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In this graphic novel adaptation of his bestselling collection of essays, legendary news anchor Dan Rather provides a voice of reason and explores what it means to be a true patriot. Brought to life in stunning color by artist Tim Foley, What Unites Us: The Graphic Novel takes apart the building blocks of this country, from the freedoms that define us, to the values that ha In this graphic novel adaptation of his bestselling collection of essays, legendary news anchor Dan Rather provides a voice of reason and explores what it means to be a true patriot. Brought to life in stunning color by artist Tim Foley, What Unites Us: The Graphic Novel takes apart the building blocks of this country, from the freedoms that define us, to the values that have transformed us, to the institutions that sustain us. Rather's vast experience and his unique perspective as one of America's most renowned newscasters shed light on who we were and who we are today, allowing us to see a possible future, where we are one country; united.


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In this graphic novel adaptation of his bestselling collection of essays, legendary news anchor Dan Rather provides a voice of reason and explores what it means to be a true patriot. Brought to life in stunning color by artist Tim Foley, What Unites Us: The Graphic Novel takes apart the building blocks of this country, from the freedoms that define us, to the values that ha In this graphic novel adaptation of his bestselling collection of essays, legendary news anchor Dan Rather provides a voice of reason and explores what it means to be a true patriot. Brought to life in stunning color by artist Tim Foley, What Unites Us: The Graphic Novel takes apart the building blocks of this country, from the freedoms that define us, to the values that have transformed us, to the institutions that sustain us. Rather's vast experience and his unique perspective as one of America's most renowned newscasters shed light on who we were and who we are today, allowing us to see a possible future, where we are one country; united.

30 review for What Unites Us: The Graphic Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Dan Rather dons his I'm-a-journalist-dammit trench coat and trudges through his lifetime of American history, sharing ever-so-folksy stories of his poor childhood, name dropping famous people he has interviewed, and lecturing on his opinions about what's right and wrong with America. He waffles and sidesteps a bit, but he's generally pushing a progressive and liberal agenda and a call for civic responsibility that I can get behind. But the problem is that he is Dan Rather. I didn't pick this up b Dan Rather dons his I'm-a-journalist-dammit trench coat and trudges through his lifetime of American history, sharing ever-so-folksy stories of his poor childhood, name dropping famous people he has interviewed, and lecturing on his opinions about what's right and wrong with America. He waffles and sidesteps a bit, but he's generally pushing a progressive and liberal agenda and a call for civic responsibility that I can get behind. But the problem is that he is Dan Rather. I didn't pick this up because of his name -- I was more inclined to tune in Tom Brokaw or Peter Jennings back in the olden days when I actually watched evening news broadcasts -- I only grabbed it from the library because it is part of the intriguing World Citizen Comics series, and it is my least favorite of the three published so far. Rather wants to give off this wizened sage vibe, but in thinking of his relevance and plodding through his less-than-fresh political insights and regrets about homophobia -- "Those were the times in which we were living, and we were not sensitive." (emphasis his) -- all I can think are the wise words of another sage: "Yeah, it's like a cow's opinion. It just doesn't matter. It's moo."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Dan Rather has a very slightly rosy view of America. This book is an illustrated version of a series of essays he wrote about how he felt about the United States, both drawing from his years as a reporter as well as growing up poor, during the Depression. It is a very White, Male point of view. It is the party line of American being the best and the brightest. He talks about how wonderful Carnegie was for giving people libraries, without acknowledging how he made his riches by exploiting the work Dan Rather has a very slightly rosy view of America. This book is an illustrated version of a series of essays he wrote about how he felt about the United States, both drawing from his years as a reporter as well as growing up poor, during the Depression. It is a very White, Male point of view. It is the party line of American being the best and the brightest. He talks about how wonderful Carnegie was for giving people libraries, without acknowledging how he made his riches by exploiting the working class. He talks about how wonderful the founding fathers were with their checks and balances, without noting how this has all fallen apart with the Republicans and the current (until Jan 20, 2021) occupant of the White House, and how together they have torn apart those self-same checks and balances. Granted, these essays were first published in 2017, back when we were just learning the horrors of what the Orange Mango in the White House was up to. So, I won't fault the author for missing those things. But on the other hand, his history of the greatness of the melting pot (or mosaic, as he later refers to it), is that we all pull together. He does acknowledge civil rights, in bits, but in other bits, it is the history we are taught in school, rather than what actually happened. So, while this might be a good book as an introduction to US civics, as something that someone would casually read, it lacks something. It is a bit too long and drawn out. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    I've always really admired Dan Rather - his integrity has shown through in many difficult moments in our nation's history (including recent times). I was interested in reading his book but when I saw it as a graphic novel version, I was even more intrigued. This is a wonderful story that I'd recommend for all young adults. It describes some really hard times in America's past (Vietnam War, McCarthyism, JFK's assassination, etc.) and how Americans were able to come together to overcome them. Rath I've always really admired Dan Rather - his integrity has shown through in many difficult moments in our nation's history (including recent times). I was interested in reading his book but when I saw it as a graphic novel version, I was even more intrigued. This is a wonderful story that I'd recommend for all young adults. It describes some really hard times in America's past (Vietnam War, McCarthyism, JFK's assassination, etc.) and how Americans were able to come together to overcome them. Rather also gives his unique perspective on current struggles - everything from climate change to LGBTQ rights. Because he's lived through a lot, he offers great wisdom on a lot of different issues. The artwork for this graphic novel is simple but effective. The color scheme sticks to red, blue, black, and white; I thought it was really creative how the red and blue colors were used when discussing partisan issues. The way the panels are laid out also helps to create a flowing narrative that easily holds the reader's attention. Although I've seen some negative reviews on Goodreads (mostly people who don't like Rather's left-leaning opinions), I thought the book's theme of what unites us was really moving and powerful. For young readers, this is a great way to introduce historical events and their context without seeming boring. I also appreciated that Rather included sections of his own story to provide a personal perspective for the reader. I'll be recommending this to young adults or anyone who wants an insightful look at our country's past and where we're headed in the future. *Free ARC provided by Netgalley and publisher in exchange for an honest review*

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    What Unites Us: Reflections on Patriotism The Graphic Novel covered many values Dan Rather learned and would like to see in America. At times it is a reflection of his life, at others cobvering history from his point or view or the value he is focusing on in that chapter. It seemed at times to get into a rosy view of idealism and forgets to acknowledge his view may not be the same for others- for instance his reminiscing of WWII times and how Americans ALL pulled together for the common good and What Unites Us: Reflections on Patriotism The Graphic Novel covered many values Dan Rather learned and would like to see in America. At times it is a reflection of his life, at others cobvering history from his point or view or the value he is focusing on in that chapter. It seemed at times to get into a rosy view of idealism and forgets to acknowledge his view may not be the same for others- for instance his reminiscing of WWII times and how Americans ALL pulled together for the common good and community negates the way Americans of Japanese decent were left out and segregated from society in camps. It just seemed too idealistic at times.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kurt Freeman

    It feels good to be an American as I read this book. But the message is clear. It is up to us, the American Citizens, to make the connections that unite us. When we come together as communities we are stronger and our voices can’t be overlooked. Inspiring storytelling.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany (OomilyReads)

    What Unites Us, A Graphic Novel written by Dan Rather, Elliott Kirschner, illustrated by Tim Foley PUB DATE: March 9, 2021 This is the stunning graphic novel adaptation of "What Unites Us”, is a collection of essays by legendary news anchor Dan Rather. Rather explores what it means to be a true patriot and provides the basic facets that unites us as a country. The graphics are simple yet just perfect to paint the picture of history for readers. First & foremost, what is patriotism? Don’t confuse it What Unites Us, A Graphic Novel written by Dan Rather, Elliott Kirschner, illustrated by Tim Foley PUB DATE: March 9, 2021 This is the stunning graphic novel adaptation of "What Unites Us”, is a collection of essays by legendary news anchor Dan Rather. Rather explores what it means to be a true patriot and provides the basic facets that unites us as a country. The graphics are simple yet just perfect to paint the picture of history for readers. First & foremost, what is patriotism? Don’t confuse it with nationalism. “Patriotism is rooted in humility. Nationalism is rooted in arrogance.” Rather explains patriotism is a dialogue with your fellow citizens about what you love about your country but also how it can be improved. It is important we are must break down the problems of society, the government and be active instead of passive in our citizenry. He goes through the United States History and mentions Abraham Lincoln, MLK Jr’s speeches, as well as some hard-hitting times that America has gone through & sometimes because due to your own arrogance such as the Korean War, Vietnam War, Challenger Explosion (shuttle), JFK & MLK Jr.’s assassinations as well as inspiring events in history. This would be a great graphic novel for a middle grader/young adult and someone like me! I love a quick lesson in civics. In the end, I felt encouraged to continue to be less passive, more active and most importantly the power of the vote. We must work against gerrymandering as it undercuts and silences voters. “Patriotism would require standing up to what I had seen – not standing alongside it in silence”.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chris Barsanti

    An inspirational civics lesson that illustrates (pun) the promise of its title with great clarity and purpose.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lyzz

    Title: What Unites Us Author: Dan Rather Genre: Memoir, Graphic Novel Pages: 288 Publication Date: 3/9/2021 What Unites Us is a graphic novel adaptation of Dan Rather’s memoir. Rather is a journalist who began his career in the early 1960s and covered the Civil Rights Era, the Vietnam War, the AIDS crisis, the Iraq War as well as many more important events in modern history. The focus of his memoir is to discuss his life experience in relation to what he believes unites us. This is a bit of a spin o Title: What Unites Us Author: Dan Rather Genre: Memoir, Graphic Novel Pages: 288 Publication Date: 3/9/2021 What Unites Us is a graphic novel adaptation of Dan Rather’s memoir. Rather is a journalist who began his career in the early 1960s and covered the Civil Rights Era, the Vietnam War, the AIDS crisis, the Iraq War as well as many more important events in modern history. The focus of his memoir is to discuss his life experience in relation to what he believes unites us. This is a bit of a spin on the traditional focus on what is dividing us. The graphic novel also covers many values that Dan Rather believes are shared regardless of a political party such as love of innovation. He also identifies characteristics he believes are key to our identity such as audacity. The graphic novel concludes with an afterword written after the 2020 US election. What I loved: •I loved Rather’s explanation of the difference between patriotism and nationalism and it deeply resonated with me. I’m often deeply critical of our country but because I want us to improve and right our wrongs. “It is important not to confuse “patriotism” with “nationalism.” As I define it, nationalism is a monologue in which you place your country in a position of moral and cultural supremacy over others. Patriotism, while deeply personal, is a dialogue with your fellow citizens, and a larger world, about not only what you love about your country but also how it can be improved.” •I loved his discussion of the importance of dissent. •I really appreciated his humility about what he wishes he would have done differently as a journalist particularly around the AIDS crisis and the Iraq War. •The color palette for this graphic novel is red, white, and blue. It is done in such a visually striking way. You would think it would be corny, but it works well. •The illustrations embody the voice of the graphic novel. They just “fit.” What I did not like: •I felt like the graphic novel was trying to capture everything in the memoir. I would have liked it to focus on one part of the memoir and do it in more depth throughout the novels. •Rather discusses the subjugation of Native Americans several times but never delves into it. I would have liked more thoughtful coverage of that like some of the other important issues. •While he offers a great amount of humility about the Iraq War, he does not really delve beyond a surface level into what journalists got wrong and what the consequences were. •At times, I felt like the graphic novel was very text-heavy and could have relied more on the illustrations to communicate the message. Overall, I enjoyed this graphic novel. Dan Rather introduces an interesting framework at looking at what we have in common instead of what divides us as well as a compelling exploration of patriotism and dissent. ARC provided to me by First Second Books, via Net Galley, in exchange for an honest review. #WhatUnitesUsTheGraphicNovel #NetGalley

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Read more graphic novel reviews at The Graphic Library. Dan Rather's original prose book, What Unites Us, is a collection of essays, musings and observations with lots of autobiographical details, about American history and political climate. This graphic novel adapts many of the essays from the prose version. The historical events are not told in any sort of chronological order. Instead, Rather uses his perspective on key historical moments to illustrate bigger ideologies; things like "courage" Read more graphic novel reviews at The Graphic Library. Dan Rather's original prose book, What Unites Us, is a collection of essays, musings and observations with lots of autobiographical details, about American history and political climate. This graphic novel adapts many of the essays from the prose version. The historical events are not told in any sort of chronological order. Instead, Rather uses his perspective on key historical moments to illustrate bigger ideologies; things like "courage", or "patriotism." Rather attempts to explain what is special about America, what brings us together as a nation, but also what has worked to separate us, especially partisan bickering and political turmoil. There is a lot of text in this book. Not having read the original prose book, I'm not entirely sure how much was edited from the original essays, if anything. There may be fewer chapters or ideologies discussed, but this adaptation strives to include much of the original work, and that can be overwhelming at times. The book is also quite long, so this is definitely more suited to readers with some stamina. Rather presents his views in a factual manner, but his left-leaning bias is present in many of the retellings of the past, especially when it comes to Republican lawmakers. The bias is subtle, but important to note. Taking these things into account, this was a fascinating examination of American history from World War II to present. Having limited education on post-Vietnam America, I always appreciate anything that can offer perspective on American History from 1970s-present. Rather was a trusted name in news media for so long, and this gave him access to some of the most important events of our history. His perspective and retelling of American history is interesting and thorough. Rather has some really poignant lessons for us all about what it means to be an American. The color palette is exclusively red, white, blue, and black, right up until the last two pages, where Rather walks away across an American Flag into a purple "sunset". Instead of clashing as Red and Blue tend to do often, Foley expertly mixes the two in some really beautiful ways. For the age rating for this title, I have chosen upper high school grades, not because there is any content within the pages that would be too graphic for younger audiences, but that I think the concepts in this book are more elevated and would partner well with a US History or Government class in the ways it discusses American History and the American Experience. Sara's Rating: 8/10 Suitability Level: Grades 11-12 This review was made possible with an advanced reader copy from the publisher through Net Galley. This graphic novel will be on sale March 9, 2021.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Diane Hernandez

    At its heart, What Unites Us is a memoir of an elderly white man’s life from the casual racism of his youth to the Trump administration’s perceived nationalism. It also attempts to explain what is causing our national chaos and how we can, and should, move forward toward a kinder, more inclusive, society. The book will quickly divide readers on party lines. If you are a Trump supporter, you will not enjoy this book. In fact, the author condemns the current nationalistic mood of the country. MAGA At its heart, What Unites Us is a memoir of an elderly white man’s life from the casual racism of his youth to the Trump administration’s perceived nationalism. It also attempts to explain what is causing our national chaos and how we can, and should, move forward toward a kinder, more inclusive, society. The book will quickly divide readers on party lines. If you are a Trump supporter, you will not enjoy this book. In fact, the author condemns the current nationalistic mood of the country. MAGA supporters, with their dislike of immigration, are not true patriots according to the book. Mr. Rather writes these words as Trump just begins his presidential term. I am reading and reviewing the book in December 2020, just as Trump’s term ends. Many of the book’s predictions have come horribly true. Yelling fraud, with no evidence because you lost the election, is tantamount to discarding our fundamental democratic process. While What Unites Us occasionally seems almost preachy at times, it is an interesting read especially for a liberal high school student interested in US politics. It uses telling, rather than showing, and so it is much slower-paced than the usual graphic novel. The artwork is rather blah line drawings with two color backgrounds. For these reasons, 3 stars. Thanks to First Second Books and NetGalley for a copy in exchange for my honest review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    April Gray

    I haven't yet read Dan Rather's book "What Unites Us," but this graphic novel version makes me want to read it. In this condensed version, Rather touches on many subjects we are currently grappling with, such as political division, voter suppression, immigration, and more, with a nostalgic eye toward the past feelings of the greatness of our country, and a sober look at our faults. The simple art (it's not flashy- no dynamic action scenes here) goes well with the text, I think, illustrating it i I haven't yet read Dan Rather's book "What Unites Us," but this graphic novel version makes me want to read it. In this condensed version, Rather touches on many subjects we are currently grappling with, such as political division, voter suppression, immigration, and more, with a nostalgic eye toward the past feelings of the greatness of our country, and a sober look at our faults. The simple art (it's not flashy- no dynamic action scenes here) goes well with the text, I think, illustrating it in a quiet but effective way. In looking at other people's reviews for this book, some felt Rather's tone was preachy; I did not. The tone feels conversational to me, that of a storyteller, and feels hopeful. Some reviewers found a left-leaning bias, but it seemed pretty balanced to me- he called out Democrats as well as Republicans, and acknowledged good, decent acts along with not-so-good, downright reprehensible things politicians have done over the years, some of them being the same people (looking at you, Reagan). I quite enjoyed this graphic novel, and as I said before, it made me interested in reading the book that it's based on. We need to take a look at our country, see what is not working, and fix it. Acknowledge our mistakes, and work toward a better future. Maybe Mr. Rather can inspire us to do so. #WhatUnitesUsTheGraphicNovel #NetGalley

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

    When I saw that Dan Rather’s recent book What Unites Us had been adapted to graphic novel form, I was really happy because the book was in my TBR for quite a while and it sounded like the perfect, helpful booky antidote for the current political climate. And-I’ll always choose the graphic novel! Having yet to read the original book, I wasn’t sure how dense it was or how it was structured-I’m presuming that it’s a series of essays. This illustrated adaptation, however, is extremely wordy, so I ima When I saw that Dan Rather’s recent book What Unites Us had been adapted to graphic novel form, I was really happy because the book was in my TBR for quite a while and it sounded like the perfect, helpful booky antidote for the current political climate. And-I’ll always choose the graphic novel! Having yet to read the original book, I wasn’t sure how dense it was or how it was structured-I’m presuming that it’s a series of essays. This illustrated adaptation, however, is extremely wordy, so I imagine the majority of the original’s text is here. I suppose it would be an helpful book for a high school student to use as an accompaniment to their civics/history texts (are there still civics classes?) Nevertheless, dude, it’s still boring! So, for non-required reading, I was not not enthralled. Overall-other than the chapter about libraries being the amazing cornerstone of all things-I found it pretty preachy and verbose. The cartoon of Dan in the trench coat constantly popping up to pontificate and lecture me; and then accompanying me through history while reminding me how often he was there as world’s best journalist got grating. And some times, he’s just sketched in the background, Waldo-like. Sorry, not for me. Warning: pompous pronouncements ahead.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shawn

    I have not read the book this graphic novel is based in, but after reading the graphic novel, I think I will have to read it. This graphic novel is broken into 6 chapters with each chapter broken up into 2 or the sections based around one idea. Rather uses personal anecdotes, history, and excerpts from famous speeches and interviews to expound on and explain the importance of the idea. Overall, this work was very inspirational. From ideas on the nature of patriotism to the importance of science a I have not read the book this graphic novel is based in, but after reading the graphic novel, I think I will have to read it. This graphic novel is broken into 6 chapters with each chapter broken up into 2 or the sections based around one idea. Rather uses personal anecdotes, history, and excerpts from famous speeches and interviews to expound on and explain the importance of the idea. Overall, this work was very inspirational. From ideas on the nature of patriotism to the importance of science and education in American culture, this book does a great job explaining the basis of what it means to be an American. Many of the sections could be read and analyzed in a government or civics course (given the language, it could be appropriate from 7th grade on) to give students an introduction to what it means to be an involved citizen. I would recommend this graphic novel as an introduction or inspiration to others to become more civically minded and active. Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for the opportunity to read an advance copy of this book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    Dan Rather and Elliot Kirschner's graphic novel, What Unites Us, comes at a fitting and relevant time when our nation is so deeply polarized. What is normally viewed as a boring and dry subject of history and civics lessons becomes lively and engaging with the art by Tim Foley. In his book, Rather discusses what it means to be patriotic and what our society needs in order to come together. This graphic novel packs a lot of facts, history, and some of Rather's life lessons. Unlike other graphic n Dan Rather and Elliot Kirschner's graphic novel, What Unites Us, comes at a fitting and relevant time when our nation is so deeply polarized. What is normally viewed as a boring and dry subject of history and civics lessons becomes lively and engaging with the art by Tim Foley. In his book, Rather discusses what it means to be patriotic and what our society needs in order to come together. This graphic novel packs a lot of facts, history, and some of Rather's life lessons. Unlike other graphic novels, you won't be able to finish this in one sitting because there's a lot to digest. Rather's views and writing is very thought provoking, fair, and balanced. Maybe it's because Rather is an experienced and distinguished journalist, but I am amazed that he was able to write about politics but not come off as political. I think this book deserves to be read in every middle school and high school. I also highly recommend the other graphic novels in the World Citizen Comics series to both young teens and adults to learn more about our government and it's complex history.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lissa00

    I have been meaning to read the full length version of this book for a while so when I saw the graphic novel version, I jumped on it immediately. I really enjoy Dan Rather's twitter feed and a lot of his even-handed perspective can be found here. He grew up during the Great Depression and World War II and has seen so much during his reporting years to offer a nuanced look at our country and what makes it great and what makes it less than great. The graphics were enjoyable, if a little lacking in I have been meaning to read the full length version of this book for a while so when I saw the graphic novel version, I jumped on it immediately. I really enjoy Dan Rather's twitter feed and a lot of his even-handed perspective can be found here. He grew up during the Great Depression and World War II and has seen so much during his reporting years to offer a nuanced look at our country and what makes it great and what makes it less than great. The graphics were enjoyable, if a little lacking in color, but I read this more for the words and in them found an increase in hope for this country. I received this book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    Dan Rather's 2017 book has been adapted into a graphic novel with excellent illustrations and updated for 2021. Rather explores different aspects of society looking at various examples from throughout American and world history to show that whole we have always disagreed about political decisions, we have also been bound together by values and belief in our nation's purpose. It may not feel like we agree on much these days - even some of those values, and especially who gets to enjoy our rights Dan Rather's 2017 book has been adapted into a graphic novel with excellent illustrations and updated for 2021. Rather explores different aspects of society looking at various examples from throughout American and world history to show that whole we have always disagreed about political decisions, we have also been bound together by values and belief in our nation's purpose. It may not feel like we agree on much these days - even some of those values, and especially who gets to enjoy our rights and freedoms, but as Martin Luther King, Jr. said, "The arc of the moral universe is long, but bends toward justice."

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lara

    The graphic novel format works well for the presentation of the content of this book, and I've been a Dan Rather fan since the 1980s (in all honesty, I had a bit of a crush on him during his CBS Evening News days!). The book is an interesting combination of personal and historical soul-searching for Rather, and I hope folks who were born in this century will read it, because I'm always worried that later generations are going to forget the 20th century. And as Rather argues convincingly, that wo The graphic novel format works well for the presentation of the content of this book, and I've been a Dan Rather fan since the 1980s (in all honesty, I had a bit of a crush on him during his CBS Evening News days!). The book is an interesting combination of personal and historical soul-searching for Rather, and I hope folks who were born in this century will read it, because I'm always worried that later generations are going to forget the 20th century. And as Rather argues convincingly, that would be a very bad thing for this country. Thanks for the giveaway, Goodreads!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kiki

    Just as good as the non-graphic novel version and in some ways better. The imagery was just as moving as the words. Such an important message with how divided we are and how we put more weight into opinions and theories than facts. A quote in the book from Isaac Asimov that really struck a chord was: "The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that my ignorance is just as Just as good as the non-graphic novel version and in some ways better. The imagery was just as moving as the words. Such an important message with how divided we are and how we put more weight into opinions and theories than facts. A quote in the book from Isaac Asimov that really struck a chord was: "The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Thank you so much, NetGalley and publisher, for this excellent review copy! I have liked others in this series but this one is the best. It might actually have helped fill in some of the disappointment and disillusionment I felt after the terrible events of Jan 6 2021. This is a stellar example of good content and good visual presentation and I am just delighted with it. I don't even know how many times I teared up, and I too want to take back the word "patriotism." Highly recommended. Thank you so much, NetGalley and publisher, for this excellent review copy! I have liked others in this series but this one is the best. It might actually have helped fill in some of the disappointment and disillusionment I felt after the terrible events of Jan 6 2021. This is a stellar example of good content and good visual presentation and I am just delighted with it. I don't even know how many times I teared up, and I too want to take back the word "patriotism." Highly recommended.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Katy Jean Vance

    Inspiring. An easy read in the sense that it’s visually pleasing and Mr. Rather’s voice is accessible. I feel hope having read this book. Also, I love that it’s a graphic novel, which makes this sort of commentary on the recent political environment more accessible beyond its potentially dry print format. Thank to to NetGallety and First Second for this ARC in return for an honest review. As a librarian, I would purchase this for American MS/HS classrooms and libraries.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amanda [Novel Addiction]

    These World Citizen Comics are fantastic, and I highly recommend them. This was another amazing volume. I appreciated the switch between red and blue colors - even when not strictly talking about GOP vs. Democrats, the use of that colors carries throughout, which gives the whole volume a little extra cohesion. Definitely worth a read, though I'll admit to liking the other two I've read a little more. These World Citizen Comics are fantastic, and I highly recommend them. This was another amazing volume. I appreciated the switch between red and blue colors - even when not strictly talking about GOP vs. Democrats, the use of that colors carries throughout, which gives the whole volume a little extra cohesion. Definitely worth a read, though I'll admit to liking the other two I've read a little more.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Libriar

    Much to reflect on in this graphic novel adaptation of Dan Rather's book. It would make a good book to frame a high school civics course. The first 4-5 chapters are the strongest. You can't change that Dan Rather is a white male and this is his story but he makes decent efforts to acknowledge his privilege and point out that others didn't have the same opportunities as he did. In a time where our country is so divided, this is good reminder of the core values that the country was founded on. Much to reflect on in this graphic novel adaptation of Dan Rather's book. It would make a good book to frame a high school civics course. The first 4-5 chapters are the strongest. You can't change that Dan Rather is a white male and this is his story but he makes decent efforts to acknowledge his privilege and point out that others didn't have the same opportunities as he did. In a time where our country is so divided, this is good reminder of the core values that the country was founded on.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Christine Ho

    I’m a huge fan of the collection of “what unites us” essays that what published last year- I bought this for my kids (age 10 and 12) - does a wonderful job of conveying ideas, ideals, optimism, and concepts without diluting the message. My 12 year old couldn’t stop talking about it as he read the graphic novel version, and now he wants to read the full text. Beautifully illustrated.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Erikka

    I'll admit, I skimmed this because I've already read the amazing book and reviewed it (https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...). But I wanted to see the art and I'm glad I did. The illustrations add a lot and I think will make this a lot more approachable for some readers. No matter how you read it, just do it. You won't regret it. I'll admit, I skimmed this because I've already read the amazing book and reviewed it (https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...). But I wanted to see the art and I'm glad I did. The illustrations add a lot and I think will make this a lot more approachable for some readers. No matter how you read it, just do it. You won't regret it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    If you are as disturbed and unsteady about the political events that unfolded this week in Washington, DC, this series of essays by Dan Rather, put into graphic novel format, will be a calming voice in the chaos. Pre order now. This will be published in March 2021.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    In thinking of my prior work with young adults, I think this book would be great for those who prefer graphic novel format. The subject matter is important for today's political and social climate. All in all a great book. I always love making typically difficult subject matter more accessible. In thinking of my prior work with young adults, I think this book would be great for those who prefer graphic novel format. The subject matter is important for today's political and social climate. All in all a great book. I always love making typically difficult subject matter more accessible.

  27. 5 out of 5

    David Schwan

    This is the fourth book in a series (World Citizens Comics). The previous three were wonderful, this one just OK. The audience for this book are people who believe all the nonsense from the right about what it means to be a patriotic American.

  28. 5 out of 5

    LeAnn

    It's kinda amazing to me how someone whose witnessed so much horror and injustice and death, can be so optimistic and still believe deeply in our shared humanity. Reading this book made me a little more hopeful about the future. It's kinda amazing to me how someone whose witnessed so much horror and injustice and death, can be so optimistic and still believe deeply in our shared humanity. Reading this book made me a little more hopeful about the future.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Andréa

    Note: I received a digital review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Sanders

    **I received an ARC from the publisher on Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I haven't read the actual book but the graphic novel was really good. It's an interesting read. **I received an ARC from the publisher on Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I haven't read the actual book but the graphic novel was really good. It's an interesting read.

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