web site hit counter Superstitions: A Handbook of Folklore, Myths, and Legends from around the World - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Superstitions: A Handbook of Folklore, Myths, and Legends from around the World

Availability: Ready to download

Across all cultures and spanning centuries, superstitions rooted in cultural legends and myths have formed and influenced daily life. Superstitions: A Handbook of Folklore, Myths, and Legends from around the Worldâ?? explains how and why these legends and the associated behaviors behind them developed, accompanied by beautiful illustrations. In this definitive reference, y Across all cultures and spanning centuries, superstitions rooted in cultural legends and myths have formed and influenced daily life. Superstitions: A Handbook of Folklore, Myths, and Legends from around the Worldâ?? explains how and why these legends and the associated behaviors behind them developed, accompanied by beautiful illustrations. In this definitive reference, you’ll learn the fascinating and often bizarre histories of a comprehensive range of superstitions from around the world. For example, the belief that one will have seven years' bad luck if you break a mirror is said to come from the Romans, who were the first to create glass mirrors. And in Japanese culture, cutting your nails at night is thought to lead to a quick death because the two phrases sound similar. You’ll also find out why some superstitions vary from culture to culture. For instance, the “unlucky” number 13 is considered a bad omen in some countries, like the US, and “lucky” in other countries, like Italy—where the number 17 is considered unlucky. The information is organized by country, so you can easily investigate the popular superstitions linked to your own or other specific ethnic heritage or cultural identity. Satisfy your burning curiosity with this complete guide to superstitions, folklore, and myths. The Mystical Handbook series from Wellfleet takes you on a magical journey through the wonderful world of spellcraft and spellcasting. Explore a new practice with each volume and learn how to incorporate spells, rituals, blessings, and cleansings into your daily routine. These portable companions feature beautiful foil-detail covers and color-saturated interiors on a premium paper blend. Other titles in the series include: Witchcraft, Love Spells, Moon Magic, Knot Magic, and House Magic.  


Compare

Across all cultures and spanning centuries, superstitions rooted in cultural legends and myths have formed and influenced daily life. Superstitions: A Handbook of Folklore, Myths, and Legends from around the Worldâ?? explains how and why these legends and the associated behaviors behind them developed, accompanied by beautiful illustrations. In this definitive reference, y Across all cultures and spanning centuries, superstitions rooted in cultural legends and myths have formed and influenced daily life. Superstitions: A Handbook of Folklore, Myths, and Legends from around the Worldâ?? explains how and why these legends and the associated behaviors behind them developed, accompanied by beautiful illustrations. In this definitive reference, you’ll learn the fascinating and often bizarre histories of a comprehensive range of superstitions from around the world. For example, the belief that one will have seven years' bad luck if you break a mirror is said to come from the Romans, who were the first to create glass mirrors. And in Japanese culture, cutting your nails at night is thought to lead to a quick death because the two phrases sound similar. You’ll also find out why some superstitions vary from culture to culture. For instance, the “unlucky” number 13 is considered a bad omen in some countries, like the US, and “lucky” in other countries, like Italy—where the number 17 is considered unlucky. The information is organized by country, so you can easily investigate the popular superstitions linked to your own or other specific ethnic heritage or cultural identity. Satisfy your burning curiosity with this complete guide to superstitions, folklore, and myths. The Mystical Handbook series from Wellfleet takes you on a magical journey through the wonderful world of spellcraft and spellcasting. Explore a new practice with each volume and learn how to incorporate spells, rituals, blessings, and cleansings into your daily routine. These portable companions feature beautiful foil-detail covers and color-saturated interiors on a premium paper blend. Other titles in the series include: Witchcraft, Love Spells, Moon Magic, Knot Magic, and House Magic.  

30 review for Superstitions: A Handbook of Folklore, Myths, and Legends from around the World

  1. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    I loved this!!! I loved how the author went into detail about the different places around the world and went through all the different superstitions. I rather liked going though the Egyptian Gods and superstitions that was really neat! I definitely recommend this book! This author really knows his stuff and I loved it will definitely look into more by this author

  2. 4 out of 5

    Deb✨

    Superstitions: A Handbook of Folklore, Myths, and Legends from around the World By D.R. McElroy To be published May 26, 2020 Superstitions: A Handbook of Folklore, Myths, and Legends from around the World explains how and why these legends and the associated behaviors behind them developed. This is very well researched and encompasses every part of the world. It covers each continent and country and their beliefs, going way back to very early history. Their gods, goddesses, idols, creatures, monste Superstitions: A Handbook of Folklore, Myths, and Legends from around the World By D.R. McElroy To be published May 26, 2020 Superstitions: A Handbook of Folklore, Myths, and Legends from around the World explains how and why these legends and the associated behaviors behind them developed. This is very well researched and encompasses every part of the world. It covers each continent and country and their beliefs, going way back to very early history. Their gods, goddesses, idols, creatures, monsters, totems, folklore, myths, legends, fables, parables, urban legends/urban myths, and of course, superstitions are all covered in this book. It gives a brief outline of each one and the basic belief behind them. There are pictures of some of them, and I would have loved to see even more pictures because they were fascinating. My favorite part about this book were the superstitions from each part of the world. I thought it was interesting and fun to see the differences between the countries. Also, to be able to learn about some of the other beliefs from history pertaining to each country and their gods, legends, folklore and myths were interesting as well. I also have to give a special nod to some of the more well-known creatures and monsters that we all know, such as Bigfoot, different types of werewolves, chupacabra, ghost ships, vampires, giants and leprechauns, etc. They and so many others can all be found here. I enjoyed this book and if you are interested in this subject matter, I would recommend it. I would like to thank the Quarto Publishing Group, Wellfleet Press and the author for this advanced digital ARC of this book in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Gizem-in-Wonderland

    I have to admit I requested this book mainly because of the adorable mystic cover. Yes, I judge a book by the cover and I usually get disillusioned but this was not the case for this one despite the disappointment created by the misleading title. This book encapsulates some beautiful drawings and illustrations BUT it contains too little information when it comes to superstitions and their origins. The content mainly revolves around gods, goddesses, monsters and myths of various cultures prevaile I have to admit I requested this book mainly because of the adorable mystic cover. Yes, I judge a book by the cover and I usually get disillusioned but this was not the case for this one despite the disappointment created by the misleading title. This book encapsulates some beautiful drawings and illustrations BUT it contains too little information when it comes to superstitions and their origins. The content mainly revolves around gods, goddesses, monsters and myths of various cultures prevailed on all seven continents. It is a very well-thought and researched book and I thoroughly enjoyed it even though it was not what I expected at first glance. I was also quite surprised to learn that even the most distant cultures have common superstitions, shared customs and mythical creatures. Overall an intriguing and reading experience for those fond of myths, legends and superstitions and their origins. (Received an advanced readers copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Raymond

    I found the actual superstitions in this book more interesting than the gods and creatures featured in it. I enjoyed learning about the origins of the superstitions that I grew up with especially those such as: not putting your hat on the bed (Mexco) and itchy palms means money is coming your way. (all cultures but originated in Africa). Thanks to Net Galley, Wellfleet Press, and D. R. McElroy for a free ARC copy in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Luna

    The ARC of this book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I found it very entertaining to learn about different superstitions from all over the world. It was an interesting journey and it's making me wanna dig up more and learn about superstitions from other countries. The ARC of this book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I found it very entertaining to learn about different superstitions from all over the world. It was an interesting journey and it's making me wanna dig up more and learn about superstitions from other countries.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    The title of "Superstitions" is actually quite misleading in this case. There are only a few scant paragraphs that go into detail about some of the well-known superstitions that people take part in (not walking under ladders, bad luck for broken mirrors, etc.). The real heft of the book is broken down into different countries and their folklore and gods. While this information was interesting, I felt like I was expecting something quite different. I would have loved for McElroy to go into much g The title of "Superstitions" is actually quite misleading in this case. There are only a few scant paragraphs that go into detail about some of the well-known superstitions that people take part in (not walking under ladders, bad luck for broken mirrors, etc.). The real heft of the book is broken down into different countries and their folklore and gods. While this information was interesting, I felt like I was expecting something quite different. I would have loved for McElroy to go into much greater detail about where superstitions originated and how they're still used in our present times. Instead, I read a lot of info about specific gods worshipped by everything from ancient Egyptians to Inuits. This book is extremely well-researched and I appreciated how each section was divided into easy-to-digest sections. However, I did find myself skimming certain paragraphs that just didn't hold any interest for me. People looking for factual tidbits about superstitions will likely have to look elsewhere. *Free ARC provided by Netgalley and Quarto Publishing Group in exchange for an honest review*

  7. 4 out of 5

    SpoonfulofHygge

    One could say that I a biased because I am always curious reading about this topic but I loved this book regardless!!! Apart from the variety and diversity of folklore tales and superstitions, the design is impeccably done and I just wanted more of everything! I would definitely recommend this one and I hope to read more of it by author D.R. McElroy!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Not what I expected, based on the title - this book focused more on mythologies/gods and goddesses and monsters/mythical creatures more than actual superstitions. Still, it was very interesting, though I wish there were more images to go along with the entries.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    Simplistic overview of different belief systems. Most of the book is gods/goddess, with smaller sections on monsters and cultural superstitions. It would be an interesting reference book or jumping off point, but it seems a bit childish to be classified as an adult book. It’d probably be cool for middle grade or maybe high school. I will note that as a Christian, including Yahweh/Jehovah as a mythical god and depicting him as vengeful and tormenting felt a little off base. Also seemed odd that Y Simplistic overview of different belief systems. Most of the book is gods/goddess, with smaller sections on monsters and cultural superstitions. It would be an interesting reference book or jumping off point, but it seems a bit childish to be classified as an adult book. It’d probably be cool for middle grade or maybe high school. I will note that as a Christian, including Yahweh/Jehovah as a mythical god and depicting him as vengeful and tormenting felt a little off base. Also seemed odd that Yahweh was listed as a myth in the Middle East, but nowhere is Allah listed? Either they were trying to be politically correct towards Islam by not listing it as a myth (though I doubt it, since they included Hindu gods) or they were just slighting it all together.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Angela Natividad

    Superstition's title and introduction suggest it is about superstitions and their practical (or impractical) origins. The intro describes the social impact of believing black cats are unlucky, and the possible source of the belief that it’s bad luck to open umbrellas indoors. If the author remained focused on these everyday superstitions and elaborated on them, I would have gotten what I expected and been glad. It would be enriching to dig deep into even a few weird beliefs, the way Aja Raden’s S Superstition's title and introduction suggest it is about superstitions and their practical (or impractical) origins. The intro describes the social impact of believing black cats are unlucky, and the possible source of the belief that it’s bad luck to open umbrellas indoors. If the author remained focused on these everyday superstitions and elaborated on them, I would have gotten what I expected and been glad. It would be enriching to dig deep into even a few weird beliefs, the way Aja Raden’s Stoned approaches the preciousness of certain jewels through story. Instead, Superstitions is a loose global encyclopaedia of gods, monsters and *some* superstitions, divided by region. That's ambitious—impossibly ambitious, even—and this attempt to generalise the pantheon of human storytelling, in such a limited format, has numerous setbacks. These local-ish surveys are organised thus: A description of an area’s historical context, followed by a selection of its mythological gods, monsters, and superstitions. This format is not always strictly followed, and inclusions can feel arbitrary: In “African Mythical Monsters,” the Agogwe of East Africa directly follows Ghana’s Adze. It is not clear how or why either was chosen from their respective canons. Building on that, categorisation can feel callously broad: A section labeled “Hindu Monsters” includes the Penanggalan of Malaysia, Buddhism’s Kalavinka, and Laos’ Phaya Naga. None of these are Hindu and it is unclear why they are there. You can potentially argue that some creatures, like the Phaya Naga—dragons believed to live in moving water sources in Southeast Asia—share characteristics (even origins!) with the Hindu naga, female serpent princesses. But that doesn’t make this specific iteration Hindu to contemporary users. Some information is incorrect. Under “Hindu Superstitions” lies the passage, “Take a bath after attending a funeral. This one makes good sense. Decomposing bodies release a number of toxins and bacteria into the air, which may contaminate mourners.” This is false. Decomposition in and of itself is not pathogenic. The unquestioned belief that it is pathogenic has created an exploitative funeral industry in which we seek to distance ourselves from the dead, and dispose of them, as quickly as possible—often in environmentally poisonous ways. What’s more, the Middle East section, for example, has no superstitions at all, though these are ostensibly the primary subject of the book. I think the author is working on the assumption that myths generally are a form of superstition, and these are best represented by the creatures that populate their stories. I hope I’ve done a good job of illustrating the limitations of that approach in terms of rigour and organisation, but also hope people who do buy Superstitions appreciate the jewels hidden within, despite these caveats. You will learn a lot of funny stuff, like the Philippine belief that sleeping with wet hair causes blindness. And while you'll encounter well-known creatures, like Bigfoot or succubi, others I didn’t know at all, like the succubus-like Qarînah; or Akaname, red-skinned demons of dirty bathrooms in Japan. I learned the charming story of Yhi, Australia's Dreamtime goddess who gave life tangible form on Earth, but a little too whimsically (hence platypi and kangaroos). And I liked that spiritual beliefs of African-American origin are treated as a separate subset of belief within the Americas. Lastly, there’s a feeling the author’s greatest ambition is to show people there have been, and continue to be, other ways of imagining reality. I’m into that. “One of the primary—if not the most important—tenets of Hinduism is truth. But Hindus don’t believe that truth is didactic,” McElroy writes. “Instead, truth can be found in many places and all truth is relative to the place, time and culture of whomever espouses it. Therefore, modern Hindus believe strongly in the need for tolerance and the broad-based search for knowledge from disparate sources.” Superstitions can best be described as one person’s cryptozoological field notes. In no way does it reflect an expertise in its topics of predilection, not even superstition, but I don’t think it wants to do that. I wish it had been clearer about that; a better framing of what I’d encounter would have made me happier with the text. I also think that such a broad scope does a disservice to its central premise: Because it covers so much ground, even when you do learn a few odd superstitions, no time at all is spent examining why they exist at all. On the other hand, lots of people like wide surveys of mythology—as other reviews demonstrate—and it works just fine thus. I'd recommend it as a starting-point, or an imagination engine. It’s also beautifully illustrated and would make a great coffee table or bathroom book. I can see parents using this to come up with new story fodder for kids at bedtime, or curious people using it to fall in love with new mythologies they never knew existed. #netgalley

  11. 5 out of 5

    Myshara Leta

    This is an amazing guide that is both thorough and concise. It would be a great reference book to teach children and adults about different gods, monsters, and myths from around the world. I wish the pictures had had names or titles identifying them specifically. I recommend this book to everyone.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Hmmm… This was proof to me that this kind of book is hard to do well. It's a glossy, nicely pictorial (ie not space-wastingly so) dictionary of the world's monsters, gods and superstitions, but it is a bit higgledy-piggledy. Just take early chapters about Africa, the Levant and Asia – it's all very well breaking the world down into logical regions, but the creators here kind of give up on that, so that the gods of one region zip from country to country just to fit into the enforced A-Z format. T Hmmm… This was proof to me that this kind of book is hard to do well. It's a glossy, nicely pictorial (ie not space-wastingly so) dictionary of the world's monsters, gods and superstitions, but it is a bit higgledy-piggledy. Just take early chapters about Africa, the Levant and Asia – it's all very well breaking the world down into logical regions, but the creators here kind of give up on that, so that the gods of one region zip from country to country just to fit into the enforced A-Z format. Thus you get a nudge to the fact one god from here became known as the other god there, and the third god over yonder, but you don't really get the full gist of any mythological narrative as such, such are the thumbnail sketches used. I would suggest mythology is all about narrative, and a guide to it with hardly a full story in it kind of defeats the issue. You're given not enough information to learn much, yet too much in your helter-skelter geographical trip for you to piece anything together. Something is referred to as "another" thing known from the Arabian Nights before the first one is reached. Luckily we eventually hit richer seams – the stories of Sedna and her creation of a watery purgatory/hell for the Inuit cultures is likely to be new to many readers, and we can get the best of this as it transforms from a wobbly dictionary to a more solid encyclopaedia. But flaws still remain – it's no good giving us Irish Gaelic gods and characters without a pronunciation guide, for one. So I don't wish ill of this book, but I still don't think I've hit the mother-lode when it comes to such reference books for the arcane. Three and a half stars, however, for the education this did (almost despite itself) provide.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    Overall I really enjoyed this book however, I felt like the focus was more on the mythology of Deities and Monsters (and not even a full list of them) more than the actual superstitions. That being said I feel like the book was really well researched and included a nice mix of countries. The author didn't lump everything together and put what culture the superstition, deity, or monster was from. The illustrations are also very nice, but I wish they had included more. I also appreciated how when Overall I really enjoyed this book however, I felt like the focus was more on the mythology of Deities and Monsters (and not even a full list of them) more than the actual superstitions. That being said I feel like the book was really well researched and included a nice mix of countries. The author didn't lump everything together and put what culture the superstition, deity, or monster was from. The illustrations are also very nice, but I wish they had included more. I also appreciated how when discussing hoodoo and vodu the author included a lot of detail about the different cultures and their version of the practice as well as how they were affected by the slave trade and didn't just gloss over or ignore it altogether. So while the amount of superstitions is actually really limited I enjoyed the book and think it will be a good reference.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I received an ARC of this book thanks to NetGalley and publisher Wellfleet Press in exchange for an honest review. This is a beautifully presented and interesting collection of superstitions, mythology and other folklore from around the world. I love the effort that has been put into making this book attractive and I can only imagine it is better in a non-digital format. The information is presented geographically and then alphabetically which works really well. I had some issues with the tone an I received an ARC of this book thanks to NetGalley and publisher Wellfleet Press in exchange for an honest review. This is a beautifully presented and interesting collection of superstitions, mythology and other folklore from around the world. I love the effort that has been put into making this book attractive and I can only imagine it is better in a non-digital format. The information is presented geographically and then alphabetically which works really well. I had some issues with the tone and wording of some parts (for example, describing Africa as a mystical place is a little ill-informed in this day and age) but a lot of that is the usual tone of more spiritual books like this so I was willing to let that slide. Definitely a brilliant book to just pick up and flick through,

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tamara

    This book describes different myths and legends across different cultures and continents. It talks about where certain things like tossing salt over your shoulder came to be. I found it very fascinating and interesting. I read a lot of different types of fiction books that reference some of the folklore listed in this book, which is why I found it fascinating. It goes in depth on Asian, Egyptian, Irish and other cultural folklore. If you've ever been curious about legends and superstitions, then This book describes different myths and legends across different cultures and continents. It talks about where certain things like tossing salt over your shoulder came to be. I found it very fascinating and interesting. I read a lot of different types of fiction books that reference some of the folklore listed in this book, which is why I found it fascinating. It goes in depth on Asian, Egyptian, Irish and other cultural folklore. If you've ever been curious about legends and superstitions, then you should read this book. The illustrations are great. I received this arc for my honest review. #Superstitions #NetGalley

  16. 4 out of 5

    LyyraBat

    The title and synopsis were incredibly misleading. I went into a book titled Superstitions expecting it to be primarily about, you know, superstitions and instead ended up with an encyclopedia of what seemed to be randomly-chosen gods, monsters, and legends... with a few superstitions thrown in for good measure. Had I purchased the book, I would have been angry, but as I received it as an ARC via NetGalley, I was just disappointed. It's a relatively interesting book that seems well-researched, i The title and synopsis were incredibly misleading. I went into a book titled Superstitions expecting it to be primarily about, you know, superstitions and instead ended up with an encyclopedia of what seemed to be randomly-chosen gods, monsters, and legends... with a few superstitions thrown in for good measure. Had I purchased the book, I would have been angry, but as I received it as an ARC via NetGalley, I was just disappointed. It's a relatively interesting book that seems well-researched, it's gorgeous (though the illustrations not always matching the descriptions was driving me nuts), and I'm sure plenty of people will love it, but it's just not for me.

  17. 5 out of 5

    The Starry Library

    I was very disappointed with this book. There was only one page per chapter about superstitions in each culture and the explanations very vague. This was a book mostly about gods and goddesses which was not what I was expecting. I wanted to learn about the origins of superstitions such as why it's bad luck to open an umbrella indoors or why someone can incur 7 years of bad luck if they break a mirror? Instead there were 1 sentence descriptions of mythological gods and creatures. I wanted to lear I was very disappointed with this book. There was only one page per chapter about superstitions in each culture and the explanations very vague. This was a book mostly about gods and goddesses which was not what I was expecting. I wanted to learn about the origins of superstitions such as why it's bad luck to open an umbrella indoors or why someone can incur 7 years of bad luck if they break a mirror? Instead there were 1 sentence descriptions of mythological gods and creatures. I wanted to learn about superstitions and unfortunately it didn't actually discuss them.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Smith

    Superstitions: A Handbook of Folklore, Myths, and Legends from around the World​ is the perfect title for this book as it is a comprehensive reference about all three. I think I might have enjoyed the information about the differences between folklore, myths, and legends the best. I loved the whole book! I found it fascinating and entertaining. If you have an interest in superstitions, I cannot recommend this book enough!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jenn Marshall

    The synopsis of this book says it explains legends and the behaviors around them from all over the world, but it is really more of an encyclopedic list of gods and monsters. It groups by continent and is really interesting, but doesn't really explain superstitions. I really liked it and learned a lot. The synopsis of this book says it explains legends and the behaviors around them from all over the world, but it is really more of an encyclopedic list of gods and monsters. It groups by continent and is really interesting, but doesn't really explain superstitions. I really liked it and learned a lot.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Annarella

    A brilliant collection of facts and information covering all the world. I liked to discover new things and I think this book is highly recommended. Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra

    A brief introduction to different myth animals/persons and a few superstitions from around the world. Categorized mainly by continent - with a few countries specified with own ones. Nice for those who have an interest in something like this, a nice jump off point.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kiersten

    A helpful book in my research library for all things superstitions, witchcraft and folklore, "Superstitions" is a great read. Not only does it cover a more global view than most books, it keeps it clear and simple for those who are not as deeply enmeshed in said beliefs. A helpful book in my research library for all things superstitions, witchcraft and folklore, "Superstitions" is a great read. Not only does it cover a more global view than most books, it keeps it clear and simple for those who are not as deeply enmeshed in said beliefs.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Elexndra

    library borrow

  24. 4 out of 5

    Istoria Lit

    Great for fans of the creepy and macabre. Makes an excellent addition to any occult library. Really enjoyed reading it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chermaine

    I can't wait to buy this book it was so amazing addition to the library that I work the amazing like stories from around the world was just unbelievable to read I can't wait to buy this book it was so amazing addition to the library that I work the amazing like stories from around the world was just unbelievable to read

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten is tired

    Would that this was published when I were a child, I would have eaten it right up! Fantastically well researched and written in a friendly, informative, sensitive way. Love it!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    An interesting well researched read on varying superstitions from around the world and different cultures. I loved some of the anecdotes and stories more then others but overall a great read. I received a free review copy from the publisher in exchange for my honest unedited feedback. #read #reader #book #bookstagram #readersofinstagram #bookreview #greatreads #alwaysreading #reading #ilovebooks #currentreads #bookaddict #booknerd #bookish #bibliophile #goodreads #readerlife #booklife #readandrev An interesting well researched read on varying superstitions from around the world and different cultures. I loved some of the anecdotes and stories more then others but overall a great read. I received a free review copy from the publisher in exchange for my honest unedited feedback. #read #reader #book #bookstagram #readersofinstagram #bookreview #greatreads #alwaysreading #reading #ilovebooks #currentreads #bookaddict #booknerd #bookish #bibliophile #goodreads #readerlife #booklife #readandreview #cozy

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kerrie Hoar

    I did enjoy the book, but it is not what I was expecting. There is little space dedicated to superstitions, with the bulk of the book dedicated to mythology and monsters. (NetGalley ebook -  I received a complimentary advanced reader copy of this book through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Chrissy

    It states that Jesus is a myth or legend rather than a historical figure. This is a bold faced falsehood regardless of your religious background or lack thereof. There is a good deal of historical evidence from multiple secular sources that proves that Jesus was an actual historical figure. If the author can't get that simple fact correct, how can I trust the rest of the book? It states that Jesus is a myth or legend rather than a historical figure. This is a bold faced falsehood regardless of your religious background or lack thereof. There is a good deal of historical evidence from multiple secular sources that proves that Jesus was an actual historical figure. If the author can't get that simple fact correct, how can I trust the rest of the book?

  30. 5 out of 5

    Willow.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.