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The Complete Buddy Bradley Stories from Hate Comics, Vol. 2: Buddy Does Jersey, 1994-1998

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This volume collects all 15 issues of describing the arc of Buddy's East Coast experience that appeared in "Hate Comics." Originally released in color, these stories are presented de-colorized in the pristine black and white of earlier Buddy stories. Older teens.


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This volume collects all 15 issues of describing the arc of Buddy's East Coast experience that appeared in "Hate Comics." Originally released in color, these stories are presented de-colorized in the pristine black and white of earlier Buddy stories. Older teens.

30 review for The Complete Buddy Bradley Stories from Hate Comics, Vol. 2: Buddy Does Jersey, 1994-1998

  1. 5 out of 5

    Julesreads

    As with most any saga, the more you get into it, the more it grows on you. Buddy Does Seattle had a grotesque, shameful charm to it, but as the stories went along, and the characters and relationships matured, it took on a life of its own. Buddy Does Jersey fully ingratiates itself to the reader, despite its off-putting ways, as you are now a part of the family. It’s a much more involved storytelling, while also keeping the spirit of HATE and Hate and hate alive in Buddy and his horrible buddies As with most any saga, the more you get into it, the more it grows on you. Buddy Does Seattle had a grotesque, shameful charm to it, but as the stories went along, and the characters and relationships matured, it took on a life of its own. Buddy Does Jersey fully ingratiates itself to the reader, despite its off-putting ways, as you are now a part of the family. It’s a much more involved storytelling, while also keeping the spirit of HATE and Hate and hate alive in Buddy and his horrible buddies, tiring family, and just shy of deadbeat life. Of course, the drawing style, whether one finds it “pretty” or not, is distinct, it is Buddy, and it is clean. Let’s all move to Jersey! Wahoo!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Petr Fabián

    Tak to vzalo hodně rychle hodně dark turn. První knížka je pohodička ve stylu Kevina Smithe a najednou se řeší vztahový krize, krize identity, stárnutí, smrt. Sakra tohle byla depka, trochu too close to home ale je to prostě zatraceně dobrý.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Si Squires-Kasten

    Along with Dykes to Watch Out For, Hate is the platonic ideal of a 90s alt comic

  4. 5 out of 5

    Erik

    I last followed the exploits of Buddy Bradley in Bagge’s first collected volume of his series Hate, entitled Buddy Does Seattle. Being a denizen of the Emerald City myself, I found Buddy’s adventures to be hilarious send-ups of the 90s grunge scene that made my city the top of the hot list for all those years. Buddy was a riotous spoof of the disaffected slacker-turned-hipster-wannabe who came to Seattle to slum it. Whether it be his on-again off-again sordid relationship with the sex and attent I last followed the exploits of Buddy Bradley in Bagge’s first collected volume of his series Hate, entitled Buddy Does Seattle. Being a denizen of the Emerald City myself, I found Buddy’s adventures to be hilarious send-ups of the 90s grunge scene that made my city the top of the hot list for all those years. Buddy was a riotous spoof of the disaffected slacker-turned-hipster-wannabe who came to Seattle to slum it. Whether it be his on-again off-again sordid relationship with the sex and attention-starved Lisa, or his creepy roommate Stinky (who sleeps in the pantry), Buddy’s life was anything but boring. In this his second collected volume, Buddy Does Jersey, Buddy returns home to the Garden State with Lisa in tow. And even though they initially have no intention of staying, they wind up moving into his parents’ house. Which begs the question of what is more pathetic: Being a twenty-something slacker barely scraping by in a big city, or returning to the nest, so to speak? A moot point, perhaps. Although I was initially hesitant about Bagge returning Buddy to his roots, I quickly found these misadventures to be just as wickedly funny as his sojourns here in Seattle. Buddy’s latest woes include: the return of his even-more-of-a-slacker brother Jay, Stinky’s arrival in Jersey (which ends calamitously), Lisa’s increasing instability, his wicked family members (his sister Babs, her awful kids, and her deranged and greasy-haired ex), not to mention his recovering narc of a neighbor. Oh, and imagine going to a strip club with your ailing father, whose heart is just about to give out while his face is planted within the bosom of a stripper. That in a nut-shell sums up Buddy’s crazy life back on the East Coast. While Bagge has admittedly hung-up the mantle of penning and drawing Buddy Bradley’s exploits – all good things…, as they say – I feel lucky to be able to enjoy reading about his on-going misadventures in these handsomely collected volumes, courtesy of local indie publisher Fantagraphics. Amen.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    With his comic series Hate, and more importantly with his character Buddy Bradley, Peter Bagge has created what is, for my money, one of the funniest, most thoughtful, and most realistic slacker tales ever. Brief history lesson: Buddy Does Jersey is the second half of the Buddy Bradley stories that originally appeared in Bagge's Hate periodical (the first half can be found in the Buddy Does Seattle collection). Over the course of these two volumes we see a character who lives the prototypical sla With his comic series Hate, and more importantly with his character Buddy Bradley, Peter Bagge has created what is, for my money, one of the funniest, most thoughtful, and most realistic slacker tales ever. Brief history lesson: Buddy Does Jersey is the second half of the Buddy Bradley stories that originally appeared in Bagge's Hate periodical (the first half can be found in the Buddy Does Seattle collection). Over the course of these two volumes we see a character who lives the prototypical slacker lifestyle: He's out of school, intelligent, and has absolutely no desire to join the "regular" workforce. What's perhaps most interesting about Buddy, however, is that while he is trapped by his lack of desire, he embraces it as well. He's a pretty self-aware guy for the most part, but he'll only take action if something truly interferes with his easy-going existence. The stories go from friendship squabbles to roommate squabbles to relationship squabbles to family squabbles, all through the perspective of Buddy. Most of the time it's funny, sometimes it's sad, sometimes it's thoughtful, but it's always entertaining. Bagge's artwork is a fantastic mix of underground comics styles that mirrors Buddy's non-mainstream lifestyle. Buddy Does Jersey ain't the end, however: Mr. Bradley's saga continues in Hate today, albeit on a much more infrequent basis.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Fantagraphics Books

    Buddy Does Jersey collects all 15 issues of Hate describing the arc of Buddy's East Coast experience, including his launch as a small businessman (co-owning and running a nostalgia store with the dubious Jay) and his reintegration with his family (his sister now a harassed mom, his brother still pretty much a psycho, and his parents — well, wait and see). Also included in this volume is the shocking final fate of the exuberant Stinky — a story that caused jaws to drop in unison all around the wo Buddy Does Jersey collects all 15 issues of Hate describing the arc of Buddy's East Coast experience, including his launch as a small businessman (co-owning and running a nostalgia store with the dubious Jay) and his reintegration with his family (his sister now a harassed mom, his brother still pretty much a psycho, and his parents — well, wait and see). Also included in this volume is the shocking final fate of the exuberant Stinky — a story that caused jaws to drop in unison all around the world when it was originally released — and the riotous tale of Lisa's brief conversion to lesbianism and subsequent breakup with Buddy. Originally released in color, the stories in Buddy Does Jersey are here presented de-colorized in the pristine black and white of earlier Buddy stories, in order to better show off the crisp beauty of inker Jim Blanchard's linework. (Or as much crisp beauty as you need to delineate a row of partygoers setting fire to their own flatulence!) Buddy Does Jersey features a long introduction by Bagge describing (for the first time) how the stories in this book reflected events in his own life, and a foreword by the inheritor of Bagge's mantle of hilarious grossness, Angry Youth Comix' Johnny Ryan.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Niklas Pivic

    Human and funny, dirty and real. This is the second volume of what happens to the main character, Buddy Bradley, after he during the mid 1990s leaves American Seattle for New Jersey together with his girlfriend, Lisa, to go live in his parents' house. His decrepit old dad is mean and his younger brother, dishonourably discharged from the navy, stays at home and gets up to no good, which drives Buddy to try and start a new business with a friend. Things get more complicated as his relationship wi Human and funny, dirty and real. This is the second volume of what happens to the main character, Buddy Bradley, after he during the mid 1990s leaves American Seattle for New Jersey together with his girlfriend, Lisa, to go live in his parents' house. His decrepit old dad is mean and his younger brother, dishonourably discharged from the navy, stays at home and gets up to no good, which drives Buddy to try and start a new business with a friend. Things get more complicated as his relationship with Lisa moves in different directions and his "friends" edge him towards all kind of edges. Of course, Buddy's master of his own destiny, and as such perhaps isn't the best captain of his own ship... This is a very human, heart-felt second omnibus of comics from the depths of low society-life where Buddy confesses to living as a snarling, optimistic yet dirty scoundrel. Funny, original and I really liked the characters; I will most definitely get the third volume.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Hamish

    It's cliche, but I really do love Hate. Bagge does something extremely difficult: he creates characters that are stereotypes/caricature/satires with very exaggerated traits, and yet he also makes them seem very human and real. Part of the reason this works is because instead of using a character to satire a large group, he uses more specific targets. These are all people we know in real life, just a little exaggerated. It's not "this guy is a parody of all those crazy liberals", it's "this guy i It's cliche, but I really do love Hate. Bagge does something extremely difficult: he creates characters that are stereotypes/caricature/satires with very exaggerated traits, and yet he also makes them seem very human and real. Part of the reason this works is because instead of using a character to satire a large group, he uses more specific targets. These are all people we know in real life, just a little exaggerated. It's not "this guy is a parody of all those crazy liberals", it's "this guy is a parody of that friend you had in High School who could never get his shit together and eventually became a dealer." Everyone knows a Lisa or a Stinky, and that's why it's so fun to watch them destroy their lives, but unlike in real life you can laugh at them instead of just feeling depressed. And yeah, they're all fuck-ups (my favorite issue title: "Buddy and His Loser Friends in 'Let's Start a Crack House'"), but Bagge makes you love them, warts and all.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Beau

    I bought this on vacation and planned to wait until I got home to read the entire Buddy Bradley series in order. I ended up staying up all night just to finish this off. Buddy Bradley is probably the most accurate depiction of the last generation or so that I've ever read. This is the third collection of Buddy's story. The earlier comics were of Buddy's teen and young adult years. This is him "growing up." If this is where I'm headed, then this book is even more depressing than I thought. Absolutely I bought this on vacation and planned to wait until I got home to read the entire Buddy Bradley series in order. I ended up staying up all night just to finish this off. Buddy Bradley is probably the most accurate depiction of the last generation or so that I've ever read. This is the third collection of Buddy's story. The earlier comics were of Buddy's teen and young adult years. This is him "growing up." If this is where I'm headed, then this book is even more depressing than I thought. Absolutely hilarious, yes, but very fucking depressing.

  10. 4 out of 5

    John Parkinson

    One of the things about getting older, either your discrimination gets looser or you are able to pick stuff to read more selectively......another four star review. Although, perhaps, my enjoyment of this is related more to the memories of enjoying earlier editions of Hate in monthly format years ago than to any close current analysis. Buddy Bradley is a particular type of everyman and everything he does and processes is believable, even to someone from a drastically different location (but simil One of the things about getting older, either your discrimination gets looser or you are able to pick stuff to read more selectively......another four star review. Although, perhaps, my enjoyment of this is related more to the memories of enjoying earlier editions of Hate in monthly format years ago than to any close current analysis. Buddy Bradley is a particular type of everyman and everything he does and processes is believable, even to someone from a drastically different location (but similar background).

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ian Hrabe

    Four stars only because Bagge decided to have this printed in black and white, which makes all the comics look really weird and unfinished because so much of the latter half of Hate relied on color. The stories though, the stories are excellent. Buddy Bradley is forced to mature after moving in with his parents and then has to deal with you know, life stuff. The comics get funnier and sadder at the same time, which is what Hate does best. Not quite tragicomic, more sadfunny.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dominick

    The rest of the Buddy Bradley (and related) stories take Buddy's life to a semi-closural moment, after more sometimes funny but more often grim adventures in the lives of major losers and dickheads. The increasingly realistic and serious tone of the stories is somewhat at odds with Bagge's rubbery style, but there's no question he's a strong cartoonist and writer.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Heath

    Man, I thought Pete Bagge's comics read well in single issue form. Almost 10 years later, these Buddy Bradley stories read even better all in one run. No need to fuss through the non-Buddy stuff in the original comics; here, you can get everything in one clear line of storytelling. It's more coherent than I noticed the first time!

  14. 5 out of 5

    A.

    Apparently the last half of the Hate series wasn't as well loved by fans, but I love this book. It enriches all the characters so much, especially Butch. Also Buddy and Lisa: possibly the most poignant ending to a comics series ever. (Sorry, Captain America.)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    ***SPOILER Alert*** Best ending in American Literature. Buddy coming to terms with pregnant Lisa and owning a ma and pa business: "And Baby Makes Three!!! We'll be living the American Dream! Hey Lisa, is it okay to pork you while your pregnant?".

  16. 5 out of 5

    chris

    Talking about this at work the other day, I hastily compared it to Dostoevsky. I felt a little bit silly about it immediately afterword, but after taking some time to think it over, I have to say that I stand by the comparison.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Even though Buddy Bradley is sort of a self-absorbed asshole, I love Hate. (I guess that's sort of the point, actually.) I found the end of the series incredibly bleak. For some reason, everyone else I've ever spoken to seems to think it's a happy ending.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Phil Overeem

    I loved BUDDY DOES SEATTLE. But this one takes the cake. Hilarious, true, exasperating. Read 'em both folks. I came to these late (46)--and I can't imagine how much I would have liked them when they came out. Buddy (despite some obvious detriments) is a great Everyman.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Darran Mclaughlin

    The second half of the adventures of Buddy Bradley. More great stuff. His star seems to have waned a bit compared to other alt comics stars like Daniel Clowes and Charles Burns which is partly a result of his work being less polished and refined than theirs, but I like the punkiness of it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Matt Shaqfan

    this one's great cause it reprints HATE #16-30 in black and white, instead of color as they originally appeared. no offense to the color but the b/w fits better i think.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Clark

    Thank you Peter Bagge, for understanding.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jeb

    Great misanthropic fun. Highly recommended.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    Wish it didn't have to end!!!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth

    raunchy, sordid, comical, bittersweet slice of life. My favorite part was Buddy's reaction to a potential date to a U2 concert.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Erik Wirfs-Brock

    So good it distracted me from the season finale of Mad Men!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Merritt

    I just finished this today. The storylines are darker and more complex than Seattle, but you still want to jump into the panel.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Candy

    I wanted to love Hate, but sometimes I hated it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Daniel

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mario

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jorge Palacios

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