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Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries, now streaming on Netflix, starring Essie Davis as the honourable Phryne Fisher "Another Down Under adventure that's definitely a cut above." —BooklistThe redoubtable Phryne Fisher is holidaying at Cave House, a Gothic mansion in the heart of Australia's Victorian mountain country. But the peaceful surroundings mask danger. Her host is rec Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries, now streaming on Netflix, starring Essie Davis as the honourable Phryne Fisher "Another Down Under adventure that's definitely a cut above." —BooklistThe redoubtable Phryne Fisher is holidaying at Cave House, a Gothic mansion in the heart of Australia's Victorian mountain country. But the peaceful surroundings mask danger. Her host is receiving death threats, lethal traps are set without explanation, and the parlour maid is found strangled to death. What with the reappearance of mysterious funerary urns, a pair of young lovers, an extremely eccentric swagman, an angry outcast heir, and the luscious Lin Chung, Phryne's attention has definitely been caught. Her search for answers takes her deep into the dungeons of the house and into the limestone Buchan caves. What will she find this time?


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Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries, now streaming on Netflix, starring Essie Davis as the honourable Phryne Fisher "Another Down Under adventure that's definitely a cut above." —BooklistThe redoubtable Phryne Fisher is holidaying at Cave House, a Gothic mansion in the heart of Australia's Victorian mountain country. But the peaceful surroundings mask danger. Her host is rec Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries, now streaming on Netflix, starring Essie Davis as the honourable Phryne Fisher "Another Down Under adventure that's definitely a cut above." —BooklistThe redoubtable Phryne Fisher is holidaying at Cave House, a Gothic mansion in the heart of Australia's Victorian mountain country. But the peaceful surroundings mask danger. Her host is receiving death threats, lethal traps are set without explanation, and the parlour maid is found strangled to death. What with the reappearance of mysterious funerary urns, a pair of young lovers, an extremely eccentric swagman, an angry outcast heir, and the luscious Lin Chung, Phryne's attention has definitely been caught. Her search for answers takes her deep into the dungeons of the house and into the limestone Buchan caves. What will she find this time?

30 review for Urn Burial

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    This story was out of Phyrne's normal geographic area and was missing most of the usual characters which was a problem. It takes place at a houseparty and the people at the party seemed too numerous and not clearly drawn enough to keep track of easily. This is the weakest of the PF novels I have read. This story was out of Phyrne's normal geographic area and was missing most of the usual characters which was a problem. It takes place at a houseparty and the people at the party seemed too numerous and not clearly drawn enough to keep track of easily. This is the weakest of the PF novels I have read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Orinoco Womble (tidy bag and all)

    I know I'm in trouble when a mystery novel has a) a map of the area where the crime took place or b)a list of characters at the beginning. It means that there would feasibly be confusion on the part of the reader as to what took place where, or who did what, or even who is who(m). God help us if I ever find a mystery that has both--I don't think I'll bother with it if I do. The quotes that begin each chapter were annoying, poorly chosen and had nothing to do with the action in each chapter. Yes, I know I'm in trouble when a mystery novel has a) a map of the area where the crime took place or b)a list of characters at the beginning. It means that there would feasibly be confusion on the part of the reader as to what took place where, or who did what, or even who is who(m). God help us if I ever find a mystery that has both--I don't think I'll bother with it if I do. The quotes that begin each chapter were annoying, poorly chosen and had nothing to do with the action in each chapter. Yes, I know it was a convention of many novels until the 1940s, but it's not one that Greenwood handles well. The Phryne Fisher series is turning out to be rather uneven; there are some cracking good reads in there, but there are also some that are less entertaining. This is one of the latter. Sorry, pals, but the narration drags until halfway through, the reveal is ridiculous, the windup scene more so. And the sex scenes...well, there they are, needed or not. (I'm no prude, but the whole boathouse thing was just...gross. Phryne has it away, gets turned on by watching another (unaware) couple having sex, and has it away again? Ugh. Like some stupid porn film.) The main elements of this tale are drawn from a short story Greenwood wrote, but they deserved a better development than I found this to be. The whole business with the mixed-up "decor" was unnecessary and played little part in the fabric of the text. As house-party mysteries go, this one fell flat, right down to the Miss Marple/Miss Silver wannabe. Li Pen and Lin Chung have rather a lot to do in this novel, which was refreshing, if laboured in its presentation. I'm sorry to find this novel so disappointing but that's the breaks when an author confines herself to a series; it gets a bit samey. Same characters, same motivations, in her case the same year--all of these novels supposedly take place in 1928. She would have been wiser to spread them out a bit. After all Nero Wolfe and Archie Goodwin detected from 1934 to the mid 1970s and never aged a day. I can recommend the series, just not this particular instalment. What's missing is the fun, the lightheartedness that I enjoy in this author's work. Her obsession with women's issues has its place but makes this novel extremely heavyhanded. None of the Non-Phyrne-Menage characters is remotely sympathetic. ETA: More bearable as an audiobook, but still disappointing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nicky

    If you know what to expect from Phryne Fisher, then this won’t really be a surprise. It’s not particularly remarkable among the other books of the series, bar a slightly less stereotyped version of a queer couple which even includes a bisexual; it’s Phryne, being awesome, not letting anyone get away with prejudice versus her Chinese lover, solving a country house mystery. The more I think about it, the more I see the various books as echoing, mirroring, making homage to other detective stories, If you know what to expect from Phryne Fisher, then this won’t really be a surprise. It’s not particularly remarkable among the other books of the series, bar a slightly less stereotyped version of a queer couple which even includes a bisexual; it’s Phryne, being awesome, not letting anyone get away with prejudice versus her Chinese lover, solving a country house mystery. The more I think about it, the more I see the various books as echoing, mirroring, making homage to other detective stories, particularly Golden Age ones. Which kind of adds an additional level of fun, if you try to play “spot the reference”. As with the other books, I find it very relaxing and fun, even when the characters are in some danger. Cosy mystery — partly because I know Dot and Phryne and the other characters I care about are going to be alright. I wonder if, just once, Greenwood has Phryne sleep with the murderer unknowing, or has one of her lovers genuinely threatened… That might raise the stakes a little. Originally posted here.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alice Lippart

    Very enjoyable, as always.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lyn Elliott

    I've enjoyed some of the Phryne Fisher series, but this one just seemed very silly. I've enjoyed some of the Phryne Fisher series, but this one just seemed very silly.

  6. 4 out of 5

    LJ

    URN BURIAL (Private Investigator-Australia-1920s) – G+ Greenwood, Kerry – 7th in series Poisoned Pen Press, 2005- Trade Paperback Phryne Fisher, her maid, Dorothy, lover, Lin Chung and his man, Li, are headed for a holiday at Cave House in the Austrialian countryside. One the way, they hear a rifleshot and find a hysterical maid who has been molested. Later, Phryne finds the maid dead, but when she returns with help, the body is gone. Phryne discovers each of the houseguests has a secret and the ho URN BURIAL (Private Investigator-Australia-1920s) – G+ Greenwood, Kerry – 7th in series Poisoned Pen Press, 2005- Trade Paperback Phryne Fisher, her maid, Dorothy, lover, Lin Chung and his man, Li, are headed for a holiday at Cave House in the Austrialian countryside. One the way, they hear a rifleshot and find a hysterical maid who has been molested. Later, Phryne finds the maid dead, but when she returns with help, the body is gone. Phryne discovers each of the houseguests has a secret and the host is receiving threatening letters. *** This is a delightful book with an equally delightful and capable protagonist. Phryne can fly her own plane, shoot, and ride and take lovers with delight. She's also clever and solves crimes through skill and observation. Greenwood does a wonderful job of creating strong, interesting characters, excellent dialogue and tight plots. She also teaches me something in each book--in this case, it's the geology of caves--without beating me over the head or slowing down the story. There is even a delightful homage to Agatha Christie in this book. While this entry may not be quite as strong as others in the series, it was still very enjoyable.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Andree

    This one is also reasonable. Like how prejudice is dealt with in this one - well done without being preachy. Lin is also by far the most interesting of Phrynne's love interests (although I suppose the anarchist is reasonably interesting as well). This is a reasonably good example of a group of people trapped in a house with a murderer. Although, I did laugh more than once because it's genuinely the most incongruous house party in the world. And the sheer amount of motive/material for blackmail fl This one is also reasonable. Like how prejudice is dealt with in this one - well done without being preachy. Lin is also by far the most interesting of Phrynne's love interests (although I suppose the anarchist is reasonably interesting as well). This is a reasonably good example of a group of people trapped in a house with a murderer. Although, I did laugh more than once because it's genuinely the most incongruous house party in the world. And the sheer amount of motive/material for blackmail flying around was a bit funny. Oh, also sort of hilarious, was Phrynne becoming annoyed at someone else for committing a social faux pas, given her general mode of operating.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Colleen Earle

    Always a fun read I love Phryne and how she challenges social norms Exciting and quick

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mustardseeds

    It was so nice to come back to Phryne! I'm really enjoying this series! It was so nice to come back to Phryne! I'm really enjoying this series!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mashael

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This feels more like Agatha Christie than something Miss Fisher would get herself into. This book picks up apparently right after book 7, with Phryne having solved a mystery and wanting a holiday to spend time alone with Lin Chung. She is supposed to be really clever, so it's quite out of character for her to think the best way to enjoy alone time with Lin Chung and relax is to go to someone's weekend house party full of guests who are all strangers. Surely she would just relax in her house doin This feels more like Agatha Christie than something Miss Fisher would get herself into. This book picks up apparently right after book 7, with Phryne having solved a mystery and wanting a holiday to spend time alone with Lin Chung. She is supposed to be really clever, so it's quite out of character for her to think the best way to enjoy alone time with Lin Chung and relax is to go to someone's weekend house party full of guests who are all strangers. Surely she would just relax in her house doing whatever she wanted rather than waste energy being polite to a house full of strangers in a strange place? Anyway, the story itself is not that interesting. I think the plot point about someone changing all the urns around to leave a clue is particularly stupid, as even if Miss Fisher knew there was a massive urn somewhere on the property, that isn't really a way to tell her. It is also equally silly that everyone apparently witnessed the murdered carrying his victim and said nothing because they were too worried about their own secrets. Surely one of them would be a decent enough or smart enough human being to realise how dangerous it is to say nothing? Also there was a character who responds to every little problem with blackmail, seduction, and murder, surely he would be considered a dangerous sociopath, however Miss Fisher never punishes him, gives in to his every request, and sleeps with him to boot? He almost murdered Miss Fisher and possibly could have killed the host for no good reason other than he isn't getting everything he wants. Miss Fisher not only does not punish the person him, she thinks he's fab and rewards him by giving in to every demand he has, sex and money for his lover. Surely she would be angry that he had done something so dangerous and almost murdered someone without thinking about it and without remorse. It made no sense. It was also pretty strange that Miss Fisher and Lin Chung watch another couple getting it on and go for it themselves at the same time. The sex in these books is getting too weird.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nicky

    A fun reread, again showing Phryne at her most stubbornly permissive, and determined to see others doing the same. A decent portion of this book is dedicated to persuading Lin Chung to sleep with her under his host’s roof, despite said host’s distaste for the Chinese… It’s kind of fun, and I do enjoy Lin Chung as a character. There’s also a sub-plot of a love story between two young men who are hiding their relationship, including a voyeuristic sex scene. Whatever floats your boat… In any case, A fun reread, again showing Phryne at her most stubbornly permissive, and determined to see others doing the same. A decent portion of this book is dedicated to persuading Lin Chung to sleep with her under his host’s roof, despite said host’s distaste for the Chinese… It’s kind of fun, and I do enjoy Lin Chung as a character. There’s also a sub-plot of a love story between two young men who are hiding their relationship, including a voyeuristic sex scene. Whatever floats your boat… In any case, one of the pair isn’t stereotyped, which is a source of some relief to me after the tendency for the gay men Phryne meets to be rather ineffectual and/or effeminate. And the other of the pair is actually bisexual, which happens rarely enough to be worthy of note. The bond between them, and their acceptance of each other, does feel real. The actual mystery ends in a rather grotesque fashion, and it takes a bit of chicanery to pull all the plot threads together. There’s two cases of long lost men returning and not being recognised, for example, which might stretch credulity. (But then, it also stretches Phryne’s credulity.) There’s some great atmospheric bits, but overall, not a favourite of the series. Originally reviewed for The Bibliophibian.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    Another light and pleasant read featuring 1920's lady detective Phryne Fisher. This one had a distinctly Agatha Christie feel to it, with the setting being a big old country house (albeit in Victoria, Australia, not England) with a rapidly rising river that more or less cuts the house off from outside help while a murderer roams around, leaving Phryne to investigate and discover who the murderer is. One of the guests was even called Miss Mary Mead - as Agatha Christie devotees would know, St Mar Another light and pleasant read featuring 1920's lady detective Phryne Fisher. This one had a distinctly Agatha Christie feel to it, with the setting being a big old country house (albeit in Victoria, Australia, not England) with a rapidly rising river that more or less cuts the house off from outside help while a murderer roams around, leaving Phryne to investigate and discover who the murderer is. One of the guests was even called Miss Mary Mead - as Agatha Christie devotees would know, St Mary Mead is the name of the village where her lady detective, Miss Marple, lives - this made me chuckle!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia

    Urn Burial by Kerry Greenwood is the 8th book in The Miss Phryne Fisher Mystery series. Phryne is on her way to Cave House in the Victorian country when a shot is heard and they rescue a young maid. On arriving they find that this incident is one of many threats occurring in the house. I loved this book and especially all the Agatha Christie references. The setting of an isolated estate, cut off from help due to flooding was very Agatha Christie like and there was even a Miss Marple like charact Urn Burial by Kerry Greenwood is the 8th book in The Miss Phryne Fisher Mystery series. Phryne is on her way to Cave House in the Victorian country when a shot is heard and they rescue a young maid. On arriving they find that this incident is one of many threats occurring in the house. I loved this book and especially all the Agatha Christie references. The setting of an isolated estate, cut off from help due to flooding was very Agatha Christie like and there was even a Miss Marple like character, Mary Mead. Phryne is accompanied by Lin Chung whom we met in the previous book and the difficulties in their relationship is further explored. Another terrific addition to the series.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    Another enjoyable Phryne Fisher mystery, plenty of twists in this one. I really long Lin, Phryne's lover, and hope we continue to see more of him. Though the way she goes through men, I was surprised to see him again in this book. The snobby upper-class people really aren't my sort of people at all and I'm glad Phryne doesn't have much time for them, other than when she is solving mysteries. Another enjoyable Phryne Fisher mystery, plenty of twists in this one. I really long Lin, Phryne's lover, and hope we continue to see more of him. Though the way she goes through men, I was surprised to see him again in this book. The snobby upper-class people really aren't my sort of people at all and I'm glad Phryne doesn't have much time for them, other than when she is solving mysteries.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Joulwan

    Phryne Fisher is irresistible, and this installment is a manor house murder—one of my favorite things!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Ah Phryne Fisher, you just keep seducing me more with every book. (Uh oh. Now the next one will be a clinker... What was I thinking?) Actually, I thought this one was going to be a clinker for the first few chapters: Phryne starts out totally bitchy and not at all her inwardly snarky, outwardly cool and impassive self, an annoying phrase is repeated so many times I wanted to punch myself, and it was beginning to look like maybe she was going to - gasp! - parody or mock Agatha Christie's Miss Marp Ah Phryne Fisher, you just keep seducing me more with every book. (Uh oh. Now the next one will be a clinker... What was I thinking?) Actually, I thought this one was going to be a clinker for the first few chapters: Phryne starts out totally bitchy and not at all her inwardly snarky, outwardly cool and impassive self, an annoying phrase is repeated so many times I wanted to punch myself, and it was beginning to look like maybe she was going to - gasp! - parody or mock Agatha Christie's Miss Marple series. When Miss Fisher and her escort, Lin Cheng, show up for one of those weekend-in-the-country house parties, she is a bit testy. Does she know there will be a murder? Are the racial politics of dating a man of Chinese descent getting to her? Hard to tell, but she is uncharacteristically rude, ordering Lin about like a houseboy, and Dot like a well, maid. (Dot is her maid.) Additionally, she carries on about the execrable decor of her host's home (so gauche!) and the relatively poor quality of both the coffee and champagne on offer. Luckily, all it takes is a couple of rolls in the hay, and not just with Lin, and she is once again her old self. Just a moment to talk about sex. Anyone who has read any of these books will know that there is no point in slut-shaming Phryne Fisher; she is a modern woman of 1928 with a healthy sex drive and little prudery. I read some reviews in which readers were appalled that she had sex with two guys in one weekend, and found the boathouse scene too disgusting for words. Sorry, but I disagree. She discusses sleeping with the other fellow with Lin both before and after the event, and he seems cool with it. Who are we to judge? And I thought the boathouse scene was kinda sexy and much more realistic than most. If you like such things to be all shiny clean and rosy-romantic, you probably want to skip that scene however. I also kept thinking, throughout the early chapters that a good way to end up in the emergency room would be to drink a shot of vodka every time someone said the words, "the river is rising." Seriously. WE GET IT: the river is rising, it is going to cover the road and you will all be stranded at the house party! Finally, I was so happy to find that the book is indeed an homage to, and not a parody on, the Miss Marple books. Agatha Christie was just coming into her own as a writer in 1928, particularly after her award-winning story, The Murder of Roger Aykroyd. There are people who have been hating on Mrs. Christie since she started being published, but thankfully Kerry Grrenwood is not one of them!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cissa

    I love the Miss Fisher mystery series, and this is no exception! In this volume Green wood does a riff on the classic murder mystery house party, intensified by a flooding river cutting off normal access to the outside world. Meanwhile, there's murder, and blackmail, and revenge sought, and all sorts of other secrets. The plot was nicely intricate, with both things that appeared to be related ending up not being, and things that seemed unrelated twisted up together. Despite all the complications t I love the Miss Fisher mystery series, and this is no exception! In this volume Green wood does a riff on the classic murder mystery house party, intensified by a flooding river cutting off normal access to the outside world. Meanwhile, there's murder, and blackmail, and revenge sought, and all sorts of other secrets. The plot was nicely intricate, with both things that appeared to be related ending up not being, and things that seemed unrelated twisted up together. Despite all the complications this implies, I am reasonable sure that Greenwood pulled it off, without getting the threads snarled unintentionally. There were a lot more characters this time, so it was nice to have a listing of them in the front of the book- I did check that a few times when I got confused, since everyone not in Phryne's party was new to me. Her cohort, though, were beautifully drawn and we learned more about all 3 of them. The others were reasonably complex within the limits of their limited roles, though I must say the Big Bad was not so much; he was a weird mixture of savvy and batso nuts. Still, that wasn't completely obvious to me till the end, because there were at least 2 other candidates. Very enjoyable, especially when one has read a good number of country house-party murder mysteries! Greenwood has some great twists on them here. Recommended, and I have to discipline myself not to just dive into the next one!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Field

    This novel was so tongue in cheek that, for the first part of it, I completely missed that this was written in the style of a Gothic novel. It follows the same rules of the cut off mansion, the lovers (both boys!!), the secrets, the death, the foils and, of course, the explanation of all the twists and turns at the end. Yet also in this book are references to such novels as the Agatha Christie books and subversions to so many of the expectations from before the turn of the 20th century. It's set This novel was so tongue in cheek that, for the first part of it, I completely missed that this was written in the style of a Gothic novel. It follows the same rules of the cut off mansion, the lovers (both boys!!), the secrets, the death, the foils and, of course, the explanation of all the twists and turns at the end. Yet also in this book are references to such novels as the Agatha Christie books and subversions to so many of the expectations from before the turn of the 20th century. It's set near real caves in Victoria that are now, sadly, closed to the public, but was exciting to me because I've never really imagined my country being conducive to old style Gothic novels before. For the first time, we have Phryne Fisher with a somewhat more constant lover, Lin Chung, who has now appeared in a couple of books in this series. I love that Kerry has decided to linger on this companion for Phryne, because it really opens up ability to reference and commentate on the inherent racism faced by interracial couples, especially when in the higher class! Sadly, there was no room for Burt and Ces in this novel, although I did appreciate the reference to the two cab drivers, as well as the echo of Ces' refrain, "Too right!" spoken by another character. Towards the end of this book, we saw Dot pick up what may be the end of her own ability to defend herself and (fingers crossed!!) maybe become kick as in her own right. Interested in how that plays out in the next books.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stacie Haden

    I enjoyed this one. It had a little bit of an Agatha Christie feel to it, but less traditional. The Phryne Fisher series should come with a warning : If tolerant thinking and liberal morals turn you off, please put this back on the shelf. As for me, on to the next one. :) Australia 1928

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jazzy Lemon

    My least favourite of the books, but still a wonderful read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    Urn Burial (Phryne Fisher, #8) by Kerry Greenwood Synopsis / The redoubtable Phryne Fisher is holidaying at Cave House, a Gothic mansion in the heart of Australia's Victorian mountain country. But the peaceful surroundings mask danger. Her host is receiving death threats, lethal traps are set without explanation, and the parlour maid is found strangled to death. What with the reappearance of mysterious funerary urns, a pair of young lovers, an extremely eccentric swagman, an angry outcast heir, an Urn Burial (Phryne Fisher, #8) by Kerry Greenwood Synopsis / The redoubtable Phryne Fisher is holidaying at Cave House, a Gothic mansion in the heart of Australia's Victorian mountain country. But the peaceful surroundings mask danger. Her host is receiving death threats, lethal traps are set without explanation, and the parlour maid is found strangled to death. What with the reappearance of mysterious funerary urns, a pair of young lovers, an extremely eccentric swagman, an angry outcast heir, and the luscious Lin Chung, Phryne's attention has definitely been caught. Her search for answers takes her deep into the dungeons of the house and into the limestone Buchan caves. But what will she find this time? My Thoughts / Urn Burial is book 8 in the Phryne Fisher series. While this Episode is not particularly remarkable compared to other books of the series, Phryne is still being awesome - not letting anyone get away with prejudices and solving the country house mystery. What you get in this book:- a secret door; a flooded cellar; a cave tour; cryptic notes left in the library; funerary urns appearing in bedrooms; secret assignations between lovers (of course!!) a long lost amnesiac boyfriend; an estranged son; plus, an ending that reveals the secrets that each of the cast is hiding. In this Episode, oh so many questions! Who wrote the notes to Reynolds? Who sawed through the axle and laid the trap that almost killed Phryne? Who killed Lina, and why? Where is her body? And, most notably, who keeps moving the URNS!!!!! In this Episode, Phryne rescues a parlourmaid (Miss Lina Wright) who was (nearly) raped and, consequently was scared out of her wits (or whatever wits she originally had). Now, not to put a dampener on the rescue but:- Lina was not going to be able to tell her who had attacked her in the fog. A swollen countenance, blue with suffocation, confronted Phryne’s horrified gaze. Black bruises showed on the throat. Lina was dead. Ummmm, sorry folks Lina’s part in this here soirée ended early. In the beginning:- Phryne, Lin Chung (her Chinese lover), along with their ever essential attendants, Dot and (Lin’s bodyguard) Li Pen, attend a house party at Cave House in the Gippsland mountain country. The Party:- Its host, Phryne’s good friend Tom Reynolds, is receiving death threats by note, and before Phryne has a change to investigate anything, she falls foul of a trap meant to kill Tom. Queue here the question:- Who sawed through the axle and laid the trip that almost killed Phryne? The list of house guests include:- the military bully and his frightened wife; the mother intent on marrying off her daughter to a rich young man; the rich young man’s friend, the doctor; the novelist; the spinsters, and; the Polish poet. Favourite Characters in this Episode:- Phryne, Lin Chung, Dot (of course!!) and Li Pen. Another enjoyable outing with Phryne. Book #8 Favourite Quote:- Dot took Li Pen to the kitchen and supplied him with hot sweet tea and scones with strawberry jam. She had decided that he needed feeding. And she wanted to ask him if he would teach her how to put on that paralysing armlock. It was a thing any girl in 1928 might need to know.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Phryne, with her maid Dot and her Chinese lover, visit a remote country house for a getaway--and to help her friend, the owner, with a nasty outbreak of threatening letters. It's an ill-assorted house party, soon trapped in the immediate vicinity by flood-stage waters. Phryne discovers the murdered body of one of the maids, but the body disappears before she can tell the others. And someone seems to be targeting Phryne, even aside from the men the beautiful, sexy detective always attracts. I too Phryne, with her maid Dot and her Chinese lover, visit a remote country house for a getaway--and to help her friend, the owner, with a nasty outbreak of threatening letters. It's an ill-assorted house party, soon trapped in the immediate vicinity by flood-stage waters. Phryne discovers the murdered body of one of the maids, but the body disappears before she can tell the others. And someone seems to be targeting Phryne, even aside from the men the beautiful, sexy detective always attracts. I took one of the usual stars from this series, which I like in general, because the ending seemed a bit weak.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    Another well written Partner Fisher book The Hon. Miss. Fisher is off to a grand party holiday. But of course, she is there as a favor for the Host. He is being threatened and needs her help. This time, Urn Burial reads like an Status Christie mystery. There are multiple guests, staff that have secrets and it is up to Miss Fisher to figure things out. As a rule, I do NOT mix my reading with my television. I have certain characters in my head a certain way and do not like to burst that image by watc Another well written Partner Fisher book The Hon. Miss. Fisher is off to a grand party holiday. But of course, she is there as a favor for the Host. He is being threatened and needs her help. This time, Urn Burial reads like an Status Christie mystery. There are multiple guests, staff that have secrets and it is up to Miss Fisher to figure things out. As a rule, I do NOT mix my reading with my television. I have certain characters in my head a certain way and do not like to burst that image by watching made for TV episodes. The Journey Fisher mysteries are the exception - though I do not watch them in order as I do with reading the series. Urn Burial was so descriptive, I really want to see the TV version if there is one. Urn Burial was a little predictable with the few if the mini mysteries, but not enough to detract. I very much like this woman and her unbiased notions that were rare in this time period. Very refreshing.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    always a delightful fun romp with Phryne and Dot/ Greenwood is able to pack in a lot of issues into her short mysteries. A gay couple or maybe more than one. Her Chinese lover and the prejudice of the rich and the domestics. Rape, avarice, love and so many other secrets. But for the me the little old lady crocheting in the corner is named Mary Mead (HAHAHHAAHHHA is that to show devotion to Miss Marple from St Mary Mead) LOVE IT

  25. 4 out of 5

    Crissy

    Love all the Phryne mysteries but this one was especially fun for me as it was an homage to Agatha Christie with the cozy setting, locked room mystery, and an old lady spinster character named Miss Mary Mead designed as a shout-out to Miss Marple! Always action-packed and riveting, this series continues to make for enjoyable reading!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    This Phryne was a lot of fun! Lots of secrets and scandals to unfold but also a very intense showdown in the final scene with a spooky atmosphere. The mystery wasn't particularly difficult to sort it out but the cast of characters was extremely entertaining. The way the cast of characters were all in a house cut off from the rest of society was very Christie-esque ! This Phryne was a lot of fun! Lots of secrets and scandals to unfold but also a very intense showdown in the final scene with a spooky atmosphere. The mystery wasn't particularly difficult to sort it out but the cast of characters was extremely entertaining. The way the cast of characters were all in a house cut off from the rest of society was very Christie-esque !

  27. 4 out of 5

    hayls 🐴

    Favourite in the series so far.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Toni

    A book that can use concatenation in a sentence! I use in as an excel command, but haven't ever used it in a sentence. A book that can use concatenation in a sentence! I use in as an excel command, but haven't ever used it in a sentence.

  29. 4 out of 5

    G

    This is probably the first ever time I've been seriously unnerved by a Miss Fisher mystery. I was probably the most messed and shocking mystery of Kerry Greenwood's I have read, and yet still I could not put it down. It was also the fastest one I have read, and it has taken me a few days to be able to write a review about it because I wasn't sure how I felt about it. So I'll tell you this; It will mess you up. You'll be dreaming nightmares. And it's still the most tongue in cheek, covert, mystery This is probably the first ever time I've been seriously unnerved by a Miss Fisher mystery. I was probably the most messed and shocking mystery of Kerry Greenwood's I have read, and yet still I could not put it down. It was also the fastest one I have read, and it has taken me a few days to be able to write a review about it because I wasn't sure how I felt about it. So I'll tell you this; It will mess you up. You'll be dreaming nightmares. And it's still the most tongue in cheek, covert, mystery in my arsenal. And Kerry Greenwood so accurately captures 1920s drama from the view of someone who poignantly understands the brutality of the times, even if her views were considered exceptionally liberal for her day. I feel like I got a better understanding of Miss Phryne Fisher, and of the things that motivate her. She is a fair woman, and she is also very biased. Greenwood has written real life people, perfectly. So I can't necessarily say that I adore this book. I read Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries for some light reading, and instead became accosted by something far more sinister. But I was gripped by the throat and held there, right until it was over. And I can guarantee, you won't know who it was.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marianne

    Urn Burial is the 8th in the Phryne Fisher series by Kerry Greenwood. Phryne and her Chinese lover, Lin Chung, along with their essential attendants, ladies maid, Dot and bodyguard, Li Pen, attend a house party at Cave House in the Gippsland mountain country. But even their arrival is dramatic, with a gunshot and the rescue of a hysterical parlourmaid who has been assaulted in the fog. Their host, Phryne’s good friend Tom Reynolds, is receiving death threats by note, and before Phryne has a chan Urn Burial is the 8th in the Phryne Fisher series by Kerry Greenwood. Phryne and her Chinese lover, Lin Chung, along with their essential attendants, ladies maid, Dot and bodyguard, Li Pen, attend a house party at Cave House in the Gippsland mountain country. But even their arrival is dramatic, with a gunshot and the rescue of a hysterical parlourmaid who has been assaulted in the fog. Their host, Phryne’s good friend Tom Reynolds, is receiving death threats by note, and before Phryne has a change to investigate anything, she falls foul of a trap meant to kill Tom. There is a variety of interesting house guests including a military bully with a frightened wife, a mother intent on marrying off her daughter to a rich young man, the rich young man’s friend, who feels cheated out of his inheritance by Tom, a doctor with a nervous disposition, a novelist, a couple of spinsters, one of whom is raising funds to help the heathen masses, and a Polish poet. There is also a cast of staff not to be discounted when it comes to suspects. And of course, the erudite swagman who leads the cave tour. By the time Phryne discovers the parlourmaid has been strangled to death, the roads are cut by the rising river, giving this mystery a locked-room aspect. Just to keep things interesting, there is a secret door, a flooded cellar, a cave tour, cryptic notes left in the library, funerary urns appearing in bedrooms, secret assignations between lovers, a long lost amnesiac boyfriend and an estranged son. In an ending that reveals the secrets that each of the cast is hiding, our charming, sexy, independent, liberated and candid heroine manages to solve the puzzle with panache and style. Readers will look forward to the next instalment, Raisins and Almonds.

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