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Jay Shetty, social media superstar and host of the #1 podcast On Purpose, distills the timeless wisdom he learned as a monk into practical steps anyone can take every day to live a less anxious, more meaningful life. When you think like a monk, you’ll understand: - How to overcome negativity - How to stop overthinking - Why comparison kills love - How to use your fear - Why you Jay Shetty, social media superstar and host of the #1 podcast On Purpose, distills the timeless wisdom he learned as a monk into practical steps anyone can take every day to live a less anxious, more meaningful life. When you think like a monk, you’ll understand: - How to overcome negativity - How to stop overthinking - Why comparison kills love - How to use your fear - Why you can’t find happiness by looking for it - How to learn from everyone you meet - Why you are not your thoughts - How to find your purpose - Why kindness is crucial to success - And much more... Shetty grew up in a family where you could become one of three things—a doctor, a lawyer, or a failure. His family was convinced he had chosen option three: instead of attending his college graduation ceremony, he headed to India to become a monk, to meditate every day for four to eight hours, and devote his life to helping others. After three years, one of his teachers told him that he would have more impact on the world if he left the monk’s path to share his experience and wisdom with others. Heavily in debt, and with no recognizable skills on his résumé, he moved back home in north London with his parents. Shetty reconnected with old school friends—many working for some of the world’s largest corporations—who were experiencing tremendous stress, pressure, and unhappiness, and they invited Shetty to coach them on well-being, purpose, and mindfulness. Since then, Shetty has become one of the world’s most popular influencers. In 2017, he was named in the Forbes magazine 30-under-30 for being a game-changer in the world of media. In 2018, he had the #1 video on Facebook with over 360 million views. His social media following totals over 38 million, he has produced over 400 viral videos which have amassed more than 8 billion views, and his podcast, On Purpose, is consistently ranked the world’s #1 Health and Wellness podcast. In this inspiring, empowering book, Shetty draws on his time as a monk to show us how we can clear the roadblocks to our potential and power. Combining ancient wisdom and his own rich experiences in the ashram, Think Like a Monk reveals how to overcome negative thoughts and habits, and access the calm and purpose that lie within all of us. He transforms abstract lessons into advice and exercises we can all apply to reduce stress, improve relationships, and give the gifts we find in ourselves to the world. Shetty proves that everyone can—and should—think like a monk.


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Jay Shetty, social media superstar and host of the #1 podcast On Purpose, distills the timeless wisdom he learned as a monk into practical steps anyone can take every day to live a less anxious, more meaningful life. When you think like a monk, you’ll understand: - How to overcome negativity - How to stop overthinking - Why comparison kills love - How to use your fear - Why you Jay Shetty, social media superstar and host of the #1 podcast On Purpose, distills the timeless wisdom he learned as a monk into practical steps anyone can take every day to live a less anxious, more meaningful life. When you think like a monk, you’ll understand: - How to overcome negativity - How to stop overthinking - Why comparison kills love - How to use your fear - Why you can’t find happiness by looking for it - How to learn from everyone you meet - Why you are not your thoughts - How to find your purpose - Why kindness is crucial to success - And much more... Shetty grew up in a family where you could become one of three things—a doctor, a lawyer, or a failure. His family was convinced he had chosen option three: instead of attending his college graduation ceremony, he headed to India to become a monk, to meditate every day for four to eight hours, and devote his life to helping others. After three years, one of his teachers told him that he would have more impact on the world if he left the monk’s path to share his experience and wisdom with others. Heavily in debt, and with no recognizable skills on his résumé, he moved back home in north London with his parents. Shetty reconnected with old school friends—many working for some of the world’s largest corporations—who were experiencing tremendous stress, pressure, and unhappiness, and they invited Shetty to coach them on well-being, purpose, and mindfulness. Since then, Shetty has become one of the world’s most popular influencers. In 2017, he was named in the Forbes magazine 30-under-30 for being a game-changer in the world of media. In 2018, he had the #1 video on Facebook with over 360 million views. His social media following totals over 38 million, he has produced over 400 viral videos which have amassed more than 8 billion views, and his podcast, On Purpose, is consistently ranked the world’s #1 Health and Wellness podcast. In this inspiring, empowering book, Shetty draws on his time as a monk to show us how we can clear the roadblocks to our potential and power. Combining ancient wisdom and his own rich experiences in the ashram, Think Like a Monk reveals how to overcome negative thoughts and habits, and access the calm and purpose that lie within all of us. He transforms abstract lessons into advice and exercises we can all apply to reduce stress, improve relationships, and give the gifts we find in ourselves to the world. Shetty proves that everyone can—and should—think like a monk.

30 review for Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dr. Appu Sasidharan

    Summary (Regular Review) This book delineates the experiences that Jay Shetty learned in his three years of monk life in India. He tries to convey the wisdom gathered through the ancient scriptures and monks in a palatable practical manner. What I learned from this book 1) The monk mindset and the monkey mindset Mr. Shetty says that in order to train your mind to find peace, calm and purpose you have to have the monk mindset. He also depicts the differences between the monk mindset and Summary (Regular Review) This book delineates the experiences that Jay Shetty learned in his three years of monk life in India. He tries to convey the wisdom gathered through the ancient scriptures and monks in a palatable practical manner. What I learned from this book 1) The monk mindset and the monkey mindset Mr. Shetty says that in order to train your mind to find peace, calm and purpose you have to have the monk mindset. He also depicts the differences between the monk mindset and the monkey mindset 2) Why most of us study better in libraries, work better in offices, and workout better in gyms? The author tells us the importance of the locations in building up our routines. He says that every location has its own energy. If a particular place is devoted to a particular purpose with the least amount of distractions, the probability of us doing it is more. It will be easier for us to build up a routine if we visit those places regularly rather than trying to do it alone in our house. “Location has energy; time has memory. If you do something at the same time every day, it becomes easier and natural. If you do something in the same space every day, it becomes easier and natural." 3) Never go to gym to build a revenge body to make your ex jealous after breakup Exercise is something vital in our life. Never tie it to any external factors like provoking your ex. There is a chance that it can add extra salt to your wound. "If your ex doesn't notice or care, you will still feel the same frustration and loneliness. However, if you start going to the gym because you want to feel physically strong after your breakup, or if, in the course of working out, your intention shifts to get fit, you will get in shape and feel emotionally satisfied." 4) Pranayama and Cardiovascular health This is a topic that always fascinated me. I have been thinking about doing Medical research on this topic. I am delighted to see the author mentioning the same in this book. "For millennia, yogis have practiced breathing techniques called pranayama to do things like stimulate healing, raise energy and focus on the present moment. In the Rig Veda, it's written that "breath is the extension of our inmost life," and it describes breath as the path beyond the self to consciousness. Modern science backs up the effectiveness of pranayama for myriad effects including improving cardiovascular health, lowering overall stress, and even improving academic test performance. ” 5) Do I have to become a better human being or a better student? This is the question which I tried to find an answer to throughout my teenage years. I opted for becoming a better human being than a better student. The author is answering a similar question in this book. This is my favorite line from this book "To build your competence without regard for character is narcissistic, and to build character without working on skills is devoid of impact. We need to work on both in order to serve our souls and a higher purpose." 6) Sleep and Hustle culture The author is perfectly describing the problems associated with the hustle culture and sleep deprivation. It is actually the business tycoons and the self-help gurus who made this culture so popular. I am pleased to see a business giant like Mr. Bill Gates and a new age motivational speaker like Mr. Jay Shetty really acknowledging the problems associated with it and trying to find the solutions for it. "We tend to wear our ability to get by on little sleep as some sort of badge of honor that validates our work ethic. But what it is a profound failure of self-respect and of priorities." 7) Is Micro meditation effective? Mr. Shetty tells us the problems associated with the modern trend of micro meditation. "There are plenty of articles that encourage you to meditate for five minutes a day. I m not against that, but I m also not surprised if it does nothing for you. The truth is you achieve very little in five minutes. The ocean is full of treasures, but if you swim on the surface, you won't see them all. If you start a meditation practice with the idea that you can instantly clear your mind, you'll soon learn that immersion takes time and practice." 8) Is social media pushing you down a rabbit hole? This relevant topic is thoroughly discussed in this book "Let us say that whenever you go on YouTube to watch one video, you end up going down a rabbit hole. Senses recklessly transport our minds away from where we want them to be. Don't tease your own senses. Don't set yourself up to fail. A monk doesn't spend time in a strip club. We want to minimize the mind's reactive tendencies, and the easiest way to do that is for the intellect to proactively steer the senses away from stimuli that could make the mind react in ways that are hard to control. It's up to the intellect to know when you are vulnerable and to tighten the reins, just as a charioteer does when going through a field of tasty grass." 9) How can we find out our best friend, colleague, or romantic partner? We all might have at least one instance to share when a person didn't reciprocate the care and love we gave them. Is it because we are expecting too much? Is it because we are a failure in understanding others? This book gives a perfect answer to it. The author mentions four types of trust to understand why we are attracted to a person. We can determine whether they are compatible with us by finding out whether their values and trust correspond with us. My favourite three lines from this book “Salt is so humble that when something goes wrong, it takes the blame, and when everything goes right, it doesn’t take credit.” “Schadenfreude doesn't last long. The more we define ourselves in relation to the people around us the more lost we are.” “Revenge is the mode of ignorance—it’s often said that you can’t fix yourself by breaking someone else.” What I didn’t like in this book It is mentioned in this book that after three years, one of his teachers told the author that he would have more impact on the world if he left the monk's path to share his experience and wisdom with others. He moved back home in north London with his parents. This portion, which has a pivotal part in this book, should have been written a little more vividly as we can't fully understand what exactly happened and why the author decided to leave his path of becoming a monk all of a sudden. It is disheartening to see the way the author indirectly criticized Marie Kondo. Many people in the USA, including some talk show hosts, indeed find enjoyment in making fun of Marie Kondo. But I didn't expect it inside a book which was written with the sole aim of making us think like a monk. Rating 3/5 There are indeed many haters for the author, and there are some accusations of plagiarism against him. But I think I am not eligible enough to comment on it as I don't know the author personally and don't follow him on social media. This book might keep you enlightened and answers at least some of your questions regarding your life. There might be certain parts of it that might make us confused and make us question the author. Still, I have to admit that this book is packed with a lot of information that might help most of you in one way or the other.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Woodward

    *Many thanks to NetGalley, Simon & Schuster, and Jay Shetty for an ARC of this book! Now available as of 9.8.20!* Jay Shetty has found great exposure through the YouTube community and came highly recommended to me from professionals in the healthcare industry, so I was intrigued to pick this book up and learn more about Shetty's philosophies. Think Like A Monk explores some of the basic principles of his faith through examinations of negative thoughts and their impact on everyday life, the ego an *Many thanks to NetGalley, Simon & Schuster, and Jay Shetty for an ARC of this book! Now available as of 9.8.20!* Jay Shetty has found great exposure through the YouTube community and came highly recommended to me from professionals in the healthcare industry, so I was intrigued to pick this book up and learn more about Shetty's philosophies. Think Like A Monk explores some of the basic principles of his faith through examinations of negative thoughts and their impact on everyday life, the ego and its positive and negative implications, the benefits of service, the importance of gratitude, and the possibilities in life that can be explored through meditation. While I found this book interesting, I can't say I read any advice that I haven't personally read or heard before. I think this is the sort of self-help book that would befit someone who is new to introspection or self-exploration more than someone who has already discussed or reflected on these topics at length (through faith, therapy, or other avenues) The handwritten charts in the book also disrupted the flow at times, in my opinion, and made the book feel less professional, detracting from the overall benefits of the messages being delivered. Rather than a more traditional self-help book, I think I was anticipating more of a memoir feel to this book, and the anecdotes from Shetty's time as a monk are hands-down the most interesting parts of the book and my greatest takeaway. I would still recommend this book to anyone interested in an introduction to monks and their way of thinking or to anyone who has been impacted positively by Shetty's YouTube shorts, podcasts, or seminars. 3.5 ⭐️

  3. 5 out of 5

    Greta

    I feel this man is a biggest fraud internet has seen.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sanjana

    What a phoney dude and what a phoney book. A friend gifted this to me, despite knowing how not fond of self-help books I am. I couldn't finish this book so maybe I am not qualified to write a review, but whatever. His introduction starts with a quote that he cannot even place right. Funny, because he loves plagiarising and not attributing. Shetty starts the book with saying how he fell in love with the story of a monk and his riches-to-rags story. Right then I thought "what a bullshitter". Don't What a phoney dude and what a phoney book. A friend gifted this to me, despite knowing how not fond of self-help books I am. I couldn't finish this book so maybe I am not qualified to write a review, but whatever. His introduction starts with a quote that he cannot even place right. Funny, because he loves plagiarising and not attributing. Shetty starts the book with saying how he fell in love with the story of a monk and his riches-to-rags story. Right then I thought "what a bullshitter". Don't tell me to think like a monk if you are gonna work like a entrepreneur.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ronak

    https://youtu.be/ze-93apelno Think Like a Monk I just finished this book, and I have mixed feelings about it. after reading many nonfiction books, I realized most books talk about the same stuff. ( sadly that is true with this book) This book is basically summarizing jay's all youtube/Facebook videos. Its an average read. This book is divided into 3 parts basically, 1. Let go 2. Grow 3. Give Then all parts are divided into further subchapters. Talking about fear, pain, ego, purpose, etc. all those emotio https://youtu.be/ze-93apelno Think Like a Monk I just finished this book, and I have mixed feelings about it. after reading many nonfiction books, I realized most books talk about the same stuff. ( sadly that is true with this book) This book is basically summarizing jay's all youtube/Facebook videos. Its an average read. This book is divided into 3 parts basically, 1. Let go 2. Grow 3. Give Then all parts are divided into further subchapters. Talking about fear, pain, ego, purpose, etc. all those emotional words you can say. If you are an avid reader of self-help books then you will find much reparative stuff in it. We all know in anger try to breathe. How meditation and breath are connected. These books just explain all the stuff we know in different words. At the end of every chapter, there are tips or exercises to work on. That's the only helpful stuff. This book is more about understanding our genuine power. how to overcome negative thoughts and habits, and access the calm and purpose that lies within all of us. How we can all apply this method to reduce stress, improve focus. jay also talks about improving relationships, identify our hidden abilities, increase self-discipline. At the end of the book, all the references give if you want to dive deep into the topic. It's a good book for beginners only. If you are an avid reader then, probably it's not for you.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Gary Beauregard Bottomley

    How would you respond at your Ashram when your guru tells you to write about an undeserved experience? I know when the author, Shetty, asked that question my mind immediately jumped to 20 items all of them for me were along the lines of how the universe had shed its unearned favors through time and chance upon me such as meeting my wife 40 years ago and having her fall in love with me, or how my parents were better than the parents on “Leave it to Beaver”, or being granted the unearned favor of How would you respond at your Ashram when your guru tells you to write about an undeserved experience? I know when the author, Shetty, asked that question my mind immediately jumped to 20 items all of them for me were along the lines of how the universe had shed its unearned favors through time and chance upon me such as meeting my wife 40 years ago and having her fall in love with me, or how my parents were better than the parents on “Leave it to Beaver”, or being granted the unearned favor of having a twin brother and an older brother who have always had my back, or about 17 other items came in to my mind. It never even dawned on me, as it did with the author when he was at the Ashram as a novice with twenty other monks in training to think of negative experiences as he and all the other novices did. That’s the problem I had with this book. I have never thought about my negative experiences as being underserving while I did think of my undeserving experiences as blessings from the universe, and therefore there was no lesson for me. That was the lesson Shetty was trying to give, but I already have that ingrained with in me through my life experiences, and for that, and many other teachings in this book I felt they were superfluous for me. At the heart of this book is a self-help manual for those who see the world differently than me. I am never a target audience for self-help books. I understand that there are many people who suffer from a host of maladies such as addictions, depression, unsatisfactory work, or are unsatisfied with their life and need a book such as this. For them, this book can be worthwhile. Shetty makes love foundational for our meaning through out our journey. I always have a problem with that has a standard in it by itself. I’ll give a reason why. Trump’s recent Covid-19 swap meet Nuremburg rallies are filled with love. He’ll tell his mask-less crowds how much he loves them and they shout their love right back at him. Love without knowledge or willful ignorance is dangerous. Love by itself is not a sufficient standard. We need love with knowledge and a willing of the Good. The very first aphorisms Shetty gives is if you want to learn something new, read an old book, I concur. That gives me a chance to recommend a bunch of old books that do way better than Shetty does. Though, I want to be kind to Shetty because he really does write a good book for some people who haven’t yet had a chance to read the old books. Shetty does lay out the case how our life’s meaning is best served by pursuing the Good. I will say one should not stumble over that word Good. Everyone has a general idea in what it means. Thomas Aquinas will lay it out in his Summa Theologia (old book alert) and he makes our highest meaning the contemplation of the Good. That is discovering what is true, what is ethical, and what is beautiful. The section Shetty wrote on fear and anxiety reminded me of Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War when the Athenians are ready to attack Syracuse and the Captain gives the speech on how to proceed and tells them not to let their fears, anxieties and dread overcome them. Really, I wish that whenever I got the urge to read a modern self-help book, I wish I would just reread Thucydides, because he said it all and he said it over two thousand years ago and he said it better. For those who have not read that book, I want to note that the real theme in that book is how the particular makes up the universal and how us humans find meaning through our self, our community, and our culture. That’s actually a theme within Shetty’s book too (I’m not judging Shetty’s book, I fully understand that this book is useful for a large swath of audiences, I’m just not its target group). I think the finest self-help book ever is Spinoza’s Ethics. Yes, the first two sections are devilishly complex because he writes axiomatically and the reader needs to understand their Aristotle. The last two sections are mostly a self-help book that covers most of what was in this book, and Spinoza does it better. After all, if one wants to learn something new read an old book. Also, since I’ve mentioned Aristotle, I want to mention his Ethics. Aristotle will tell his reader that ethos means habit and that our good habits make for a Good ethos. I would say that Shetty had that as a theme in this book too. There’s one more old book I would recommend instead of this one, Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy. There’s a reason that book was in more home libraries in the 17th century than any other book except for the bible. He reconciles Plato with Aristotle and gives meaning to our significance by emphasizing the Good in the manner of Plotinus by pointing out evil is the absence of the Good and that the Universe does not have evil as such, and that is our lack of knowledge (wisdom) that leads to our dread, and the truly vile among us are the least among us because they never get to learn or grow and they are worthy of our empathy and consideration. I would say that all of the books I mentioned covered most of the material presented in this book and they each did it in a more highly original manner. There really is not anything unique within the mostly Buddhist/Hindu traditions presented in this book. I want to emphasize that this book definitely can appeal to a host of others. I would say that if you thought in terms of negative response to the challenge ‘describe an undeserving experience’, and if you have not read much on this topic previously, and if you just don’t have the time to read those older better books, this book would be worthwhile if you are in need of a self-help book. I think it’s perfectly reasonable for some people to rate this book five stars. I would say this book just was not my cup of tea.

  7. 5 out of 5

    ☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣

    Wow! A new instafav!!! Passion + Skill = Talent (Varna) Skill + Usefullness = Occupation Usefullness + Compassion = Servise (Seva) Compassion + Passion = Charity Varna + Seva + Occupation + Charity = (?) Passion + Expertise + Usefulness = Dharma Now that's some formulaic Buddhism! Love the 'VISUALIZATION FOR TOMORROW' routine! 'TRANSFORM THE MUNDANE' Q: In 1902, the sociologist Charles Horton Cooley wrote: “I am not what I think I am, and I am not what you think I am. I am what I think you think I am. ( Wow! A new instafav!!! Passion + Skill = Talent (Varna) Skill + Usefullness = Occupation Usefullness + Compassion = Servise (Seva) Compassion + Passion = Charity Varna + Seva + Occupation + Charity = (?) Passion + Expertise + Usefulness = Dharma Now that's some formulaic Buddhism! Love the 'VISUALIZATION FOR TOMORROW' routine! 'TRANSFORM THE MUNDANE' Q: In 1902, the sociologist Charles Horton Cooley wrote: “I am not what I think I am, and I am not what you think I am. I am what I think you think I am. (c) Q: Unconsciously, we’re all method acting to some degree. We have personas we play online, at work, with friends, and at home. These different personas have their benefits. They enable us to make the money that pays our bills, they help us function in a workplace where we don’t always feel comfortable, they let us maintain relationships with people we don’t really like but need to interact with. But often our identity has so many layers that we lose sight of the real us, if we ever knew who or what that was in the first place. We bring our work role home with us, and we take the role we play with our friends into our romantic life, without any conscious control or intention. However successfully we play our roles, we end up feeling dissatisfied, depressed, unworthy, and unhappy. The “I” and “me,” small and vulnerable to begin with, get distorted. (c) Q: Every year since I was eighteen I’d spent part of the summer interning at a finance job in London and part of the year training at the ashram in Mumbai. (c) Now, that's a clash, if ever! Q: They clamor with opinions and expectations and obligations. Go straight from high school to the best college, find a lucrative job, get married, buy a home, have children, get promoted. Cultural norms exist for a reason—there is nothing wrong with a society that offers models of what a fulfilling life might look like. But if we take on these goals without reflection, we’ll never understand why we don’t own a home or we’re not happy where we live, why our job feels hollow, whether we even want a spouse or any of the goals we’re striving for. (c) Q: The only way to build a meaningful life is to filter out that noise and look within. (c) Q: If you go to a networking event every day and have to tell people what you do for a living, it’s hard to step away from that reduction of who you are. If you watch Real Housewives every night, you start to think that throwing glasses of wine in your friends’ faces is routine behavior. When we fill up our lives and leave ourselves no room to reflect, those distractions become our values by default. (c) Q: filter out the noise of opinions, expectations, and obligations (OEOs) (c) Q: Every day we are assaulted by negativity. No wonder we can’t help but dish it out as well as receive it. We report the aches and pains of the day rather than the small joys. We compare ourselves to our neighbors, complain about our partners, say things about our friends behind their backs that we would never say to their faces, criticize people on social media, argue, deceive, even explode into anger. (c) Q: We have three core emotional needs, which I like to think of as peace, love, and understanding (c) Q: Stanford psychologists took 104 subjects and assigned them to one of two groups—one told to write a short essay about a time they were bored, and the other to write about a time when life seemed unfair or when they felt “wronged or slighted by someone.” Afterward, the participants were asked if they wanted to help the researchers with an easy task. Those who’d written about a time they’d been wronged were 26 percent less likely to help the researchers. In a similar study, participants who identified with a victim mindset were not only more likely to express selfish attitudes afterward, they were also more likely to leave behind trash and even take the experimenters’ pens! (c) Q: We’re social creatures who get most of what we want in life—peace, love, and understanding—from the group we gather around us. Our brains adjust automatically to both harmony and disagreement. We’ve already talked about how we unconsciously try to please others. Well, we also want to agree with others. (c) Q: Complainers, like the friend on the phone, who complain endlessly without looking for solutions. Life is a problem that will be hard if not impossible to solve. Cancellers, who take a compliment and spin it: “You look good today” becomes “You mean I looked bad yesterday?” Casualties, who think the world is against them and blame their problems on others.Critics, who judge others for either having a different opinion or not having one, for any choices they’ve made that are different from what the critic would have done. Commanders, who realize their own limits but pressure others to succeed. They’ll say, “You never have time for me,” even though they’re busy as well. Competitors, who compare themselves to others, controlling and manipulating to make themselves or their choices look better. They are in so much pain that they want to bring others down. Often we have to play down our successes around these people because we know they can’t appreciate them. Controllers, who monitor and try to direct how their friends or partners spend time, and with whom, and what choices they make. ... Once you recognize a complainer isn’t looking for solutions, you realize you don’t have to provide them. If a commander says, “You’re too busy for me,” you can say, “Should we find a time that works for both of us?” (c) Q: Don’t judge someone with a different disease. Don’t expect anyone to be perfect. Don’t think you are perfect. (c) Q: Dharma, like many Sanskrit terms, can’t be defined by a single English word, though to say something is “your calling” comes close. My definition of dharma is an effort to make it practical to our lives today. I see dharma as the combination of varna and seva. Think of varna (also a word with complex meanings) as passion and skills. Seva is understanding the world’s needs and selflessly serving others. When your natural talents and passions (your varna) connect with what the universe needs (seva) and become your purpose, you are living in your dharma. When you spend your time and energy living in your dharma, you have the satisfaction of using your best abilities and doing something that matters to the world. Living in your dharma is a certain route to fulfillment. ... Passion + Expertise + Usefulness = Dharma (c) Q: One professor didn’t realize that there was a fire extinguisher just inches from the office he’d occupied for twenty-five years. (c) Q: Location has energy; time has memory.If you do something at the same time every day, it becomes easier and natural.If you do something in the same space every day, it becomes easier and natural. (c) Q: Studies have found that only 2 percent of us can multitask effectively; most of us are terrible at it, especially when one of those tasks requires a lot of focus. When we think we’re multitasking, what’s usually happening is that we’re shifting rapidly among several different things, or “serial tasking.” (c) Q: Routines become easier if you’ve done something immersively. If you want to bring a new skill into your life, I recommend that you kick it off with single-pointed focus for a short period of time. (c) Q: Monks try to do everything immersively. Our lunches were silent. Our meditations were long. We didn’t do anything in just five minutes. (Except for showering. We weren’t showering immersively.) We had the luxury of time, and we used it to single-task for hours on end. That same level of immersion isn’t possible in the modern world, but the greater your investment, the greater your return. If something is important, it deserves to be experienced deeply. And everything is important. We all procrastinate and get distracted, even monks, but if you give yourself more time, then you can afford to get distracted and then refocus. In your morning routine, having limited time means that you’re one phone call or spilled coffee away from being late to work. If you’re frustrated with learning a new skill, understanding a concept, or assembling a piece of Ikea furniture, your instinct will be to pull away, but go all in and you’ll accomplish more than you thought possible. As it turns out, periods of deep focus are also good for your brain. When we switch tasks compulsively (like the multitaskers who showed poor memory and focus in the Stanford study), it erodes our ability to focus. We overstimulate the dopamine (reward) channel. (c) Gosh, I need to write it on my wall or something! Q: In the Hitopadeśa, an ancient Indian text by Nārāyana, the mind is compared to a drunken monkey that’s been bitten by a scorpion and haunted by a ghost. (c) It probably is, in our digital age! Q: Another option is to simply repeat an ancient samurai saying that the monks use: “Make my mind my friend,” over and over in your head. When you repeat a phrase, it quiets the default mode network—the area of the brain associated with mind wandering and thinking about yourself. The monkey will be forced to stop and listen. (c) Q: The crane stands still in water, ignoring the small fish as they pass by. Her stillness allows her to catch the bigger fish. (c)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Smita

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The best part of this book was when it ended. I'm not going to lie, by chapter 6 I just hardcore skimmed through this. I only didn't DNF it since it's a book club pick. First of all, this book is BORING. It's like a patchwork of different quotes from various sources put together but isn't very interesting to read. Shetty's writing is not engaging on all. It was like "ancient quote" + "okay remember to turn off you phone" + "more modern quote". I would honestly rather see these as individual quote The best part of this book was when it ended. I'm not going to lie, by chapter 6 I just hardcore skimmed through this. I only didn't DNF it since it's a book club pick. First of all, this book is BORING. It's like a patchwork of different quotes from various sources put together but isn't very interesting to read. Shetty's writing is not engaging on all. It was like "ancient quote" + "okay remember to turn off you phone" + "more modern quote". I would honestly rather see these as individual quotes on instagram then in a book. Also like half this book is from the Bhagavad Gita so I'm confused how he even monetized this content. I feel like every single quote I highlighted (from the first 6 chapters) wasn't an original Jay Shetty quote. It feels like it's either generically human or from someone else. Secondly this is marketed as a self-help book. Part of accepting help from someone is believing they are worthy of advising you because they've been through some kind of experience. Honestly Shetty is not a compelling author. Sure, he was a monk but so what? It's described in a couple of pages and we are then supposed to look at his quilt of quotes? He was a pretty well off 2nd gen Indian-British person, went to college, worked for a consulting firm...and so what? He didn't convince me at all that he was worth taking advice from. (Advice copy and pasted from ancient scripts!) Like I don't really appreciate a book preaching to me about I spend too much time on my phone/gossiping. Also a lot of this material is recycled from what I've heard from elders. And it's more legit coming from an old person bc presumably they made it to that age for a reason. It's very hard to have someone who is in their 30s (with a 2.5M!!! net worth) tell me how to be a better person. I have no issue with Jay Shetty spending money and living really well but somehow I was unable to connect that to this mindful monk material. Also I am confused, if the monk mindset was so great why did he decide to go back to being a regular person? Can you even truly be a "former monk"? This was boring, preachy, and unoriginal.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Evie Braithwaite

    “Before judging others, pause for a moment and ask: am I finding fault in order to distract myself or others from my own insecurities? Am I projecting my own weakness onto them? And even if I’m doing neither of those things, am I any better than the person I’m criticizing? I can’t say what the answers to the first two questions will be in every case, but the answer to the third question is always no.” This is one of the most enlightening and empowering books I have ever read. One read isn’t enough “Before judging others, pause for a moment and ask: am I finding fault in order to distract myself or others from my own insecurities? Am I projecting my own weakness onto them? And even if I’m doing neither of those things, am I any better than the person I’m criticizing? I can’t say what the answers to the first two questions will be in every case, but the answer to the third question is always no.” This is one of the most enlightening and empowering books I have ever read. One read isn’t enough, and I’ve just ordered a physical copy so I can revisit it with a pen at hand. Jay reveals how to overcome negative thoughts and habits and access the calm and purpose that lie within all of us - if there was ever a time to read this book, it’s now.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lily Yunoc

    After the Nicole Arbour exposure, I just can't with Jay Shetty. There are many other books in this genre that do a better job from people who actually walk the walk. After the Nicole Arbour exposure, I just can't with Jay Shetty. There are many other books in this genre that do a better job from people who actually walk the walk.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tanu

    "Monkey mind: Overwhelmed by multiple branches. Monk mind: Focused on the root of the issue. Monkey mind: Overthinks and procrastinates. Monk mind: Analyzes and articulates. Monkey mind: Distracted by small things. Monk mind: Disciplined. Monkey mind: Multitasking. Monk mind: Single-tasking. Monkey mind: Looks for pleasure. Monk mind: Looks for meaning." Jay Shetty reveals what he learned as a young man during three years living as a Hindu monk in India. He brought home the fruits of his daily meditati "Monkey mind: Overwhelmed by multiple branches. Monk mind: Focused on the root of the issue. Monkey mind: Overthinks and procrastinates. Monk mind: Analyzes and articulates. Monkey mind: Distracted by small things. Monk mind: Disciplined. Monkey mind: Multitasking. Monk mind: Single-tasking. Monkey mind: Looks for pleasure. Monk mind: Looks for meaning." Jay Shetty reveals what he learned as a young man during three years living as a Hindu monk in India. He brought home the fruits of his daily meditation practice to England and shared them with college friends who were already experiencing a lot of stress in their work. His goal was to make the monk's life practical and relevant to today's world. Honestly, I don't think I read anything new. There was a lot of repeated content but there were some valid points that he raised and shared tho. If you are a beginner in the self-help genre this book is packed with a lot of information that might help most of you in one way or the other, otherwise reading this book won't be a good idea.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ink_Drinker

    Jay Shetty is the narrator of Think Like a Monk and it truly feels like we are having a conversation in my living room. Shetty shares many personal stories of his three years spent training as a monk in an ashram in India. He shares the way a monk thinks (monk mind) and the ancient techniques still used today to have a more joyful, peaceful, purposeful life. I didn't think I wouldn’t be able to do any of this in my own life because I don’t have the years of experience Shetty has, but through She Jay Shetty is the narrator of Think Like a Monk and it truly feels like we are having a conversation in my living room. Shetty shares many personal stories of his three years spent training as a monk in an ashram in India. He shares the way a monk thinks (monk mind) and the ancient techniques still used today to have a more joyful, peaceful, purposeful life. I didn't think I wouldn’t be able to do any of this in my own life because I don’t have the years of experience Shetty has, but through Shetty’s masterful story-telling, he gives you everyday examples and “try this” exercises that you can do easily with practice. As Shetty says, “You don’t have to be a monk to think like a monk!!” Jay has a very soothing voice and I looked forward to the hour or two of "me time” with Jay!!! Yes, we are on a first name basis now!! I also found that when I had to miss a day of listening, I felt a little off. I’ll be listening to the audio again many times in the future. Since listening, I now use a mantra that keeps me centered when I feel anxiety coming on. Although I may not be feeling the positive effects of all of the exercises yet, I can hear Jay telling me to keep practicing. These methods have also helped me to feel more in the present, calmer and more reflective which was a goal of mine. If you've read a lot of self-help books, a lot of what Jay shares will not be new. However, the way that it is presented is new and fresh! A different perspective and way of looking at these ancient methods. I highly recommend the audio to anyone that wants to live a more purposeful balanced life. A few of Jay's Quotes that resonate with me: “Remember, saying whatever we want, whenever we want, however we want, is not freedom. Real freedom is not feeling the need to say these things.” “Detachment is not that you own nothing, but that nothing should own you.” “When your present in gratitude, you can’t be anywhere else.” “If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito.” “If we try to be problem-solvers, then we become frustrated when people don’t take our brilliant advice. The desire to save others is ego-driven.” “Failures are only failures when we don’t learn from them , because when we learn from them they become lessons.”

  13. 4 out of 5

    Karishma Vyas

    This is a fantastic book, its everything I expected and more. There are so many useful and practical take aways that you can begin to apply straight away. It is like having Jay as a personal coach. In Chapter 1 , I learned about values and Jay takes you through exercises which can help you understand and identify where these have come from, which is an important exercise. I especially love the part about knowing the difference between what we think our values are and our actions. This is vital t This is a fantastic book, its everything I expected and more. There are so many useful and practical take aways that you can begin to apply straight away. It is like having Jay as a personal coach. In Chapter 1 , I learned about values and Jay takes you through exercises which can help you understand and identify where these have come from, which is an important exercise. I especially love the part about knowing the difference between what we think our values are and our actions. This is vital to be aware of. So many of us live life and do things that do not align with our values. And, in order to live a life and have a mind that is at peace, we must know what our values are and live accordingly. Jay breaks this process down in an easy step by step guide so that anyone can understand what their values truly are and begin living life accordingly. In Chapter 2 Jay talks about forgiveness as a two way street snd what this mean as well as forgiving ourselves and takes us through a great exercise to navigate through forgiveness. Overall this is a fantastic book that keeps you engaged and focused throughout, needless to say, when I pick it up I cant put it down. If you are new to self-development or continuing your journey, I highly recommend this book, it really teaches you to dive deep and give you the practical tools to get to know yourself, change your mindset and live a happier and peaceful life

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ujjawal Sureka

    One of the best reads in the year 2020. Jay Shetty offers a monk like perspective and approach to the modern world. It was peaceful and therapeutic to read this book. Highly recommended.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bibek

    Shallow & pretentious. A toxic self-help book. Read if you have nothing else to do in your life.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Raphael Rafíey

    Part I: Let Go Identity Our identity is like a mirror covered in dust. We have no idea who we are, what we want to be, who we seek, and what we want to value. This is due to the dust that obscures our vision. Jay explains that cleaning your mirror will not be a pleasant experience. However, only once you have removed the dust obscuring your mirror can you see your true reflection. Removing the dust allows you to see who you truly are. Jay distinguishes between detachment and attachment. Jay define Part I: Let Go Identity Our identity is like a mirror covered in dust. We have no idea who we are, what we want to be, who we seek, and what we want to value. This is due to the dust that obscures our vision. Jay explains that cleaning your mirror will not be a pleasant experience. However, only once you have removed the dust obscuring your mirror can you see your true reflection. Removing the dust allows you to see who you truly are. Jay distinguishes between detachment and attachment. Jay defines attachment as wanting something to happen in a particular way. In contrast, detachment occurs when you want something to happen in the best way. The problem with attachment is that you think you know the best way. We need to be more deliberate about the values we follow because our values guide us in life. Jay provides the example of method actors. Specifically, individuals like Heath Ledger and Daniel Day-Lewis. These actors would utilize method acting to better adopt the role they were playing in a movie. However, Jay explains these actors would often feel lost after leaving this role. They had started to adopt the identity of their character. Jay explains the same concept is experienced by individuals who do not have deliberate values. If you are continually following your life based on projects rather than your purpose, you will be lost when these projects fail. You are not at the end of your last journey when you choose purpose over projects. Instead, you are at the beginning of who you’re going to become. Higher and Lower Values Jay Shetty describes two types of values with differing outcomes. He encourages readers to pursue higher values, including gratitude, service, truthfulness, and compassion. Ultimately, these higher values are what will give you happiness, fulfillment, and meaning. In comparison, Jay Shetty suggests readers avoid lower values. Examples of common lower values include greed, lust, anger, and envy. The outcome of these lower values is a combination of anxiety, depression, and suffering. Negativity You need to learn to encourage a culture of compassion. Primarily, you need to encourage self-compassion and self-forgiveness. Choosing this approach rather than dwelling on negative actions can have a significant impact on your life. Instead of beating yourself up about your mistakes, you should be trying to build the muscles to help you be resilient. If you feed your resilience effectively, then you will be happy irrespective of what life brings you. Jay explains you need to put on your protective shield. You should not walk onto the battlefield of life without doing your training and shielding. There are three steps to prepare yourself for the negative battlefield of life: Step 1 – Sights Think about the first thing you see in the morning. Studies suggest 80% of people see their phone before their partner in both the morning and evening. Instead, make the first thing you see in the morning a quote you love, a work of art that inspires you, or a picture of your family that means a lot to you. Making these things the first thing you see in the morning will help you pause and think. In contrast, looking at your phones first means you start your day by reacting to other people’s agendas. Step 2 – Scents Jay talks about the power of smell. There is a reason that spas use smells like lavender and eucalyptus. These scents help create positivity and relaxation that helps protect you from negativity. Step 3 – Sounds Jay talks about how irrelevant sounds can increase your cognitive load. While living in New York, Jay was starting to feel exhausted for no true reason. After reading academic articles, he learned how having irrelevant sounds in your environment could increase cognitive load. You are wasting 80% of your cognitive load if you have news on in the background or loud drilling nearby. Seek to create an environment where you are intentionally creating sound—for example, choosing music that uplifts you and gives you energy. Spot, Stop and Swap Ss Finally, Jay encourages readers to address negativity through another three-step process. This process involves awareness, addressing and amending. He then breaks these three actions down into three simple Ss: spot (awareness), stop (addressing), and swap (amending). This is the way that stoics used to approach negativity. Firstly, you need to learn to spot negative thoughts as they arise. Once you have spotted the negative thoughts, you can start considering how you can stop them. For example, are these negative thoughts associated with a specific environment or activity? Finally, you should swap the time you spend within these negative environments with something productive. Upgrade this time to an action that can be associated with a higher purpose. Fear According to Jay Shetty, the root cause of fear is an obsession with attachment and control. Therefore, the cure for fear is detachment. Detachment is not that you own nothing, but that nothing owns you. Detachment does not mean you should be indifferent to life and the things around you. Instead, you should completely avoid letting objects control your decisions. Jay calls these objects “preferred indifferents”. It is acceptable to prefer having these things in your life. However, you do not need these things to be happy. Part II: Grow “When you learn a little, you feel you know a lot. But when you learn a lot, you realize you know very little.” – Jay Shetty One of the crucial features of successful pursuits is passion. Hence, Jay Shetty encourages readers to identify their passions. These passions should be the activities that you have a natural talent for and love. Based on the importance of skill and passion, Shetty provides a concept called the quadrant of potential. The quadrant of potential considers the overlap between skill and passion. In this quadrant, an activity can fall into one of four categories: Skill but no passion Skill and passion No skill but passion No skill and no passion Jay recommends you consider where most of your daily activities lie in this quadrant. He suggests you need to start moving towards incorporating more activities filled with both skill and passion. Intention “The grass is greener when you’re watering it.” – Jay Shetty Having the wrong intention for the right thing can lead us down the wrong path. Jay encourages alignment over achievement, as alignment means having your intention aligned with your action. Being aligned means looking for the right thing in the right way. Positive intention is extremely powerful. You can be doing the wrong thing with the right intention and still get to where you want to be. Jay uses an analogy to explain this point. Suppose you plant some seeds and then go to water them. If you accidentally water both the seeds and the weed next to them, the seeds will still grow. Plus, you can spot the weeds later down the line. You must continue to water your seeds to think like a monk. You need to stop and think about why you are doing something. Do not let external factors drive your internal happiness. Allowing external factors to drive your happiness means you are putting your happiness in somebody else’s hands. You are relinquishing your control over your happiness. Routine Morning routines are crucial for setting your day up in the right way. Jay explains that having a powerful routine is critical to having an incredible day. However, Jay does not suggest that you need to be someone who achieves everything in the morning. You do not have to work out for hours or obtain your life goals in the morning. Despite this, Jay does outline a few simple practices that you can engage with to help your morning routine positively impact your life. Don’t Look at Your Phone When you look at your phone in the morning, you are already letting messages and information come and override your mind. You are already setting yourself up for being reactive throughout the day. Plan Your Next Day the Night Before Jay explains that people tend to make decisions during the morning that will impact the rest of their day. For example, in the morning, we decide what to wear, eat, and do that evening. However, Jay warns against something called decision fatigue. We can make the wrong decisions if we have to make them on the morning of that day. Therefore, Jay recommends making simple decisions today about tomorrow. This approach will allow you to make the significant decisions when you get into the office. You won’t have decision fatigue from the simple decisions. Integrate TIME Into Your Life Jay introduces an acronym of TIME. The T stands for thankfulness. Try to find a moment daily to be thankful and truly grateful for the things you have in your life. The I stands for insight. Try to find some time for insight during your day. Jay recommends doing so by listening to a podcast while commuting or listening to an audio book while traveling. These mediums will help your brain to grow and keep active. Doing so can improve the quality of your life and well-being. M stands for meditation. Jay does not suggest you have to engage in prolonged meditation sessions. Instead, try to find 2 minutes each day to focus on meditation. A short amount of meditation will allow you to keep calm and provide you with mental clarity. Finally, E stands for exercise. Merely 15 minutes of exercise each morning will help you to feel energized when you need it. Bonus Tip: Location has energy, and time has memory. If you do the same thing day after day in the same location, you will find your days considerably easier. Mind Jay explains his experiences as a monk helped him quickly learn that our minds influence our values. We are not our minds, but our mind is a vehicle for deciding what is important to us. Our mind is fed by the movies you watch, the music you hear, the books you read, the TV shows you binge and the people you follow online and offline. What’s on your news feed is feeding your mind. The more you are absorbed by negative sources, including troubling news and gossip, the more our values are tainted with envy, judgment, competition, and discontent. Feed Your Mind With Positive Thoughts One way to ensure you are feeding your mind with positive thoughts is to observe and evaluate. Then, integrate space, stillness, and silence into your life. When you tune out the opinions, expectations, and obligations of the world, you can begin to hear yourself. Silence allows you to start differentiating between outside noise and your voice. In the modern world, people are often scared of being still and alone with their thoughts. Therefore, we fill our days to the brim, so we are too busy to listen to our thoughts. In fact, certain studies have found that people would rather give themselves an electric shock than spend fifteen minutes with no distractions. Despite this inclination, if you do not stop and listen to yourself, external factors will guide you. The music, videos, and news will be the means providing you with your purpose. Jay provides three approaches that can help you actively create the space, silence, and stillness required for reflection. Together, these approaches will help you think like a monk: Sit down daily to reflect on how the day went and what emotions you are feeling. Monthly, try to go to an environment you have never been to before. Visiting these new places will help you explore yourself within a different environment. Get involved in something meaningful to you, such as a hobby, charity, or political cause. Part III: Give Mudita “Mudita is the principle of taking sympathetic or unselfish joy in the good fortune of others. If I only find joy in my own successes, I’m limiting my joy. But if I can take pleasure in the successes of my friends and family—ten, twenty, fifty people!—I get to experience fifty times the happiness and joy. Who doesn’t want that?” – Jay Shetty Jay describes a concept called mudita. Mudita is a principle that involves taking sympathies or unselfish joy in the good fortune of others. Mudita is a principle that Jay recommends you should incorporate into all your life. Relationships If you don’t know who you are, you will not know what you want from a relationship. Subsequently, you will send out the wrong signals and attract the wrong people. The heart of all challenges in relationships is diagnosing what we are asking for and what we need. Most of us are asking for something from relationships that we don’t actually need. From Jay’s time coaching people on their relationships, the most common thing that people want from their partner is time. However, just being in the same area as your partner is not spending time with them. For example, suppose one of you is sitting on their phone and the other is watching TV. In this instance, you are not truly spending time together. Therefore, Jay outlines three ways that you can genuinely spend time with people you care about: Presence Attention Intimacy When loved ones are asking for your time they are asking for these characteristics. They want something deeper than just spending time with them. Try to be present in the moment by avoiding digital and thought distractions. Ensure you are paying full attention to the other individual and what they are saying. Finally, put time aside to enjoy the company of your loved ones alone. Intimate conversations are where you can both be yourselves. How to Better Diagnose Relationships Jay also provides guidance on better diagnosing how you feel and articulating it within your relationships. He recommends something called the Harvard Emotional Vocabulary. Instead of giving a blanket response of ‘Things are bad’, this tool provides all the words associated with you feeling emotionally bad. For example, under the banner of ‘bad’ would be anger, disappointment, and sadness. Seeing these words can help you better diagnose how you feel and improve the communication of emotions within your relationships. If you are asking for the right thing, then people will understand you. -raphael

  17. 4 out of 5

    B Schrodinger

    Jay gives out some run-of-the-mill advice that could probably be found in most self-help books, while being just a little too good to be true and offering you WISDOM TM. Maybe I’m not the right audience. Maybe I’m too old. There were way too remarks about how his audience wants things like Instagram followers or being an entrepreneur. Jay, I just want to be happy in my skin. He doesn’t seem to be steering people too far from material wants for a monk. And here is me, not knowing the criteria of Jay gives out some run-of-the-mill advice that could probably be found in most self-help books, while being just a little too good to be true and offering you WISDOM TM. Maybe I’m not the right audience. Maybe I’m too old. There were way too remarks about how his audience wants things like Instagram followers or being an entrepreneur. Jay, I just want to be happy in my skin. He doesn’t seem to be steering people too far from material wants for a monk. And here is me, not knowing the criteria of monkdom, thinking this guy is a legit monk. Turns out nope, just spent some time in an ashram. A book written for post-millennials that offers okay life advice, at best. The cover should have been enough of an alarm bell.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Johanna Sawyer

    Amazing read! Ever wonder what it’s like to think like a monk? Jay Shetty is a communicable voice of reason in an age where not much makes sense. So many people wandering the earth completely disconnected and full of selfishness with zero purpose. I enjoyed this book immensely and will probably read it a few more times. Jay Shetty reminds me of Osho, with tales of mindfulness and lessons in service. What did I like? I’m familiar with Jay because of his podcasts and Facebook messages that alway Amazing read! Ever wonder what it’s like to think like a monk? Jay Shetty is a communicable voice of reason in an age where not much makes sense. So many people wandering the earth completely disconnected and full of selfishness with zero purpose. I enjoyed this book immensely and will probably read it a few more times. Jay Shetty reminds me of Osho, with tales of mindfulness and lessons in service. What did I like? I’m familiar with Jay because of his podcasts and Facebook messages that always felt uplifting and positive. Most of us can see that Jay’s calling was not that of a monk but as a speaker and spiritual leader. His stories on Facebook always stirred something in me and this book was no different. From breathing and meditation to finding a purpose and acts of service leading us into the lives of how to think like a monk. I felt the message in the book was quite clear, and enlightening. As always with these books one read is not enough, repetition until we understand and can give as we receive. Would I recommend or buy? I believe Jay is popular enough that his book will be a big seller. I think he is a positive example of what we strive to be and this book reflects that. The world needs all the good service it can take. I will get a paper copy when this book comes out. Five stars for a great book! I received a ARC to read and voluntarily left an opinion.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Anubha (BooksFullOfLife, LifeFullOfBooks)

    It was a really conflicting read, somethings I agree with him, but if you have read Buddhist literature or about the various rules, there's a lot to disagree with. But I guess I am more inclined towards Hinayana than Mahayana so. 💁‍♀️ It was a really conflicting read, somethings I agree with him, but if you have read Buddhist literature or about the various rules, there's a lot to disagree with. But I guess I am more inclined towards Hinayana than Mahayana so. 💁‍♀️

  20. 4 out of 5

    Grant Lemanski

    Because of this book I.... - have a goal to give up social media on weekdays - looked and continue to search for my life’s purpose - dug to the root of why I want material things in life just to realize that they do not matter - am getting on a weekly meditation/breathing/visualization schedule - dove into what I fear most in life and reflected on why they are scare me - spend 3 nights a week thinking/writing down everything I am thankful for - learned the difference between attraction and deep conne Because of this book I.... - have a goal to give up social media on weekdays - looked and continue to search for my life’s purpose - dug to the root of why I want material things in life just to realize that they do not matter - am getting on a weekly meditation/breathing/visualization schedule - dove into what I fear most in life and reflected on why they are scare me - spend 3 nights a week thinking/writing down everything I am thankful for - learned the difference between attraction and deep connection in relationships - am working to detach from my ego. I am not my successes or my failures - have learned life’s highest purpose (read to find out) If you want to seriously change your outlook on life, this is a must read. You have to take the exercises seriously though, this book is not meant to be read fast. Deeply contemplate your life when reading this, and you can get as much out of this book as I did. Happy reading!

  21. 4 out of 5

    April

    DNF. This is not for me. I finished chapter 1 and am already overwhelmed by Shetty’s writing which feels dull and sexist (just stop buying so many shoes and spending so long getting ready, ladies!) and classist (really think about if those daily $4 lattees are worth it!). It’s all about how spending 3 whole years as a monk gave him the great insight to write this book to share with us! It doesn’t appear much of the rest of the book is much of a memoir of his monk times though but more a cobbling DNF. This is not for me. I finished chapter 1 and am already overwhelmed by Shetty’s writing which feels dull and sexist (just stop buying so many shoes and spending so long getting ready, ladies!) and classist (really think about if those daily $4 lattees are worth it!). It’s all about how spending 3 whole years as a monk gave him the great insight to write this book to share with us! It doesn’t appear much of the rest of the book is much of a memoir of his monk times though but more a cobbling together of Bhagavad Gita quotes and smug assertions that just putting down the iPhone will solve your woes. Perhaps there are ideas in here that will help some folks but for me I’m tapping out. It reads how I imagine the book written by Tahani Al-Jamil (the self-absorbed character from the Good Place) after her short stint in a monastery would read...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rory Fox

    Think Like a Monk is a positive and beneficial self-help book, but in places it generalises towards being platitudinal and misleading. The book essentially takes the skills which Buddhist monks learn, and applies them to the day to day lives of non-monks. Skilfully interwoven throughout the book, is the story of the authors discovery of Buddhist monasticism, his life within the Ashram and his departure. The main thrust of the book will be familiar to readers of ‘self help’ literature. The reader i Think Like a Monk is a positive and beneficial self-help book, but in places it generalises towards being platitudinal and misleading. The book essentially takes the skills which Buddhist monks learn, and applies them to the day to day lives of non-monks. Skilfully interwoven throughout the book, is the story of the authors discovery of Buddhist monasticism, his life within the Ashram and his departure. The main thrust of the book will be familiar to readers of ‘self help’ literature. The reader is taken through a programme of recognising and liberating their ‘true self,’ learning to distance it from negativity and the factors which undermine their potential. Techniques like meditation and visualisation are revisited, with copious details and follow up materials. Almost a third of the book is notes. The author’s style and anecdotes bring a welcome freshness to some well-trodden pathways. However, the book’s simple format also glosses over some important issues. Whilst meditation is a documented and beneficial process, it can also trigger negative and problematic insights for some individuals. A greater recognition of that would be beneficial. Simplifying ideas is a strength of the book, however at times it becomes simplistic. For example, we are told that it is illusory to think that success equates to happiness (Kindle loc. 1151). Yes, that is certainly the case sometimes. But it isn’t always the case, as some success rightly leads to happiness. Similarly, we are told that ‘happiness doesn’t require success’ (1176). Yes, that may be the case sometimes, but it may also be entirely wrong. It all depends on what is meant by success. For example, if a key element of happiness is right thinking (or some other process which people can be responsible for) then the rightness of those actions are a form of success. In that scenario, happiness would always require a form of success. Sometimes the book veers towards platitudes and overly positivistic tones which are misleading. We are told that what holds us back from achieving the impossible is our belief that its impossible (2687). No, it’s the impossibility of the impossible, that holds us back. Changing a belief or mindset cannot suddenly create a capacity to do something that is impossible. Similarly, we are told not to judge ourselves when things go wrong. This is because ‘the world isn’t with you or against you. You create your own reality in every moment’ (4251). Neither of those claims are quite right. Sometimes we need to judge ourselves, if we are responsible for something going wrong. It’s a serious problem when people don’t take responsibility. What we need to avoid is bad-judgement of ourselves, especially when its overly negative. As for the claim that we create our own reality… Really? When a tornado sweeps in and devastates an area, no amount of thinking differently can change that reality. It just isn’t right to say that the world isn’t sometimes against people. Natural disasters are exactly instances of the world being against people. Yes, how people think about the issues can compound the negativity of the situation. But we mustn’t lose sight of the fact that there is a real, external world outside of people’s minds, in which bad things happen; and that occurs totally independently of any human thinking. All things considered, I think that this is a useful book, worth reading; as long as the reader is alert to the occasional overly optimistic thinking which veers towards misleading.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Reading_ Tam_ Ishly

    Review coming up 👍

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Going against the grain here. I can’t even give this a star rating. It falls outside the border of what I am comfortable with since I didn’t read enough to be able to give an informed review, but I read enough to know that I can’t read this. The description alone “Jay Shetty, social media superstar and podcast host” haha and monk? No, just no. Going from England to visiting ashrams in India to move to LA and hang out with Kardashians, this smells of hypocrisy. I also don’t believe that the monks Going against the grain here. I can’t even give this a star rating. It falls outside the border of what I am comfortable with since I didn’t read enough to be able to give an informed review, but I read enough to know that I can’t read this. The description alone “Jay Shetty, social media superstar and podcast host” haha and monk? No, just no. Going from England to visiting ashrams in India to move to LA and hang out with Kardashians, this smells of hypocrisy. I also don’t believe that the monks told him to do it. Isn’t their motto to not want, but to serve? It feels a little too self serving to me to release a book with your face on it, and post meme’s on instagram to 7+ millions followers. With this high a rating, I’m sure people are finding some sort of peace and enlightenment and learning something, but I can’t get past how wrong it is to try and fit this holy lifestyle into a social media box.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jinan

    OOOMMMMM

  26. 5 out of 5

    Oviya Balan

    If you are familiar with his podcasts and have listened to almost all the episodes, then you can gladly miss this book. Even though there are various concepts explained in new ways, they are not new themselves. Having said that, if you have never heard of this man or his works, then please pick this book. You might find his story intriguing and his thoughts comforting.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    I never heard of Jay Shetty before this book, this might have added to my enjoyment. His story and perspective were fresh and new to me. I liked hearing his personal examples from both inside and outside the ashram. Sometimes meditation or improvement books feel judgmental or out of touch with real day-to-day struggles. I didn't feel that way with this book. I listened to the audiobook narrated by the author. His energy [great accent!] and passion for the subject is obvious. Rather than feeling I never heard of Jay Shetty before this book, this might have added to my enjoyment. His story and perspective were fresh and new to me. I liked hearing his personal examples from both inside and outside the ashram. Sometimes meditation or improvement books feel judgmental or out of touch with real day-to-day struggles. I didn't feel that way with this book. I listened to the audiobook narrated by the author. His energy [great accent!] and passion for the subject is obvious. Rather than feeling like he was "reading his book" I felt like we were having coffee together and he was sharing his life and wisdom. He includes "try this" sections that are practical tips to reinforce what he is teaching. This book is relevant for anyone facing struggles or lacking purpose, but it seems ridiculously relevant given the current state of the world. If there was ever a time to read this book...it is 2020! I am glad I bought it via audible because this is a book I will re-visit and re-listen to often.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Carey Landon

    If you are in the mood to receive it, this book does a great job of making you reflect on and transform your current thought pattens which was EXACTLY what I was looking for.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Loredana (Bookinista08)

    I honestly don't know what to say about this book, except the fact that it has made me see the world through different eyes. I will really try and practice what Jay wrote about, because I really need it and I think I'm at that stage in my life where I can truly understand the need for change. Change for the better. For me it was an enlightening book and I loved it! Highly recommended to everyone who wants a little bit of peace and love and understanding in their lives. I honestly don't know what to say about this book, except the fact that it has made me see the world through different eyes. I will really try and practice what Jay wrote about, because I really need it and I think I'm at that stage in my life where I can truly understand the need for change. Change for the better. For me it was an enlightening book and I loved it! Highly recommended to everyone who wants a little bit of peace and love and understanding in their lives.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tania

    I read very few self-help books, but as I'm trying to expand me genre's, I thought I would give this one a try. I liked his writing and especially the examples he used to explain terms and themes. It took me forever to finish it though, as it's quite densely packed with activities you can do to get to know yourself and to help you train yourself to think more like a monk. For me the breathing exercises and the focus on daily gratitude are definitely the elements that have made an impact on my da I read very few self-help books, but as I'm trying to expand me genre's, I thought I would give this one a try. I liked his writing and especially the examples he used to explain terms and themes. It took me forever to finish it though, as it's quite densely packed with activities you can do to get to know yourself and to help you train yourself to think more like a monk. For me the breathing exercises and the focus on daily gratitude are definitely the elements that have made an impact on my daily life. The Book: The Sunday Times Number One Bestseller Jay Shetty, social media superstar and host of the #1 podcast 'On Purpose', distils the timeless wisdom he learned as a practicing monk into practical steps anyone can take every day to live a less anxious, more meaningful life.

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