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Jay Shetty, social media superstar and host of the #1 podcast On Purpose, distills the timeless wisdom he learned as a monk into practical steps anyone can take every day to live a less anxious, more meaningful life. When you think like a monk, you’ll understand: - How to overcome negativity - How to stop overthinking - Why comparison kills love - How to use your fear - Why you Jay Shetty, social media superstar and host of the #1 podcast On Purpose, distills the timeless wisdom he learned as a monk into practical steps anyone can take every day to live a less anxious, more meaningful life. When you think like a monk, you’ll understand: - How to overcome negativity - How to stop overthinking - Why comparison kills love - How to use your fear - Why you can’t find happiness by looking for it - How to learn from everyone you meet - Why you are not your thoughts - How to find your purpose - Why kindness is crucial to success - And much more... Shetty grew up in a family where you could become one of three things—a doctor, a lawyer, or a failure. His family was convinced he had chosen option three: instead of attending his college graduation ceremony, he headed to India to become a monk, to meditate every day for four to eight hours, and devote his life to helping others. After three years, one of his teachers told him that he would have more impact on the world if he left the monk’s path to share his experience and wisdom with others. Heavily in debt, and with no recognizable skills on his résumé, he moved back home in north London with his parents. Shetty reconnected with old school friends—many working for some of the world’s largest corporations—who were experiencing tremendous stress, pressure, and unhappiness, and they invited Shetty to coach them on well-being, purpose, and mindfulness. Since then, Shetty has become one of the world’s most popular influencers. In 2017, he was named in the Forbes magazine 30-under-30 for being a game-changer in the world of media. In 2018, he had the #1 video on Facebook with over 360 million views. His social media following totals over 38 million, he has produced over 400 viral videos which have amassed more than 8 billion views, and his podcast, On Purpose, is consistently ranked the world’s #1 Health and Wellness podcast. In this inspiring, empowering book, Shetty draws on his time as a monk to show us how we can clear the roadblocks to our potential and power. Combining ancient wisdom and his own rich experiences in the ashram, Think Like a Monk reveals how to overcome negative thoughts and habits, and access the calm and purpose that lie within all of us. He transforms abstract lessons into advice and exercises we can all apply to reduce stress, improve relationships, and give the gifts we find in ourselves to the world. Shetty proves that everyone can—and should—think like a monk.


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Jay Shetty, social media superstar and host of the #1 podcast On Purpose, distills the timeless wisdom he learned as a monk into practical steps anyone can take every day to live a less anxious, more meaningful life. When you think like a monk, you’ll understand: - How to overcome negativity - How to stop overthinking - Why comparison kills love - How to use your fear - Why you Jay Shetty, social media superstar and host of the #1 podcast On Purpose, distills the timeless wisdom he learned as a monk into practical steps anyone can take every day to live a less anxious, more meaningful life. When you think like a monk, you’ll understand: - How to overcome negativity - How to stop overthinking - Why comparison kills love - How to use your fear - Why you can’t find happiness by looking for it - How to learn from everyone you meet - Why you are not your thoughts - How to find your purpose - Why kindness is crucial to success - And much more... Shetty grew up in a family where you could become one of three things—a doctor, a lawyer, or a failure. His family was convinced he had chosen option three: instead of attending his college graduation ceremony, he headed to India to become a monk, to meditate every day for four to eight hours, and devote his life to helping others. After three years, one of his teachers told him that he would have more impact on the world if he left the monk’s path to share his experience and wisdom with others. Heavily in debt, and with no recognizable skills on his résumé, he moved back home in north London with his parents. Shetty reconnected with old school friends—many working for some of the world’s largest corporations—who were experiencing tremendous stress, pressure, and unhappiness, and they invited Shetty to coach them on well-being, purpose, and mindfulness. Since then, Shetty has become one of the world’s most popular influencers. In 2017, he was named in the Forbes magazine 30-under-30 for being a game-changer in the world of media. In 2018, he had the #1 video on Facebook with over 360 million views. His social media following totals over 38 million, he has produced over 400 viral videos which have amassed more than 8 billion views, and his podcast, On Purpose, is consistently ranked the world’s #1 Health and Wellness podcast. In this inspiring, empowering book, Shetty draws on his time as a monk to show us how we can clear the roadblocks to our potential and power. Combining ancient wisdom and his own rich experiences in the ashram, Think Like a Monk reveals how to overcome negative thoughts and habits, and access the calm and purpose that lie within all of us. He transforms abstract lessons into advice and exercises we can all apply to reduce stress, improve relationships, and give the gifts we find in ourselves to the world. Shetty proves that everyone can—and should—think like a monk.

30 review for Think Like a Monk: Train Your Mind for Peace and Purpose Every Day

  1. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Woodward

    *Many thanks to NetGalley, Simon & Schuster, and Jay Shetty for an ARC of this book! Now available as of 9.8.20!* Jay Shetty has found great exposure through the YouTube community and came highly recommended to me from professionals in the healthcare industry, so I was intrigued to pick this book up and learn more about Shetty's philosophies. Think Like A Monk explores some of the basic principles of his faith through examinations of negative thoughts and their impact on everyday life, the ego an *Many thanks to NetGalley, Simon & Schuster, and Jay Shetty for an ARC of this book! Now available as of 9.8.20!* Jay Shetty has found great exposure through the YouTube community and came highly recommended to me from professionals in the healthcare industry, so I was intrigued to pick this book up and learn more about Shetty's philosophies. Think Like A Monk explores some of the basic principles of his faith through examinations of negative thoughts and their impact on everyday life, the ego and its positive and negative implications, the benefits of service, the importance of gratitude, and the possibilities in life that can be explored through meditation. While I found this book interesting, I can't say I read any advice that I haven't personally read or heard before. I think this is the sort of self-help book that would befit someone who is new to introspection or self-exploration more than someone who has already discussed or reflected on these topics at length (through faith, therapy, or other avenues) The handwritten charts in the book also disrupted the flow at times, in my opinion, and made the book feel less professional, detracting from the overall benefits of the messages being delivered. Rather than a more traditional self-help book, I think I was anticipating more of a memoir feel to this book, and the anecdotes from Shetty's time as a monk are hands-down the most interesting parts of the book and my greatest takeaway. I would still recommend this book to anyone interested in an introduction to monks and their way of thinking or to anyone who has been impacted positively by Shetty's YouTube shorts, podcasts, or seminars. 3.5 ⭐️

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ronak

    https://youtu.be/ze-93apelno Think Like a Monk I just finished this book, and I have mixed feelings about it. after reading many nonfiction books, I realized most books talk about the same stuff. ( sadly that is true with this book) This book is basically summarizing jay's all youtube/Facebook videos. Its an average read. This book is divided into 3 parts basically, 1. Let go 2. Grow 3. Give Then all parts are divided into further subchapters. Talking about fear, pain, ego, purpose, etc. all those emotio https://youtu.be/ze-93apelno Think Like a Monk I just finished this book, and I have mixed feelings about it. after reading many nonfiction books, I realized most books talk about the same stuff. ( sadly that is true with this book) This book is basically summarizing jay's all youtube/Facebook videos. Its an average read. This book is divided into 3 parts basically, 1. Let go 2. Grow 3. Give Then all parts are divided into further subchapters. Talking about fear, pain, ego, purpose, etc. all those emotional words you can say. If you are an avid reader of self-help books then you will find much reparative stuff in it. We all know in anger try to breathe. How meditation and breath are connected. These books just explain all the stuff we know in different words. At the end of every chapter, there are tips or exercises to work on. That's the only helpful stuff. This book is more about understanding our genuine power. how to overcome negative thoughts and habits, and access the calm and purpose that lies within all of us. How we can all apply this method to reduce stress, improve focus. jay also talks about improving relationships, identify our hidden abilities, increase self-discipline. At the end of the book, all the references give if you want to dive deep into the topic. It's a good book for beginners only. If you are an avid reader then, probably it's not for you.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Akelly

    I’m in a book slump, send help! I picked this up because I like Shetti’s emphatic and inspiring videos. I was disappointed because all I got was another pulp self help book with no contemplative spiritual basis. A lot of it seemed to do with looking at other people in your life and I’m all about that change from within.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Greta

    I feel this man is a biggest fraud internet has seen.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gary Beauregard Bottomley

    How would you respond at your Ashram when your guru tells you to write about an undeserved experience? I know when the author, Shetty, asked that question my mind immediately jumped to 20 items all of them for me were along the lines of how the universe had shed its unearned favors through time and chance upon me such as meeting my wife 40 years ago and having her fall in love with me, or how my parents were better than the parents on “Leave it to Beaver”, or being granted the unearned favor of How would you respond at your Ashram when your guru tells you to write about an undeserved experience? I know when the author, Shetty, asked that question my mind immediately jumped to 20 items all of them for me were along the lines of how the universe had shed its unearned favors through time and chance upon me such as meeting my wife 40 years ago and having her fall in love with me, or how my parents were better than the parents on “Leave it to Beaver”, or being granted the unearned favor of having a twin brother and an older brother who have always had my back, or about 17 other items came in to my mind. It never even dawned on me, as it did with the author when he was at the Ashram as a novice with twenty other monks in training to think of negative experiences as he and all the other novices did. That’s the problem I had with this book. I have never thought about my negative experiences as being underserving while I did think of my undeserving experiences as blessings from the universe, and therefore there was no lesson for me. That was the lesson Shetty was trying to give, but I already have that ingrained with in me through my life experiences, and for that, and many other teachings in this book I felt they were superfluous for me. At the heart of this book is a self-help manual for those who see the world differently than me. I am never a target audience for self-help books. I understand that there are many people who suffer from a host of maladies such as addictions, depression, unsatisfactory work, or are unsatisfied with their life and need a book such as this. For them, this book can be worthwhile. Shetty makes love foundational for our meaning through out our journey. I always have a problem with that has a standard in it by itself. I’ll give a reason why. Trump’s recent Covid-19 swap meet Nuremburg rallies are filled with love. He’ll tell his mask-less crowds how much he loves them and they shout their love right back at him. Love without knowledge or willful ignorance is dangerous. Love by itself is not a sufficient standard. We need love with knowledge and a willing of the Good. The very first aphorisms Shetty gives is if you want to learn something new, read an old book, I concur. That gives me a chance to recommend a bunch of old books that do way better than Shetty does. Though, I want to be kind to Shetty because he really does write a good book for some people who haven’t yet had a chance to read the old books. Shetty does lay out the case how our life’s meaning is best served by pursuing the Good. I will say one should not stumble over that word Good. Everyone has a general idea in what it means. Thomas Aquinas will lay it out in his Summa Theologia (old book alert) and he makes our highest meaning the contemplation of the Good. That is discovering what is true, what is ethical, and what is beautiful. The section Shetty wrote on fear and anxiety reminded me of Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War when the Athenians are ready to attack Syracuse and the Captain gives the speech on how to proceed and tells them not to let their fears, anxieties and dread overcome them. Really, I wish that whenever I got the urge to read a modern self-help book, I wish I would just reread Thucydides, because he said it all and he said it over two thousand years ago and he said it better. For those who have not read that book, I want to note that the real theme in that book is how the particular makes up the universal and how us humans find meaning through our self, our community, and our culture. That’s actually a theme within Shetty’s book too (I’m not judging Shetty’s book, I fully understand that this book is useful for a large swath of audiences, I’m just not its target group). I think the finest self-help book ever is Spinoza’s Ethics. Yes, the first two sections are devilishly complex because he writes axiomatically and the reader needs to understand their Aristotle. The last two sections are mostly a self-help book that covers most of what was in this book, and Spinoza does it better. After all, if one wants to learn something new read an old book. Also, since I’ve mentioned Aristotle, I want to mention his Ethics. Aristotle will tell his reader that ethos means habit and that our good habits make for a Good ethos. I would say that Shetty had that as a theme in this book too. There’s one more old book I would recommend instead of this one, Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy. There’s a reason that book was in more home libraries in the 17th century than any other book except for the bible. He reconciles Plato with Aristotle and gives meaning to our significance by emphasizing the Good in the manner of Plotinus by pointing out evil is the absence of the Good and that the Universe does not have evil as such, and that is our lack of knowledge (wisdom) that leads to our dread, and the truly vile among us are the least among us because they never get to learn or grow and they are worthy of our empathy and consideration. I would say that all of the books I mentioned covered most of the material presented in this book and they each did it in a more highly original manner. There really is not anything unique within the mostly Buddhist/Hindu traditions presented in this book. I want to emphasize that this book definitely can appeal to a host of others. I would say that if you thought in terms of negative response to the challenge ‘describe an undeserving experience’, and if you have not read much on this topic previously, and if you just don’t have the time to read those older better books, this book would be worthwhile if you are in need of a self-help book. I think it’s perfectly reasonable for some people to rate this book five stars. I would say this book just was not my cup of tea.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Karishma Vyas

    This is a fantastic book, its everything I expected and more. There are so many useful and practical take aways that you can begin to apply straight away. It is like having Jay as a personal coach. In Chapter 1 , I learned about values and Jay takes you through exercises which can help you understand and identify where these have come from, which is an important exercise. I especially love the part about knowing the difference between what we think our values are and our actions. This is vital t This is a fantastic book, its everything I expected and more. There are so many useful and practical take aways that you can begin to apply straight away. It is like having Jay as a personal coach. In Chapter 1 , I learned about values and Jay takes you through exercises which can help you understand and identify where these have come from, which is an important exercise. I especially love the part about knowing the difference between what we think our values are and our actions. This is vital to be aware of. So many of us live life and do things that do not align with our values. And, in order to live a life and have a mind that is at peace, we must know what our values are and live accordingly. Jay breaks this process down in an easy step by step guide so that anyone can understand what their values truly are and begin living life accordingly. In Chapter 2 Jay talks about forgiveness as a two way street snd what this mean as well as forgiving ourselves and takes us through a great exercise to navigate through forgiveness. Overall this is a fantastic book that keeps you engaged and focused throughout, needless to say, when I pick it up I cant put it down. If you are new to self-development or continuing your journey, I highly recommend this book, it really teaches you to dive deep and give you the practical tools to get to know yourself, change your mindset and live a happier and peaceful life

  7. 4 out of 5

    Anubha (BooksFullOfLife, LifeFullOfBooks)

    It was a really conflicting read, somethings I agree with him, but if you have read Buddhist literature or about the various rules, there's a lot to disagree with. But I guess I am more inclined towards Hinayana than Mahayana so. 💁‍♀️

  8. 4 out of 5

    Evie Braithwaite

    “Before judging others, pause for a moment and ask: am I finding fault in order to distract myself or others from my own insecurities? Am I projecting my own weakness onto them? And even if I’m doing neither of those things, am I any better than the person I’m criticizing? I can’t say what the answers to the first two questions will be in every case, but the answer to the third question is always no.” This is one of the most enlightening and empowering books I have ever read. One read isn’t enough “Before judging others, pause for a moment and ask: am I finding fault in order to distract myself or others from my own insecurities? Am I projecting my own weakness onto them? And even if I’m doing neither of those things, am I any better than the person I’m criticizing? I can’t say what the answers to the first two questions will be in every case, but the answer to the third question is always no.” This is one of the most enlightening and empowering books I have ever read. One read isn’t enough, and I’ve just ordered a physical copy so I can revisit it with a pen at hand. Jay reveals how to overcome negative thoughts and habits and access the calm and purpose that lie within all of us - if there was ever a time to read this book, it’s now.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Johanna Sawyer

    Amazing read! Ever wonder what it’s like to think like a monk? Jay Shetty is a communicable voice of reason in an age where not much makes sense. So many people wandering the earth completely disconnected and full of selfishness with zero purpose. I enjoyed this book immensely and will probably read it a few more times. Jay Shetty reminds me of Osho, with tales of mindfulness and lessons in service. What did I like? I’m familiar with Jay because of his podcasts and Facebook messages that alway Amazing read! Ever wonder what it’s like to think like a monk? Jay Shetty is a communicable voice of reason in an age where not much makes sense. So many people wandering the earth completely disconnected and full of selfishness with zero purpose. I enjoyed this book immensely and will probably read it a few more times. Jay Shetty reminds me of Osho, with tales of mindfulness and lessons in service. What did I like? I’m familiar with Jay because of his podcasts and Facebook messages that always felt uplifting and positive. Most of us can see that Jay’s calling was not that of a monk but as a speaker and spiritual leader. His stories on Facebook always stirred something in me and this book was no different. From breathing and meditation to finding a purpose and acts of service leading us into the lives of how to think like a monk. I felt the message in the book was quite clear, and enlightening. As always with these books one read is not enough, repetition until we understand and can give as we receive. Would I recommend or buy? I believe Jay is popular enough that his book will be a big seller. I think he is a positive example of what we strive to be and this book reflects that. The world needs all the good service it can take. I will get a paper copy when this book comes out. Five stars for a great book! I received a ARC to read and voluntarily left an opinion.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lily Yunoc

    After the Nicole Arbour exposure, I just can't with Jay Shetty. There are many other books in this genre that do a better job from people who actually walk the walk.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rory Fox

    Think Like a Monk is a positive and beneficial self-help book, but in places it generalises towards being platitudinal and misleading. The book essentially takes the skills which Buddhist monks learn, and applies them to the day to day lives of non-monks. Skilfully interwoven throughout the book, is the story of the authors discovery of Buddhist monasticism, his life within the Ashram and his departure. The main thrust of the book will be familiar to readers of ‘self help’ literature. The reader i Think Like a Monk is a positive and beneficial self-help book, but in places it generalises towards being platitudinal and misleading. The book essentially takes the skills which Buddhist monks learn, and applies them to the day to day lives of non-monks. Skilfully interwoven throughout the book, is the story of the authors discovery of Buddhist monasticism, his life within the Ashram and his departure. The main thrust of the book will be familiar to readers of ‘self help’ literature. The reader is taken through a programme of recognising and liberating their ‘true self,’ learning to distance it from negativity and the factors which undermine their potential. Techniques like meditation and visualisation are revisited, with copious details and follow up materials. Almost a third of the book is notes. The author’s style and anecdotes bring a welcome freshness to some well-trodden pathways. However, the book’s simple format also glosses over some important issues. Whilst meditation is a documented and beneficial process, it can also trigger negative and problematic insights for some individuals. A greater recognition of that would be beneficial. Simplifying ideas is a strength of the book, however at times it becomes simplistic. For example, we are told that it is illusory to think that success equates to happiness (Kindle loc. 1151). Yes, that is certainly the case sometimes. But it isn’t always the case, as some success rightly leads to happiness. Similarly, we are told that ‘happiness doesn’t require success’ (1176). Yes, that may be the case sometimes, but it may also be entirely wrong. It all depends on what is meant by success. For example, if a key element of happiness is right thinking (or some other process which people can be responsible for) then the rightness of those actions are a form of success. In that scenario, happiness would always require a form of success. Sometimes the book veers towards platitudes and overly positivistic tones which are misleading. We are told that what holds us back from achieving the impossible is our belief that its impossible (2687). No, it’s the impossibility of the impossible, that holds us back. Changing a belief or mindset cannot suddenly create a capacity to do something that is impossible. Similarly, we are told not to judge ourselves when things go wrong. This is because ‘the world isn’t with you or against you. You create your own reality in every moment’ (4251). Neither of those claims are quite right. Sometimes we need to judge ourselves, if we are responsible for something going wrong. It’s a serious problem when people don’t take responsibility. What we need to avoid is bad-judgement of ourselves, especially when its overly negative. As for the claim that we create our own reality… Really? When a tornado sweeps in and devastates an area, no amount of thinking differently can change that reality. It just isn’t right to say that the world isn’t sometimes against people. Natural disasters are exactly instances of the world being against people. Yes, how people think about the issues can compound the negativity of the situation. But we mustn’t lose sight of the fact that there is a real, external world outside of people’s minds, in which bad things happen; and that occurs totally independently of any human thinking. All things considered, I think that this is a useful book, worth reading; as long as the reader is alert to the occasional overly optimistic thinking which veers towards misleading.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    I never heard of Jay Shetty before this book, this might have added to my enjoyment. His story and perspective were fresh and new to me. I liked hearing his personal examples from both inside and outside the ashram. Sometimes meditation or improvement books feel judgmental or out of touch with real day-to-day struggles. I didn't feel that way with this book. I listened to the audiobook narrated by the author. His energy [great accent!] and passion for the subject is obvious. Rather than feeling I never heard of Jay Shetty before this book, this might have added to my enjoyment. His story and perspective were fresh and new to me. I liked hearing his personal examples from both inside and outside the ashram. Sometimes meditation or improvement books feel judgmental or out of touch with real day-to-day struggles. I didn't feel that way with this book. I listened to the audiobook narrated by the author. His energy [great accent!] and passion for the subject is obvious. Rather than feeling like he was "reading his book" I felt like we were having coffee together and he was sharing his life and wisdom. He includes "try this" sections that are practical tips to reinforce what he is teaching. This book is relevant for anyone facing struggles or lacking purpose, but it seems ridiculously relevant given the current state of the world. If there was ever a time to read this book...it is 2020! I am glad I bought it via audible because this is a book I will re-visit and re-listen to often.

  13. 5 out of 5

    The Conch

    We, The Indian, have four 'Ashramas' (stages of life) - Bramhacharya (student), Grahastha (married life), Banaprastha (retirement and going to seclusion for spiritual upliftment) and Sanyas (renunciation). T Author lived all these stages except Banaprashtha and illuminates reader from his wisdom. The book has good flow with plenty of real life situation, examples, motivational quotes and application tools. The chapter on finding purpose or passion and how to connect with profession is really wort We, The Indian, have four 'Ashramas' (stages of life) - Bramhacharya (student), Grahastha (married life), Banaprastha (retirement and going to seclusion for spiritual upliftment) and Sanyas (renunciation). T Author lived all these stages except Banaprashtha and illuminates reader from his wisdom. The book has good flow with plenty of real life situation, examples, motivational quotes and application tools. The chapter on finding purpose or passion and how to connect with profession is really worth of repeated reading. Chapter on gratitude, give, relationship and service have no exception from popular self-helps and regular readers of this genre may feel "Oh! I knew that already" type of feeling. In the lase, analysis to find one's "Varna" is quite interesting. Overall, the book can be useful to tool to uplift oneself.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Pani

    “Your identity is a mirror covered with dust. When you first look in the mirror, the truth of who you are and what you value is obscured. Clearing it may not be pleasant, but only when that dust is gone can you see your true reflection.” What a well written and beautiful, yet a simple book! I was a little familiar with Jay Shetty through his social media accounts and yet, since I had only heard bits and pieces of his words here and there, I hadn’t realized how healing his words and advises are unt “Your identity is a mirror covered with dust. When you first look in the mirror, the truth of who you are and what you value is obscured. Clearing it may not be pleasant, but only when that dust is gone can you see your true reflection.” What a well written and beautiful, yet a simple book! I was a little familiar with Jay Shetty through his social media accounts and yet, since I had only heard bits and pieces of his words here and there, I hadn’t realized how healing his words and advises are until I read this book. It was everything I expected and more. If I was to sum up the book, I’d say it’s like having Jay Shetty as your personal coach in the beginning of your self-care journey. The book is full of great things from meditation to finding purpose in life. His message in this book is very uplifting and positive and I highly recommend it! Thank you NetGalley and Jay Shetty for a copy of this book!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Didu (Out of Write blogger)

    Fear does not prevent death. It prevents life. Think like a monk is a self help book in my opinion, but if you’ve picked it up, you clearly aren’t satisfied with yourself just yet. The book is easy to read and touches subjects like anger, fear, love, nurture – any feeling we feel really. But I think it’s helpful, we resent so many things, hate so many people, we should all concentrate on ourself, on how we can improve ourself. This book mainly discusses on how to accept help and it’s here to give Fear does not prevent death. It prevents life. Think like a monk is a self help book in my opinion, but if you’ve picked it up, you clearly aren’t satisfied with yourself just yet. The book is easy to read and touches subjects like anger, fear, love, nurture – any feeling we feel really. But I think it’s helpful, we resent so many things, hate so many people, we should all concentrate on ourself, on how we can improve ourself. This book mainly discusses on how to accept help and it’s here to give it to you. Invest in yourself, in your mind, body, skin care, makeup, books, love, in everything that makes you feel alive. Nothing is impossible. We can be everything we want to be. Believe in yourself, help yourself, nurture yourself, love yourself, love the people close to you, show them daily, give without having a thought that something will come back to you. Give to be happy. I know this is a short review, but in order to pick up a self help book you have to want to change, and in order for a self help book to actually help you, you need to want the help. This book will only work if you work for a better you. We are all capable of good. The author speaks in an awesome manner, you understand and can absorb every word he says, his calm is absorbing. I do recommend it solely for the reasons I’ve specified in this article.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Joan Nehls

    I really love his thought process and this audiobook felt like a summary of all Jay’s social media posts. Be around the people who have the values I want not the things I want. Our identity is wrapped up in what others think of us or what we think others think of us. Whats in your social media news feed is feeding your mind. Determine what your values are and are your choices in alignment? Complaining is contagious. The more we define ourselves in relation to people around us, the more lost we are. Aud I really love his thought process and this audiobook felt like a summary of all Jay’s social media posts. Be around the people who have the values I want not the things I want. Our identity is wrapped up in what others think of us or what we think others think of us. Whats in your social media news feed is feeding your mind. Determine what your values are and are your choices in alignment? Complaining is contagious. The more we define ourselves in relation to people around us, the more lost we are. Audit your negative comments. The goal is zero. When we feel shame or guilt for what we’ve done in the past, it’s because those actions no longer reflect our values.

  17. 5 out of 5

    capture the stories

    “My whole life I’d been fascinated by people who’d gone from nothing to something – rags-to-riches stories. Now, for the first time, I was in the presence of someone who’d deliberately done the opposite.” Jay Shetty, Think Like a Monk I have always been intrigued by monks. They carry with them a composed, calm and detached manner that seemed undisturbed from the weariness of life. Reading a few self-help books before down the line, Jay Shetty’s Think Like a Monk is a reasonable and doable practic “My whole life I’d been fascinated by people who’d gone from nothing to something – rags-to-riches stories. Now, for the first time, I was in the presence of someone who’d deliberately done the opposite.” Jay Shetty, Think Like a Monk I have always been intrigued by monks. They carry with them a composed, calm and detached manner that seemed undisturbed from the weariness of life. Reading a few self-help books before down the line, Jay Shetty’s Think Like a Monk is a reasonable and doable practice that we can follow as long as we set out heart and mind for it. The book covers many façades of life from thoughts, emotions, routines, habits, and relationships. As Jay shared his experiences being a monk, the struggle and sufferings therein the monk life, the book became relatable and humane. I have realized everyone has some kind of pain, big or small, but how we see and deal with the problem makes all the differences in the end. This book is not just any “reading” book that I can read through, get done with it, and tuck it away to the shelf. It’s a reading journey that needs to be taken, walked on, and a destination looked forward. I could see myself reading the book, again and again, looking over to the notes highlighted and reflecting on how far I’ve reached that point. It’s a book that offers ancient wisdom in a modern language that brings clarity, consciousness, and awareness of mindfulness. The reading journey has been delightful and enlightening in a way that is commendable and recommendable.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Versha

    I am not much into self-help books. I read it occasionally, either I find it difficult to follow or I find it too preachy. To my surprise, for me, this wasn’t anything like that. The difference between monk mind and monkey mind in the introduction part gave me an insight into what I am going to take away from this book. I like how the author has broken down each topic and has explained simply with his personal experience, which only makes it more relatable. How fear affects us, what negative min I am not much into self-help books. I read it occasionally, either I find it difficult to follow or I find it too preachy. To my surprise, for me, this wasn’t anything like that. The difference between monk mind and monkey mind in the introduction part gave me an insight into what I am going to take away from this book. I like how the author has broken down each topic and has explained simply with his personal experience, which only makes it more relatable. How fear affects us, what negative mindset does to our mind and body and how accepting ourselves, forgivingness, detachment heal us. Of course, it is hard and one cannot learn everything just after reading this book or any book for that matter but practising it, is what we shouldn’t stop. The ‘try it’ and ‘breathing exercise’ part in the book was really helpful. How ancient wisdom is relevant, why one shouldn't multitask, what is ‘complaining mindfully’, what are the four levels of forgiveness, these and many other interesting topics like these have been discussed in this book by the author. Well, I didn’t find anything in this book that one shouldn’t follow.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Smita

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The best part of this book was when it ended. I'm not going to lie, by chapter 6 I just hardcore skimmed through this. I only didn't DNF it since it's a book club pick. First of all, this book is BORING. It's like a patchwork of different quotes from various sources put together but isn't very interesting to read. Shetty's writing is not engaging on all. It was like "ancient quote" + "okay remember to turn off you phone" + "more modern quote". I would honestly rather see these as individual quote The best part of this book was when it ended. I'm not going to lie, by chapter 6 I just hardcore skimmed through this. I only didn't DNF it since it's a book club pick. First of all, this book is BORING. It's like a patchwork of different quotes from various sources put together but isn't very interesting to read. Shetty's writing is not engaging on all. It was like "ancient quote" + "okay remember to turn off you phone" + "more modern quote". I would honestly rather see these as individual quotes on instagram then in a book. Also like half this book is from the Bhagavad Gita so I'm confused how he even monetized this content. I feel like every single quote I highlighted (from the first 6 chapters) wasn't an original Jay Shetty quote. It feels like it's either generically human or from someone else. Secondly this is marketed as a self-help book. Part of accepting help from someone is believing they are worthy of advising you because they've been through some kind of experience. Honestly Shetty is not a compelling author. Sure, he was a monk but so what? It's described in a couple of pages and we are then supposed to look at his quilt of quotes? He was a pretty well off 2nd gen Indian-British person, went to college, worked for a consulting firm...and so what? He didn't convince me at all that he was worth taking advice from. (Advice copy and pasted from ancient scripts!) Like I don't really appreciate a book preaching to me about I spend too much time on my phone/gossiping. Also a lot of this material is recycled from what I've heard from elders. And it's more legit coming from an old person bc presumably they made it to that age for a reason. It's very hard to have someone who is in their 30s (with a 2.5M!!! net worth) tell me how to be a better person. I have no issue with Jay Shetty spending money and living really well but somehow I was unable to connect that to this mindful monk material. Also I am confused, if the monk mindset was so great why did he decide to go back to being a regular person? Can you even truly be a "former monk"? This was boring, preachy, and unoriginal.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Jagpal

    Very insightful read. Book is split into 3 main parts: Let go, Grow and Give. Each part offers great guidance to build a meaningful life with quick and concise sub-chapters. Offers good tips on breathe work and meditation as well. 4/5.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nirmal Mathew

    Extremely valuable compilation of very helpful and interesting thoughts. An eclectic mix of Indian spirituality with western self-help, Jay Shetty inspires the reader to condition themselves for a more efficient but simple life. The book will provide you with a spiritual model for success and what it really takes to be happy Highly recommended!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nick Rolston

    There is nothing revolutionary about the messages told in this book, and yet they are incredibly powerful and framed in a way that everyone can benefit from. The Buddhist perspective is universally applicable and the concepts of impermanence, self-grasping (ego), dharma (duty), and meditation are all communicated with wonderful analogies and clear explanations. The tenets are remarkably consistent with Christianity in terms of achieving the same end of control over one's mind and avoiding love f There is nothing revolutionary about the messages told in this book, and yet they are incredibly powerful and framed in a way that everyone can benefit from. The Buddhist perspective is universally applicable and the concepts of impermanence, self-grasping (ego), dharma (duty), and meditation are all communicated with wonderful analogies and clear explanations. The tenets are remarkably consistent with Christianity in terms of achieving the same end of control over one's mind and avoiding love for things of this world through fasting, meditation (prayer), and service to others. I specifically plan to incorporate more gratitude in life and avoiding the constant urge to compare oneself to others.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    First off, thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for this ARC. I’ve listened to Jay before, his podcast is engaging and he’s very easy to listen to. I was excited to get this book and I can say that while it’s follows the same knowledge of a lot of other self help books, it breaks down things differently. There is a lot to take from “Thinking like a Monk”, from being present in life, for showing gratitude, to slowing down and living your best life. This is (for me) one of those books that I First off, thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for this ARC. I’ve listened to Jay before, his podcast is engaging and he’s very easy to listen to. I was excited to get this book and I can say that while it’s follows the same knowledge of a lot of other self help books, it breaks down things differently. There is a lot to take from “Thinking like a Monk”, from being present in life, for showing gratitude, to slowing down and living your best life. This is (for me) one of those books that I would highlight chapters or passages to look back on when I need a reminder to meditate, or be at one with myself. I’m not religious, but I can absolutely get behind the spiritual aspect of this book. If you’re a fan of Jay’s work, add this to your list.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Peaceful Warrior

    We've heard this before. I am a little disappointed with Jay Shetty's first book. The stuff he says are no longer new -they are mainstream- and all over YouTube. His monk days have certainly affected his personality but he still has the vibe of an entrepreneur. If you want to be more productive and a little bit happier, then this book is for you. It isn't for you if you're into real spirituality though, so don't bother. Real spirituality is about wanting LESS not more. In general it's not a total We've heard this before. I am a little disappointed with Jay Shetty's first book. The stuff he says are no longer new -they are mainstream- and all over YouTube. His monk days have certainly affected his personality but he still has the vibe of an entrepreneur. If you want to be more productive and a little bit happier, then this book is for you. It isn't for you if you're into real spirituality though, so don't bother. Real spirituality is about wanting LESS not more. In general it's not a total waster. 3 stars

  25. 4 out of 5

    Linzi Johnson

    LOVE!! This book is going on my annual reading list. Here’s some of my favorite quotes: “Before judging others, pause for a moment and ask: am I finding fault in order to distract myself or others from my own insecurities? Am I projecting my own weakness onto them? And even if I’m doing neither of those things, am I any better than the person I’m criticizing? I can’t say what the answers to the first two questions will be in every case, but the answer to the third question is always no.” “Humili LOVE!! This book is going on my annual reading list. Here’s some of my favorite quotes: “Before judging others, pause for a moment and ask: am I finding fault in order to distract myself or others from my own insecurities? Am I projecting my own weakness onto them? And even if I’m doing neither of those things, am I any better than the person I’m criticizing? I can’t say what the answers to the first two questions will be in every case, but the answer to the third question is always no.” “Humility comes from accepting where you are without seeing it as a reflection of who you are.” “Meditation doesn’t eliminate distractions, it manages them.” “Kindness and gratitude are symbiotic.” “Here’s a life hack: Service is always the answer. Service is the direct path to a meaningful life.” “Nobody completes you. You’re not half.” “Nobody deserves verbal, emotional, or physical abuse. It is better to be alone.” “Your value doesn’t depend on someone else’s ability to see your worth.”

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rox

    So, firstly, Think Like a Monk by Jay Shetty was released early September of this year. The book mainly falls in the self-help category of books, but it also delves into spirituality, psychology and philosophy. Think Like a Monk looks into how we can overcome negativity, how we can use our fears to motivate us, how we can stop over thinking, and, what was most impactful for me, what our values are and if our actions align with those values. The book is divided into three parts (Let Go, Grow and So, firstly, Think Like a Monk by Jay Shetty was released early September of this year. The book mainly falls in the self-help category of books, but it also delves into spirituality, psychology and philosophy. Think Like a Monk looks into how we can overcome negativity, how we can use our fears to motivate us, how we can stop over thinking, and, what was most impactful for me, what our values are and if our actions align with those values. The book is divided into three parts (Let Go, Grow and Give) with each part then divided into different chapters. Part 1 consists of Identity, Negativity, Fear, Intention, ending with the meditation and breathe work. Part 2 consists of Purpose, Routine, the Mind, Ego and ends with meditation: visualisation. Lastly, part 3 consists of Gratitude, Relationships, Service and once again ends with meditation: Chant. Each chapter is filled with history and lessons from other monks or spiritual leaders, and even regular people. Shetty also draws a few parallels from his personal life and how he was able to use what he learned from his time being a student in an ashram to modern day life. In fact, I think this was one of the positives of the book: Shetty does not expect you to fast or meditate for hours on end (at one point he blatantly says in the book “Don’t try this at home”), he merely provides you with tools from a monk mindset to deal with a modern life. A life where we are bombarded with news, social media, what everyone is doing constantly, pressure to be better, money, a fast life, newer, better. The moment we open our eyes, a majority of us immediately reach for our phones, meaning, first thing in the morning we are overwhelmed with tons of information, but with no possible way for us to take it all in, and that’s simply modern life. In addition to the self-development tools given to us, Shetty also gives us tools to navigate relationships around us. The main chapter on relationships is obviously the one called Relationships, but other chapters such as Ego, Gratitude and Service also look at our interactions with the people around us and the people we love. Again, he doesn’t say get rid of your friends, but he gives us tools to evaluate the relationships we have and how to keep a healthy balance of people around us. Now, I am someone who rarely reaches for self-help books because I always feel that the advice given is a bit abstract. It’s like I’m being told to climb this metaphorical mountain, but I have no idea how. How do I evaluate my relationships? How do I live with gratitude? I want more than advice, and this is definitely what Shetty does. Throughout the book there are short exercises, titled TRY THIS. In these sections, Shetty gives us literal instructions on what to do. He gives a list of questions you need to ask yourself. He gives you a step by step guide to “expand the moment”. Even for people familiar with self-reflection and meditation practices, I think Think Like a Monk might still give a new perspective. (However, here I speak from the perspective of someone who’s only attended around 4 meditation classes). While Think Like a Monk is by no means a memoir, we do get the overall story of Shetty’s life and how he ended up doing what he was always meant to do, living his dharma, which I think was very interesting. He grew up in a family where you could become one of three things—a doctor, a lawyer, or a failure. And I’m pretty sure that’s something many people can relate to While some might not know Shetty’s name, many have seen his viral videos on Facebook, where he has more than 300 million views. And it was because of this popularity I was definitely a bit sceptical about delving into this book. But I was pleasantly surprised. I enjoyed reading Think Like a Monk. It was exhausting, because this is not really a book you read once, or simply read to relax. It’s one where you kind of have to put in a bit of an effort. But I enjoyed the experience and would instantly recommend it to anyone.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sidharth Chaudhary

    Jay Shetty has produced a masterpiece. This is one of the few books which have had such a profound impact on me. This book is a must-read for you if you are someone who wants to train his/her mind to become peaceful and calmer and seek purpose, meaning, and happiness in life. And such an appropriate title, Think like a monk because this is unarguably the best way there is if you are looking for clarity in your thoughts and want to build a healthy and positive relationship with your mind. Whenever Jay Shetty has produced a masterpiece. This is one of the few books which have had such a profound impact on me. This book is a must-read for you if you are someone who wants to train his/her mind to become peaceful and calmer and seek purpose, meaning, and happiness in life. And such an appropriate title, Think like a monk because this is unarguably the best way there is if you are looking for clarity in your thoughts and want to build a healthy and positive relationship with your mind. Whenever in doubt just ask yourself this simple question, ”What would a monk have done in this situation. ” If there is one thing you can be sure about is that this guy knows what he is talking about, as Jay himself has been a monk and spent over 3 years in an ashram located in India. And it is this monk’s mindset which has helped him reach the pinnacles of success and navigate his way towards happiness and purpose. He has been able to touch and bring about a change in the lives of millions through his craft and service. So, hop in and let Jay drive you through this wonderful journey of self-transformation. This book is broadly divided into 3 parts which are namely Let Go, Grow, and Give. And in these segments Jay mainly focuses on the following: 1) Cutting out noise from the external influences to listen to the voice which is coming from within you and become self-aware. 2) Ways to discover your highest values and learn what governs the choices that you make in your life. 3) Covers various techniques to effectively deal with your fears. 4) Importance of letting go of your ego and prevent it from becoming an impediment to your growth. 5) Covers various techniques of mind management. 6) Touches upon concepts such as Following your dharma, Importance of gratitude in life 7) Teaches you how to build more meaningful and healthy relationships and why service should be the ultimate purpose in your life. Some of the things which I loved about the book and are worth mentioning are: 1) The part where Jay draws comparisons between the monk and the monkey mind. 2) The part where he tells how we only deal with the leaves of our problem rather than digging deeper to reach the root cause of it. 3) I loved how every meditation technique is explained so thoroughly. 4) Anecdotes from his own life inside and outside the ashram and stories of other inspiring personalities. 5) The best part about this book is that without ever getting preachy or boring Jay has tried to slip in the wisdom so beautifully. Hats off for that. This book takes you through a beautiful journey of self-awareness, self-realization, and transformation. You start to observe a change in your mindset, behavior, and perspective through the course of this book. It’s my guarantee that this book is going to transform you in many ways and you’ll be a changed person on the other side of this book. Loved reading this book and at no point in time did I ever feel bored rather, I thoroughly enjoyed reading it and would keep coming back to it to reinforce the wisdom imparted in this book. Also, there can’t be a better gift than this if you wish to gift it to any of your loved ones.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Vahini

    This book is just a higher level abstract of many other books on Stoicism, Buddhism, Gita, Meditation and self-help. If you want deeper understanding of why, what and how read other specific books like Book of Joy, Power of Now, books by Thich Nhat Hanh. The approach, concepts and techniques mentioned by Jay are nothing unique, just some rewording. The main point of all these books is to invest your time and energy in yourself to follow this : 1. Have your own introspection to understand yoursel This book is just a higher level abstract of many other books on Stoicism, Buddhism, Gita, Meditation and self-help. If you want deeper understanding of why, what and how read other specific books like Book of Joy, Power of Now, books by Thich Nhat Hanh. The approach, concepts and techniques mentioned by Jay are nothing unique, just some rewording. The main point of all these books is to invest your time and energy in yourself to follow this : 1. Have your own introspection to understand yourself, who are you, what brings you joy, what gives you purpose and meaning 3. Let go of your past ego, pessimistic thoughts and troubled experiences 2. Establish your own passion, morals and values 3. Once you have that insight align your deeds and tasks in accordance with those 4. Be in the present, do one thing at a time and stop feeding your ego and monkey mind 5. Be focused and mindful every moment of life, through constant meditation practice 6. It doesn’t matter what you deserve or don’t deserve, accept everything you don’t have control over as is 7. Have your own routines and don't get swayed by external influences like social media, also be observant on who you surround yourself with 8. Keep practicing mindfulness, meditation constantly until your last breath 9. Every human being's main purpose is to help and serve others

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kay

    Think Like A Monk by Jay Shetty is a book that explores the author's experience as a monk and how that translates into the current work he does, "making wisdom go viral". The author's story is unique and compelling and offers ways we can implement the simplicity of monk life to our busy daily lives. Each chapter includes a variety of exercises and reflection questions to push the reader to think deeply about their lives. The author is broken down into three sections: Let Go, Grow, and Give and I Think Like A Monk by Jay Shetty is a book that explores the author's experience as a monk and how that translates into the current work he does, "making wisdom go viral". The author's story is unique and compelling and offers ways we can implement the simplicity of monk life to our busy daily lives. Each chapter includes a variety of exercises and reflection questions to push the reader to think deeply about their lives. The author is broken down into three sections: Let Go, Grow, and Give and I think that sums up well what the author is hoping the reader to do. Many of the things mentioned in the book such as meditation, daily routines, and gratitude are frequently mentioned in other places, but I think the anecdotes and questions help push this further than other books. I found the writing easy to read, but at times the graphics could be a bit distracting. Overall, I recommend this book and will be re-reading it as reference in the future! Many thanks to the publisher Simon & Schuster and Netgalley for the ARC in return for an honest review.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra Arthur

    Using cognitive therapy and other forms of self-help analysis, Jay Shetty, in Think A Monk, vividly details the ideas of self-awareness and promotes the discipline to make a change in your mentality about your life which sends you on a journey through the mind of the former monk, Jay Shetty. Think Like A Monk has a landscape which allows you to take a breather (no pun intended) in order to absorb the information set to you. There are exercises which help to focus on the ideas presented and make y Using cognitive therapy and other forms of self-help analysis, Jay Shetty, in Think A Monk, vividly details the ideas of self-awareness and promotes the discipline to make a change in your mentality about your life which sends you on a journey through the mind of the former monk, Jay Shetty. Think Like A Monk has a landscape which allows you to take a breather (no pun intended) in order to absorb the information set to you. There are exercises which help to focus on the ideas presented and make you feel as though you are a part of a bigger picture, working hand-in-hand with the people in the community to adhere to the ideas of a positive mental attitude. Jay Shetty outlines the ideas in Think Like A Monk very simply, keeping them organized and easy to understand. This book will help you to develop the mindset of peacefulness, giving you the tools to develop a sense of ease and lays out the ways of application of these ideas of peace and calmness, which help to balance your life.

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