web site hit counter Billionaire Wilderness: The Ultra-Wealthy and the Remaking of the American West - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Billionaire Wilderness: The Ultra-Wealthy and the Remaking of the American West

Availability: Ready to download

A revealing look at the intersection of wealth, philanthropy, and conservation Billionaire Wilderness takes you inside the exclusive world of the ultra-wealthy, showing how today's richest people are using the natural environment to solve the existential dilemmas they face. Justin Farrell spent five years in Teton County, Wyoming, the richest county in the United States, an A revealing look at the intersection of wealth, philanthropy, and conservation Billionaire Wilderness takes you inside the exclusive world of the ultra-wealthy, showing how today's richest people are using the natural environment to solve the existential dilemmas they face. Justin Farrell spent five years in Teton County, Wyoming, the richest county in the United States, and a community where income inequality is the worst in the nation. He conducted hundreds of in-depth interviews, gaining unprecedented access to tech CEOs, Wall Street financiers, oil magnates, and other prominent figures in business and politics. He also talked with the rural poor who live among the ultra-wealthy and often work for them. The result is a penetrating account of the far-reaching consequences of the massive accrual of wealth, and an eye-opening and sometimes troubling portrait of a changing American West where romanticizing rural poverty and conserving nature can be lucrative--socially as well as financially. Weaving unforgettable storytelling with thought-provoking analysis, Billionaire Wilderness reveals how the ultra-wealthy are buying up the land and leveraging one of the most pristine ecosystems in the world to climb even higher on the socioeconomic ladder. The affluent of Teton County are people burdened by stigmas, guilt, and status anxiety--and they appropriate nature and rural people to create more virtuous and deserving versions of themselves. Incisive and compelling, Billionaire Wilderness reveals the hidden connections between wealth concentration and the environment, two of the most pressing and contentious issues of our time.


Compare

A revealing look at the intersection of wealth, philanthropy, and conservation Billionaire Wilderness takes you inside the exclusive world of the ultra-wealthy, showing how today's richest people are using the natural environment to solve the existential dilemmas they face. Justin Farrell spent five years in Teton County, Wyoming, the richest county in the United States, an A revealing look at the intersection of wealth, philanthropy, and conservation Billionaire Wilderness takes you inside the exclusive world of the ultra-wealthy, showing how today's richest people are using the natural environment to solve the existential dilemmas they face. Justin Farrell spent five years in Teton County, Wyoming, the richest county in the United States, and a community where income inequality is the worst in the nation. He conducted hundreds of in-depth interviews, gaining unprecedented access to tech CEOs, Wall Street financiers, oil magnates, and other prominent figures in business and politics. He also talked with the rural poor who live among the ultra-wealthy and often work for them. The result is a penetrating account of the far-reaching consequences of the massive accrual of wealth, and an eye-opening and sometimes troubling portrait of a changing American West where romanticizing rural poverty and conserving nature can be lucrative--socially as well as financially. Weaving unforgettable storytelling with thought-provoking analysis, Billionaire Wilderness reveals how the ultra-wealthy are buying up the land and leveraging one of the most pristine ecosystems in the world to climb even higher on the socioeconomic ladder. The affluent of Teton County are people burdened by stigmas, guilt, and status anxiety--and they appropriate nature and rural people to create more virtuous and deserving versions of themselves. Incisive and compelling, Billionaire Wilderness reveals the hidden connections between wealth concentration and the environment, two of the most pressing and contentious issues of our time.

30 review for Billionaire Wilderness: The Ultra-Wealthy and the Remaking of the American West

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    I spend a lot of time on Goodreads, so I've gotten pretty adept at reading book reviews and realizing: the type of book review that is filled with memes about how the reader is just SHATTERED and this book is just I CAN’T and YOU MUST READ AND YOUR LIFE WILL BE CHANGED, usually mean the book is complete and utter crap. So I can only humbly beg you: please read this book, it isn’t crap, it’s incredibly important and everyone should read it even though I’m about to post exactly that type of fan-gi I spend a lot of time on Goodreads, so I've gotten pretty adept at reading book reviews and realizing: the type of book review that is filled with memes about how the reader is just SHATTERED and this book is just I CAN’T and YOU MUST READ AND YOUR LIFE WILL BE CHANGED, usually mean the book is complete and utter crap. So I can only humbly beg you: please read this book, it isn’t crap, it’s incredibly important and everyone should read it even though I’m about to post exactly that type of fan-girling review. * Billionaire Wilderness is a study of the county in the United States greatest wealth inequality: not, as you may be guessing, Silicon Valley, but Teton County, Wyoming. Here, a place where “billionaires move and displace the millionaires,” the country’s wealthiest elite gather to enjoy the splendors of nature and a return to the simple ways of rural Western life. They build million-dollar mansions in view of the Grand Tetons, walk around in jeans and cowboy boots, celebrate how money doesn’t get in the way of community and their ability to make friends with the working poor because they all share the same value system (“nature”). They get the rest and relaxation they so readily deserve. Oh, and they use the complete tax shelter that is Wyoming to avoid paying any income tax, drive lower-income people out of town by putting all the land under private ownership to protect it from any ‘lesser uses’, employ tools like conservation easements to make even more money, and engage with nature on capitalist-safe terms by buying up land for conservation while ignoring local social issues and whether or not the sources of their billions – like oil drilling or financial manipulation of the market – may actually be causing all the problems they’re now so concerned about solving. The author, Justin Farrell, has done some truly impressive research in putting this book together. He spent five years interviewing nearly two hundred wealthy residents of Wyoming – crucial, it turns out, because the wealthy, for a lot of reasons, are systematically understudied. We spend lots of time studying and learning from people in lower income brackets but have very little insight into the upper income brackets, even though they wield a massive influence on our world. Farrell pioneers a completely new method: he interviews not only wealthy people, but the lower-income people his original interviewees refer to, giving him a two-sided perspective on his topic – almost a journalistic approach to sociology, and one that brings an incredible new depth and nuance to his work. He combines this with a quantitative dataset, painstakingly assembled from IRS records, to map where all of the non-profit money and social connections flow in Teton County. In place with probably the highest per-capita distribution of non-profits in the country, Farrell's dataset shows wealthy people donate nearly everything to art and local land protection and almost nothing to social services that support real people in the community. The psychology of the ultra-wealthy, and the results of their actions that Farrell’s research articulates is truly, sickeningly fascinating. The wealthy use nature as a form of restorative, rejuvenate identity. Protecting it – by locking up more land – becomes a way to reconcile any guilt they may feel for their vast wealth, to feel like they are part of a cherished community all working towards the same thing. They idolize the simpler ways of the west, the values of people who simply “love nature.” Farrell points out: “This approach also corresponds with the view that nature is a much needed (and deserved) therapeutic cure-all, enabling the ultra-wealthy to remain sane amid the stress-inducting powder keg of a high-profile career, great wealth, and family demands. This safe approach to conservation, which emphasizes a vague “everything in balance” use of science, is aimed to preserve and purify an imagined Eden for the purpose of providing health-giving aesthetic beauty. In the end, this veneer prevents engagement with many of the most pressing, contentious, costly, self-demanding, and ‘unsafe’ environmental problems that we face today (for example, energy transition, climate change, modern consumption, drought, deforestation, and so on).” Lest I merely summarize the whole book, let me simply say: this book is a study in contradictions, in nuance, in complexity of issues, in asking hard questions about who wins under our current system and who doesn’t, and then who gets to feel good about it, generate social prestige from it, and continue to protect what they have. Farrell states, over and over again, that he did not conduct this research with an agenda, nor to judge the people he interviews, and I believe him. Yet the results speak for themselves - the ultimate show, don't tell. While not an ultra-wealthy person myself, I’ve always been in support of conservation easements (here on the East Coast, they’re often a vehicle for small family farms to survive financially), but seeing them wielded in the way they are here – a tool to generate more wealth, further drive others out, lock away nature from those who might “spoil it” by simply trying to survive, and all under the guise of clapping yourself on the back about your own generosity – made me emotionally, physically consider new nuances of nature and wealth. After all this raving, however, you may be wondering why this qualifies as a 4-star book and not a 5-star book. Two reasons: first, I am a perpetual cynic and critic determined to find flaw in perfection; second, there were a few issues with the writing. Farrell was so pleased with some of the phrases he came up with that he used them over and over again in a manner that was distracting, not helpful. (“Solving with the left hand the problems the right hand created” is a great phrase!...the first time. By the fourth time…I’ve got it. I’ve got what you’re saying. Move on.) A larger issue was repeating examples. When your methodology relies heavily on qualitative interviews, but the same anecdote is repeatedly offered, it implies to me that the author is cherry picking and only has this one piece of evidence for their argument. Farrell would announce very clearly, this is what I’m going to prove – here’s an example that proves it – look, see, I provide it! – and while, yes, that’s how you’re supposed to guide a reader along, you’re supposed to do it subtly. It got to the point where I was being told so aggressively what was about to be proven that I started doubting the supporting facts truly did show anything with that degree of intensity. But. I’m still recommending this book to half the people in my life – people interested in the environment, people interested in wealth inequality, people fiercely striving to be this type of successful, people interested in effective altruism…really, if I know you, I can find some way to recommend this book to you. This type of research, that so artfully combines such a multitude of fields and issues from a truly unique perspective, should be held up as an example for all non-fiction. My form of highest praise for a book is not 5 stars on Goodreads: it’s purchasing my own copy, which I’ll be doing at a local bookstore ASAP. This book shook me and is making me rethink many of my own goals and approaches to political issues, and that can’t be anything but good. *Except without the GIFs. I had to draw the line somewhere.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Paigeforeman

    I'm very lucky to have Justin Farrell as my professor! I read this book for his course on Nature, Moral Politics, and Rationality. Farrell's pairing of both ultra-wealthy and working class perspectives in his research led to important insights about the disconnect in how rich people perceive themselves and reality. Wyoming is an escapist paradise for the ultra-wealthy, who come to soak up the healing tonic of nature and the authentic rural cowboy culture. They try very hard to appear "normal" an I'm very lucky to have Justin Farrell as my professor! I read this book for his course on Nature, Moral Politics, and Rationality. Farrell's pairing of both ultra-wealthy and working class perspectives in his research led to important insights about the disconnect in how rich people perceive themselves and reality. Wyoming is an escapist paradise for the ultra-wealthy, who come to soak up the healing tonic of nature and the authentic rural cowboy culture. They try very hard to appear "normal" and conserve "nature." However, conservation often benefits the wealthy and there's a very exploitive relationship between the wealthy and those who work for them, who are often immigrants. Philanthropy also caters to ultra-wealthy interests. It made me think about where I saw these dynamics in my own communities. I appreciated how Farrell calls for policy changes and an "empathy-in-action" mindset in his epilogue. I hope the ultra-wealthy read this book and take his advice to heart. This book is often redundant and gave it the appearance of cherry picking quotes. However, I trust Professor Farrell's integrity more than anything and don't think this is the case. He's very clear about the moral ground on which he stands, but also doesn't proselytize. I often wanted deeper analysis and suggestions for solutions in place of the repetitions of ideas. Overall, this is an excellent work of scholarship.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matt Mcgee

    This book is a detailed analysis of the income inequality that exists in Teton County, and highlights many issues that exist on a national scale. This book does a great job of exploring the factors that influence philanthropy in Teton County and should be required reading for anyone working for a non-profit organization in this part of Wyoming.

  4. 5 out of 5

    TJS

    I wish I knew Teton County, Wyo., better. But I can describe the situation in Gunnison County, Colo. The vicinity of Crested Butte is dotted with monster homes, virtually all of them architectural monstrosities, whose out-of-county occupants might use them four weeks a year. Meanwhile, down in Gunnison and off of U.S. 50 is a large trailer park, whose occupants must struggle with Gunnison's frigid winter temperatures. Gunnison rivals International Falls, Minn., as one of the coldest places in th I wish I knew Teton County, Wyo., better. But I can describe the situation in Gunnison County, Colo. The vicinity of Crested Butte is dotted with monster homes, virtually all of them architectural monstrosities, whose out-of-county occupants might use them four weeks a year. Meanwhile, down in Gunnison and off of U.S. 50 is a large trailer park, whose occupants must struggle with Gunnison's frigid winter temperatures. Gunnison rivals International Falls, Minn., as one of the coldest places in the U.S. in winter. I don't perceive much of a middle class in Gunnison County either. Perhaps ranchers and a few professionals comprise most of what little there probably is. So I was intrigued to get such an in-depth view of the mindsets of Teton County's overlords and its vassals. A study like this has long been overdue. The book is at its best when it simply lets the rich and the poor talk, à la Studs Terkel. It's really interesting. One of the book's most striking findings is its claim that Teton County has the nation's widest disparity between people claiming residence there for tax purposes (i.e., taking dubious advantage of Wyoming's low taxes) and somewhere else for census purposes (i.e., where the tax avoiders really live). It sounds like tax reform is overdue in Cheyenne, Wyo., and Washington, D.C., both. I wish, though, that Prof. Farrell had spent more time on the relationship between the wealthy and people like wilderness guides, fly-fishing guides, personal trainers, physical therapists, and the like. The book insists that the rich delusionally think of their servants as their friends, but then concentrates on poor, often illegally present, Latinos as the referent group of servants. I really doubt that the former think they have much in common with the latter, as opposed to their white, local-origin outdoor guides and personal wellness gurus. Yet we hear little if anything about the latter group's perspective. In Crested Butte, Colo., the nice young white baristas and pizza wait staff seem to struggle to pay rent and drop hints about it ("tips most welcome"), while multimillionaires sit around in Patagonia and drink sophisticated coffees. I do wonder what the first group thinks about the second, and whether they regret or welcome their disappearance in fall and spring, between the mountain biking season and the ski season, when Gunnison County returns to the local residents. I also wish that the author had explored the bad taste of Teton County's rich, assuming that they have the kind of garish, Costco-sized monster homes whose designs would make many architects cringe and many Europeans laugh. Is it because, as is often said, the B and C students become rich and the A students end up working for them? Where did wealthy Americans' aesthetic tastes go so wrong? Each Friday, The Wall Street Journal's "Mansion" section offers up a number of these McMansions for sale, and looking at them is cause for both laughter and wonderment at who would build or buy such things. I wish the author had asked them directly, though he does often allude to the character of these nouveau-riche palaces. As I've said in other reviews, publishers need to help authors with better editing. Billionaire Wilderness becomes increasingly repetitive as one reads, and a third of the text could be cut without any loss of information. The saved space could be used to describe how federal public-lands policies worsen Teton County's situation, but the author has nothing to say about this. I get the point: Teton County's rich delude themselves about their generosity, their landed-gentry environmentalism benefits themselves at the expense of the less well-off, and they dress in jeans and boots to try to overcome a crisis of authenticity, i.e., a form of imposter syndrome. It is, however, said again and again, long after one has grasped the points. Perhaps to palliate the repetition, the author uses lots and lots of italics, which reminds me of well-used law school textbooks where passages are highlighted and then portions in those passages are re-highlighted, underlined, and set out with asterisks or exclamation marks. There is the occasional missing word in a sentence, the odd spelling or punctuation mistake, and a couple of misused words (alluded and eluded are two different things, as are defused and diffused). You'd think the Princeton University Press could do better by its authors.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Wells

    “Julie describes this world—where people wear jeans, enjoy nature, and are simply too laid back to be resentful—feeling guilty just doesn’t make too much sense to her: “By far, the best thing about the area are the laid-back people. I mean our friends are everything from ski-bums to people who are very successful with immense wealth, and you would never know it because we’re all just in our jeans and flannel shirts. It’s very casual, and money just doesn’t matter to people like it does other pla “Julie describes this world—where people wear jeans, enjoy nature, and are simply too laid back to be resentful—feeling guilty just doesn’t make too much sense to her: “By far, the best thing about the area are the laid-back people. I mean our friends are everything from ski-bums to people who are very successful with immense wealth, and you would never know it because we’re all just in our jeans and flannel shirts. It’s very casual, and money just doesn’t matter to people like it does other places. I like to say that there is a ‘no asshole’ policy in the community.”” Meanwhile... “Dolorita explains that people are crammed in tough living conditions, sometimes ten people to a trailer. Nevertheless, she and Hector continue to work hard, juggling multiple jobs to make it all work. The previous month, the Padillas were unexpectedly and immediately evicted from their trailer to clear the way for a new upscale development called “Nature’s Escape.”11 Despite pleading with the developers for more time, they were forced out in two weeks. Unable to find affordable housing in town, they were pushed forty-five minutes away into Idaho, on the other side of the treacherous Teton Pass, where a good majority of the working poor now live. Each day, both Hector and Dolorita make the dangerous and sometimes even deadly drive to work and back, up and over the steep 8,431-foot mountain pass. Living on razor-thin margins, Hector says he doesn’t have time to bemoan setbacks that seem to be more frequent—instead, he mostly keeps his head down and focuses on his work and his family. He expresses gratitude to people like Julie who provide him with a second job. Even though from Hector’s perspective, his relationship with Julie is a purely economic one—and would not approach the depth of “friendship” that Julie waxes lyrical about—he still speaks highly of her because she has treated him and Dolorita with respect and provides them with much-needed income.” It amazes me how these people with hundreds of millions to billions of dollars try to assuage their guilt by pretending to be friends with the help rather than pay them a livable wage (which would be not even a drop in the bucket of their immense wealth). It was a fascinating look into that world. I had only recently heard about Jackson, Wyoming when the Kardashians started spending time there. There is a lot of interesting material here, but I found the way he organized the book to be a little dry, so I’d say 3.5.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alex Gruenenfelder

    This is a profoundly academic book, and yet it does not read like one. "Billionaire Wilderness" reads like a solid narrative, despite the many times it references research methodology and the theses the author brought to the book. It is the kind of book that any lover of nonfiction will not want to put down. One very refreshing thing about the book is its fairness and its honesty. The author is opinionated and outspoken, but also sees all present in the book as probably-good human beings. He is s This is a profoundly academic book, and yet it does not read like one. "Billionaire Wilderness" reads like a solid narrative, despite the many times it references research methodology and the theses the author brought to the book. It is the kind of book that any lover of nonfiction will not want to put down. One very refreshing thing about the book is its fairness and its honesty. The author is opinionated and outspoken, but also sees all present in the book as probably-good human beings. He is sympathetic to and understanding of the ultra-wealth, seeking their stories rather than demonizing them; at the same time, he speaks to the marginalized poor and working class, not allowing their stories to be sidelined for a book solely focusing on the elites. It makes the book fascinating to read. The book dissects philanthropy heavily, which is one of its interesting conclusions. It is not dissecting it so much for the tax reasons that the subject often is, but for the social ramifications and the focuses. Environmentalism isn't always as pure and idyllic as it may seem. I won't spoil more, but the topic is extensively discussed in the book. Last summer, I went to Montana for the first time, and fell in love with it. The American West that acts as the centerpiece of this book is magnificent and heavily desirable. As a Californian who went up there, I was in love nearly immediately. There is a fine line between admiration and fetishize toon, this book posits, and it opens the door for a lot to go wrong. For those who have long studied urban poverty, displacement, gentrification, and the like, this book takes an important look at race and class in a part of society many of us miss: the rural west.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Beth Conerty

    A unique perspective of the ultra-wealthy in Teton County, Wyoming. A valuable critique of the situation in that specific location as well as capitalism more broadly. Some specific problems that I had with the book: female representation is severely lacking in the substantial discussion. It only appears in earnest in the chapter about guilt. Farrell talks more about how many interviews were conducted and how many people he talked to more than he actually shares the content of those interviews. I A unique perspective of the ultra-wealthy in Teton County, Wyoming. A valuable critique of the situation in that specific location as well as capitalism more broadly. Some specific problems that I had with the book: female representation is severely lacking in the substantial discussion. It only appears in earnest in the chapter about guilt. Farrell talks more about how many interviews were conducted and how many people he talked to more than he actually shares the content of those interviews. It felt like a lot of wind up without much actual action. Also, there are a lot of statistics and anecdotes that are used repeatedly. This might make the chapters usable in an academic context, but it makes it far less interesting to read outright - again, especially since he mentions frequently that he has an abundance of examples and stories.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kate Sherrod

    My biggest takeaway: if there is an American remake of Parasite it should be set in Teton County. Hit me up, Hollywood; I was born there but couldn't afford to grow up there IN THE 70s, so, you know, I'm your girl for this... My biggest takeaway: if there is an American remake of Parasite it should be set in Teton County. Hit me up, Hollywood; I was born there but couldn't afford to grow up there IN THE 70s, so, you know, I'm your girl for this...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Patten

    I picked up this book interested in how the elite class relates to the West. Instead I found Farrell had a lot of opinions, choosing one community where his theories would fit, describing the uber-rich as interested in nature and conservation causes (for reasons he enumerates). I live in Wyoming, but not in the Jackson area. Billionaires are all over the place here, mostly as second or third homes, some as permanent residences. The tax shelters are great in Wyoming. But like all humans, billiona I picked up this book interested in how the elite class relates to the West. Instead I found Farrell had a lot of opinions, choosing one community where his theories would fit, describing the uber-rich as interested in nature and conservation causes (for reasons he enumerates). I live in Wyoming, but not in the Jackson area. Billionaires are all over the place here, mostly as second or third homes, some as permanent residences. The tax shelters are great in Wyoming. But like all humans, billionaires come in many flavors, not just the conservation philanthropists that Farrell describes pepper the Jackson area. For instance, many run cattle for the massive tax write-off it provides. Instead of cowboying and protecting their cattle, they'll employ the free services of the U.S. government that kills wolves and other predators, yet the state provides a generous subsidy for predator-livestock kills. Farrell very briefly mentions in his book Foster Friess who lives in Jackson and has the largest multi-million dollar foundation in the county. Friess is not a conservation philanthropist. He donates to right wing politicians and evangelical Christian causes. Somehow, Farrell left him out of his paradigm. Many wealthy landowners here are involved with oil/gas. What do they contribute to conservation? Possibly, but Farrell doesn't explore their transactional relationships. Farrell uses Teton County to highlight financial inequities, which are very real throughout our country. But his framework, that uber-rich give to conservation causes does not represent reality on the ground in Wyoming. Teton County is not representative of the 1%er's here in Wyoming or even across the U.S. In Wyoming, Teton County is considered an outlier. But there are plenty of uber-rich living in Wyoming elsewhere around Yellowstone Park and across our state. Where are they in his book? I felt Farrell did a great injustice to conservation efforts in Wyoming. Wyoming is home to some of the last remaining iconic wildlife and wildlife migrations in our country, yet has some of the most aggressive and backward policies when it comes to protecting livestock and removing predators. For instance, 85% of our state wolves can be killed any means without a permit. Our trapping laws are among the most onerous in the country. Wyoming certainly needs to get out of its dependence on dirty fuels and have a corporate and income tax. But I for one certainly welcome any conservation philanthropy and influence in our state. Farrell's work painted the giving of dollars to conservation causes like a pet-project of the rich to ennoble themselves. He could have just as easily looked at Koch Brothers supporters among the rich, or right wing Trump supporters, like the DeVoss's who also have homes in Wyoming. Farrell grew up outside Jackson, and in the 1970s Jackson was a very different place. A small town with a 40 bed hospital. It wasn't till the 80s that the ski community began to discover it. Then the wealthy. Frankly it felt like under the guise of social science, Farrell had an ax to grind about his hometown.

  10. 4 out of 5

    wyllys terry

    Inequality and nature A long winded sociological study of a fascinating community of the wealthy in the “wild” west. Interesting but not surprising results.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Marija

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The author is a Yale professor who interviews 250+ people over 5 years in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. He interviews a mix of billionaires, millionaires, and the "non moneyed" working class (immigrants and otherwise). It is worth noting that Jackson Hole is one of the most inequitable cities in America. The author's thesis is that the ultra-wealthy residents of Jackson Hole vastly overestimate their perceptions of how charitable they are in light of the high degree of housing and income inequity the c The author is a Yale professor who interviews 250+ people over 5 years in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. He interviews a mix of billionaires, millionaires, and the "non moneyed" working class (immigrants and otherwise). It is worth noting that Jackson Hole is one of the most inequitable cities in America. The author's thesis is that the ultra-wealthy residents of Jackson Hole vastly overestimate their perceptions of how charitable they are in light of the high degree of housing and income inequity the city. He evidences his thesis through a combination of interviews and data from individuals' tax returns and other financial data related to changes in the city's housing prices, charitable giving, etc. The author's second thesis relates to the public policy implications. If we believe that trickle-down economics should work, then it is failing terribly in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. He points out that the influx of enormous wealth into Jackson Hole started in the 1980s, and since then, income inequality and affordable housing has gotten worse, and not better. The author likens Jackson Hole, Wyoming to the "offshore, onshore tax haven" and explains how Wyoming's policy choices brought the city to this point. For example, Wyoming has one of the loosest requirements for residency and the lowest taxes. Wyoming also allows land purchases to be tax deductible if they are put under conservation. This is problematic because 97% of Wyoming is public land and the ultra wealthy are being incentivised to buy up large parcels of land. This results in both an insufficient tax base and a shortage of affordable housing that pushes out the working, upper-income, and millionaire classes. Financial documents show that the ultra wealthy largely donate to the arts and the environment. Interviews indicate that charitable giving is a topic of conversation at cocktail and dinner parties and so charitable giving is another status symbol. When the author tries to bring up other issues affecting immigrants and housing affordability, the interviewees appear uncomfortable and one likens it to a 'buzzkill'. In combination, this starts to explain why one of the richest cities in America can still have such inequality. What I enjoyed most about this book are the interviews with the ultra wealthy, who are so happy that they have managed to 'fit in' and 'blend in' which highlights their total disconnect to the rest of the community's reality.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lori White

    Billionaire Wilderness by Justin Farrell is an insightful, fascinating and mostly accurate look at the ultra-wealthy in and around Jackson, Wyoming. It is also deeply flawed. I live outside Jackson, so the topic and premise of this book resonated deeply with my own experiences here — the ultra-wealthy have definitely chosen this area as their escape hatch, and the author does a great job of explaining why and what they’re doing here. There’s a solid body of primary source research behind this book Billionaire Wilderness by Justin Farrell is an insightful, fascinating and mostly accurate look at the ultra-wealthy in and around Jackson, Wyoming. It is also deeply flawed. I live outside Jackson, so the topic and premise of this book resonated deeply with my own experiences here — the ultra-wealthy have definitely chosen this area as their escape hatch, and the author does a great job of explaining why and what they’re doing here. There’s a solid body of primary source research behind this book, including interviews with named and anonymous full and part-time residents. And the author — himself a Wyoming native and now Yale professor — does a smart job of connecting the dots. Yes, the ultra wealthy strive to fit in with the locals; yes, they use philanthropy as social currency and score-keeping; yes, they have created the largest wealth gap in the US; and yes, their wealth-growth strategies are loosely veiled as altruism. The insights and analysis are spot on, and provide realistic and unvarnished insight into this growing segment of the community, the roles they play and the impact they have on everything from conservation efforts and the hugely successful arts community to income disparity, local politics and social services. Where the author goes off course, I think, is his assumption that the “local folks” the ultra-wealthy consider friends, and whom they hope to emulate are members of the large Latino population. That’s just not true, and the final section of the book falls apart as a result. To be sure, Teton County’s Latino population is at the bottom of the economic ladder, and they suffer greatly as a result of the county’s large wealth gap created by the influx of the ultra-wealthy. But the author’s reliance on them as counterpoint pulls the focus of the book in a different direction, and left me unsatisfied. Which was too bad. Jackson is, in many ways, the epicenter of income disparity in action, and understanding the ultra-wealthy behind that trend is becoming more and more relevant to all of us.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Ward

    A boring book with very little engaging information despite the author's repeated claims of how vital his "research" into this subject area is. The author never tired of claiming his dual bonafides of being born in Wyoming and attending Yale. While this undoubtedly impressed the insufferable classist snobs that he was writing a book about, it left me wondering how empty his information basket must be for him to have to emphasize these two facts over and over. The fact is the American West is being A boring book with very little engaging information despite the author's repeated claims of how vital his "research" into this subject area is. The author never tired of claiming his dual bonafides of being born in Wyoming and attending Yale. While this undoubtedly impressed the insufferable classist snobs that he was writing a book about, it left me wondering how empty his information basket must be for him to have to emphasize these two facts over and over. The fact is the American West is being constantly remade. Subjugating the Native Americans, overtaking open lands with privately owned cattle ranches and extraction industries, pushing these rural industries aside for the outdoor recreation and tourism industry, and finally the current closed environment of rich people cos-playing cowboy/rancher and congratulating each other for their fabulousness with the assistance of their underpaid service industry minions crowding into hotels and trailers and worrying about their visa status. Anyone who has had their eyes open for the last 30 years has witnessed the income disparity and the rise of obscene profits in the financial sector. It should come as no surprise to anyone that the people at the top of this pyramid of privilege are largely self-serving. The book would have been better off as a click bait article on the web and the title could just as easily have been "Rich People: Myopic and Entitled."

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cecilia

    4.5/5 By no means a perfect book (ie the repetitive writing) and it reading like an academic paper/academic grant didn't bother me where I can see it bothering other people. Found it well researched, engaging, and the author focused nuanced discussions into concrete conclusions without losing the caveats. Over turned some of my assumptions about Wyoming (was unaware of it being a haven for the ultra wealthy, unaware of the immigrants there). Blaming my own ignorance, but it is mind boggling the 4.5/5 By no means a perfect book (ie the repetitive writing) and it reading like an academic paper/academic grant didn't bother me where I can see it bothering other people. Found it well researched, engaging, and the author focused nuanced discussions into concrete conclusions without losing the caveats. Over turned some of my assumptions about Wyoming (was unaware of it being a haven for the ultra wealthy, unaware of the immigrants there). Blaming my own ignorance, but it is mind boggling the wealth these people hold and unreal to hear some of their thoughts that seem so out of touch. Gave me a lot to reflect on

  15. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Nothing groundbreaking if you already live and are part of a mountain community (or any tourism-driven community with a large economic disparity across residents). Well-written and thorough. Now living in Teton County after moving from another mountain town, I see these understandable challenges here along with a deep-rooted collection of people who are passionate about this entire community and very involved in moving forward well.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    Very academic. Very repetitive. I can't believe I've never clocked the negative of land trusts making less housing available. I'm not sure that the fly fishing guide and the ski bum and the guy at the bar whom the ultra rich are "friends" with are the same people as the ultra poor community building houses and serving coffee. Very academic. Very repetitive. I can't believe I've never clocked the negative of land trusts making less housing available. I'm not sure that the fly fishing guide and the ski bum and the guy at the bar whom the ultra rich are "friends" with are the same people as the ultra poor community building houses and serving coffee.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Adam Ploetz

    A stomach churning indictment of the moral hubris of the ultra wealthy and just how abjectly half baked their thoughts/ideas about conservation and the environment are. I think with better editing I would have gotten more out of the book. Structurally, it leans far too hard on the academic tropes of contemporary sociology research while the author's delivery is pretty insufferable. A stomach churning indictment of the moral hubris of the ultra wealthy and just how abjectly half baked their thoughts/ideas about conservation and the environment are. I think with better editing I would have gotten more out of the book. Structurally, it leans far too hard on the academic tropes of contemporary sociology research while the author's delivery is pretty insufferable.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Phil Round

    This was an important book and valuable in many respects. I did not find it particularly well written, but I still felt compelled to learn what the author’s conclusions were. I live in Teton County (40+ years) and am a member of the working middle class, though the obscene escalation in real estate prices here might put any longtime homeowner into the next higher economic class (NOT the “uber wealthy”). While it’s true that there is a preponderance of wealth here, almost all my friends are in th This was an important book and valuable in many respects. I did not find it particularly well written, but I still felt compelled to learn what the author’s conclusions were. I live in Teton County (40+ years) and am a member of the working middle class, though the obscene escalation in real estate prices here might put any longtime homeowner into the next higher economic class (NOT the “uber wealthy”). While it’s true that there is a preponderance of wealth here, almost all my friends are in the worker middle class, however broadly you might define it. I get the impression that Farrell thinks we have shrunk to the point of insignificance or are gone from the socioeconomic landscape entirely. I was disappointed that the book would lead a reader to conclude that we don’t exist in the dichotomous paradigm that is the lens through which the author sees things. It’s demonstrably true that the middle class is shrinking, moving out and cashing in, but we still constitute a significant part of the population that is the community I care about. I see that the wealth wants to emulate us (very aggrandizing!), but the people who live here (measured in dozens of winters) laugh at these attempts to acquire JH “authenticity”. Putting on tire chains in a below zero blizzard is authentic (and necessary!) for most of us, not Wrangler jeans. However, he is correct in pointing out the vapid symbolism. The other issue I have is his apparent lack of understanding for how ecologically rare and important this part of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem is. We are surrounded by National Forest, National Parks and designated (as well as undesignated) Wildrrness Areas. Yay us! Who wouldn’t want to live here that gave a rat’s ass about nature and environmental integrity. I liked his coining of the term “Connoisseur Conservation” and I agree that it is a real phenomenon. But that in no way diminishes the importance of conservation in this region and the celebrated history of pioneering heroes like Olaus and Mardy Murie, Lawrence Rockefeller, Frank and John Craighead, Bert Raynes, Ted Major and many, many other dedicated conservationists. Just because the ultra wealthy might have ulterior motives for donating doesn’t mean that the issues are pure NIMBYisms or superficial. Protecting the grizzly as an indicator species of ecosystem health is really important! Creating housing for workers to service the rich is less so, IMHO. I think the problems with Connoisseur Conservation are bigger systemic problems that result from capitalism and the private ownership of land and I don’t know who or what is going to solve that problem! I wish we weren’t being displaced by these rich folk, but that’s America. When money is a culture’s religion, the folks that have it are eventually going to go to the Money Promised Land, especially when the tax situation practically begs them to do so. The state government has been funded by severance taxes from extractive industry (gas, oil, mining) and has never had an income tax. Sam Western’s seminal book “Pushed Off the Mountain, Sold Down the River: Wyoming's Search for Its Soul” is a great history of the state’s exploitation by industry over the course of it’s official existence (and before, by railroads and the cattle industry). In it he says that we are an energy colony and an income tax would be a huge step towards bringing us closer to being part of a representative democracy. Amen. If you’re interested in this issue, read both books. And Jeffrey Lockwood’s “Behind The Carbon Curtain”. That would get one closer to the true picture.

  19. 4 out of 5

    R.J. Gilmour

    Farrell, sociology professor at Yale University looks at the disparity of wealth in Teton County, Wyoming through interviews with the ultra-wealthy who have built homes in the area. It is a fascinating study of modern inequality and how the wealthy view themselves. "Teton County, Wyoming, proved to be an exemplary case study site because, as noted earlier, not only is it the richest county in the United States, and the county with the highest levels of income inequality, but it is also a place w Farrell, sociology professor at Yale University looks at the disparity of wealth in Teton County, Wyoming through interviews with the ultra-wealthy who have built homes in the area. It is a fascinating study of modern inequality and how the wealthy view themselves. "Teton County, Wyoming, proved to be an exemplary case study site because, as noted earlier, not only is it the richest county in the United States, and the county with the highest levels of income inequality, but it is also a place where these patterns developed rapidly over the last thirty years or so, providing me a unique window into the unfolding of these dynamics over a relatively short period of time." 24 "Environmental conservation is at root a battle over the control of resources. These resources have material and symbolic value." 77 "Ironically, extreme wealth disparity can render social problems invisible, creating the illusion that all is well in paradise. There is very little authentic interclass contact on a day-to-day basis, making it difficult for human services organizations to even convince those who hold the majority of the purse strings that the problems are real and could use more support." 161 "Peter Buffet...As more lives and communities are destroyed by the system that creates vast amounts of wealth for the few, the more heroic it sounds to "give back." It's what I would call "conscience laundering"-feeling better about accumulating more than any one person could possibly need to live on by sprinkling a little around as an act of charity. But this just keeps the existing structure of inequality in place. The rich sleep better at night, while other get just enough to keep the pot from boiling over...I'm really not calling for an end to capitalism: I'm calling for humanism...Money should be spent trying out concepts that shatter current structures and systems that have turned much of the world into one vast market. Is progress really Wi-Fi on every street corner? No. It's when no 13-year-old girl on the planet gets sold for sex. But as long as most folks are patting themselves on the back for charitable acts, we've got a perpetual poverty machine. It's an old story; we really need a new story." 164 "The ultra-wealthy simplicity and explicit cope with the persistent stigma, anxiety, religious warnings, and scientific findings about the risk of of their affluence by using their great wealth to transform themselves. This transformation is both internal and external. Wealth is used as a tool to self-fulfillment and happiness and to facilitate acceptance as authentic members of the community. Two birds, one stone." 160

  20. 4 out of 5

    Miguel

    In the USA’s richest county (Teton, WY) the conditions on the ground are about as one would expect – an opulent outdoor playground studded with McMansions for those with the overabundant means to enjoy one of the most beautiful places on earth and a fairly dire place for those living in overcrowded conditions serving those unaware of their plight. That’s essentially what one learns with the insightful sociological study that Farrell put together in his years long study of the people inhabiting t In the USA’s richest county (Teton, WY) the conditions on the ground are about as one would expect – an opulent outdoor playground studded with McMansions for those with the overabundant means to enjoy one of the most beautiful places on earth and a fairly dire place for those living in overcrowded conditions serving those unaware of their plight. That’s essentially what one learns with the insightful sociological study that Farrell put together in his years long study of the people inhabiting this environment. The environs viewed here are essentially gross income inequality on steroids where one finds a State offering the most favorable income tax conditions in the country luring the rich and weak zoning and social programs which result in underprivileged families that are sharing trailer homes due to unaffordable conditions. The first hand interviews with the uber-rich are unintentionally interesting as they reveal that these folks are not the enlightened and super intelligent beings they’re often held to be – many repeat platitudes to the author about hard work paying off and how they’re just ‘normal’ folks and boast of wearing normal Western wear. They serve as a prime example of allowing a tiny sliver of humanity to run amok with ostensibly altruistic ideals of saving the local environment (and of course spreading their personal compounds as wide as possible) which generally results in negative environmental benefits. They dwell on illogical thinking such as the banker that claims that wildlife thrives better with human presence, which falls under the rubric of the ‘rich connoisseur conservation’ that the author describes. Their thoughts don’t dwell on those much less unfortunate around them serving them food and tending to their needs, and when pressed don’t see any issue. This books is a glaring example for the need for an introduction of a wealth tax in the US.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Keith O'D

    Most people have no idea how much one billion dollars is. There's a popular hyperbolic comparison that goes something like, the money you earn in one year is the same as what Jeff Bezos earns in the time it takes you to read this sentence. I was compelled to read "Billionaire Wilderness" more so for the wilderness part of the title. As in, what is it about the U.S.'s vacant inner lands that would attract such enormous wealth? It turns out that some of the super-rich also have a social conscience, o Most people have no idea how much one billion dollars is. There's a popular hyperbolic comparison that goes something like, the money you earn in one year is the same as what Jeff Bezos earns in the time it takes you to read this sentence. I was compelled to read "Billionaire Wilderness" more so for the wilderness part of the title. As in, what is it about the U.S.'s vacant inner lands that would attract such enormous wealth? It turns out that some of the super-rich also have a social conscience, or at least that's what they want their legacy to be. Justin Farrell's book focuses on Teton County, Wyo., a sort of inter-continental Cayman Islands, where the scenery is great and the tax burden is minimal, thanks to generations of crafty politicians. (A memorable line from the book describes the area as "where the millionaires are being driven out by the billionaires). The tech titans and energy executives arrive - along with their bratty, entitled children - with intentions of land and animal conservation. These noble but tone-deaf activities come at a cost to the everyday locals, who build and maintain the massive homes and compounds, and in many ways become subservient to the wealthy newcomers. Particularly eye-opening is how the non-wealthy residents, some of whom have family history going back generations, lose their voice in the community when the wealthy landowners begin taking seats in local government. Farrell spoke to hundreds of people in the area while researching this book, and he provides poignant and informative anecdotes to help weave the story together. The main criticism is that the text sometimes comes across as academic, and the narrative can be interrupted by citations or references to previous notations. Regardless, it's difficult to find a journalistic report written with the hand of crafty wordsmith. I recommend this book base on its worthwhile content.

  22. 4 out of 5

    La Crosse County Library

    Most people have no idea how much one billion dollars is. There's a popular hyperbolic comparison that goes something like, the money you earn in one year is the same as what Jeff Bezos earns in the time it takes you to read this sentence. I was compelled to read "Billionaire Wilderness" more so for the wilderness part of the title. As in, what is it about the U.S.'s vacant inner lands that would attract such enormous wealth? It turns out that some of the super-rich also have a social conscience, o Most people have no idea how much one billion dollars is. There's a popular hyperbolic comparison that goes something like, the money you earn in one year is the same as what Jeff Bezos earns in the time it takes you to read this sentence. I was compelled to read "Billionaire Wilderness" more so for the wilderness part of the title. As in, what is it about the U.S.'s vacant inner lands that would attract such enormous wealth? It turns out that some of the super-rich also have a social conscience, or at least that's what they want their legacy to be. Justin Farrell's book focuses on Teton County, Wyo., a sort of inter-continental Cayman Islands, where the scenery is great and the tax burden is minimal, thanks to generations of crafty politicians. (A memorable line from the book describes the area as "where the millionaires are being driven out by the billionaires). The tech titans and energy executives arrive - along with their bratty, entitled children - with intentions of land and animal conservation. These noble but tone-deaf activities come at a cost to the everyday locals, who build and maintain the massive homes and compounds, and in many ways become subservient to the wealthy newcomers. Particularly eye-opening is how the non-wealthy residents, some of whom have family history going back generations, lose their voice in the community when the wealthy landowners begin taking seats in local government. Farrell spoke to hundreds of people in the area while researching this book, and he provides poignant and informative anecdotes to help weave the story together. The main criticism is that the text sometimes comes across as academic, and the narrative can be interrupted by citations or references to previous notations. Regardless, it's difficult to find a journalistic report written with the hand of crafty wordsmith. I recommend this book base on its worthwhile content. KO'D

  23. 4 out of 5

    McKenzie

    In Billionaire Wilderness, Yale professor Justin Farrell sets out to understand the ultra-wealthy who live in Teton County, America's richest county and the county with the most wealth disparity in the country. By capitalizing on his Yale affiliation and his Wyoming childhood, he is able to access rich people for interviews where he asks them their perspective on living in Teton County, what it means to be part of a community where the working class have been completely priced out, and the conse In Billionaire Wilderness, Yale professor Justin Farrell sets out to understand the ultra-wealthy who live in Teton County, America's richest county and the county with the most wealth disparity in the country. By capitalizing on his Yale affiliation and his Wyoming childhood, he is able to access rich people for interviews where he asks them their perspective on living in Teton County, what it means to be part of a community where the working class have been completely priced out, and the conservation efforts they undertake ostensibly out of care for the environment but which actually help keep this beautiful area closed for development to anyone else lower on the socioeconomic ladder. Farrell offers a lot of interesting points, and I enjoyed reading this book and discussing it with my husband, though I constantly felt a low-level discomfort with his portrayal of the rich people he interviewed. Though he takes care to make all individuals anonymous, he had to slightly deceive them in order to access them for these interviews, and he inserts more of his personal opinion in their descriptions than I felt was academically necessary. He considers the perception of wealth in America today as wealth disparity is higher than it has ever been, and the impacts his findings will have on other western areas being developed by the ultra-wealthy (and closed off to everyone else). I definitely recommend Billionaire Wilderness for anyone interested in these topics, and now I know that if I ever visit Teton County, I'll fit in if I wear my jeans and flannel shirt, regardless of my income being far below the average.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Eric White

    This book provides a well researched and and skillfully written perspective on the intersection of great wealth and environmentalism, philanthropy, class, race, economics, and land use in the intermountain west. It focuses on Teton County in Wyoming, but the findings are broad ranging and also ring true for many communities where I live, in Idaho. I particularly appreciated the author’s paired research approach, interviewing people with extreme wealth and people experiencing poverty within the sa This book provides a well researched and and skillfully written perspective on the intersection of great wealth and environmentalism, philanthropy, class, race, economics, and land use in the intermountain west. It focuses on Teton County in Wyoming, but the findings are broad ranging and also ring true for many communities where I live, in Idaho. I particularly appreciated the author’s paired research approach, interviewing people with extreme wealth and people experiencing poverty within the same community. The author describes the importance and relative lack of research on the views of people with great wealth. I did come away wishing there were more pages dedicated to the people in the community that are struggling to make the ends meet. I initially read this book because I am related to the author, although I do not feel any obligation to give this book a good review. That said, I think this is an excellent and important work. I would recommended it to anyone interested in social science research on public administration, economics, or environmental philanthropy.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    There's a lot of interesting and important stuff here, and I will return to it when I'm in a more generous frame of mind. (At the moment, the politics are upsetting and a little much to handle.) Ever the editor, I find it extremely annoying that Farrell spends the first section going into detail on why he chose Teton County, then promptly switches over to investigate the sociology of the Yellowstone Club - which is in a different state. Perhaps most readers didn't realize this (Farrell convenien There's a lot of interesting and important stuff here, and I will return to it when I'm in a more generous frame of mind. (At the moment, the politics are upsetting and a little much to handle.) Ever the editor, I find it extremely annoying that Farrell spends the first section going into detail on why he chose Teton County, then promptly switches over to investigate the sociology of the Yellowstone Club - which is in a different state. Perhaps most readers didn't realize this (Farrell conveniently neglects to mention that he's left the county he just spent thirty pages discussing), or don't mind the deception, but the Yellowstone Club is in Gallatin County, Montana. Not Teton County, Wyoming. I don't argue that it fits Farrell's thesis, only that after spending soooo long discussing tax shelters and economics of one particular place (Teton County), it's bizarre to immediately leave that place to find support for your argument in a different state.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    This book has an interesting and important premise and makes some fascinating points. The interviews conducted with the low-income workers of Teton County and the ultra-wealthy people who have migrated there provide valuable insight into this bifurcated community. The access he gained is remarkable. However, the writing is excruciatingly repetitive. The constant repetition and use of the same phrases over and over is distracting and frustrating. The book is divided into four parts. At the start This book has an interesting and important premise and makes some fascinating points. The interviews conducted with the low-income workers of Teton County and the ultra-wealthy people who have migrated there provide valuable insight into this bifurcated community. The access he gained is remarkable. However, the writing is excruciatingly repetitive. The constant repetition and use of the same phrases over and over is distracting and frustrating. The book is divided into four parts. At the start of each part, the author gives a summary of that section and often reveals the most shocking statistics or quotes that will be discussed further in late chapters. I did learn some things from this book but I was glad to be done with it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kate Fowee

    This book was well researched and gave some perspective on a place I love. I grew up visiting my grandparents who had a home in Jackson. I would spend a month in the summer and a week in the winter. Those times were some of my absolute favorites while growing up. This book helped put a lot of my experiences in perspective. That being said this book reads like a research paper that wasn’t written all at once. He would find ten ways to say the same thing. This book could have easily been shorter a This book was well researched and gave some perspective on a place I love. I grew up visiting my grandparents who had a home in Jackson. I would spend a month in the summer and a week in the winter. Those times were some of my absolute favorites while growing up. This book helped put a lot of my experiences in perspective. That being said this book reads like a research paper that wasn’t written all at once. He would find ten ways to say the same thing. This book could have easily been shorter and more concise. My research is in the field of rarefied gas dynamics and never have I seen the word “rarefied” used more ubiquitously and with as much density as I did in this book. It was a nice literary device and metaphor once. It didn’t need to be used as often.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sara Miller

    This book was a fascinating exploration of economics and philanthropy that I’m surrounded by living in the semi-affluent “rural” West. As always with academically-bent books, I didn’t walk away with many answers, but I did find myself saying, “This is fascinating” and reading passages out loud to my family every few pages. The book shed light on my own work in a “safe” nonprofit arena—the arts—and it forced me to look at my friends, my contacts at work, my family, and my own philanthropic effort This book was a fascinating exploration of economics and philanthropy that I’m surrounded by living in the semi-affluent “rural” West. As always with academically-bent books, I didn’t walk away with many answers, but I did find myself saying, “This is fascinating” and reading passages out loud to my family every few pages. The book shed light on my own work in a “safe” nonprofit arena—the arts—and it forced me to look at my friends, my contacts at work, my family, and my own philanthropic efforts in a new light.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Abby C

    Really enjoyed this book! As someone who has lived in Teton County for the last year it really struck a chord with me. This sociological text identified and explained a lot of things I have seen and felt about town that I could not put in to words. I would be interested in hearing Farrell’s thoughts on the communities of seasonal workers (aka the penniless nature lovers and ski bums) and how they tie in to the community as well.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mam

    Detailed research and a lot of numbers. I listened to the audible version, and I think I would be better served by reading it either in an ebook or a paper book. I think the book contains some important viewpoints and insights into wealth disparity and the ethos of what 'causes' are supported by the super-wealthy. Detailed research and a lot of numbers. I listened to the audible version, and I think I would be better served by reading it either in an ebook or a paper book. I think the book contains some important viewpoints and insights into wealth disparity and the ethos of what 'causes' are supported by the super-wealthy.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.