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The Saboteur of Auschwitz: The Inspiring True Story of a British Soldier Held Prisoner in Auschwitz

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In 1942, young British soldier Arthur Dodd was taken prisoner by the German Army and transported to Oswiecim in Polish Upper Silesia. The Germans gave it another name, now synonymous with mankind’s darkest hours. They called it Auschwitz. Forced to do hard labour, starved and savagely beaten, Arthur thought his life would end in Auschwitz. Determined to go down fighting, In 1942, young British soldier Arthur Dodd was taken prisoner by the German Army and transported to Oswiecim in Polish Upper Silesia. The Germans gave it another name, now synonymous with mankind’s darkest hours. They called it Auschwitz. Forced to do hard labour, starved and savagely beaten, Arthur thought his life would end in Auschwitz. Determined to go down fighting, he sabotaged Nazi industrial work, risked his life to alleviate the suffering of the Jewish prisoners and aided a partisan group planning a mass break-out. This shocking true story sheds new light on the operations at the camp, exposes a hierarchy of prisoner treatment by the SS and presents the largely unknown story of the military POWs held there.


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In 1942, young British soldier Arthur Dodd was taken prisoner by the German Army and transported to Oswiecim in Polish Upper Silesia. The Germans gave it another name, now synonymous with mankind’s darkest hours. They called it Auschwitz. Forced to do hard labour, starved and savagely beaten, Arthur thought his life would end in Auschwitz. Determined to go down fighting, In 1942, young British soldier Arthur Dodd was taken prisoner by the German Army and transported to Oswiecim in Polish Upper Silesia. The Germans gave it another name, now synonymous with mankind’s darkest hours. They called it Auschwitz. Forced to do hard labour, starved and savagely beaten, Arthur thought his life would end in Auschwitz. Determined to go down fighting, he sabotaged Nazi industrial work, risked his life to alleviate the suffering of the Jewish prisoners and aided a partisan group planning a mass break-out. This shocking true story sheds new light on the operations at the camp, exposes a hierarchy of prisoner treatment by the SS and presents the largely unknown story of the military POWs held there.

30 review for The Saboteur of Auschwitz: The Inspiring True Story of a British Soldier Held Prisoner in Auschwitz

  1. 5 out of 5

    ReadWithAbi

    Themes: Historical, Non-fiction, Holocaust, War, Biography, British Government, Survival, Prisoner of War, Courage, Bravery Plot: Arthur Dodd was a British Soldier during WW2. Whilst serving, he became a Prisoner of War (POW) and imprisoned at an Auschwitz sub-camp (Monowitz). POWs are protected under the Geneva Convention rules, however this was not generally followed. Many British POWs were forced to do hard labour, starved and savagely beaten. Determined to go down fighting, he sabotaged Nazi in Themes: Historical, Non-fiction, Holocaust, War, Biography, British Government, Survival, Prisoner of War, Courage, Bravery Plot: Arthur Dodd was a British Soldier during WW2. Whilst serving, he became a Prisoner of War (POW) and imprisoned at an Auschwitz sub-camp (Monowitz). POWs are protected under the Geneva Convention rules, however this was not generally followed. Many British POWs were forced to do hard labour, starved and savagely beaten. Determined to go down fighting, he sabotaged Nazi industrial work, risked his life to alleviate the suffering of the Jewish prisoners and aided a partisan group planning a mass break-out. This shocking true story sheds new light on the operations at the camp, exposes a hierarchy of prisoner treatment by the SS and presents the largely unknown story of the military POWs held there. Opinion: I am still in shock at how recent the Holocaust was, WW2 only ENDED 75 YEARS AGO! I have now learnt what a 'Prisoner of War' is and how they were treated cruelly; to think that Jews were treated worse is unthinkable. I appreciated how this book was informative and split into sections which also included other survivor's stories. I am rating this book five stars because it is well researched and an important read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alice (Married To Books)

    3.5 stars! I got a copy from the UK discount chain The Works way back in the New Year or at the end of last year. I've read quite a few WW2 memoirs and history books in my lifetime, so going into reading The Saboteur of Auschwitz, I knew that most of the information and facts wouldn't be new to me. The real experiences of a soldier called Arthur Dodd, who is captured and taken as a POW (Prisoner of War) to the concentration camp called Auschwitz. He is held there along with other POWs for nearly 3.5 stars! I got a copy from the UK discount chain The Works way back in the New Year or at the end of last year. I've read quite a few WW2 memoirs and history books in my lifetime, so going into reading The Saboteur of Auschwitz, I knew that most of the information and facts wouldn't be new to me. The real experiences of a soldier called Arthur Dodd, who is captured and taken as a POW (Prisoner of War) to the concentration camp called Auschwitz. He is held there along with other POWs for nearly two years during which many others lose their lives due to the cruelty and horrible conditions. I generally thought that the book would be just Arthur's story. However, it is actually split into other parts with even more historical information. That did take up a chunk of the book and took away some of the interest I had as a whole. It was an OK read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sam Herbert

    This is a harrowing read: the sheer brutality, cruelty and violence shown to POWs and the Jews at Auschwitz shown by fellow humans is shocking and hard to comprehend. This book follows the journey of one particular British POW, Arthur, and the obstacles he had to face and overcome in order to be free. He's strong and resilient and showed kindness to others throughout his time as prisoner. It's written by the author telling Arthur's story and, although it is well researched, it could have been mo This is a harrowing read: the sheer brutality, cruelty and violence shown to POWs and the Jews at Auschwitz shown by fellow humans is shocking and hard to comprehend. This book follows the journey of one particular British POW, Arthur, and the obstacles he had to face and overcome in order to be free. He's strong and resilient and showed kindness to others throughout his time as prisoner. It's written by the author telling Arthur's story and, although it is well researched, it could have been more personal. I feel it lacked the passion and emotion needed to really deliver this story with an impact.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Cox

    Interesting to read a British POW's account of being aushwitz, I forget it was not only Jews sent there. Interesting to read a British POW's account of being aushwitz, I forget it was not only Jews sent there.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mr Michael R Stevens

    I have just finished this book and I feel, moved, saddened and educated. This book covers the surprising story of Allied and other POW’s held at the Auschwitz camp. Put to work by their captors as labourers on the construction at of German chemical works and other factories it tells of their deliberate sabotage of the work they were allocated at the risk of their own lives. The book is centred around one soldiers story- Arthur Dodd and his experiences but also has input from other survivors of th I have just finished this book and I feel, moved, saddened and educated. This book covers the surprising story of Allied and other POW’s held at the Auschwitz camp. Put to work by their captors as labourers on the construction at of German chemical works and other factories it tells of their deliberate sabotage of the work they were allocated at the risk of their own lives. The book is centred around one soldiers story- Arthur Dodd and his experiences but also has input from other survivors of the camp who contacted him, their input only adds to an already remarkable story. The additional short accounts following Arthur’s account make the story more compelling. Although people may be familiar with British SOE agents such as Odette Samson being held in the concentration camps few people know of POW’s being held in these camps. They endured further hardship in their match across Europe to escape the advancing Soviet forces. Following their repatriation and discharge their treatment by the British authorities beggars belief. A remarkable story.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Olivia Brooks

    This book is absolutely incredible. It has to be a must read along with the Diary of Anne Frank. Rushton does an amazing job at enlightening his readers through Arthur Dodd’s accounts of the less publicised atrocities that took place at Auschwitz. I’m ashamed to say that, even as a university history student, I had no idea that there were British POWs at Auschwitz. Thank you Colin Rushton for writing such a beautifully constructed piece of writing. And thank you to Arthur Dodd for being brave enou This book is absolutely incredible. It has to be a must read along with the Diary of Anne Frank. Rushton does an amazing job at enlightening his readers through Arthur Dodd’s accounts of the less publicised atrocities that took place at Auschwitz. I’m ashamed to say that, even as a university history student, I had no idea that there were British POWs at Auschwitz. Thank you Colin Rushton for writing such a beautifully constructed piece of writing. And thank you to Arthur Dodd for being brave enough to share your story so that it could be used to educate thousands and thousands of people.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Haunting I've read a lot of books relating to the horror of Auschwitz. The sheer spirit, and courage and bravery of all those who played their part in overcoming such evil is nothing short of incredible. I'm left with the knowledge that while humans can be pure evil, there is always light & goodness to eventually overcome it. I feel everyone should read this book & be aware of the hell that was inflicted by other "humans" Haunting I've read a lot of books relating to the horror of Auschwitz. The sheer spirit, and courage and bravery of all those who played their part in overcoming such evil is nothing short of incredible. I'm left with the knowledge that while humans can be pure evil, there is always light & goodness to eventually overcome it. I feel everyone should read this book & be aware of the hell that was inflicted by other "humans"

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tom Platt

    Upon purchasing this book I knew what I was in for. However the title of “The Saboteur of Auschwitz” gave me an added angle of interest. Keen to know about what kind of skulduggery a British POW got up to, I thought and was told exactly what these brave and enduring British soldiers did to frustrate and slow down the Nazi war machine and its industrialized mass murder factory. Arthur’s story was one of endurance. He suffered great physical and mental abuse as did every human at that hell hole who Upon purchasing this book I knew what I was in for. However the title of “The Saboteur of Auschwitz” gave me an added angle of interest. Keen to know about what kind of skulduggery a British POW got up to, I thought and was told exactly what these brave and enduring British soldiers did to frustrate and slow down the Nazi war machine and its industrialized mass murder factory. Arthur’s story was one of endurance. He suffered great physical and mental abuse as did every human at that hell hole who wasn’t a Nazi. I acknowledge his story. However in part two of the other people’s accounts I could not continue. Extremely disturbing, and it is not out of a lack of respect to the victims. Absolutely not, I am aware of such depravity they had to endure but reading this for me was too difficult. I know from many examples from this book and others what happened there. But reading it in this book was too stressful. Particularly when it came to children I had to stop or skip parts. In the end it became too much. Mentally prepare yourself for this one, particularly part 2. One cannot understand how human beings can behave in such a way to each other. Lost for words.

  9. 5 out of 5

    milsbookcorner

    I don’t know where to begin or what to say about this book. I have to admit shamefully that this is my first auschwitz read however there is a few that I do want to read! I’m so pleased I chose to read this because it’s opened my eyes in ways I never knew were possible, I thought I had somewhat knowledge on the place however after reading this I truly felt I’ve learnt more from this single book than 18 years of learning! because the book is an account of Arthur’s time pre, there and post auschwi I don’t know where to begin or what to say about this book. I have to admit shamefully that this is my first auschwitz read however there is a few that I do want to read! I’m so pleased I chose to read this because it’s opened my eyes in ways I never knew were possible, I thought I had somewhat knowledge on the place however after reading this I truly felt I’ve learnt more from this single book than 18 years of learning! because the book is an account of Arthur’s time pre, there and post auschwitz meant that you got a very personal and raw view which I don’t think you can get anywhere else. As I said I know I haven’t read a book like this before but I can not imagine reading anything ever as well as this was put!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Sissons

    Nice little book. I didn't realise there were British in austwitz Nice little book. I didn't realise there were British in austwitz

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sian Hackett

    A moving an educational true story

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Haunting. I appreciated the multiple sections of the book, especially people who wrote letters.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Claire Brown

    A tricky read. I expected a "true story", but this is more of a factual account. In some ways, therefore, it makes it a more horrifying read in the sense that there is no exaggeration or flowery language - it is very matter-of-fact in its delivery. However, I felt that certain moments lacked the emotion necessary to be as impactful as they are in other similar accounts. Having said that, I think it is an important story and hits home more due to the fact that Arthur is British - not much is know A tricky read. I expected a "true story", but this is more of a factual account. In some ways, therefore, it makes it a more horrifying read in the sense that there is no exaggeration or flowery language - it is very matter-of-fact in its delivery. However, I felt that certain moments lacked the emotion necessary to be as impactful as they are in other similar accounts. Having said that, I think it is an important story and hits home more due to the fact that Arthur is British - not much is known about Auschwitz from that perspective. The added accounts and reactions from readers are also an added bonus.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sengagh Hill

    I actually ended up DNF this book which is the first time I’ve ever done that with a book. For me it just wasn’t what I was expecting. It felt very much like someone had just done a load of research and shoved it into a book without adding the storytelling element or any of the personability. I felt so removed from the main person Arthur and just didn’t get a feel for who he was. What really highlighted this for me was the fact that the author dropped in events and details that were so far remov I actually ended up DNF this book which is the first time I’ve ever done that with a book. For me it just wasn’t what I was expecting. It felt very much like someone had just done a load of research and shoved it into a book without adding the storytelling element or any of the personability. I felt so removed from the main person Arthur and just didn’t get a feel for who he was. What really highlighted this for me was the fact that the author dropped in events and details that were so far removed from Arthur’s experience. A key example of this was the fact that Anne Frank’s arrival was mentioned in the book when Arthur never met her or knew of her or anything and so it left me questioning why it was even in this book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dan Liggins

    A capturing encounter that will tear at your heartstrings & leave you with admiration. Colin Rushton has encapsulated a world a lot of us may not know much about. The world of English POW in German Nazi Regime concentration camps. We all know the tragic stories & unexplainable happenings of The Nazi Regime concentration camps. Here in ‘The Saboteur of Auschwitz’, Colin Rushton tells us the story & life of Arthur Dodd who was unfortunate enough to find himself held prisoner at Oswiecim, or as it i A capturing encounter that will tear at your heartstrings & leave you with admiration. Colin Rushton has encapsulated a world a lot of us may not know much about. The world of English POW in German Nazi Regime concentration camps. We all know the tragic stories & unexplainable happenings of The Nazi Regime concentration camps. Here in ‘The Saboteur of Auschwitz’, Colin Rushton tells us the story & life of Arthur Dodd who was unfortunate enough to find himself held prisoner at Oswiecim, or as it is now infamously called, Auschwitz. Arthur was living a life of freedom, fun, & full of possible futures. We follow Arthur’s backstory from the off in this book. It exhibits how Arthur had a clear love & passion for all things mechanical - from small motor bikes to large HGV machines. Arthur knew & wanted to know the ins & outs of it all. This logic he was so desirable to learn was inevitably what helped him survive the dramatic turn his life would take. Fast forward through various endeavors Arthur takes - he does eventually end up on the battlefields of WWII. I say eventually like it is a good thing because as you will find out as you read, Arthur, like a lot of British Males his age found the need to serve his Country a requirement filled with thrilling adventures. Arthur is captured by Germans on the battlefield & winds up behind the barbed, electric wired fences of Auschwitz. He is placed into a specific block inside the camp that has been made purely for British POW as they are captured. Although the basis of this book is Arthur’s story; telling us what British POW endured inside the camps, Colin Rushton, through the words of Arthur, is keen to display how brutally horrific the camps were for the Jewish prisoners. ‘For many of them, death was a merciful relief, but the constant smell of scorched hair and burning flesh was nauseating…’. ‘Most Jews were gassed within an hour of arriving…’ Arthur wanted to really get across how horrifically cruel it was for the Jewish prisoners & would detail how he witnessed them being treated in front of his own eyes whilst he too was a prisoner. This is one of the key points of the book. The comparisons between the British POW compared to the Jewish prisoners. Arthur Dodd did not have it easy at all. Like the Jews, he had to live day to day - only one wrong word or move away from a bullet to his head. Arthur quickly learnt, through beatings to himself & others, that these camps & the German officers patrolling them had the upper hand in everything. They could beat you simply if they woke in a foul mood & you were the first person they saw that day. Arthur learnt, along with many other British prisoners we hear about in this book, that keeping your head down was the key to survival! Whenever he saw how horrendous the Jewish prisoners had it, he always felt utter sorrow along with a pleasurable guilt because the British prisoners were treated almost like Royalty in comparison. Any chance he got; Arthur would help a Jewish prisoner out. He soon adapted to stealth & ghosting his way around the camp to pass across small rations of food to the Jewish compounds. This said, Arthur was also the opposite in his quest for attempting freedom & still serving his country. After mutually befriending other British POW - he realised that as they were being put to work, they could use this sleight of hand & knowledge of engineering to their & every prisoner’s benefit. Together, the British soldiers would slowly sabotage their work in some way. Arthur gets this chance a lot. A chance to manipulate his knowledge over the powerful Germans. This book is a compelling true story that Arthur, after many decades of holding back the information to even the ones he loved truly, shares with us to give us a small but very impactful idea of how the British POW’s actually had to live in Auschwitz. How they adapted to survive. How they coped with the daily onslaught of death surrounding them. How they became a team in a place seemingly deserted of Human Emotions: plagued with horror & murder! Colin Rushton has successfully displayed the words & life of Arthur in such a strong way. As you read this book you feel the sympathy, the horror but also the bravery & relentlessness of everybody mentioned. Colin also adds at the end segments of this book, short stories told by other survivors of Auschwitz. These additions may be just as hard to read but they re-iterate the stories we must all hear - from those who single-handedly survived this part of history. Personally, I enjoyed reading this book for the new knowledge it gave me on the British POW. A perspective on the lives of other people held at Auschwitz is something that many people over-look due to the overbearing sadness of the mass homicide to the Jewish people. Rushton is very empathetic with the way he tells Arthur’s story. You cannot read this book & not feel a sense of admiration for Arthur Dodd. He, along with all the prisoners held in concentration camps, those who survived or sadly did not should never be forgotten! If you do not know much or anything about the British POW that wound up under the hands of the Germans during WWII then I highly suggest you give this book a read. If you are searching for a book that gives you a large informative perspective on the tragedies of Auschwitz in general, then I would steer clear of this book for the time being.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    It's a funny thing to realize about a subject that you feel you have a pretty good knowledge about, that in fact you still have so much to learn. I have even been to Auschwitz but it wasn't until I picked up a copy of The Saboteur Of Auschwitz did I become aware that British P.O.W had been kept there. In fact for a large part of its running life. I suppose when we think of allied P.O.W's are mind goes to those war film of the sixties and seventies such as The Great Escape or Colditz. It's easy It's a funny thing to realize about a subject that you feel you have a pretty good knowledge about, that in fact you still have so much to learn. I have even been to Auschwitz but it wasn't until I picked up a copy of The Saboteur Of Auschwitz did I become aware that British P.O.W had been kept there. In fact for a large part of its running life. I suppose when we think of allied P.O.W's are mind goes to those war film of the sixties and seventies such as The Great Escape or Colditz. It's easy to slip into the fictional worlds presented to us, and why shouldn't we a two-hour film is much simpler for our minds to get a grip on. But this in and of its self does a great diss honor to those men who lived through it. I suspect if not for Arthur's story being laid out in this book I may never have known this fact. In this book, the author has tried to give us the best overview of Arthur's life. It goes a long way in showing us the character of a man who suffered a great deal in his time at the camp and just maybe how he lived to come out the other side. Much like many of his generation, he saw it as his duty to fight for his country in any way he could. And whilst he served bravely and to the best of his ability fate laid him to a place that he could never have imagined in his darkest nightmares. It is through his eyes that we get to witness a different view of the camp. Treated only slightly better than those the camp was set up to exterminate they moved around more seeing every aspect of camp life. They were valued as engineers a trait to be explored to its fullest in the advancement of the Third Reich. I think if not for this saving grace their fates would have been a great deal worse. It is hard to imagine what these men witnessed on a daily bases. I can only guess at the feeling of impedance at seeing the brutality hand out to the other poor unfortunates of the camp and being able to do little about it. Men like Arthur fought back in the only way they could small acts of sabotage at the factory they were forced to work at. Even here they were threatened with death if ever they were caught in the act. But I suspect that in their minds doing anything to slow this death machine was enough to keep them going. A need to fight back against the evils of such a place no matter what. This is a book the gives the reader insight into a group of people most don't really know about. It's not like my government has done anything to highlight what these men went through. It seems like it is something they wish to leave in the past forgotten for all time. So I have to thank the author for bringing it to the forefront and to educate us on what these men went through. For me, it is through books like this that I can educate myself of the past, And whilst the subjects are never easy to read about I feel they are important ones. Already we are losing our connection to what to place during the war. For many younger people, it is an abstract subject there is nothing to connect it to the lives they live. And with each passing year, those that lived it are slowly becoming less and less. So for me, books like this are important they show us what has happened in the hopes that it will not agian.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Mea

    I believe this book has been released previously under the title ‘Spectator in Hell’. I actually prefer the previous title as Auschwitz was clearly a living hell for anybody who was on the opposite end of the Nazis. My knowledge of history in general could be 100 times better than it is currently. Aside from GCSE History, my knowledge is very little in regards to historic events. I’m pretty sure we studied mostly WW1 and WW2 at school so these are probably areas of history which interest me the m I believe this book has been released previously under the title ‘Spectator in Hell’. I actually prefer the previous title as Auschwitz was clearly a living hell for anybody who was on the opposite end of the Nazis. My knowledge of history in general could be 100 times better than it is currently. Aside from GCSE History, my knowledge is very little in regards to historic events. I’m pretty sure we studied mostly WW1 and WW2 at school so these are probably areas of history which interest me the most. In addition, my nana has told me stories of my great grandfather’s (who I unfortunately never got the chance to meet) experiences in the war and in Belsen concentration after the war had ended. My nana said that he only ever talked openly about his experience twice in his entire life. My point is, I know what happened in concentration camps, but not the magnitude of what went on. For the past few years I have been interested in survivors stories, both from Jewish survivors and more recently POW. To be completely honest, I had no idea that there were British prisoners working in Auschwitz. This book is based on Arthur Dodd’s experience as a POW in Auschwitz. Arthur witnessed and experienced horrific things in Auschwitz, things that I cannot even fathom. The fact that the Holocaust happened less than 80 years ago is insane to me, as I am sure it is to everybody. How could so much cruelness and evil have happened in our parents/grandparents lifetimes? This book is a very detailed account of what Arthur experienced and is truly worth your time. The only thing I would possibly change about this book is the fact that there are other accounts after Arthur’s etc. I don’t think this was needed, Arthur’s story had such an impact that it almost took away from his story. Of course other individuals experiences are just as important but I feel as though this book was supposed to be about Arthur and how truly wonderful and brave he was. If anything, this book made me realise that, even during these uncertain and unstable times, during a global pandemic, being a masters graduate and unable to find a job. I have a roof over my head, I have food, I have water, I have heating, I have my family and my friends. That was taken away from millions of people during the war and the holocaust. Their lives were torn apart, their families destroyed, their possessions stolen, they were starved, they were tortured and they were murdered. All of this happened such a short period of time ago. I am lucky. Most of us are lucky. Not to invalidate anybody’s struggles in the current day because those are very much real too. However, most of us are not living in the same hell as those brave individuals in the 1940’s. I am going to give this book 3.5/5 ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ I wanted that to be 4 but unfortunately, due to the sections after Arthur’s story I feel as though it takes away from him. For more reviews from me: mightymentality.wordpress.com

  18. 5 out of 5

    Hannah May Book Reviews

    Book 47 of 2020 📚 Title: The Saboteur of Auschwitz Author: Colin Rushton Pages: 286 My Rating: 3.5/4 Synopsis: In 1942, Arthur Dodd was taken prisoner by the German Army during the war. He was taken to the terrifying Auschwitz where he was starved, forced to do hard labour and beaten. Arthur Dodd didn't know if he would make it out alive but he was determined to go down fighting and therefore began to sabotage the industrial work for the Nazis. Arthur risked his life by trying to help suffering Jews a Book 47 of 2020 📚 Title: The Saboteur of Auschwitz Author: Colin Rushton Pages: 286 My Rating: 3.5/4 Synopsis: In 1942, Arthur Dodd was taken prisoner by the German Army during the war. He was taken to the terrifying Auschwitz where he was starved, forced to do hard labour and beaten. Arthur Dodd didn't know if he would make it out alive but he was determined to go down fighting and therefore began to sabotage the industrial work for the Nazis. Arthur risked his life by trying to help suffering Jews and aided in planning a mass breakout. Review: What I liked about this read was that we are told the horrors of Auschwitz through a different perspective, a POWs perspective and an English man's. I admired Arthur as it was clear from the start he was a determined man who was constantly overcoming obstacles. It is evident too that he is a lucky man despite his circumstances due to the close calls he encountered in his life. I have heard many facts about what happened in Auschwitz and have seen the place myself but I still taken aback by some facts I had read in this book It must have been horrid to watch others suffer the way they did and contain emotions just to keep alive yourself. The horrors Arthur he experienced and witnessed was shocking there's no doubt about it but reading what the Jewish endured in other books still haunts/impacted me more which is why I didn't give this read a higher rating However I do feel a little more edducted on how the POWs were treated during the war and hearing other accounts in this book contributed to making this read rather powerful.

  19. 4 out of 5

    NHC Gonzo Division

    Few realise that there were British inmates in Auschwitz, but there was. POWs from all over the UK: Scots, Geordies, Scousars, Yorkshiremen, Cockneys, Irish, Welsh, everyone, the whole mixed-bag. More than 170,000 British POWs were taken by German and Italian forces during WWII. This is the story of the few thousand really unlucky ones who ended up at Auschwitz as seen through the eyes of Arthur Dodd. Though they didn’t suffer quite so badly as the Jews, they weren’t much better off, and they bo Few realise that there were British inmates in Auschwitz, but there was. POWs from all over the UK: Scots, Geordies, Scousars, Yorkshiremen, Cockneys, Irish, Welsh, everyone, the whole mixed-bag. More than 170,000 British POWs were taken by German and Italian forces during WWII. This is the story of the few thousand really unlucky ones who ended up at Auschwitz as seen through the eyes of Arthur Dodd. Though they didn’t suffer quite so badly as the Jews, they weren’t much better off, and they bore witness to all the atrocities. I read ‘Tattooist of Auschwitz’ before this, so I’ve read the harrowing experience from the perspective of a Slovakian Jew and from the perspective of an English POW, and I visited the haunted place when I was in Krakow a few years ago, and watched all the documentaries and that’s plenty for me. Mankind’s darkest moments, recorded for all to know because “those who forget the past are condemned to repeat it”.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Masters

    I thought this would be a poor copy of the Tattooist of Auschwitz. I was wrong. This is a retitled book previously called "Spectator in Hell" and is a sad, intriguing read. It tells the true story of a British POW in Auschwitz who sees unspeakable horrors. After years in Auschwitz, he has to make his way home in a way I knew little about before reading this. His story is followed by very short stories from other inmates, testimony from the Nuremberg Trials and letters from readers of the earlier I thought this would be a poor copy of the Tattooist of Auschwitz. I was wrong. This is a retitled book previously called "Spectator in Hell" and is a sad, intriguing read. It tells the true story of a British POW in Auschwitz who sees unspeakable horrors. After years in Auschwitz, he has to make his way home in a way I knew little about before reading this. His story is followed by very short stories from other inmates, testimony from the Nuremberg Trials and letters from readers of the earlier editions of the book. It is an important and fascinating read. But be aware, it is emotionally traumatic. The writing is sometimes a little clunky, and the descriptions seem somehow too unfeeling on occasion, but the story itself is why this gets five stars.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Simmons

    I have just this minute finished this book. I don't know what to say or where to begin. I am ashamed to say that I was among those who never knew Alied Prisoners of War were held prisioner in concentration camps let alone the most evil place on earth Auschwitz. This book made me feel many emotions and I am not ashamed to say I wept openly on reading the heart rendering account of the atrocities committed by the Nazis. Arthur Dodds and all the Pows who had the misfortune to be sent there in my op I have just this minute finished this book. I don't know what to say or where to begin. I am ashamed to say that I was among those who never knew Alied Prisoners of War were held prisioner in concentration camps let alone the most evil place on earth Auschwitz. This book made me feel many emotions and I am not ashamed to say I wept openly on reading the heart rendering account of the atrocities committed by the Nazis. Arthur Dodds and all the Pows who had the misfortune to be sent there in my opinion are the strongest and bravest men I have ever heard of. Not all unfortunately gained their Freedom to join their families. God Bless them all.

  22. 4 out of 5

    james mc donagh

    Could not put this book down. Highly recommend this exceptionally well written and documented book, of what can only be described as a living hell for those unfortunate to have been held there. Arthur Dodd has been portrayed as a man of great courage, resilience, and somebody who fought to free others. Very sad to think that the treatment which was handed out to thousands of innocent people on a daily basis, only occurred over 70yrs ago. The writer of this book should be highly commended for how Could not put this book down. Highly recommend this exceptionally well written and documented book, of what can only be described as a living hell for those unfortunate to have been held there. Arthur Dodd has been portrayed as a man of great courage, resilience, and somebody who fought to free others. Very sad to think that the treatment which was handed out to thousands of innocent people on a daily basis, only occurred over 70yrs ago. The writer of this book should be highly commended for how he showed the atrocities in an honest, yet somewhat compassionate way for all the lives lost. Could not put this book down. Thank you.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Becky Lockyer

    I feel awful giving this book such a low rating, but the truth is that I skimmed the final third because it became repetitive and wordy. The first half of the book is excellent. It is in equal measure both moving and shocking. I believe this account should absolutely be read by all, to enlighten us to the horrors of our not-so-distant history. I think this is where the book should have concluded. The final third of the book became a little boring. It was unnecessary and, I feel, added nothing to I feel awful giving this book such a low rating, but the truth is that I skimmed the final third because it became repetitive and wordy. The first half of the book is excellent. It is in equal measure both moving and shocking. I believe this account should absolutely be read by all, to enlighten us to the horrors of our not-so-distant history. I think this is where the book should have concluded. The final third of the book became a little boring. It was unnecessary and, I feel, added nothing to the incredible account of which the book was supposed to focus. Overall, an important read which should have been done to a much higher standard.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alex Bailey

    An interesting and thought provoking account of a British POW inside Auschwitz. The existence of British POW’s in this ghastly camp was not something I was aware of before reading this, and I’m glad that their stories are getting the attention they deserve in this book. The book details what the POW’s experienced and saw in their day-to-day lives in the camp, with particular emphasis on their activities to undermine and sabotage the Nazi effort in their forced labour. Ultimately a very sobering An interesting and thought provoking account of a British POW inside Auschwitz. The existence of British POW’s in this ghastly camp was not something I was aware of before reading this, and I’m glad that their stories are getting the attention they deserve in this book. The book details what the POW’s experienced and saw in their day-to-day lives in the camp, with particular emphasis on their activities to undermine and sabotage the Nazi effort in their forced labour. Ultimately a very sobering read, although the writing could have benefitted from more detail and fewer colloquialisms. 4 stars.

  25. 4 out of 5

    a teen who reads

    i think this book has a certain genre that some people might not have a taste for. i loved how it was a true story, including each part described thoroughly. it was inspirational to hear a real survivor's story. however i found that there was a lot of information to learn in a small-ish book, so i found myself zoning out and almost tempted to skip pages as i'm not so good with so much non-fiction. But that in no way means it was written badly or it is a bad book, it was a amazing, but not for me i think this book has a certain genre that some people might not have a taste for. i loved how it was a true story, including each part described thoroughly. it was inspirational to hear a real survivor's story. however i found that there was a lot of information to learn in a small-ish book, so i found myself zoning out and almost tempted to skip pages as i'm not so good with so much non-fiction. But that in no way means it was written badly or it is a bad book, it was a amazing, but not for me. if you like historical non-fiction, but in a storytelling way, im sure you'd enjoy this book. :)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    I never know how to word a review for this kind of book. As a good read just doesn't seem the appropriate word. No words can describe what people went through at this time in history but they were very brave and to come forward and describe the horrors they saw reaping it over in their minds must be a nightmare, which says it all as that is what they are still having. These books should never be stopped being published and printed to let future generations know the unbelievable things that once I never know how to word a review for this kind of book. As a good read just doesn't seem the appropriate word. No words can describe what people went through at this time in history but they were very brave and to come forward and describe the horrors they saw reaping it over in their minds must be a nightmare, which says it all as that is what they are still having. These books should never be stopped being published and printed to let future generations know the unbelievable things that once happened.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kay Benney

    I felt I was there, it was so well written. I had heard of Auschwitz but it took me until now aged 74 years to really learn the truth of what happened. This story should be made more known publicly. The worst thing I find is that there is still so much prejudice and racism , we have not learnt much have we and probably never will while stories like this are kept hidden and not believed. I found it atrocious that the government at the time were aware of this. Thank you for writing this.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Damien Payne

    It's hard to critique a book about anyone who as experienced first hand of the evil that anyone as witnessed for themselves, these victims for this is what they are deserve our respect and undivid attention and if we don't it will be our undoing, we have to read and see what they went through no matter how horrible it may seem to us it's the least we can do, horrors to fellow humans will always continue over the world weather it be 1 life or millions of lives, we should remember them all, I am i It's hard to critique a book about anyone who as experienced first hand of the evil that anyone as witnessed for themselves, these victims for this is what they are deserve our respect and undivid attention and if we don't it will be our undoing, we have to read and see what they went through no matter how horrible it may seem to us it's the least we can do, horrors to fellow humans will always continue over the world weather it be 1 life or millions of lives, we should remember them all, I am in admiration to those who tell us there story of the suffering they endured

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Ng

    Fantastic book. Arthur was a British POW in Auschwitz. He saw the brutality of how the Jews were treated and he chose to spoke out about it so in generations to come the Holocaust will not be forgotten. This man should have died at LEAST 3 times, and once again I'm assuming his survival is so he can tell his story and say what he saw. It's why I think it is SO important to read these books so what happend is never forgotten. Also, this man was a Christian, which although not fixated on at all was Fantastic book. Arthur was a British POW in Auschwitz. He saw the brutality of how the Jews were treated and he chose to spoke out about it so in generations to come the Holocaust will not be forgotten. This man should have died at LEAST 3 times, and once again I'm assuming his survival is so he can tell his story and say what he saw. It's why I think it is SO important to read these books so what happend is never forgotten. Also, this man was a Christian, which although not fixated on at all was spoken about just enough to make clear what his faith was.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Great read I, like so many others, didn’t have a clue that there were British POW’s in captivity at Auschwitz. This book is a testament to the horrors they witnessed on a daily basis and is just unimaginable to most of us fellow human beings. I’m so glad I read this. Thank you to the author but especially Arthur, for telling his story. If, like me, you’ve read other survivors tales through their books, then this one is definitely for you.

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