web site hit counter The Art of Seeing - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Art of Seeing

Availability: Ready to download

Both a document and a handbook The Art of Seeing records Aldous Huxley's victory over near-blindness and details the simple exercises anyone can follow to improve eyesight. Using the method devised by Dr. William H. Bates, "the pioneer of visual education," as Huxley called him, and heeding the advice of Dr. Bates' disciple, Margaret D. Corbett, Aldous Huxley conquered a Both a document and a handbook The Art of Seeing records Aldous Huxley's victory over near-blindness and details the simple exercises anyone can follow to improve eyesight. Using the method devised by Dr. William H. Bates, "the pioneer of visual education," as Huxley called him, and heeding the advice of Dr. Bates' disciple, Margaret D. Corbett, Aldous Huxley conquered a vision problem that had plagued him for more than a quarter century.


Compare

Both a document and a handbook The Art of Seeing records Aldous Huxley's victory over near-blindness and details the simple exercises anyone can follow to improve eyesight. Using the method devised by Dr. William H. Bates, "the pioneer of visual education," as Huxley called him, and heeding the advice of Dr. Bates' disciple, Margaret D. Corbett, Aldous Huxley conquered a Both a document and a handbook The Art of Seeing records Aldous Huxley's victory over near-blindness and details the simple exercises anyone can follow to improve eyesight. Using the method devised by Dr. William H. Bates, "the pioneer of visual education," as Huxley called him, and heeding the advice of Dr. Bates' disciple, Margaret D. Corbett, Aldous Huxley conquered a vision problem that had plagued him for more than a quarter century.

30 review for The Art of Seeing

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    I have parted with this book before finishing it, so that others may benefit more from its contents. However though I was only about 60% of the way through it is a great work and, so far as I know, describes techniques for healing and improving eyesight that are still far from mainstream, but that work wonderfully. The testimony of Huxley himself in this book is wondrous. I had no idea this great author originally had to rely on braille to read. However, he went from being nearly blind to being I have parted with this book before finishing it, so that others may benefit more from its contents. However though I was only about 60% of the way through it is a great work and, so far as I know, describes techniques for healing and improving eyesight that are still far from mainstream, but that work wonderfully. The testimony of Huxley himself in this book is wondrous. I had no idea this great author originally had to rely on braille to read. However, he went from being nearly blind to being able to read without glasses thanks to the techniques described in this book. The techniques are not his, but the discussion of them and their application is most helpful. If you, or someone you know, is currently wearing glasses, get this book. Even if your vision is good the content of this book will help you preserve and enhance it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Erik Graff

    This book, a description and prescription of the Bates method which Aldous Huxley claimed to have successfully utilized to alleviate his near blindness, is written with a clarity and precision which might well serve as a model for the authors of "owner's manuals" and self-help books. However, although motivated by my own inconvenient myopia and a great respect for Huxley, I found this book ponderously tedious, despite the fine quality of its prose and the occasionally interesting points made abo This book, a description and prescription of the Bates method which Aldous Huxley claimed to have successfully utilized to alleviate his near blindness, is written with a clarity and precision which might well serve as a model for the authors of "owner's manuals" and self-help books. However, although motivated by my own inconvenient myopia and a great respect for Huxley, I found this book ponderously tedious, despite the fine quality of its prose and the occasionally interesting points made about the complex interrelations between mind, body and environment in the highly interpretative act of seeing.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Seizure Romero

    The idea that you can exercise and improve or maintain your vision = good. Doing so by looking at the sun, however briefly = not so much.

  4. 5 out of 5

    J. PAUL

    My visual acuity improved after reading this book! Today, over twenty years after reading this book, my vision is significantly better than most people in my age group.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    This is a very practical & informative book for those looking to improve their eyesight. Probably only Aldous could champion this "think outside the box" approach so persuasively, concentrating on exercises to train the eyes rather than the cop-out band-aid approach of prescription spectacles. Has anyone since stopped to think upon the prevalence of glasses as part of an enormous addiction spread & perpetuated by the companies that manufacture them? Huxley also brings ridicule down on the sungla This is a very practical & informative book for those looking to improve their eyesight. Probably only Aldous could champion this "think outside the box" approach so persuasively, concentrating on exercises to train the eyes rather than the cop-out band-aid approach of prescription spectacles. Has anyone since stopped to think upon the prevalence of glasses as part of an enormous addiction spread & perpetuated by the companies that manufacture them? Huxley also brings ridicule down on the sunglasses industry, noting that in the early part of the 20th century only people with serious eye problems wore them, & then suddenly they became a fashion staple & prerequisite of "cool," when in reality they simply train one's eyes to become less accustomed to natural light. It takes both patience & stubbornness to follow his suggestions (& make it thru the book!) & I find it quite amusing to hear that people at dinner parties would be a bit disconcerted to find Aldous suddenly covering his eyes with his hands without a word of explanation. His wife would relieve the tension by explaining he was not bored or rude, just engaging in some "palming," one of the therapeutic techniques he recommends here. We should all be so smart & stubborn! Huxley was actually able to improve his eyesight a great deal by following the methods he shares here. Good job Aldous!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Ball

    "The first is connected with the silly craze for shutting out the light, described in an earlier paragraph. Medical alarmists and the advertisers, who exploit the opinions of these learned gentlemen for their own profit, have convinced large sections of the public that light is harmful to the eyes. This is not true; but the belief that it is true can cause a great deal of harm to those who entertain it. If faith can move mountains, it can also ruin vision —as anyone may see for himself who has watche "The first is connected with the silly craze for shutting out the light, described in an earlier paragraph. Medical alarmists and the advertisers, who exploit the opinions of these learned gentlemen for their own profit, have convinced large sections of the public that light is harmful to the eyes. This is not true; but the belief that it is true can cause a great deal of harm to those who entertain it. If faith can move mountains, it can also ruin vision —as anyone may see for himself who has watched the behaviour of light-fearing people when suddenly exposed to sunshine. They know that light is bad for them. Consequently, what grimaces! What frowns! What narrowings of the lids! What screwings-up of the eyes! In a word, what manifest symptoms of strain and tension! Originating in a false belief, the purely mental terror of light expresses itself physically in terms of a strained and thoroughly abnormal condition of the sensing-apparatus. Eyes in such a condition are no longer capable of reacting as they should to the external environment. Instead of accepting the sunlight easily and as a blessing, they suffer discomfort and even develop an inflammation of the tissues. Hence more pain and a heightening of fear, a confirmation of the false faith that light is harmful. There is also another reason for the discomfort which so many people now experience when exposed to light. They may not start with any a priori terror of light; but because their seeing organs are strained and defective, owing to habits of wrong use, their eyes and mind may be incapable of reacting normally to the external environment. Strong light is painful to the tense, strained seeing organs. Because it is painful, a fear of light develops in the mind; and this fear becomes, in its turn, a cause of further strain and discomfort"

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brett

    I picked this up because I am a Huxley completist, but I cannot in good conscience recommend it to anyone. If you are having vision trouble, go see your optometrist instead of reading this unhelpful book. Judging by the title, you may hope that the Art of Seeing has to do with how to be more perceptive in the world or something to that effect, but it is literally about how to improve failing vision. Huxley is hooked on something called the "Bates Method" named for the doctor that invented it. Bas I picked this up because I am a Huxley completist, but I cannot in good conscience recommend it to anyone. If you are having vision trouble, go see your optometrist instead of reading this unhelpful book. Judging by the title, you may hope that the Art of Seeing has to do with how to be more perceptive in the world or something to that effect, but it is literally about how to improve failing vision. Huxley is hooked on something called the "Bates Method" named for the doctor that invented it. Basically, it recommends that a person often cover their eyes with their palms for a few minutes, practice seeing things far away or near, swing your head around and try to see stuff, and--unbelievably--to "sun" your eyes by looking directly into the sun, albeit for short periods. If this sounds like advice that is very unlikely to cure your failing vision, I think you are right. The book was written in 1942, and my impression is that science has not come around to accept these practices as beneficial. In one brief section at the beginning of the book, Huxley describes the nature of the scientific debate as between those that believe the eye focuses using only the lenses, and others (such as Bates) that believe the muscles around the eye also squeeze the actual shape of the eye to affect vision as well. I don't know really anything about biology, but again, I think the modern understanding of how eyes work does not include Bates' idea. Toward the later part of his life, Huxley was opening himself up to all kinds of new experiences, such as experimenting with psychotropic drugs and generally becoming a precursor to what would later be called "hippies." Some of the writing that came out of the period is pretty good, but this book deserves to shelved next to the non-FDA approved herbal remedies and quackery such as therapeutic touch or holistic medicines. Just go see your damned doctor.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Taylor

    I came across this book at a used bookstore in Victoria, British Columbia. I had never heard of it before but because it was by Huxley and looked curious I picked it up. I don’t regret the purchase. The book is of interest from three perspectives. First, it discusses techniques for alleviating vision problems. Some of these techniques are common sense and some are not. People with poor eyesight may want to read the book to check for useful ideas. Be warned, though, it is repetitive. So, be patien I came across this book at a used bookstore in Victoria, British Columbia. I had never heard of it before but because it was by Huxley and looked curious I picked it up. I don’t regret the purchase. The book is of interest from three perspectives. First, it discusses techniques for alleviating vision problems. Some of these techniques are common sense and some are not. People with poor eyesight may want to read the book to check for useful ideas. Be warned, though, it is repetitive. So, be patient. Or skim. Second, it is a book by and about (to some extent) Aldous Huxley. He was an intelligent writer and it is interesting to read his take on issues that affected him so directly and so significantly. Third, the book has a philosophical and anthropological aspect as it provides insight into early twentieth century thinking on vision, mind-body interaction and similar themes. For example, Huxley talks about the importance of “dynamic relaxation” – a concept which appears to be the equivalent of “being in the zone”. He also suggests that the capacity for perception depends upon past experience – an idea which can be only partially correct since we all have to start somewhere. In any event, there are numerous ideas of interest and many of them resonate with contemporary thinking about stress and mindfulness. It is worth a look.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    I've yet to read "Brave New World," but heard it's good. Huxley maybe should've stuck to fiction. Painfully verbose, yet simultaneously bereft of information. I'm researching alternatives to lasik surgery and came across this book. Huxley's own vision was improved dramatically using the Bates Method, so he wrote this book to promote it. Written in 1942, much of the information is out of date (such as "sunning" the eyes), but there are suggested exercises that seem to follow logical enough to war I've yet to read "Brave New World," but heard it's good. Huxley maybe should've stuck to fiction. Painfully verbose, yet simultaneously bereft of information. I'm researching alternatives to lasik surgery and came across this book. Huxley's own vision was improved dramatically using the Bates Method, so he wrote this book to promote it. Written in 1942, much of the information is out of date (such as "sunning" the eyes), but there are suggested exercises that seem to follow logical enough to warrant further research. Despite the absence of references to empirical studies and as controversial as the Bates Method is, this book piqued my interest just enough to look into it further.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Marina

    Read the entire book with my pin hole glasses on! Interesting exposition of Dr Bates's theories on the causes and cures of vision problems. Some of the techniques were familiar from vision improvement courses I've tried - with some success. I'm now motivated to go back to them in the hope of ditching my glasses! Read the entire book with my pin hole glasses on! Interesting exposition of Dr Bates's theories on the causes and cures of vision problems. Some of the techniques were familiar from vision improvement courses I've tried - with some success. I'm now motivated to go back to them in the hope of ditching my glasses!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Benito

    Prefiero no entrar en detalle en el contenido. Como mínimo es obsoleto en muchos aspectos, lo que lo hace técnicamente irrelevante. Quien esté interesado en el método Bates hará mejor en recurrir a otras fuentes. Como libro es ilegible.

  12. 5 out of 5

    b e a c h g o t h

    Not what I expected.... and not something I enjoyed

  13. 4 out of 5

    G.

    Very good “first book” for these who eventually really want to go deeper and explore the topic.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Julian BLOWER

    things this book tells you how to do: - get rid of a headache things this book doesn't tell you how to do: - cure myopia things this book tells you how to do: - get rid of a headache things this book doesn't tell you how to do: - cure myopia

  15. 5 out of 5

    Oleksandr

    Must read

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ernesto

    THIS BOOK IS INCREDIBLE

  17. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    It was very interesting. I stopped reading it because the methods discussed did not apply to macular degeneration.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sardor

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. папвапвапвапва

  19. 4 out of 5

    Silvia Giordani

    Un libro molto tecnico. Certe parti risulteranno noiose a chi non realmente interessato alla rieducazione della vista tramite esercizi e allenamento.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Paige Ellen Stone

    An absolutely personal accomplishment in Huxley's life. Words fail to capture what he actually did. VERY inspiring. An absolutely personal accomplishment in Huxley's life. Words fail to capture what he actually did. VERY inspiring.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Franfredo

    Useful advice, as usual it could have been half pages less if it wasn't for Aldous Huxley's pen. Useful advice, as usual it could have been half pages less if it wasn't for Aldous Huxley's pen.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dony Grayman

    "El exitoso y ya clásico método de recuperación visual explciado por el célebre escritor británico". Ediciones Renglón. "El exitoso y ya clásico método de recuperación visual explciado por el célebre escritor británico". Ediciones Renglón.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dita di Polvere

    Tante dritte interessanti, ma resta da vedere quanto siano effettivamente utili. Un buon manuale, da prendere con le pinze.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lisbeth

    didn't finish didn't finish

  25. 5 out of 5

    Johanna

    I really doubt this is effective, read the book and tried some tips but no change at all!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Neville Ridley-smith

    Some interesting stuff and some *really* dodgy stuff. Staring a the sun?! But anyway, some helpful speed reading tips.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rubén

    Pretty quick and interesting read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Paola Valentina

    Excelente libro para todas las personas que necesitan/usan anteojos, y si no los necesitan también. Huxley, te queremos.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Vegard 1bpm

  30. 4 out of 5

    Herwin Cabasal

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.