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When the Alliance Fleet mounts a major campaign against a deadly warlord, tyrant Ysanne Isard has taken control of Thyferra, intending to use its supply of medicinal bacta to destabilize and destroy the New Republic. Undermanned, deprived of Alliance support, Rogue Squadron must oppose Isard's plans, defeat her Star Destroyer fleet, and free Thyferra from her rule in a win When the Alliance Fleet mounts a major campaign against a deadly warlord, tyrant Ysanne Isard has taken control of Thyferra, intending to use its supply of medicinal bacta to destabilize and destroy the New Republic. Undermanned, deprived of Alliance support, Rogue Squadron must oppose Isard's plans, defeat her Star Destroyer fleet, and free Thyferra from her rule in a winner-take-all battle against a seemingly superior force.


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When the Alliance Fleet mounts a major campaign against a deadly warlord, tyrant Ysanne Isard has taken control of Thyferra, intending to use its supply of medicinal bacta to destabilize and destroy the New Republic. Undermanned, deprived of Alliance support, Rogue Squadron must oppose Isard's plans, defeat her Star Destroyer fleet, and free Thyferra from her rule in a win When the Alliance Fleet mounts a major campaign against a deadly warlord, tyrant Ysanne Isard has taken control of Thyferra, intending to use its supply of medicinal bacta to destabilize and destroy the New Republic. Undermanned, deprived of Alliance support, Rogue Squadron must oppose Isard's plans, defeat her Star Destroyer fleet, and free Thyferra from her rule in a winner-take-all battle against a seemingly superior force.

30 review for The Bacta War

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

    It's easy to see why this series is among the best-loved parts of the Expanded Universe. Great action and a fun plot; what's not to like? Then again, I could have done without the scene in the first chapter that implies sex. It's easy to see why this series is among the best-loved parts of the Expanded Universe. Great action and a fun plot; what's not to like? Then again, I could have done without the scene in the first chapter that implies sex.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Starr Light

    Rogue Squadron goes rogue After the events of The Krytos Trap, the Rogues were in a sticky position: let Ysanne Isard have control of Thyferra and the galaxy’s supply of bacta (which would cure the deadly Krytos virus) or leave the New Republic and go after her. Being Rogues, Wedge, Tycho, Corran, and the others leave their post and begin to plan a way to release Thyferra from Imperial rule. NOTE: Based on audiobook and novel. I Liked: It’s nice to see the pilots of Rogue Squadron have to fight with Rogue Squadron goes rogue After the events of The Krytos Trap, the Rogues were in a sticky position: let Ysanne Isard have control of Thyferra and the galaxy’s supply of bacta (which would cure the deadly Krytos virus) or leave the New Republic and go after her. Being Rogues, Wedge, Tycho, Corran, and the others leave their post and begin to plan a way to release Thyferra from Imperial rule. NOTE: Based on audiobook and novel. I Liked: It’s nice to see the pilots of Rogue Squadron have to fight with their brains instead of overwhelming firepower. The story of this book is unique. Instead of working with the New Republic, the Rogues have to leave in order to defeat the Empire (which is very different than how most authors tend to paint the New Republic, as the rosy-posy, goody-two-shoes, nearly utopian government). Stackpole continues to please me by including continuity nods to Zahn’s trilogy among others. I was particularly pleased to see mentions to Outbound Flight, the Katana fleet, Winter, and even Talon Karrde! And speaking of Winter and Karrde, Stackpole writes them brilliantly, just as I think Zahn would want. Corran Horn gets some growth: relationally and in the Force. I really liked to see how he tried and failed to use the Force (after Luke asked Corran to join his Academy). I Didn’t Like: I wasn’t too fond of how much recapping occurred in this book. The first 15min of the audiobook (which is only 180 min long) was basically a recap of the previous book. I don’t recall so much recap from the previous books (even The Krytos Trap, in which Corran was captured), and I don’t really feel it is necessary. Also, Isard is reduced to the Cackling Villain variety, a variety I loathe. She could be really good, but all she does is talk about how she will destroy the Rebel Alliance and the Empire will rise again. A shame. Our other villain, Vorru, isn’t so bad, but he really doesn’t have as much power as he likes to think. And Kirtan Loor, the villain I really liked, is gone. Lastly, I just had trouble getting involved in the story. It wasn’t boring, it wasn’t terribly written, it’s just after the info-dump and the recap, I found myself unengaged. Dialogue/Sexual Situations/Violence: Star Wars curse words. Mirax and Corran consummate their love off-screen. Dogfights galore. Corran also unintentionally starts a fight while trying to use a Jedi Mind Trick. Overall: The Bacta War wraps up many things in the X-Wing line: the Rogue Squadron’s story, Ysanne Isard’s flee from Coruscant, the Krytos virus arc, and Stackpole’s four book run (though he would return to X-Wing in “Isard’s Revenge”). It was a decent novel, but I just couldn’t seem to get interested in it. I’m rounding to 4 because it might have been A) the audiobook (the narrator uses some annoying voices for the women and an odd Scottish accent for Wedge), B) my mood, or C) being distracted.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    Probably ought to be 3.5, but I wanted to give Stackpole credit for successfully finishing a series in less than a dozen books. (No small accomplishment these days.)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Trachta

    Ok, read this one a while back and wanted to read a little fluff and see how this one had aged on me (I guess). Have to say it aged poorly at best. While I believe there was some hope for the general story (really this should have been drawn out over several books, instead Iceheart is made to look like a fool) the over the top performance of the Rogue Squadron really makes you question the series and writer. for openers Rogue Squadron seems to always have win engagements no matter the odds; yes Ok, read this one a while back and wanted to read a little fluff and see how this one had aged on me (I guess). Have to say it aged poorly at best. While I believe there was some hope for the general story (really this should have been drawn out over several books, instead Iceheart is made to look like a fool) the over the top performance of the Rogue Squadron really makes you question the series and writer. for openers Rogue Squadron seems to always have win engagements no matter the odds; yes i get it that they're good (arguable the best) but 10-0 kill ratio's don't happen in one engagement (they do for Rogue). Attrition happens and we never see Rogue losing a pilot (yes, one is forced to punch out at the end). I'll follow this up with the Empire (or the organization formally known as the Empire) must be full of idiots. How many "ships" must you lose to "snub fighters" before you recognize that "snub fighters" aren't only a threat but you really need to improve your defenses against them (turbo-laser turrets were used by the Death Star and failed, same for Endor and every other encounter we've read about. If I'm an Imperial Captain I'm either going to disengage when they appear or ensure my fighters hit them as one so I have multiple Tie's engaging each "snub fighter"). Merging this with an "Empirical Force" that can't seem to bring Rogue to heel no matter what happens makes for a lot of cotton candy reading and little that's truly fun or entertaining.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Meggie

    For 2020, I decided to reread (in publication order) all the Bantam-era Star Wars books that were released between 1991 and 1999; that shakes out to 38 adult novels and 5 anthologies of short stories & novellas. This week’s focus: the fourth X-Wing book by Michael A. Stackpole, The Bacta War. SOME HISTORY: Compared to 1996’s record of nine books released, 1997 proved a more leisurely year with only six books published: the fourth X-Wing book, two hardcover releases in the spring and fall, the first For 2020, I decided to reread (in publication order) all the Bantam-era Star Wars books that were released between 1991 and 1999; that shakes out to 38 adult novels and 5 anthologies of short stories & novellas. This week’s focus: the fourth X-Wing book by Michael A. Stackpole, The Bacta War. SOME HISTORY: Compared to 1996’s record of nine books released, 1997 proved a more leisurely year with only six books published: the fourth X-Wing book, two hardcover releases in the spring and fall, the first two volumes of the Han Solo trilogy, and a fourth Tales collection. And with the conclusion of Stackpole’s four-book series in February, there wouldn’t be another X-Wing book until the release of Aaron Allston’s Wraith Squadron in February 1998. The Bacta War made it to number thirteen on the New York Times paperback bestseller list for the week of February 2, 1997. MY RECOLLECTION OF THE BOOK: This book contained most of the scenes I thought were missing from previous books. A lengthy visit to the Darklighters on Tatooine? Check. Resolution of Bror Jace’s mysterious death from book 2? Also check. I didn’t think I reread these books all that frequently, but apparently I did. A BRIEF SUMMARY: Ysanne Isard has taken control of Thyferra, intending to control production of bacta. Deprived of Alliance support, Rogue Squadron resigns and goes rogue. They must oppose Isard's plans, defeat her Star Destroyer fleet, and free Thyferra from her rule in a battle against a seemingly superior force. THE CHARACTERS: Wedge (once again) has an awful lot on his plate, but I feel like Stackpole never fleshes out his character to the extent that he did with Corran. Wedge is the boss, Wedge has to make a ton of tough choices, and he regrets all the people that squadron has lost, but he doesn’t have as developed an arc as Corran. Corran learned at the end of book 3 about his heritage (his biological grandfather, Nejaa Halcyon, was a Corellian Jedi), but he’s more concerned with freeing the prisoners on the Lusankya than pursuing the Jedi path. And if anything, he proves that a little knowledge can be a dangerous thing: he attempts--very badly--to use a Jedi mind trick on a stormtrooper, and he doesn’t know enough about lightsaber combat to be particularly good at using his saber. He also starts to second guess himself; is he nervous in this situation because of intuition from the Force? Can he even rely on that yet? I liked Stackpole’s nuanced take on the Jedi, that Corran’s own perception of them is colored by the vague legends and propaganda films about them. Tycho gets one outstanding chapter--Chapter 12, wherein he goes to the Graveyard to pay his respects to his family--but otherwise he’s just here, being Wedge’s second-in-command. His choice to use Another Chance’s transponder code ends up working very well for the Rogues, though, since it gains them the help of the automated Thranta-class War Cruiser during the second ambush in the Graveyard. (And Another Chance in general is an interesting facet of Alderaanian history.) After books 1 and 2 detailed Corran and Mirax’s growing friendship and book 3 took a backseat to any relationship development, The Bacta War opens with them already together. I guess Stackpole didn’t want to write out their DTR, but it felt a little abrupt to me. They’re good, Corran and Booster don’t like each other but work things out, and then Corran and Mirax get engaged AND married super quickly. Umm, OK? Iella’s plotline is perhaps the weakest, mostly because we just don’t see much of what they’re doing. Iella and Elscol are inserted on-planet to meet up with the Ashern rebels and take down Isard’s government, but we don’t see enough of their plans for me to feel like they’re essential to the story. In comparison, Iella’s emotional arc felt more compelling--she’s still grieving the loss of her husband from book 3, and has to figure out how she can move on from her grief. I love Booster Terrik, and he was a highpoint of the novel for me. He’s a shrewd businessman and a frankly intimidating figure, but he also loves his daughter very much. (And he got a Star Destroyer in the end! Go Booster.) Karrde also makes an appearance, very similar to his character in the Thrawn trilogy--so props to Stackpole for using him properly. He doesn’t want to pick sides, but he also wants to make a profit. Frankly, I found the Imperials surprisingly weak this go-around. In previous books, Isard was an enigma: a shadowy figure, true, but one that also seemed to have a good grasp of strategy. All that goes out the window in book 4, where she becomes an irrational woman with temper tantrums. Vorru thinks that she’s insane, and she’s always been insane: the former seems quite possible in this book, but the latter just doesn’t mesh with the Machiavellian schemer we see in books 1-3. Books 2 and 3 presented Vorru as someone entirely self-serving, only allying with Isard because it’s in his best interests. In The Bacta War, though, he seems to be working for her a lot more actively than I’d expect. I thought he wanted to revitalize Black Sun? But here he’s perfectly happy (for most of the book) serving as her Minister of Trade. Erisi, too, seems to have no problems following Isard’s lead, and has been reduced to just a good pilot in charge of inexperienced newbies. And the Star Destroyer commanders are a mixed bag. Captain Convarion is aggressive and competent, but he dies first. The captain of the Lusankya is a moron; the captain of the Virulence is remarkably ineffective, which is probably how Booster Terrik was able to capture her ship. And the captain of the Avarice is blackmailed/bribed into switching sides, where he doesn’t do too badly. ISSUES: In long-running series (although four books is not particularly long!) there’s this desire to shake up the status quo and hit the reset button by making our heroes work outside the law. In this case, the Rogues “go rogue” by leaving the New Republic and becoming mercenaries working against Isard. But not completely--the NR still gives them support, practically sends them their ships, and welcomes them back with open arms. And the logistics of the rebel Rogues don’t really work for me. They start out with the 10 million credits that the Imperials put in Tycho’s bank accounts, and somehow this is enough to fund their initial escapades? Putting together a military unit is very very expensive, so this is one instance where I definitely had to suspend my disbelief. I love all the dogfights, especially after their lack/lesser frequency in the previous two books, but also tended to find them confusing. Stackpole has the pilots banking and swerving and engaging the rudder and I just...sometimes couldn’t follow. It wasn’t that I wanted to skip the battles for the character scenes, but more that I often felt lost and longed for something easier to follow--like dialogue. Stackpole doesn’t really make any effort to flesh out any of the Rogues beyond Corran, Tycho, and maybe Gavin. It’s almost as though he introduced us to the various Rogues in Rogue Squadron, then noped out of further development for the non-mains. Riv Shiel the Shistavanen is killed during an ambush from the Victory-class Star Destroyer, which should be shocking! But since we know so little of him and have barely heard him speak, his death lacks any emotion or poignance. I enjoyed how Booster used the spy in Karrde’s organization--he gave Melina the runaround until they were ready to leak the station’s location to Isard--but I was expecting resolution there that never came. She leaves a probe droid, heads to Corellia, and ??? After Karrde was brainstorming all the different ways to kill her, I expected her to be dealt with in some way. Four books isn’t a particularly long series by any means, but Stackpole both wrapped up a surprising number of plot threads as well as leaving some tantalizingly open. We saw Isard’s shuttle destroyed, but was she actually on board? We see Erisi’s TIE go down and get smooshed, but since there wasn’t an explosion is she dead? Will Vorru be able to finagle his way back out of New Republic custody? (Seeing as Stackpole wrote another X-Wing book that was released in 1999, we’ll probably get answers to some of those questions.) IN CONCLUSION: The Bacta War is exciting and action-filled, but also features the weakest villains yet of the series. It wrapped up the subseries remarkably well, though, despite my issues. Next up: the conclusion to the informal Callista trilogy, Planet of Twilight by Barbara Hambly. My YouTube review: https://youtu.be/bGdHsP8cX1U

  6. 5 out of 5

    David

    After the first several X-Wing books, this one was a bit of a let down. In Krytos Trap, some issues started popping up (less character development, less showing more telling, no dramatic tension) . This was supposed to be the climax to the story, and instead we get...I don't even know how to explain it. The book is called Bacta War, and instead we get a couple of half-hearted battles where the good guys win because they're the good guys (though I guess we're supposed to believe they're tactical g After the first several X-Wing books, this one was a bit of a let down. In Krytos Trap, some issues started popping up (less character development, less showing more telling, no dramatic tension) . This was supposed to be the climax to the story, and instead we get...I don't even know how to explain it. The book is called Bacta War, and instead we get a couple of half-hearted battles where the good guys win because they're the good guys (though I guess we're supposed to believe they're tactical geniuses). Isard comes off as a complete idiot, which was a let down because she seemed quite capable in the first two books. I guess I'm just surprised that the writing quality dipped as much as it did after Rogue Squadron/Wedge's Gambit. It feels to me like Stackpole just came up with an outline with a bunch of plot points, then sort of just connected the dots between them and called it a day. The book ends up feeling shallow because of it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    DiscoSpacePanther

    So, I’ve come to the end of the first arc of the Star Wars: X-Wing series, Michael A. Stackpole’s The Bacta War (not Rogues Unbound as the previous paperback previews had promised). It’s more of the same and, as far as I’m concerned, that is absolutely a good thing. Stackpole’s prose is workmanlike - it never soars to poetic heights (Star Wars literature seldom does), but neither does it sink to the depths of turgid fanfic wish-fulfilment like the Darth Bane sequence or the silly Jedi-as-comicboo So, I’ve come to the end of the first arc of the Star Wars: X-Wing series, Michael A. Stackpole’s The Bacta War (not Rogues Unbound as the previous paperback previews had promised). It’s more of the same and, as far as I’m concerned, that is absolutely a good thing. Stackpole’s prose is workmanlike - it never soars to poetic heights (Star Wars literature seldom does), but neither does it sink to the depths of turgid fanfic wish-fulfilment like the Darth Bane sequence or the silly Jedi-as-comicbook-superhero stuff that KJA was peddling in the mid-‘90s. The plot is thinner than the previous novels—the traitor has already been outed and Corsuscant liberated—and it feels as if this is Stackpole tying up the loose ends that he’d left lying around during the previous three books, but there is enough action and character drama that this shortcoming is barely noticeable. We get to meet Biggs’ family on Tatooine, courtesy of his cousin, Gavin Darklighter (Georgette Heyer would thoroughly disapprove of Gavin Darklighter’s pink and puce landspeeder, regardless of whether it keeps the Krayt Dragons away), and there is the first appearance of Booster Terrik (Mirax’s father), who goes on to play a very frequent role in the later Legends books. Also, Talon Karrde makes a pre-Thrawn Trilogy appearance, as wily and calculating as ever, which makes him a welcome addition to the X-Wing cast. We get a couple of new characters—the captains of Iceheart’s small fleet of Star Destroyers play pivotal roles—and there is a visit to the Twi’lek world of Ryloth where another pilot is introduced. Tal’dira’s butch posturing is a little tiresome, but at least the Twi’lek culture is given more variety than typical of SF ‘warrior’ societies, like the Klingons. I’d hate to think what Tal’dira would do if he discovered one of his allies hopping on a transparisteel leg. Still no more mention of Portha the Trandoshan—I suppose I will have to try my hand at fanfic to ensure that my favourite sauroid gets some closure to his story! And does The Bacta War have the first mention of rontos outside of the Star Wars Special Edition? How did we ever enjoy Star Wars without dinosaurs randomly walking in front of the camera with jawas swinging from their reins? This kind of story may not be to every fan’s taste—if you are more interested in Jedi shenanigans than in the lives of pilots and soldiers then this might not be the series for you. I think I prefer this style to an overabundance of Force users, though. The characters have a thicker veneer of realism, plus—since I spent many a happy hour in the ‘90s playing X-Wing, TIE Fighter, X-Wing vs. TIE Fighter and X-Wing Alliance—I have a high tolerance for the intricate descriptions of the fictional technologies of the Star Wars universe and long descriptions of space combat (although, Stackpole needed to dial back on his use of the word “argent”). It gives me the same feeling I get when watching Red Leader and Gold Leader show up at the Battle of Scarif in Rogue One—this is my Star Wars! Re-reading these four novels has been pure comfort-food for me, and the enjoyment they have given me makes the five stars I’ve given each of them richly deserved.

  8. 4 out of 5

    James

    This was a really good end to the Rogue Squadron Quintet by Michael Stackpole. Isard leaves Corusant and sets up her new centre of power at Thyferrah the centre of Bacta production. Rogue Squadron have left the New Republic to wage a private war against Isard. The book is well written and the characters are either likeable or loathesome as they should be. Many threads are brought together and to a conclusion from the earlier books, but some are left open to allow for follow on stories. Sometimes This was a really good end to the Rogue Squadron Quintet by Michael Stackpole. Isard leaves Corusant and sets up her new centre of power at Thyferrah the centre of Bacta production. Rogue Squadron have left the New Republic to wage a private war against Isard. The book is well written and the characters are either likeable or loathesome as they should be. Many threads are brought together and to a conclusion from the earlier books, but some are left open to allow for follow on stories. Sometimes this can be annoying but in this case it is done in a way so that you aren't left hanging desperate for the next book, but does allow for continuity. The Rogue Squadron novels are my favourite of all the Star Wars novels and I would recommend them to any Star Wars fan.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    I'll never understand how this series doesn't have more of a fan following. The camaraderie is amazing.I love all of the personalities. My two faves are of course Corran and Mirax. This is their book. I don't want to spoil it, but I want to remember when I look back at my reviews that this is the one where the good stuff happens. I would never have guessed how much I could love Wedge Antilles, but this book series has shown me that it's a lot. I love Ooryl to bits and pieces. I want a toy of him. P I'll never understand how this series doesn't have more of a fan following. The camaraderie is amazing.I love all of the personalities. My two faves are of course Corran and Mirax. This is their book. I don't want to spoil it, but I want to remember when I look back at my reviews that this is the one where the good stuff happens. I would never have guessed how much I could love Wedge Antilles, but this book series has shown me that it's a lot. I love Ooryl to bits and pieces. I want a toy of him. Preferably one with a draw string that talks in third person. I was so proud for him in this book. Booster Terik is always a crack up. He is a needed foil against all the seriousness of the war they are fighting.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amelia Nichole Defield

    I don't know how many times I re-read the X-Wing Squadron books, but I enjoy them everytime. I was surprised that my favorite of the Rogue Squadron books had changed from the first one and fourth one to the first one and the third one. This one took me an extra day to get through, but honestly it brings a grin to my face. I don't know how many times I re-read the X-Wing Squadron books, but I enjoy them everytime. I was surprised that my favorite of the Rogue Squadron books had changed from the first one and fourth one to the first one and the third one. This one took me an extra day to get through, but honestly it brings a grin to my face.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ithlilian

    Well that certainly was Star-Wars-y. By that I mean it was very plan something out, ship battle, award ceremony. Pretty simple and straightforward with the same set of characters with their same personalities. A little development here or there with Corran and the Jedi thing but not too much, otherwise everything else is the same. No surprises just good clean xwing pewpew fun and I liked it!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Charity

    This was a good end to the Isanne Ysard reign! I would say the series, but I know this continues on into a couple more books. :) I really enjoyed this book and the characters.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lidia

    It probably deserves less than four stars but I enjoyed it enough to round up. :)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anders

    After having read the first four books in the X-wing series (which make one arc of sorts), I must say I had a pretty good time. As one might expect, these books were loaded with action, particularly dogfights and space battles, and the pacing was, with some exceptions, brisk and kept my attention. Some of the dogfights could at first be a little hard to follow due to the amount of sci-fi techno jargon mixed with all the shooting and maneuvering but little by little I started making sense of it a After having read the first four books in the X-wing series (which make one arc of sorts), I must say I had a pretty good time. As one might expect, these books were loaded with action, particularly dogfights and space battles, and the pacing was, with some exceptions, brisk and kept my attention. Some of the dogfights could at first be a little hard to follow due to the amount of sci-fi techno jargon mixed with all the shooting and maneuvering but little by little I started making sense of it and enjoy the battles. But what good is action if you don't care about the people involved in it? You of course need a good cast of characters to connect with and these aren't bad. The series is centered around the elite squad of Alliance fighter pilots known as Rogue Squadron led by Commander Wedge Antilles (a background character from the movies) and the pilots are pretty well defined and likeable. It's a fun, diverse group with several aliens and a pretty even split between men and women (I dare feminists to find something to complain about here!). The two primary protagonists in the squad are the aforementioned Wedge and his lieutenant, Corran Horn. Wedge is admirable not only for his skills in a cockpit but also for his ability to read his subordinates and talk them through their problems before they get themselves or their comrades killed in battle. He is compassionate but stern when he needs to be and this is due to the fact that he has seen so many of his friends die in the field. A nice touch of humanity. Corran is a reserved, sometimes stubborn and hot blooded man who never gives up without a fight. He is often suspicious and initially cautious around his squad mates and it was nice to see him warm up as the series went on. He even had a romance that wasn't half bad. As an added bonus it turned out he also has Jedi potential (continued in other books). The villains were decent but I think the main antagonist, Ysanne Isard faltered a little in the last book. Where she had previously been a nicely calculating and cool headed strategist, she now often had severe temper tantrums over her inability to get our heroes and her right hand man often had to try and talk sense into her. However, she did still have some inspired plans sometimes and it didn't ruin the book by any means. Overall, this series is a fun read for hardcore Star Wars fans. It may not be for casual audiences as the books often seem to expect you to know what certain ships and races look like.

  15. 4 out of 5

    J

    The Bacta War continues the X-Wing series through to its (first) conclusion. Rogue Squadron is fresh off it's victories against the Krytos Virus, Ysanne Issard and seemingly even death itself, but the work isn't done. Issard has fled Coruscant and is now in control of Thyferra, the galaxy's only supplier of Bacta. The New Republic has forbidden them to go after her because of the political fallout, so they've gone to their namesake, ...they've gone Rogue! I enjoyed the music, sound effects and pr The Bacta War continues the X-Wing series through to its (first) conclusion. Rogue Squadron is fresh off it's victories against the Krytos Virus, Ysanne Issard and seemingly even death itself, but the work isn't done. Issard has fled Coruscant and is now in control of Thyferra, the galaxy's only supplier of Bacta. The New Republic has forbidden them to go after her because of the political fallout, so they've gone to their namesake, ...they've gone Rogue! I enjoyed the music, sound effects and production of the audiobook. Anthony Heald brings a new energy and better characterization further improving the production. The story goes back to what Star Wars had done best, a small passionate force out to fight something much larger and well supplied. The story also shows even the villains (some) as human when they begin to think about escaping Isard as she becomes more unstable. Having not just a straight fight but showing collateral damage and ultimately a planned genocide to motivate our heroes was also well presented and truly showed Isard's faction as evil to be opposed. As usual there are the shortcuts. Isard, previously a calculating and cold person, becomes completely unhinged by one tiny group while she ostensibly has a planet and organization to run. The captain of her Super Star Destroyer chews scenery with the best arch villans Star Wars has ever produced, not the sort of person who would have ever risen to such a military command. And finally the civil uprising/war for a whole planet is reduced to one commando raid. Still this may have fallen victim to the abridgment of the audio. Still, fun, fast-paced and enjoyable for fans of the series.

  16. 4 out of 5

    David

    I have read this series many times and this was always my favorite. It focused on what this series does best: space battles. The main villain has taken over the planet that produces all the bacta, the miracle cure medicine, in the galaxy. So Rogue Squadron fights a series of space battles to free the planet. Overall the book is very entertaining, but I am seeing more flaws in the series as I re-read. First, Ysanne Isard is just a horrible "villain." The decision to give up Coruscant just seemed I have read this series many times and this was always my favorite. It focused on what this series does best: space battles. The main villain has taken over the planet that produces all the bacta, the miracle cure medicine, in the galaxy. So Rogue Squadron fights a series of space battles to free the planet. Overall the book is very entertaining, but I am seeing more flaws in the series as I re-read. First, Ysanne Isard is just a horrible "villain." The decision to give up Coruscant just seemed driven by plot, but she just doesn't have the menace of Darth Vader or the brilliance of Grand Admiral Thrawn. It unfortunately is a weakness in Star Wars in general because Admiral Daala was another poorly written female antagonist. Again, there is also focus on too few characters. After 4 books now, most of the squadron members are cardboard cutout characters that periodically get killed off. Finally, I have a lot of trouble from a military stand point with the last battle. How is a ship the size of a Super Star Destroyer defeated by such a wimpy force? Why is it so easy to knock down its shields? But again, overall I really enjoyed it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    T James Womack

    This is it, the end of the first installment of The X-Wing series before Aaron Allston took up the reigns with Wraith Squadron. This is the culmination of the four novel arc, the ride was fun, and the payoff is spectacular. I love the politics Mr. Stackpole creates in the series. We have the good against evil factions as we’d expect from Star Wars, but now we have third parties and intrigue. There are neutral factions, and sub-factions within that have their own leanings and agendas. This helps This is it, the end of the first installment of The X-Wing series before Aaron Allston took up the reigns with Wraith Squadron. This is the culmination of the four novel arc, the ride was fun, and the payoff is spectacular. I love the politics Mr. Stackpole creates in the series. We have the good against evil factions as we’d expect from Star Wars, but now we have third parties and intrigue. There are neutral factions, and sub-factions within that have their own leanings and agendas. This helps brings life to the universe and creates feelings of suspense, danger, and realism- we now have gray to contrast the light and the dark. The Rogues have a mission- a mission the New Republic can’t support, for very sympathetic reasons. Corran and by extension, the rest of the squadron, are compelled to undertake the mission to repay a great personal debt. Rogue Squadron fulfills their namesake and goes rogue to that end, making new allies and new enemies, and rediscovering someone they once thought dead. It truly is a wonderful book and a fantastic wrap-up to the story arc begun in Rogue Squadron. I recommend the entire series.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    A clear five stars for me. :D The Krytos Trap might have had a lot of build up and bit too much focus on the Imperials for my taste, but not so with The Bacta War. This one gets into the action quickly and the action keeps going throughout the book. It also has many great exchanges of lines and comments to make me laugh, which I greatly appreciate in a book. I prefer my books to have some humor. (And for the same reason I very much look forward to Allston's books). I also find the characters actual A clear five stars for me. :D The Krytos Trap might have had a lot of build up and bit too much focus on the Imperials for my taste, but not so with The Bacta War. This one gets into the action quickly and the action keeps going throughout the book. It also has many great exchanges of lines and comments to make me laugh, which I greatly appreciate in a book. I prefer my books to have some humor. (And for the same reason I very much look forward to Allston's books). I also find the characters actually do have some development over time, and in general this four book arc is well thought out. The only real downside as far as characters are concerned, is that with a full squadron worth of people plus supporting characters around the squadron, there's really too many characters to be properly introduced to everyone. I might have liked some books and their plots better than others, but all in all I think Stackpole has managed to do spin this tale of Rogue Squadron well.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Damien Rappuhn

    In the fourth installment of the series, Stackpole builds on the achievements of character, drama, and conflict of the third novel without ignoring the important elements of space adventures (as did the second novel). However, peripheral characters are still largely ignored, new characters are introduced and (again) left underdeveloped, and main characters do the same thing they've always done. It's a fun read, you'll need to suspend disbelief at parts and have a generous imagination with some c In the fourth installment of the series, Stackpole builds on the achievements of character, drama, and conflict of the third novel without ignoring the important elements of space adventures (as did the second novel). However, peripheral characters are still largely ignored, new characters are introduced and (again) left underdeveloped, and main characters do the same thing they've always done. It's a fun read, you'll need to suspend disbelief at parts and have a generous imagination with some characters, but don't look for anything deeper or more substantive (I mean, it IS a Star Wars-branded novel after all, not a Pulitzer). Have fun and carry on! I'm looking forward to digging (back) into the next one.

  20. 4 out of 5

    [boredom.is.overrated]

    Wow, almost everything about this entry was excellent. The inclusion of Booster Terrik and Talon Karrde was perfect and hilarious. Corran finally got the guts to make things official with Mirax (only took 4 books). And the space battles were much better described than the first three books. I thought the dialogue was a bit extraneous at times and not quite as believable as in The Krytos Trap, but it is a Star Wars book with no actual cursing. Corran’s development was great to experience; I really Wow, almost everything about this entry was excellent. The inclusion of Booster Terrik and Talon Karrde was perfect and hilarious. Corran finally got the guts to make things official with Mirax (only took 4 books). And the space battles were much better described than the first three books. I thought the dialogue was a bit extraneous at times and not quite as believable as in The Krytos Trap, but it is a Star Wars book with no actual cursing. Corran’s development was great to experience; I really did not care for him in the first book but he became much more likable character. Stackpole writes a great Wedge. Overall, what a nice tidy way to finish up this four book arc! I give it 5 Impstars out of 5. 5/5

  21. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    Wow I really just forgot to write a review on this. I loved this book, so much. The Rouges going Rouge is kind of my favorite thing ever. Watching them build up their own mini rebellion against Isard is super enjoyable. I loved the space station base and the new paint jobs on the x-wings. I also loved meeting Booster Terrik. Of course these characters are very perfect heroes compared to wraith squadron (which I'm reading about now) but they have a very special place in my heart. This is definite Wow I really just forgot to write a review on this. I loved this book, so much. The Rouges going Rouge is kind of my favorite thing ever. Watching them build up their own mini rebellion against Isard is super enjoyable. I loved the space station base and the new paint jobs on the x-wings. I also loved meeting Booster Terrik. Of course these characters are very perfect heroes compared to wraith squadron (which I'm reading about now) but they have a very special place in my heart. This is definitely my favorite in the series so far. This book definitely made me an even bigger fan of Tycho. We really love how oh look all of our gear is for sale, sweet! Anyways I'll shut up now.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Vill'Neuve

    I enjoyed this book. It was hard to put down. I loved that Mirax's father, Booster, was in it and I enjoyed his interactions with Corran. I also enjoyed the parts with Iella and her progression of dealing with her husband's death. My main complaint is that Iceheart was a bit of a letdown in this book. Previous books really built her up and then she just went insane in this one. It was very disappointing. I also felt like the characters now all have plot armor with some even returning from the de I enjoyed this book. It was hard to put down. I loved that Mirax's father, Booster, was in it and I enjoyed his interactions with Corran. I also enjoyed the parts with Iella and her progression of dealing with her husband's death. My main complaint is that Iceheart was a bit of a letdown in this book. Previous books really built her up and then she just went insane in this one. It was very disappointing. I also felt like the characters now all have plot armor with some even returning from the dead. I also felt like the Twi'lek's were only added in order to supply the pilots to die in the book so that they still "lose" ships. But overall it was a fun and enjoyable read!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Caleb Dillinger

    A great conclusion to a wonderful story. It continues on in book five with a change in author and new cast of characters that eventually interact with these. But you could end here and it be a complete story. Book one was my favorite, but this comes in at my second favorite in this quadrilogy. Corran Horn is an amazing character and makes huge impacts in the Star Wars universe. Read this series to enjoy his origin story :)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Zacharias

    And another sequel to the wonderful Star Wars Episode VI. I love how the X-Wing books are focusing more on the military aspect and the non-Jedi heroes of the New Republic. And I love romance, all the time, so this is also very welcoming. If you like a romantic military science fiction novel, don‘t read this book, read all of them. And trust me, they are way better than these Episode VII to IX movies.

  25. 4 out of 5

    James Hogan

    Book 4 of the X-Wing series and the conclusion of this mini-arc! This book was the best one yet, action packed and building to an exciting climax (especially since I couldn't really remember how this one ended, so I was on the edge of my seat the whole time...) This book is the one where the Rogues finally go rogue and instead of lots of subversive tactics, everything is pretty much out in the open - traitors, tyrannous warlords, valiant heroics...lots of great moments! A good fun read. Book 4 of the X-Wing series and the conclusion of this mini-arc! This book was the best one yet, action packed and building to an exciting climax (especially since I couldn't really remember how this one ended, so I was on the edge of my seat the whole time...) This book is the one where the Rogues finally go rogue and instead of lots of subversive tactics, everything is pretty much out in the open - traitors, tyrannous warlords, valiant heroics...lots of great moments! A good fun read.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Herdis Marie

    2,5 stars. I AM FINISHED WITH STACKPOLE'S BOOKS. FINISHED. Well. At least for now. I see he's written a couple books later in the series, but I have a looong break before I get to them, thank goodness. So I'm not going to write a long review for this one, because I've pretty much detailed everything that's wrong with Stackpole's writing in my reviews of the previous three instalments. Here's a short summary: 1. Poor/unoriginal characterisation/character description 2. Predictable plot twists 3. Intensely 2,5 stars. I AM FINISHED WITH STACKPOLE'S BOOKS. FINISHED. Well. At least for now. I see he's written a couple books later in the series, but I have a looong break before I get to them, thank goodness. So I'm not going to write a long review for this one, because I've pretty much detailed everything that's wrong with Stackpole's writing in my reviews of the previous three instalments. Here's a short summary: 1. Poor/unoriginal characterisation/character description 2. Predictable plot twists 3. Intensely sexualised portrayal of all female characters 4. Language fraught with clichés and errors And so on. So anyway, only read these if you're an incredibly intense fan of Star Wars. That way, the fact that it's Star Wars will get you through it. ;) Herdis Marie out.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Shaun

    A fun conclusion to the Bacta War. Stackpole does a great job capturing the spirit of Star Wars with both his characters and plot. I fell in love with Corran, Wedge and the others. I look forward to seeing what the Rogues have planned next.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Plume

    This series is still pretty good, with characters I enjoy rooting for (and against). I will say I’m growing a little tired of the fake-out death trope (it’s almost never believable and with 7 or 8 through four books it’s becoming silly).

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Despite its flaws, it - like the other books in the series - is a reasonably enjoyable read. Just don't think about anything too much, and try to ignore how questionably the female characters are handled. Though Corran's romance nearly cost the book a star. Mirax deserves so much better. Despite its flaws, it - like the other books in the series - is a reasonably enjoyable read. Just don't think about anything too much, and try to ignore how questionably the female characters are handled. Though Corran's romance nearly cost the book a star. Mirax deserves so much better.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lia Cooper

    easily the worst one in the series so far. it has all of Stackpole's bad writing habits turned up to 11 and we dont even get a very interesting plot or good povs. a real bummer because i thought the Krytos Trap was pretty fun easily the worst one in the series so far. it has all of Stackpole's bad writing habits turned up to 11 and we dont even get a very interesting plot or good povs. a real bummer because i thought the Krytos Trap was pretty fun

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