Sherlock’s brother, Mycroft, features strongly in this tale as well, and Dr. Watson has yet to marry, still residing in the rooms with Holmes. A bright spring morning is interrupted by the arrival of Inspector Lestrade, a pale and clearly shaken Lestrade. What has the usually unflappable Lestrade so shaken is the prospect that the Whitehall Murderer has not, in fact, ceased his deadly activities, for another woman has been found dead in the street. Of course, Holmes and Watson are off to assist immediately. Fortunately, it doesn’t take Holmes but an instant to determine that, wherever or whoever Jack the Ripper is, he isn’t responsible for this bloody death. Revealing much more of who died, why and how would, unhappily, take much of the suspense out of the tale. It is, however, as well plotted and fun to follow as one written by Doyle himself, with as happy an ending as can be expected in a story that starts with one corpse and adds a couple more on the way. Sherlock Holmes and the Molly Boy Murders comes highly recommended for mystery lovers, Sherlock Holmes lovers, and lovers of any genuinely good reads.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Heyman-Marsaw

    Margaret Walsh’s Sherlock Holmes and the Molly-Boy Murders offers an original, highly poignant and realistic insight into the plight of transgender individuals at the end 19th century. It is an engrossing story where fully developed characters leap off the pages. Ms. Walsh has a gift of characterizations that are fresh but quite in keeping with the nuances of those individuals within the Canon. But it is the relationship amongst Inspector Lestrade, Dr. Watson and Sherlock Holmes that is the most Margaret Walsh’s Sherlock Holmes and the Molly-Boy Murders offers an original, highly poignant and realistic insight into the plight of transgender individuals at the end 19th century. It is an engrossing story where fully developed characters leap off the pages. Ms. Walsh has a gift of characterizations that are fresh but quite in keeping with the nuances of those individuals within the Canon. But it is the relationship amongst Inspector Lestrade, Dr. Watson and Sherlock Holmes that is the most evolved and appealing. Dr. Watson admits that his portrayals of Lestrade were previously overly negative in their nature and the Inspector assumes a place of equality in his relationship with Holmes and Watson. After all, Lestrade’s history with Holmes and Watson is noted in 13 cases in the Canon and covers a time period between 1881- 1902. Together the three men work in concert to solve the horrific murders of the deeply misunderstood and tortured existence of the so -called “he/she ladies”. Mycroft plays an important secondary role in the story. His primary concern is that there is no embarrassment arising from the mystery that may have a negative upon the Diogenes Club and the work he performs for the government. Thus, Mycroft represents a more establishment view of the persons involved in the case. But even he become distressed with the case and offers assistance in various areas. Ms. Walsh also champions the enfranchisement of women voters – offering the example that Mrs. Hudson, a property owner, may only vote in local elections but not for her representative in the House of Commons. The plight of children is also addressed. In all I found Margaret Walsh’s book to be an excellent psychological study written in a completely engrossing, touching and sensitive manner. The story itself demonstrates the relevance of the struggles of transgender people that still exist in today’s society. It is a pastiche of uncommon quality. I look forward to reading her newest book that is currently being released.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Maria Rivas-mc

    Margaret Walsh takes us to 1889 London. It is a city still nervous after the depredations of Jack the Ripper. As such, neither the police nor the public have the stomach for another round of gruesome, inexplicable molly-boy murders. The fact that one of the victims isn’t, muddies the investigative waters. The end of the 19th century was signalling coming changes - not all would be positive. It was a harsh and rigid time, especially for the poor, the orphaned, women, and those who “live tentative Margaret Walsh takes us to 1889 London. It is a city still nervous after the depredations of Jack the Ripper. As such, neither the police nor the public have the stomach for another round of gruesome, inexplicable molly-boy murders. The fact that one of the victims isn’t, muddies the investigative waters. The end of the 19th century was signalling coming changes - not all would be positive. It was a harsh and rigid time, especially for the poor, the orphaned, women, and those who “live tentative lives on the very edge of society”. Come to think of it, while progress has been made, the issues remain the same in the 21st century. Sherlock Holmes, Dr. John Watson, and Inspector Giles Lestrade team up to connect the dots and identify the culprit. Using a tone authentic to the time and to the original Watson, the author weaves her work of fiction around actual events, people, and mores (like the peculiar preoccupation with death and mourning). This allows us to live, virtually, in Victorian times for a little while. A delightful place to visit if not to actually live! It’s an excellent read with sympathetic characters (and that included, for me, the murderer). Recommended, particularly if you like period mysteries and Sherlock Holmes. My thanks to Booktasters and the author for facilitating a complimentary copy in exchange for a fair review.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Keith McTaggart

    Sherlock Holmes and the Molly-Boy Murders is an exquisite yarn, remaining true to the Conan Doyle tradition whilst bringing something new and fresh to the story collection, a collection that “Watson” would never have imagined would keep on expanding. The tale of course could have been true, does not hide from the horrid, and involves activity that the genteel public would have been shocked by [still would be?]. The characters of Holmes, Watson and Lestrade are slightly “improved” versions, but re Sherlock Holmes and the Molly-Boy Murders is an exquisite yarn, remaining true to the Conan Doyle tradition whilst bringing something new and fresh to the story collection, a collection that “Watson” would never have imagined would keep on expanding. The tale of course could have been true, does not hide from the horrid, and involves activity that the genteel public would have been shocked by [still would be?]. The characters of Holmes, Watson and Lestrade are slightly “improved” versions, but remain faithful to the originals. Conan Doyle’s principals learned, changed and developed so modern exponents of the craft paying homage to 221B Baker Street can be expected to make minor adjustments to our heroes, I believe. Certainly, all three are more worldly and kindly than their forebears. Most of all I like the wit which is delicately but frequently shown. The story itself is interesting, even important, in the part of society it portrays with sensitivity. I’ll avoid spoilers because the review reader should purchase the book and read for themselves what is a fascinating, exciting and genuine Holmesian plot.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Allyson Dyar

    The Game is Afoot! Author Margaret Walsh has continued what Arthur Conan Doyle started. Normally, I'm not particularly fond of authors picking up where the author has left off (usually because said author has died), but I was totally captivated by Margaret's vision of Holmes and Watson as well as her take on Inspector Lestrade. The case itself took the more modern aspect of one's true gender identity and placed it squarely within Victorian morals and attitudes. While I had wondered if this story w The Game is Afoot! Author Margaret Walsh has continued what Arthur Conan Doyle started. Normally, I'm not particularly fond of authors picking up where the author has left off (usually because said author has died), but I was totally captivated by Margaret's vision of Holmes and Watson as well as her take on Inspector Lestrade. The case itself took the more modern aspect of one's true gender identity and placed it squarely within Victorian morals and attitudes. While I had wondered if this story would have taken place during the era, Margaret has an addendum to the story where she demonstrates by listing her sources. So I have no doubt the story was true to the era. I highly recommend this book -- I give it 4.5 stars -- if you are a Holmes fan, but all means, give it a go. As long as you have an open mind about the subject, you'll have a grand read!

  16. 5 out of 5

    María José

    For a newcomer on the Arthur Conan Doyle saga, this take on the classic comes with an update on a complicated subject. For History buffs the handling and comparisons of the topic may be disputed, but the ambiance and complexity of the Victorian era in modernity is very well crafted, as with the title characters themselves. Very well written. Totally recommended. It goes beyond any fan fiction qualities.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    The setting is from the same time period of the beloved characters, Watson and Holmes. However, the author introduces a controversial crime, one that perhaps may have not been addressed in a Sir Doyle novel. The duo is off to solve the killings of men who dress as women. Males who dressed as women were known as “Mollies” in the 18th century. With mistakenly being thought as prostitutes, these transvestites/transgendered are being murdered. I was impressed on the writing style of the author and h The setting is from the same time period of the beloved characters, Watson and Holmes. However, the author introduces a controversial crime, one that perhaps may have not been addressed in a Sir Doyle novel. The duo is off to solve the killings of men who dress as women. Males who dressed as women were known as “Mollies” in the 18th century. With mistakenly being thought as prostitutes, these transvestites/transgendered are being murdered. I was impressed on the writing style of the author and how she kept the feel of the characters. It was a good mystery that kept my attention. I enjoyed learning more details about the two main characters and would be interested in a spin-off on the character, Archie. Recommend to anyone who enjoys Sherlock and Watson adventures.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    A excellent story A excellent story with a very strong character driven narrative a look a the darker side of Victorian society ,well worth a read

  19. 5 out of 5

    cathy levan

    Excellent I loved all of it you did a fine job. I don't say that often but all the characters were great . Thanks Excellent I loved all of it you did a fine job. I don't say that often but all the characters were great . Thanks

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    I really enjoyed this Sherlock Holmes novel. It had the warmth and intrigue of the original Sherlock Novels whilst having a thoroughly fascinating murder mystery which I really enjoyed although I did struggle to keep Benedict C out of my head the whole time.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Geo

    It's been quite a while since I've read a Sherlock Holmes and Watson novel. But I do love them! And this one reminded me of why. The story was set in London, in the 19th century. The crime itself seemed more modern, and it was just a great mystery thriller. The author did a great job. Highly recommend to Holmes and Watson fans. It's been quite a while since I've read a Sherlock Holmes and Watson novel. But I do love them! And this one reminded me of why. The story was set in London, in the 19th century. The crime itself seemed more modern, and it was just a great mystery thriller. The author did a great job. Highly recommend to Holmes and Watson fans.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Vaishali Singh

    This is the second novel I’ve read from this author. It was exciting till the end. I love the thrill in Sherlock Holmes novels and I wasn’t disappointed in this one as well. The writing style enables us to visualize the scene and relate even more to the story. Being a huge Sherlock fan, I’d recommend the novel.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mike Bradbury

    One of the best books I’ve read in many a year

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mariel

    This is an exciting and thrilling addition to any fan of the famous Sherlock and Watson tales and crime lover in general. Set in 1889, the inhabitants of London think they have seen their fill of killings and are recovering from the shadow of Jack the Ripper still imprinted on their minds when a murderer stalks the streets once again, but this time with a difference. The bodies are of boys, naked, with their throats slit from ear to ear. Will the formidable duo solve the scandal in time? The book This is an exciting and thrilling addition to any fan of the famous Sherlock and Watson tales and crime lover in general. Set in 1889, the inhabitants of London think they have seen their fill of killings and are recovering from the shadow of Jack the Ripper still imprinted on their minds when a murderer stalks the streets once again, but this time with a difference. The bodies are of boys, naked, with their throats slit from ear to ear. Will the formidable duo solve the scandal in time? The book is written from Watsons perspective beginning with the unexpected vist of Lestrade who shockingly reveals the discovery of two victims, both killed identically. The rapport between the pair is kept as the ultimate partnership where one compliments the other with the assistance of Inspector Lestrade completing the crime solving trio. My first book read written by the author Margaret Walsh. She creates the suspense we know and love from Sherlock adventures, it happens in the stillness of the story, in the gaps between the action sequences, in the moments between the expectation of something dreadful about to happen and its arrival. She creates a promise from the beginning and delivers the anticipated result as the finale. A refreshing read with the attitudes of Sherlock and Watson being far more humane and understanding.Not the usual scenarios concerning female characters,the women encountered are portrayed as “ strong women “ and occasionally formidable. Even the couple of sleuths find it a pleasant change from the habitual " damsels in distress " . I give Sherlock Holmes and the Molly-Boy Murders 5 out of 5 stars.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Turley

    First-time pasticheur Margaret Walsh tackles a difficult subject in her debut novel, and she handles it extremely well. Set early in 1889, The Molly-Boy Murders offers a postscript to the infamous Ripper murders and a prelude to the Cleveland Street scandal, which involved boy brothels and eventually touched the royal palace. In this story, Holmes, Watson, and Lestrade investigate the murder of one of Mycroft’s secret agents, soon finding it linked to the similar murders of young, transgender pr First-time pasticheur Margaret Walsh tackles a difficult subject in her debut novel, and she handles it extremely well. Set early in 1889, The Molly-Boy Murders offers a postscript to the infamous Ripper murders and a prelude to the Cleveland Street scandal, which involved boy brothels and eventually touched the royal palace. In this story, Holmes, Watson, and Lestrade investigate the murder of one of Mycroft’s secret agents, soon finding it linked to the similar murders of young, transgender prostitutes. Not a case to be recorded in the Canon! However, there is nothing sensational in Ms. Walsh’s novel; its only graphic passages describe forensics. Her Canonical characters, and most of the others, show not merely tolerance for feminine natures trapped inside male bodies, but an understanding and compassion rare in Victorian England and uncommon in our own time. Yet, their response is explicable within the personalities of Holmes, Watson, and Lestrade as she presents them. Ms. Walsh does especially well by the Scotland Yard detective; her Lestrade is as admirable as Marcia Wilson’s. Before beginning her next story, she may wish to review Baring-Gould's Canonical timeline. There is no mention here of Mary Morstan (to whom Watson was engaged by early 1889); nor was the true nature of Mycroft Holmes’s service to the British government revealed until the Bruce-Partington case of 1895. Such minor flaws do not detract from this soundly plotted, exciting, and well-written novel. Let us hope it is the first of many from Ms. Walsh’s pen.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    I am a fan of Sherlock Holmes and this book didn’t deter from that. I enjoyed reading this partake in the character. The plot is interesting because it provides a bit of perspective with the attitudes of the Victorian Era. I think the case itself is riveting and fascinating too. It was a really good book to read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    JJ Broenner

    A Sherlock Holmes story with a twist that could be related to some more current times issues, if they happened in Sherlock’s original time frame. The story follows Holmes and Watson from location to location in pursuit of solving a case that occurred shortly after the Ripper murders in London. The multiple murders in this story have similarities to those of the Ripper. The case is solved and Holmes and Watson and left a bit melancholy for what the murders of the “Molly Boys” represent.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lizzie

    I absolutely adore Sherlock Holmes and read the canon stories regularly I was really hopping to really enjoy delving into something along the same lines. Unfortunately I could not get my head around it. It is well written but I couldn't really get into it. I absolutely adore Sherlock Holmes and read the canon stories regularly I was really hopping to really enjoy delving into something along the same lines. Unfortunately I could not get my head around it. It is well written but I couldn't really get into it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Juhi Choudhary

    Finished this book a month ago, and liked it so much, I still remember most of the details. The author maintains the style of Canon Doyle so effortlessly that it doesn't seem like the book is written by a different author; unless you consider the modern touch to it, that just adds to the overall appeal of the writing. The book highlights the plight of LGBT people in the Victorian era, with reference to the so called "He/She Ladies" - men who dress up like women and walk the streets of London. Wh Finished this book a month ago, and liked it so much, I still remember most of the details. The author maintains the style of Canon Doyle so effortlessly that it doesn't seem like the book is written by a different author; unless you consider the modern touch to it, that just adds to the overall appeal of the writing. The book highlights the plight of LGBT people in the Victorian era, with reference to the so called "He/She Ladies" - men who dress up like women and walk the streets of London. When two such people are found murdered in the same way, with their genitilias cut, it starts a series of brutal murders and it is up to Holmes and his companions to stop it. Apart from this, an appealing feature of the story is its strong female characters. It also briefly touches upon the issue of female enfranchisement during the Victorian era. I loved how the author portrayed the close friendship between Watson and Holmes, with deep conversations between them about personal things that I've hardly read in the original Sherlock stories. Also, Lestrade who seems just as close with the other two completes the "Three Musketeers" gang solving the most baffling case. Dr. Watson's sarcastic remarks every now and then is a refresher from all the drama happening in the book. Another aspect I loved about the book is the insights it provided into Mycroft Holmes, Sherlock Holmes's brother, who works for the Government, or rather let me rephrase "is the government". The bond between the Holmeses, the way they are so different, and yet understand each other is beautifully depicted throughout the story. To all the Sherlock Holmes fans, if you're not convinced even now, let me tell you, you are going to like this one. So go ahead & give it a read!

  30. 4 out of 5

    jim smith

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