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At twenty-one , Evelyn is naive about life and love. Raised in a small Montana town, she moves at age sixteen with her devout Catholic family to California. There, she is drawn to Latino culture when she works among the migrant workers. During the summer of her junior year in college, Evelyn travels to a small Mexican town to help set up a school and a library--an experien At twenty-one , Evelyn is naive about life and love. Raised in a small Montana town, she moves at age sixteen with her devout Catholic family to California. There, she is drawn to Latino culture when she works among the migrant workers. During the summer of her junior year in college, Evelyn travels to a small Mexican town to help set up a school and a library--an experience that whets her appetite for a life full of both purpose and adventure. After graduation, Evelyn joins the Peace Corps and is sent to perform community development work in a small mountain town in the Andes of Peru. There, she and her roommate, Marie, search for meaningful projects and adjust to living with few amenities. Over the course of eighteen months, the two young women work in a hospital, start 4-H clubs, attend campesino meetings, and teach PE in a school with dirt floors. Evelyn is chosen queen of the local boys' high school and--despite her resolve to resist such temptations--falls in love with a university student. As she comes of age, Evelyn learns about life and love the hard way when she must chose between following the religious rules of her youth and giving in to her sexual desires.


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At twenty-one , Evelyn is naive about life and love. Raised in a small Montana town, she moves at age sixteen with her devout Catholic family to California. There, she is drawn to Latino culture when she works among the migrant workers. During the summer of her junior year in college, Evelyn travels to a small Mexican town to help set up a school and a library--an experien At twenty-one , Evelyn is naive about life and love. Raised in a small Montana town, she moves at age sixteen with her devout Catholic family to California. There, she is drawn to Latino culture when she works among the migrant workers. During the summer of her junior year in college, Evelyn travels to a small Mexican town to help set up a school and a library--an experience that whets her appetite for a life full of both purpose and adventure. After graduation, Evelyn joins the Peace Corps and is sent to perform community development work in a small mountain town in the Andes of Peru. There, she and her roommate, Marie, search for meaningful projects and adjust to living with few amenities. Over the course of eighteen months, the two young women work in a hospital, start 4-H clubs, attend campesino meetings, and teach PE in a school with dirt floors. Evelyn is chosen queen of the local boys' high school and--despite her resolve to resist such temptations--falls in love with a university student. As she comes of age, Evelyn learns about life and love the hard way when she must chose between following the religious rules of her youth and giving in to her sexual desires.

30 review for Between Inca Walls, A Peace Corps Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Lott Laurenreadsalott

    Memoirs are not typically my go-to but I have read several recently that I’ve really enjoyed and this was definitely one of them. ‘Between Inca Walls’ by Evelyn Kohl LaTorre is such a vivid, beautiful story of her time in the peace corps in the 60s. In this empowering coming of age story, Evelyn joins the peace corps out of a desire for travel and adventure before settling into the life that she’s planned out. Evelyn’s struggles of figuring out what she really wants in life along with family and r Memoirs are not typically my go-to but I have read several recently that I’ve really enjoyed and this was definitely one of them. ‘Between Inca Walls’ by Evelyn Kohl LaTorre is such a vivid, beautiful story of her time in the peace corps in the 60s. In this empowering coming of age story, Evelyn joins the peace corps out of a desire for travel and adventure before settling into the life that she’s planned out. Evelyn’s struggles of figuring out what she really wants in life along with family and religious expectations were so relatable and raw, and it was all told while hearing about her experiences in Peru which were fascinating. This was definitely a fun feel good read! This book is releasing August 11th and I highly recommend keeping your eye out for it!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jade

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading Evelyn Kohl LaTorre’s memoir of her time in the Peace Corps in the 1960’s! The book starts with the author looking over a precipice in the Andes, towards a river 5,000 feet below, wondering what on earth she had got herself into, and with those words I was hooked. Between Inca Walls tells us about Evelyn’s two years working for the Peace Corps in remote areas in Peru, but also about her upbringing in rural Montana, her ties to the Catholic religion, and her own comin I thoroughly enjoyed reading Evelyn Kohl LaTorre’s memoir of her time in the Peace Corps in the 1960’s! The book starts with the author looking over a precipice in the Andes, towards a river 5,000 feet below, wondering what on earth she had got herself into, and with those words I was hooked. Between Inca Walls tells us about Evelyn’s two years working for the Peace Corps in remote areas in Peru, but also about her upbringing in rural Montana, her ties to the Catholic religion, and her own coming of age in an era where everything was changing in the US. Evelyn is the eldest of 5, born into a small farming community in Montana to a strict Catholic, but loving, family. As a child she was super resourceful, finding work and selling her own creations to make her own money from the age of 11, all the while studying with the aim to discover more of the world once she graduated. Instead of settling into marriage and kids like many of her peers at that time, she took another route: she joined the newly created Peace Corps in an attempt to both see the world and give something back. I love how the author writes. She draws you into her time in Peru, describing people, places, and events in a way that you can easily imagine them. She has one heck of a memory too, because her descriptions of things that happened over 50 years ago are so detailed and exact! (She must have kept a very good journal of the time too, something that always helps me remember special details of my own travels years and years later). I also love how honest she is with the reader. She goes into Mexico, and then Peru, naive about where she is heading, what she is planning to do, and what she is going to feel. She tells us of the times that she thought she was helping, when actually she was imposing her own values on a different culture, and she also tells us of how she grapples with her own sexual awakening against her Catholic upbringing. As someone who also traveled a lot in my early 20’s, living in communal settings in the Middle East, I recognized a lot of myself in the author’s words. My own experiences may have been in the early 2000’s rather than the 1960’s, but there was a lot I could relate to in this book. Falling in love far away from home, in a different setting, with someone from a South American country in my early 20’s… Totally done that! It was really interesting to learn more about the early days of the Peace Corps. I was surprised at just how the volunteers were just thrown into certain areas and basically told to figure out with the locals what they would be doing! It was also great to see just how much training the volunteers had to go through before being sent on a mission somewhere. I’m sure things are a little more structured nowadays, but I really enjoyed reading about the early days of the movement, and also how women and men were equal participants in the volunteer work. Definitely a recommended read! I couldn’t put this memoir down, and Evelyn did a wonderful job making her own story read like a novel. I’m also glad that she put a great emphasis on the importance for the organization to focus on having volunteers learn indigenous languages so that they can communicate properly with local populations. And the front cover is just gorgeous! (Also… I really hope Evelyn writes another memoir to tell us all what happens after the last page of Between Inca Walls!! As an immigrant in a relationship with another immigrant from a completely different part of the world than me, with three US born children, these types of stories really interest me, and I would love to read more about Evelyn and Antonio’s life). I received an advance copy of this beautiful memoir in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mark Walker

    After writing my own memoir, “Different Latitudes, My Life in the Peace Corps and Beyond”, I began paying more attention to this genre and have reviewed several books of fellow Returned Peace Corps Volunteers. This book interested me as well because I’ve traveled through Peru several times over the years and my Son-In-Law is Peruvian. The book is well written as the president of the National Association of Memoir Writers, Linda Joy Myers describes, “Evelyn LaTorre creates a masterful portrait of After writing my own memoir, “Different Latitudes, My Life in the Peace Corps and Beyond”, I began paying more attention to this genre and have reviewed several books of fellow Returned Peace Corps Volunteers. This book interested me as well because I’ve traveled through Peru several times over the years and my Son-In-Law is Peruvian. The book is well written as the president of the National Association of Memoir Writers, Linda Joy Myers describes, “Evelyn LaTorre creates a masterful portrait of place―from the Montana hills to the peaks of Perú―and illustrates how place shapes us. The many lovely metaphors and descriptions throughout the book invite the reader to see through the eyes of an innocent girl as she discovers exotic, lively cultures; absorbs the colors, sounds, passion, and intensity of that new world; and allows it to change her life path.” One scene in Cusco, Peru provide a myriad of details which gave a real sense of this exotic community, “Scores of small dark, leather-skinned Indians ran up and down the cobblestone streets carrying huge bundles. They carried market merchandise, food, or wood on their bent backs. The women wore several calf-length skirts, one on top of another, made of bright blue, black, or red homespun wool…My eyes widened in amazement.” I could identify with this twenty-one years old volunteer who was naïve about life and love. Although the author arrived in country ten years before I did (64-66), the circumstances were similar and we both received training in Puerto Rico. Although her training initiated in Cornell University in New York and her field training in Puerto Rico was more focused on physical stamina which included repelling up a dam. The training must have been rigorous as 23 of the initial 102 trainees dropped out. I especially appreciated the negotiation process of her site in an isolated community in the Andes. She told the Peace Corps Director, “We’d be nine hours away from a doctor, not the required seven…There’s just a dirt trail up the mountain. No road. ”We’d pestered our boss for half a month about a place in which to do our community development work. Now he seemed tired of us.” He finally broke down and allowed Evelyn share the site with another female volunteer. This resonates as my initial site was in the highest Department in Central America in Ixchiguan at over 10,000 feet and I almost froze the first several nights in a stark office with just a candle for heat at night. I eventually learned that the volunteer who had done the site survey had never actually been there… The author was raised in a small Montana town and would move to California with her devoutly Catholic family and she was drawn to the Latino culture based on her interaction with migrant workers and on a college work project to a small Mexican town. She’d have a real head start once she joined the Pe ace Corps based on her appreciation of the culture and some basic knowledge of Spanish. Once Evelyn and her roommate, Marie finally did find an acceptable home base they work for eighteen months in a hospital, started 4-H clubs, attended campesino meetings and taught PE in a rudimentary school with a dirt floor. A number of black and white photos and a map help bring the author’s story to life. The author does an excellent job describing her struggle to resist temptations as a good Catholic girl and dealing with her sexual desires with a local university student. I didn’t write much about “feelings” at all in “Different Latitudes” but by the end of this novel when the author realizes that she’s pregnant I was turning the pages quickly to learn if they’d eventually get married. One of the more humorous and touching stories was when the author explains her predicament with a local Priest as part of the sacrament of confession. “Then you are only doing what comes naturally,” Father said. “Say three Hail Mary’s and three Our Fathers and go in peace…Father’s words were a revelation. A load of guilt lifted from me. I couldn’t believe I’d heard. Father O’Brien reinforced what my sister Charlene, had written in her letter months ago…? But her parent’ response was very different. Life changed quickly towards the of the book—pregnancy test, writing a final report for the Peace Corps and figuring out if she would marry her boyfriend Antonio. As was the case with my Guatemalan wife, she’s be married in a civil ceremony followed by a religious ceremony with a few of Antonio’s family members and friends. As they emerged from a fifteenth-century Spanish chapel a new life awaited them as they ran laughing down a centuries-old cobblestone street “between the sturdy granite Inca walls that supported the big stone cathedral and the chapel behind it. “ The marriage ceremony resonated with me as I had actually married my Guatemalan wife before leaving the Peace Corps—unbeknownst to them of course. But I remember the feeling of having the room filled with Ligia’s family members (over 80—immediate family…) and wondering what the future would bring. And my parents wouldn’t get the low down until much later. In the end, this relationship with Antonio would prosper and author is working on her next book about bicultural marriage as she’s now gained a good deal of expertise. The following phrase at the beginning of the book explains not only what the author learned from her Peace Corps experience, but afterwards as well, “This book is dedicated to my sons, Tony and Tim. May you value your origins in love—discovered in the blending of two cultures. About the Author Evelyn Kohl LaTorre grew up in rural Southeastern Montana, surrounded by sheep and cattle ranches, before coming to California with her family at age sixteen. She holds a doctorate in multicultural education from the University of San Francisco, and a master’s degree in social welfare from UC Berkeley. She worked as a bilingual school psychologist and school administrator in public education until her retirement. Evelyn loves to travel; to date, she and her husband have traveled to some 100 countries. You can view her stories and photos on her website, www.evelynlatorre.com. Her writing has appeared in World View Magazine, The Delta Kappa Gamma Bulletin, the California Writers Club Literary Review, the Tri-City Voice, Dispatches, and Clever Magazine. Evelyn lives in Fremont, California. ________________________________________ Product details • Publisher: She Writes Press (August 11, 2020) • Publication Date: August 11, 2020 • Sold by: Amazon.com Services LLC • Language: English • ASIN: B083BFTCWX • Text-to-Speech: Enabled • X-Ray: Not Enabled • Word Wise: Not Enabled • Lending: Not Enabled • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #720,044 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store) o #2328 in Love & Romance (Kindle Store) o #889 in Friendship (Books) o #1313 in Travel Writing Reviewer Mark Walker: Walker was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Guatemala and spent over forty years helping disadvantaged people in the developing world. He came to Phoenix as a Senior Director for Food for the Hungry, worked with other groups like Make-A-Wish International and was the CEO of Hagar USA, a Christian-based organization that supports survivors of human trafficking. His book, Different Latitudes: My Life in the Peace Corps and Beyond, was recognized by the Arizona Literary Association for Non-Fiction and, according to the Midwest Review, “…is more than just another travel memoir. It is an engaged and engaging story of one man’s physical and spiritual journey of self-discovery…” Several of his articles have been published in Ragazine and WorldView Magazines, Literary Yard, Literary Travelers and Quail BELL, while another appeared in "Crossing Class: The Invisible Wall" anthology published by Wising Up Press. His reviews have been published by Revue Magazine, as well as Peace Corps Worldwide, and he has his own column in the “Arizona Authors Association” newsletter, “The Million Mile Walker Review: What We’re Reading and Why.” His essay, “Hugs not Walls: Returning the Children,” was a winner in the Arizona Authors Association literary competition 2020 and was reissued in “Revue Magazine.” His honors include the "Service Above Self" award from Rotary International. He’s the membership chair for “Partnering for Peace.” His wife and three children were born in Guatemala. You can learn more at www.MillionMileWalker.com and follow him on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/millionmilew... and www.Guatemalastory.net

  4. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Memoirs have quickly become one of my favorite genres to read but one of my least favorite to review. I am fascinated by the stories of others but I never want to judge other people’s life experiences. Instead I will say I really enjoyed the writing in this one. I loved learning about the early days of the Peace Corps. I enjoyed this story of falling in love, of religion and culture, of being a stranger in a foreign land. I loved the honesty and hearing about life in a different time and place. I Memoirs have quickly become one of my favorite genres to read but one of my least favorite to review. I am fascinated by the stories of others but I never want to judge other people’s life experiences. Instead I will say I really enjoyed the writing in this one. I loved learning about the early days of the Peace Corps. I enjoyed this story of falling in love, of religion and culture, of being a stranger in a foreign land. I loved the honesty and hearing about life in a different time and place. I loved this coming of age story. If you’re a memoir lover, I highly recommend this great read. And as a side note, as someone who had originally gone to school to become an anthropologist and wanted to join the Peace Corps, I loved hearing about the realities of what that life looked like for someone else. I received an advanced copy in exchange for my review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ray

    **I was provided a copy of this book from @netgalley in exchange for my honest review** 3.5 stars Readers interested in Peru, Peace Corps, strong willed woman, friendship, developing relationships will enjoy this memoir. Evelyn Kohl LaTorre shared a truly beautiful story of her time in the Peace Corps and her experiences certainly shared the importance of this work to her. Her willingness to share every aspect of her life -- from woes, to relationships, to triumphs -- made this a well-rounded memoi **I was provided a copy of this book from @netgalley in exchange for my honest review** 3.5 stars Readers interested in Peru, Peace Corps, strong willed woman, friendship, developing relationships will enjoy this memoir. Evelyn Kohl LaTorre shared a truly beautiful story of her time in the Peace Corps and her experiences certainly shared the importance of this work to her. Her willingness to share every aspect of her life -- from woes, to relationships, to triumphs -- made this a well-rounded memoir. I felt that I got a comprehensive understanding of what her life was like for the 2 years she was in Peru. I loved reading about her strong will and voice and that she did not let anyone, or anything, stand in her way of pursuing her dream. At times I felt that her flashbacks to her younger life in the US growing up in Montana and moving to California were out of place and did not add to her Peace Corps experience, but she was always able to tie the lessons she learned to an experience she had in Peru. I would have also appreciated a faster pace through the chapters in order to move the retelling along, many things were provided in detail that could have been summed up in a shorter way without loosing the integrity of the story.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Pages Places & Plates

    ***Please note: I was gifted a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review*** This is an absolutely fascinating and in-depth account of author Evelyn's experiences in Peru as a Peace Corps member in the '60s, with so much detail and content. It's not just a story of travel but many elements combined seamlessly together - cultural differences, societal attitudes and struggles, inner conflict regarding religion, and unexpected love. I thoroughly enjoyed my time reading this and really connec ***Please note: I was gifted a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review*** This is an absolutely fascinating and in-depth account of author Evelyn's experiences in Peru as a Peace Corps member in the '60s, with so much detail and content. It's not just a story of travel but many elements combined seamlessly together - cultural differences, societal attitudes and struggles, inner conflict regarding religion, and unexpected love. I thoroughly enjoyed my time reading this and really connected with Evelyn, who gave so much insight. Was truly sad for the book to end. It's also inspired me to visit Peru even more! You can read my full review here: https://pagesplacesandplates.com/2020...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Debra Thomas

    When I was young, I used to dream of joining the Peace Corps, but the truth is, I lacked the courage and adventurous spirit of Evelyn Kohl LaTorre. Between Inca Walls is an engaging memoir that is best summed up in the author’s experience rappelling down Dos Bocas Dam: She bravely took on challenges, worked hard at completing every task well, and always—always—managed to have fun. From her childhood in Montana, to her summer helping a community in Mexico, and, ultimately, to her work in the moun When I was young, I used to dream of joining the Peace Corps, but the truth is, I lacked the courage and adventurous spirit of Evelyn Kohl LaTorre. Between Inca Walls is an engaging memoir that is best summed up in the author’s experience rappelling down Dos Bocas Dam: She bravely took on challenges, worked hard at completing every task well, and always—always—managed to have fun. From her childhood in Montana, to her summer helping a community in Mexico, and, ultimately, to her work in the mountains of Peru, the author conveys her joy for life and her deep desire to help others. Her altruistic nature, however, is equally matched by her search for love, and the love story that carries us to the end of this memoir leaves us wanting more. Rumor has it a sequel is in the works.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Carol (Reading Ladies)

    3.5 Stars Thanks #netgalley #shewritespress for a complimentary e ARC of #betweenincawalls by Evelyn Kohl LaTorre. All opinions in this review are completely my own. I love memoir because I enjoy learning how others choose to spend their one precious life. Evelyn LaTorre and her family moved from Montana to California when she was sixteen and one summer working with migrant workers whets her appetite for a life of service and adventure. During college, she serves for a summer in Mexico helping to 3.5 Stars Thanks #netgalley #shewritespress for a complimentary e ARC of #betweenincawalls by Evelyn Kohl LaTorre. All opinions in this review are completely my own. I love memoir because I enjoy learning how others choose to spend their one precious life. Evelyn LaTorre and her family moved from Montana to California when she was sixteen and one summer working with migrant workers whets her appetite for a life of service and adventure. During college, she serves for a summer in Mexico helping to set up a school and establish a library. After college, she joins the #peacecorps and serves in a small mountain village in the Andes of Peru. She has many life-changing experiences, works hard, makes friends, and falls in love with a local university student. Because Evelyn is Catholic and has considered becoming a Nun, she is faced with a difficult life decision. Through Evelyn’s experiences we learn about the challenges and rewards of serving in the Peace Corps as we also agonize with her about personal choices that will affect the rest of her life. While reading Between Inca Walls, you will feel like you are reading Evelyn’s journal. I am impressed by the detailed notes she kept and I felt transported to Peru through her vivid descriptions. She is an adventurous, determined, and brave young woman! I recommend Between Inca Walls for fans of memoir, for readers interested in Peru and/or the Peace Corps, and for those who enjoy reading about the unique experiences of others. For more reviews visit my blog www.readingladies.com

  9. 5 out of 5

    Linda Metzger

    What a BEAUTIFULLY written memoir~ It is so rich in description of details that bring it alive Evelyn's time embracing new cultures in the Peace Corp and made her experience so real for the reader! I found myself rooting for Evelyn through all the ups and downs. Such an inspiring story, especially for women! I highly recommend this book! I gave it,,,5 Stars

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

    A really cool inside look into the life of someone in the Peace Corps. I loved the insight this book gave into Peruvian culture as well. An inspirational look at how one woman figures out her life path!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Charlene

    When Evelyn La Torre joins the Peace Corps she prepares with all the passion her intense nature possesses. In the experience of living first in Mexico and eventually in Peru her memoir details how her passions unfold–committed to helping others in undeveloped countries, prepared to take matters into her own hands when required, even daring dangerous possibly life-threatening rides in vehicles driven by those native to countries where cliffs fall a thousand feet on one side, and rise another thou When Evelyn La Torre joins the Peace Corps she prepares with all the passion her intense nature possesses. In the experience of living first in Mexico and eventually in Peru her memoir details how her passions unfold–committed to helping others in undeveloped countries, prepared to take matters into her own hands when required, even daring dangerous possibly life-threatening rides in vehicles driven by those native to countries where cliffs fall a thousand feet on one side, and rise another thousand on the other side. Hardly room to get one vehicle through but what happens when truck meets truck? La Torre continues her saga with daily details of settling into her home in Peru. How did she and her roommate Marie manage to buy food, cook food, obtain beds, keep the home clean? Her first impression of her new abode speaks to her determination and humility, "The twelve-by-fifteen-foot hut had windows and a concrete floor. Marie and I looked at one another surprised. How could we be so lucky as to find an acceptable place to live so quickly—and at no charge?" From struggling with the local language Quechua to yearnings for home food like hot dogs, the travelogue reminds any traveler of those moments in foreign lands when the sounds from people sound too strange and the longing for comfort food overwhelms. Through the story which winds back and forth from the US to South America, from La Torre as a passionately committed Catholic girl who had wanted to be a nun to a young woman experiencing her body's hungers, rises the true story. It is a love story. The book is well written, smoothly consistent and delivers a surprising intensity, not at first noticeable under the deliberate details. Eventually La Torre's book offers a loving tribute to romance, to a young woman's coming of age and to her attempt to live a life of generosity and compassion. Well worth the read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Kidwell

    Between Inca Walls A Peace Corps Memoir by Evelyn Kohl LaTorre She Writes Press Biographies & Memoirs Pub Date 11 Aug 2020 I am reviewing a copy of Between Inca Walls through She Writes Press and Netgalley: Evelyn is naive about life and love at twenty one. She was raised in a small Montana town, but at sixteen she and her devoutly Catholic family move to California. In California she is drawn to the Latino culture after working amongst the migrant workers. During the summer of her junior year in Between Inca Walls A Peace Corps Memoir by Evelyn Kohl LaTorre She Writes Press Biographies & Memoirs Pub Date 11 Aug 2020 I am reviewing a copy of Between Inca Walls through She Writes Press and Netgalley: Evelyn is naive about life and love at twenty one. She was raised in a small Montana town, but at sixteen she and her devoutly Catholic family move to California. In California she is drawn to the Latino culture after working amongst the migrant workers. During the summer of her junior year in college, Evelyn travels to a small Mexican town to help set up a school and a library, an experience that whets her appetite for a life full of both purpose and adventure. Evelyn joins the Peace Corps after graduation. Where she is sent to sent to perform community development work in a small mountain town in the Andes of Perú. It is there she and her roommate Marie, search for meaningful projects and adjust to living with few amenities. In eighteen months the two young women work in a hospital, start 4-H clubs, attend campesino meetings, and teach PE in a school with dirt floors. Evelyn is chosen queen of the local boys Highschool and despite being resolved to resist temptations, she falls in love with a University Student. As Evelyn comes of age she must choose between following the religious rules of her youth and giving in to her sexual desires. I give Between Inca Walls Four out of five stars! Happy Reading!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Carole Bumpus

    Between Inca Walls – Evelyn LaTorre If ever you have wondered what it would be like to pursue a stint in the Peace Corp in the 60s, you will be delighted and entertained by LaTorre’s trek into Peru. A personal memoir of her trip from her hometown in rural Montana, to northern California, to Mexico for an eye-opening trip to help the less fortunate, to gearing up for the Peace Corp in Peru following college, to climbing up those Incan walls, she carries you along with her as together you face ever Between Inca Walls – Evelyn LaTorre If ever you have wondered what it would be like to pursue a stint in the Peace Corp in the 60s, you will be delighted and entertained by LaTorre’s trek into Peru. A personal memoir of her trip from her hometown in rural Montana, to northern California, to Mexico for an eye-opening trip to help the less fortunate, to gearing up for the Peace Corp in Peru following college, to climbing up those Incan walls, she carries you along with her as together you face every careful decision she makes. Her intense and straightforward writing wrings out the angst she experienced as a young twenty-one year old, about her strict Catholic background, her moral convictions to never betray her religion, yet her struggle with finding her one true love in the hinterlands of Peru, all the while working alongside the Incans. Her descriptions of people, place and the happenstances of her eighteen-month journey are crisp and clear. A trip of a lifetime in which the untarnished and straightforward truth comes rolling forward. Looking forward to the ‘rest of the story’ in the sequel.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jaclyn (sixminutesforme)

    DNF at 30% - really interested if premise to this memoir and I certainly learned more about the peace corps than I knew before going in. I think this will appeal to readers who enjoy those super detail driven narratives and don’t mind slow movement that way, I got a third in and still hadn’t reached points indicated in the blurb so felt like there was a lot of groundwork laid before we even reached the peace corps content. I perhaps went in (from the blurb) thinking it’d be a similar read to Eme DNF at 30% - really interested if premise to this memoir and I certainly learned more about the peace corps than I knew before going in. I think this will appeal to readers who enjoy those super detail driven narratives and don’t mind slow movement that way, I got a third in and still hadn’t reached points indicated in the blurb so felt like there was a lot of groundwork laid before we even reached the peace corps content. I perhaps went in (from the blurb) thinking it’d be a similar read to Emergency Sex (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7...). Many thanks to Books Forward PR for a review copy.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Samuel Soisson

    Between Inca Walls is a memoir by Evelyn Kohl La Torre that sparked interest in me, as it was a story of a girl in who was given an opportunity to experience life in a different culture. This book takes place in several different small cities in Mexico and South America, but primarily in Abancay, a city in Peru, and is dated to 1964. I strongly recommend this book, because it was meaningful in a way to me because I like learning about different cultures, and it was interesting to see how she rea Between Inca Walls is a memoir by Evelyn Kohl La Torre that sparked interest in me, as it was a story of a girl in who was given an opportunity to experience life in a different culture. This book takes place in several different small cities in Mexico and South America, but primarily in Abancay, a city in Peru, and is dated to 1964. I strongly recommend this book, because it was meaningful in a way to me because I like learning about different cultures, and it was interesting to see how she reacted to new situations that she and I had never experienced before.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Vance

    I'm always captivated by stories of people realizing that life holds much more than just what you were taught growing up. Not only does Evelyn inspire people through her writing to volunteer and embrace new cultures, but also to make sure that you are figuring out what your purpose and path look like. And I mean, who isn't intrigued by the idea of a woman who has always thought about becoming a nun falling in love? A really unique story and an inspiring woman.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Books Forward

    This memoir is a unique look into the ways viewpoints change as you grow up and see the world. It follows Evelyn as she figures out what she really wants by embracing the cultures she travels to and the communities she is a part of. A relatable read all about the changes you face within yourself as you become an adult.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Marissa DeCuir

    A relaxing read following a woman who grows in confidence as she takes on the world. Throughout the book, you continuously root for her as she strives to understand what she really wants. Relatable for any woman who has struggled with the ups and downs of love and finding their place in the world!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Lee Arnold

    Independent woman! 60s Peace Corps! Peru! This memoir about Evelyn Koch LaTorre’s two years in a small Peruvian mountain town as a Peace Corps volunteer in the mid 60s is an adventurous, self-reflective, and historically important story. LaTorre captures so many things so vividly – growing up as a bold young woman with more resourcefulness and ambition than most Montana girls, the early innocence, good intentions, and sometimes bumbling contributions of the Peace Corps and its volunteers in Per Independent woman! 60s Peace Corps! Peru! This memoir about Evelyn Koch LaTorre’s two years in a small Peruvian mountain town as a Peace Corps volunteer in the mid 60s is an adventurous, self-reflective, and historically important story. LaTorre captures so many things so vividly – growing up as a bold young woman with more resourcefulness and ambition than most Montana girls, the early innocence, good intentions, and sometimes bumbling contributions of the Peace Corps and its volunteers in Peru, the liveliness, warmth, and safety of Cusco and other Peruvian Andean towns in the decade before Shining Path guerrillas made some of those towns too risky to live in or visit, the mores for young women from the U.S. in Peru in the 60s, the inevitable attractions between young Americans and Peruvians, and how one independent young American woman navigated all of this. This is what the highlands of Peru were like for Americans in the years way before massive tourism overran Machu Picchu and Cusco. LaTorre’s sharp observations bring the people and places of this time period alive. As someone who visited Cusco several times during the late 90’s, I could feel myself there again. LaTorre’s descriptions of terrifying bus, truck, and car rides along mountain roads with steep cliffs and no guardrails and the frequent strikes that citizens took in stride balance out the rosy picture. Grappling honestly with her Catholic faith and her awakening sexuality in an indigenous Catholic country far from home, LaTorre adds depth to an already personal story about a young woman finding her purpose and learning where love fits in. Overall, a fascinating, informative, and satisfying read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Judyth Wier

  21. 4 out of 5

    Joyce Kemper

  22. 5 out of 5

    Evelyn LaTorre

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gurleen

  24. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

  25. 5 out of 5

    Frankietree

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Greatrex

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gillian

  28. 4 out of 5

    Anne Spry

  29. 5 out of 5

    Akshita

  30. 4 out of 5

    judy bock

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