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Paradise, Massachusetts, police chief Jesse Stone confronts a town’s darkest secrets in the shocking new novel from the New York Times–bestselling author and “America’s greatest mystery writer” (The New York Sun). Things are getting strange in Paradise, Massachusetts. Police Chief Jesse Stone is called to the junior high school when reports of lewd conduct by the school’s Paradise, Massachusetts, police chief Jesse Stone confronts a town’s darkest secrets in the shocking new novel from the New York Times–bestselling author and “America’s greatest mystery writer” (The New York Sun). Things are getting strange in Paradise, Massachusetts. Police Chief Jesse Stone is called to the junior high school when reports of lewd conduct by the school’s principal, Betsy Ingersoll, filter into the station. Ingersoll claims she was protecting the propriety of her students when she inspected each girl’s undergarments in the locker room. Jesse would like nothing more than to see Ingersoll punished, but her high-powered attorney husband stands in the way. At the same time, the women of Paradise are faced with a threat to their sense of security with the emergence of a tormented voyeur, dubbed “The Night Hawk.” Initially, he’s content to peer through windows, but as times goes on, he becomes more reckless, forcing his victims to strip at gunpoint, then photographing them at their most vulnerable. And according to the notes he’s sending to Jesse, he’s not satisfied to stop there. It’s up to Jesse to catch the Night Hawk, before it’s too late.


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Paradise, Massachusetts, police chief Jesse Stone confronts a town’s darkest secrets in the shocking new novel from the New York Times–bestselling author and “America’s greatest mystery writer” (The New York Sun). Things are getting strange in Paradise, Massachusetts. Police Chief Jesse Stone is called to the junior high school when reports of lewd conduct by the school’s Paradise, Massachusetts, police chief Jesse Stone confronts a town’s darkest secrets in the shocking new novel from the New York Times–bestselling author and “America’s greatest mystery writer” (The New York Sun). Things are getting strange in Paradise, Massachusetts. Police Chief Jesse Stone is called to the junior high school when reports of lewd conduct by the school’s principal, Betsy Ingersoll, filter into the station. Ingersoll claims she was protecting the propriety of her students when she inspected each girl’s undergarments in the locker room. Jesse would like nothing more than to see Ingersoll punished, but her high-powered attorney husband stands in the way. At the same time, the women of Paradise are faced with a threat to their sense of security with the emergence of a tormented voyeur, dubbed “The Night Hawk.” Initially, he’s content to peer through windows, but as times goes on, he becomes more reckless, forcing his victims to strip at gunpoint, then photographing them at their most vulnerable. And according to the notes he’s sending to Jesse, he’s not satisfied to stop there. It’s up to Jesse to catch the Night Hawk, before it’s too late.

30 review for Night And Day

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kemper

    Even though he’s the police chief of a small town Jesse Stone has faced some big time threats like murderers, professional thieves and organized crime. So it seems like kind of a let down that his two enemies here are a Peeping Tom and a female high school principal inspecting the underwear of some of her students. It's not exactly Sherlock Holmes facing Moriarty. In his later work Robert B. Parker seemed content to have every scene be about his characters having coffee and doughnuts or throwing Even though he’s the police chief of a small town Jesse Stone has faced some big time threats like murderers, professional thieves and organized crime. So it seems like kind of a let down that his two enemies here are a Peeping Tom and a female high school principal inspecting the underwear of some of her students. It's not exactly Sherlock Holmes facing Moriarty. In his later work Robert B. Parker seemed content to have every scene be about his characters having coffee and doughnuts or throwing down a few cocktails while they exchange banter. It’s got a style and rhythm that’s familiar so it’s as if you’re listening to a song you like but have heard so many times that you don’t even really hear it anymore. It is a little weird that (view spoiler)[ while Jesse’s body count has been relatively low compared to Spenser that he and his two best officers end up shooting the peeper in what was effectively suicide-by-cop. Yeah, the guy had escalated to threatening women with a gun to get them to undress and photograph them, but he was written to be more pathetic than villain so it’s jarring that he’d be someone that Jesse ends up shooting when he’s dealt with far worse people that he didn’t kill. (hide spoiler)] So this is a typical example of the kind of 3 star book that RBP churned out like a human printing press in his later years. It’s not as good as his early stuff, but it’s still got the elements that his fans enjoyed. However, I’m really tempted to give it 5 stars for the ending. (view spoiler)[I nearly stood up and cheered when Jesse finally told his horrible ex-wife Jenn to take a hike, and it was extra sweet that it was in the context of moving forward with a relationship with Sunny Randall who also shows signs of finally letting go of her ex-husband. It’s like both characters got slightly redeemed here. It was way too long in coming, but was kind of shocking because I would have bet money that RBP was incapable and/or unwilling to finally acknowledge that Jesse’s obsession with is ex was the sign of an unhealthy relationship rather than a form of true love in which a character had to suffer the flaws of their partner. I’m so satisfied with it that I’m worried about reading the last book in this series that RBP wrote before his death lest he revert back to his usual form. (hide spoiler)]

  2. 5 out of 5

    John Culuris

    On the surface any review of this book seems superfluous. Those who like this series and/or Robert B. Parker will read it anyway, and if you’ve never read a Jesse Stone novel this is not the place to start. Like most of the books near the end of Parker’s life, it presumes you’ve been with him for a while. You will find no description of Jesse Stone or his deputies, Molly Crane and Suitcase Simpson. If you decide they happen to look like Tom Selleck, Viola Davis and Kohl Sudduth (as portrayed on On the surface any review of this book seems superfluous. Those who like this series and/or Robert B. Parker will read it anyway, and if you’ve never read a Jesse Stone novel this is not the place to start. Like most of the books near the end of Parker’s life, it presumes you’ve been with him for a while. You will find no description of Jesse Stone or his deputies, Molly Crane and Suitcase Simpson. If you decide they happen to look like Tom Selleck, Viola Davis and Kohl Sudduth (as portrayed on TV), you’ll not have to worry about the narrative contradicting you. There is barely a narrative worth mentioning. By this point Parker had mastered “get in quick, speak, get out.” Essentially he did just enough to establish the scene’s location and who is involved. The rest is talk. Then why 4 Stars? There’s talk--and then there’s talk. Once you get used to everyone speaking in short, clipped sentences, there’s a lot being said. One of Parker’s greatest strengths was the ability to explore the psychological complexity behind some outwardly straight-forward actions. This talent is often overlooked in his Spenser series because of general dislike for the character of Susan Silverman. (And “dislike” is putting it mildly; just look at any review from almost every GoodReads friend I have.) As a trained psychotherapist it falls on her to explain the psychological insight to the reader, and often the message goes unheard because of the messenger. In Night and Day there is no reason to dismiss these commentaries as “psychobabble”; there are no vain and self-absorbed characters in the Paradise Police Department or among their associates. It frees us to watch Jesse get to the bottom of more than just the cases at hand. Also, there is some real writing sprinkled in among the scene sketching. Jesse has to come to terms with some pressing personal issues and his internal monologues are compelling. We also share thoughts with the main villain, a peeping Tom who is escalating. More psychological insight. A peeping Tom? Don’t panic, he’s just one of several cases--and the seriousness of the cases is irrelevant anyway. This is not a traditional mystery. Nor is it a procedural. It’s about a group of characters--principally the core members of a small town police force--intersecting and interacting until the problems set before them are settled. One of those characters is Sunny Randall, Parker’s other private detective. Before his death, apparently Parker had come to terms with the Randall books not selling. He had ended her series two years earlier with Spare Change, where he wrapped up her lingering plotlines. And I have to say I agree with the public; Spare Change was the only one I completely enjoyed, even if I still bought them all. Parker, however, was not ready to say goodbye to the character. Sunny and Jesse had been romantically involved a few years earlier, so all Parker had to do to interject her into this series was to have her best friend Spike buy a local bar/restaurant. I never minded the character of Sunny; I just never found her stories particularly compelling. Sunny in Paradise should be a much more interesting dynamic. Unfortunately the next one, Split Image, is the last by Parker. I have been saving the final four Parker novels because I knew there would be no more. Now that I’ve broken the seal so to speak, I’m sure I’ll end up reading another one before the end of the year. I’d forgotten how much I liked these books.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Barbara H

    It is so nice to sit down and read a book just for the sheer pleasure sometimes. Robert Parker, who sadly died just a few weeks ago, had the knack of combining snappy dialog in his more than 50 mysteries. These books have varied with his popular detectives, Spenser, Jesse Stone and Sunny Randall. Each one is written with crisp, but clear humor. Parker was sparing with his words, but always managed to convey a clear and vivid picture of his characters and their surroundings. So while the reader i It is so nice to sit down and read a book just for the sheer pleasure sometimes. Robert Parker, who sadly died just a few weeks ago, had the knack of combining snappy dialog in his more than 50 mysteries. These books have varied with his popular detectives, Spenser, Jesse Stone and Sunny Randall. Each one is written with crisp, but clear humor. Parker was sparing with his words, but always managed to convey a clear and vivid picture of his characters and their surroundings. So while the reader is immersed in solving the crime, (or in this case crimes)one often spends time chuckling. This Jesse Stone book,(who now looks like Tom Selleck to me) is no exception.The TV adaptations do not really capture the essence. I will not recap the story here, it can be read and enjoyed in a day or two. A common thread that runs through Parker's novels is that the starring detective has a problem love interest, although Spenser seems to have conquered that difficulty. Many have equated this with Robert Parker's own situation, but I have read many accounts recently which would argue this. His was not a traditional arrangement. He was married to Joan for around 50 years and dedicated most of his books to her. Apparently they had arranged separate quarters in their large home, which seemed to suit them well. After all, this author seemed to be spending large portions of his life writing. He deserved his quiet space! A strange note is that he is alleged to have died sitting at his desk writing. It seems fitting. I shall miss my interludes with Robert Parker, but I just discovered two or three books written this past year that I have not read. I will not have to say good bye to my well acquainted characters yet. (2/2/10)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Eric_W

    Robert Parker’s novels all have a cadence to them that many people find disconcerting. An almost staccato dialogue, it can be especially prominent in an audiobook such as this one in the Jesse Stone Series. I rather like it. Jesse is faced with two peculiar cases: the woman principal of the school has parents irate because she dained to lift the skirts of the girls to make sure they had on appropriate undergarments before a dance (no thongs, thank you); and the other a man obsessed with watching Robert Parker’s novels all have a cadence to them that many people find disconcerting. An almost staccato dialogue, it can be especially prominent in an audiobook such as this one in the Jesse Stone Series. I rather like it. Jesse is faced with two peculiar cases: the woman principal of the school has parents irate because she dained to lift the skirts of the girls to make sure they had on appropriate undergarments before a dance (no thongs, thank you); and the other a man obsessed with watching women undress at night through their windows, his obsession escalating to entering their homes during the day and forcing them to disrobe at gunpoint and then writing Jesse about it. Everyone is in therapy in this novel: Jesse sees Dick for his drinking and inability to deal with his ex-wife’s quasi-abandonment of him; Sunny Randall (a character from another Parker series) is being therapyized by Susan Silvermann (a therapist from the Spencer series); and Betty Ingersoll, the aforementioned principal gets forced into therapy in the end and her husband should have been. It’s true most of them are a bit whacko, but a lot of the psycho-babble that’s delivered in many of the interviews seems more sermonizing than enlightening. I suspect Robert Parker must have been in therapy for decades. But, all things, considered, I enjoyed the book and the Jesse Stone character.

  5. 5 out of 5

    James Thane

    This is an entry in Robert B. Parker's Jesse Stone series. A Peeping Tom is on the prowl in Paradise, and Jesse and his team must hunt him down before the perp graduates to more serious criminal activity. In the meantime, Jesse also has to deal with the case of a school principal who has decided that it would be a good idea to inspect the underwear of the young female students. And, on top of all of that, Jesse must sort out his love life, which continues to be a confusing mess. Like much of Park This is an entry in Robert B. Parker's Jesse Stone series. A Peeping Tom is on the prowl in Paradise, and Jesse and his team must hunt him down before the perp graduates to more serious criminal activity. In the meantime, Jesse also has to deal with the case of a school principal who has decided that it would be a good idea to inspect the underwear of the young female students. And, on top of all of that, Jesse must sort out his love life, which continues to be a confusing mess. Like much of Parker's later work, this is a fairly light book that doesn't take itself too seriously. The plot is very thin, and serves mainly as a device that allows Jesse Stone and the other characters to trade witty banter for a little over three hundred pages. That said, it's not a bad book, and it's a fun way to spend an afternoon relaxing by the pool. But it's not a book that most readers will remember and still be thinking about for very long after they've finished it. Parker wrote at least one other Jesse Stone novel before his untimely death, and in a way, that's almost too bad. "Night and Day" ends on a note of apparent resolution that would have been a fine way to close the file on these characters.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Glee

    This is latest in Jesse Stone series. I never read the Spenser books, maybe someday, because I like Parker's style, but he is doing them (the Jesse Stone books) in his sleep now, I think. This is quick easy read -- perfect for when you don't have energy or interest to invest in heavy read. The last couple of books I've read were much denser and harder to get through, so I just appreciated the simplicity. However, pretty empty calories after all is said and done. This is latest in Jesse Stone series. I never read the Spenser books, maybe someday, because I like Parker's style, but he is doing them (the Jesse Stone books) in his sleep now, I think. This is quick easy read -- perfect for when you don't have energy or interest to invest in heavy read. The last couple of books I've read were much denser and harder to get through, so I just appreciated the simplicity. However, pretty empty calories after all is said and done.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Una Tiers

    While I have enjoyed most of the earlier Parker books, this one fell short of the mark. There was more repetition than usual, especially about involving the lady policewoman. The writing is still clear but the idea behind the book is thin.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dana Stabenow

    He finally hangs up on Jenn. Ding, dong, the witch is dead.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Robert Parker made so very much money and sold so very many books. I'm not sure why. I guess they are simple and predictable, like a McDonalds meal. They seemed to get worse as he cranked out so many short novels featuring Spencer or his lesser-known hero, Jesse Stone, over decades. I can just about stand them (usually as an audio book) as light entertainment on a trip or while cleaning or doing yard work. This late one (2009--Parker died in 2010) is very thin and moderately irritating. Parker f Robert Parker made so very much money and sold so very many books. I'm not sure why. I guess they are simple and predictable, like a McDonalds meal. They seemed to get worse as he cranked out so many short novels featuring Spencer or his lesser-known hero, Jesse Stone, over decades. I can just about stand them (usually as an audio book) as light entertainment on a trip or while cleaning or doing yard work. This late one (2009--Parker died in 2010) is very thin and moderately irritating. Parker falls into his too-familiar habit of very short dialogue, which he seems to think is the height of cleverness, with the characters saying the same things back and forth to each other like they are trapped in a Meisner acting exercise. I think the real purpose was to take up space on pages with a minimum of effort. Lots of short lines down the left side of the page can fill up 200 pages quicker than anything. He also loves having all the characters fawn upon Spenser or Stone, pointing out to them how handsome, what sexual athletes, what jocks, and geniuses they are, as if Parker were stroking his own--ego?--as lesser men and a chorus of thinly-developed and busty women tell him how amazing he is via his projections. In this one, the bad guy is identified by the cops 1/3 of the way in, and nothing surprising happens. So, it is not really a mystery. What is it? Mostly fake-literary masturbation. I see that the Spenser series and the Stone series will go on post-death of the author, carried on by other hands. Oh, goody.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Evelyn Wilson

    This was an interesting twist of a book. You have the swing couples, not good, I don't give a shit what you say, peeping Tom, and that Principal of that school. Shame. A lot about Jenn in this book, including how screwed up she did by moving to NYC and Jesse finally made a decision about their situation . . . Page 7 . . . "the girls say you picked up their skirts and checked their underwear." . . . "Did you look at their underwear, Mrs. Ingersoll?" . . . Page 8 . . . "did yu check their undies, Be This was an interesting twist of a book. You have the swing couples, not good, I don't give a shit what you say, peeping Tom, and that Principal of that school. Shame. A lot about Jenn in this book, including how screwed up she did by moving to NYC and Jesse finally made a decision about their situation . . . Page 7 . . . "the girls say you picked up their skirts and checked their underwear." . . . "Did you look at their underwear, Mrs. Ingersoll?" . . . Page 8 . . . "did yu check their undies, Betsy?" Jesse said. . . . "Do you know who my husband is, Jesse?" she said. . . . Page 28 is where Sunny talks to Spike about changing the name of the Gray Gull Page 57 . . . "I think it violated the civil rights of the girls," Dix said. . . . Page 58 . . . "Every time," Jesse said. "sometimes she says she doesn't want them embarrassed if someone saw them." . . ."Last time we talked she said she was trying to keep them from becoming sluts when they got older," Jesse said. . . . Page 63 . . . "Protect and serve," Maguire said. . . . Page 71 . . . He just wanted to discover their secret and move on, and discover someone else's. . . . Page 74 . . . "Candy is dandy," Jesse said, "but liquor is quicker." . . .

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jerry B

    “Night and Day” is the eighth entry in Parker’s enjoyable Jesse Stone set. Compared to some of the others, the storyline is a little tame, although three sets of events bother Jesse enough to seek righting some wrongs, crimes or not. First, a middle school (female) principal is caught literally inspecting a bunch of the girl student’s panty underwear, prompting numerous complaints to say the least – but her husband, a high-powered attorney, tries to keep the lid on that virtually all-book long. “Night and Day” is the eighth entry in Parker’s enjoyable Jesse Stone set. Compared to some of the others, the storyline is a little tame, although three sets of events bother Jesse enough to seek righting some wrongs, crimes or not. First, a middle school (female) principal is caught literally inspecting a bunch of the girl student’s panty underwear, prompting numerous complaints to say the least – but her husband, a high-powered attorney, tries to keep the lid on that virtually all-book long. Meanwhile, a peeping Tom is seen spying through some bedroom windows – and his actions soon escalate into home invasions and nude photo ops with unwilling women! Lastly, a couple who is hosting wife-swapping parties at their house, and traumatizing their kids in the process, comes to Stone’s attention via the visits of their teenaged daughter. All this action gives Jesse’s cop shop plenty to work on, in the process providing plenty of digressive material for Jesse to discuss with his shrink rather than pursue his troubles with ex-wife Jenn. Another Parker character, PI Sunny Randall, puts in a few token appearances as well, mostly as Jesse’s latest girlfriend – and will things finally start to get more serious there? So: a typical novel in the series, a quick pleasant read, with not much blood and guts, but with our world-wise favorite small town police chief prevailing in the end, as totally expected!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    Night and Day read as quickly as expected with a Robert B Parker book. This is both a good thing and bad. The story, even told sparingly, is a compelling one; it was good to visit with Jesse again and it was over too soon. In contract with the simplicity of the dialog, Jesse is a rather complex character, certainly a troubled one. You have to admire his desire to do the right thing; even though as usual, doing that puts his position as Police Chief in jeopardy. If you had asked me at the beginni Night and Day read as quickly as expected with a Robert B Parker book. This is both a good thing and bad. The story, even told sparingly, is a compelling one; it was good to visit with Jesse again and it was over too soon. In contract with the simplicity of the dialog, Jesse is a rather complex character, certainly a troubled one. You have to admire his desire to do the right thing; even though as usual, doing that puts his position as Police Chief in jeopardy. If you had asked me at the beginning of the book if I was interested in more Jenn; more beleagured Jesse as the butt of the town council's wrath; amd more drinking -- I would probably have said no. In reality, the end result holds together well, and there actually may be some progress. I am ready for the next installment.

  13. 5 out of 5

    She of Seidhr

    One of the worst I've read, not because of the plot, but of the writing. My biggest gripe with Robert B. Parker's style is the redundancy and apparent lack of a competent vocabulary. At least 90% of his dialogue goes like this: "Hello", Jesse said. "Hi", another character said. "What's up?", Jesse said. "Do you think Bob will end this sentence by telling his reader that I said something?, another character said. "Absolutely", Jesse said. This goes on the entire time. It's so jarring to the point that One of the worst I've read, not because of the plot, but of the writing. My biggest gripe with Robert B. Parker's style is the redundancy and apparent lack of a competent vocabulary. At least 90% of his dialogue goes like this: "Hello", Jesse said. "Hi", another character said. "What's up?", Jesse said. "Do you think Bob will end this sentence by telling his reader that I said something?, another character said. "Absolutely", Jesse said. This goes on the entire time. It's so jarring to the point that I purposely skip the end of his sentences so it will have some semblance of fluidity and readability. I cannot believe I spent money on not one but two of his books. I obviously will never shell out on anything from him again.

  14. 4 out of 5

    B.R. Stateham

    Okay, I've been reading a lot of the Jesse Stone novels lately. Gotta say this is in the top two of the novels so far (The newest Stone novel, Colorblind, takes top billing). Sharp, witty dialogue. A couple of interesting nuance in the plots, some really interesting characters. And Jesse Stone is the tops in being the sarcastic, dry humored male protagonist most of us like to find. Okay, I've been reading a lot of the Jesse Stone novels lately. Gotta say this is in the top two of the novels so far (The newest Stone novel, Colorblind, takes top billing). Sharp, witty dialogue. A couple of interesting nuance in the plots, some really interesting characters. And Jesse Stone is the tops in being the sarcastic, dry humored male protagonist most of us like to find.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    I enjoyed this book very much!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Donald Harwick

    Except for Jesse Stone smiling, I could picture Tom Selleck throughout the entire book. The movies captured the essence of this book perfectly. This is my first Jesse Stone novel although I have read several “Spencer” novels and I believe one Parker western. This was classic Parker, very enjoyable, and a very fast read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Carole Hardinge

    I’m liking Jesse Stone’s character more after this book. He faced some very challenging problems and issues in this book-especially the panty inspection. He’s come a long way since the first installment.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Paula Dembeck

    This is the eighth novel in the Jesse Stone Crime Series and the last one published before Parker’s death in 2010. Similar to some of the previous novels, Jesse is working three cases and at the same time dealing with his personal issues, notably his heavy drinking and his obsession with his ex-wife Jenn. In the first case, high school principal Betsy Ingersoll is being accused of molestation. Several girls report that before the last school dance they were required to lift their dresses so the p This is the eighth novel in the Jesse Stone Crime Series and the last one published before Parker’s death in 2010. Similar to some of the previous novels, Jesse is working three cases and at the same time dealing with his personal issues, notably his heavy drinking and his obsession with his ex-wife Jenn. In the first case, high school principal Betsy Ingersoll is being accused of molestation. Several girls report that before the last school dance they were required to lift their dresses so the principal could check their underwear to ensure they were modestly dressed. Betsy believes proper attire includes what shows and doesn’t show and tells the girls that anyone wearing a thong is to go home. The girls object to the “panty patrol” and their parents, equally outraged, ask for Jesse’s help. Jesse agrees it is an invasion of privacy and is definitely not right, but whether it is illegal is another question. A charge of molestation usually requires sexual contact and a charge of assault includes the intent to injure. Nevertheless, Jesse is determined to do something. Complicating matters is Betsy’ husband Jay Ingersoll, a managing partner of the biggest law firm in the state. He defends his wife, insisting that no one was injured, no harm was done and no crime was committed. But Jesse feels what Betsy did was wrong and he doesn’t want her to get away with it. When Jesse persists, Jay threatens him with ruin if he continues to annoy his wife. At the same time Jesse is dealing with another problem. Someone called the Night Hawk is looking in the windows of middle aged women while they are undressing at night. His behavior soon escalates into breaking and entering during the day, a time when he forces the women to undress at gunpoint. He never touches them but photographs them and then leaves. Jesse knows that sometimes what peepers see changes their future behavior and that the simple act of watching can lead to riskier behavior. As word spreads about the home invasions, women left home alone during the day with their children at school and their husbands at work, are becoming increasingly frightened. When the Night Hawk contacts Jesse and confesses his obsession, Jesse is not sure of the peeper’s motivation. Does he want to get caught? In the third case, Jesse is approached by a young teen who tells him her parents are “swingers”. Both she and her brother know about the parties they hold once a month which they don’t like. She says her parents’ behavior is hurting the family and she asks for Jesse’s help to make it stop. Jesse does not have a problem with consenting adults changing sex partners, but when this behavior starts to affect the children, he feels he needs to intervene. This novel is filled with Jesse’s angst over his personal life. He still bemoans his lost baseball career and the situation with his ex-wife. Jenn has moved to New York for a syndicated TV show, living with her producer until she can get a place of her own and perpetuating her pattern of sleeping with men who advance her career. This latest move has caused Jesse to increase his drinking. He is still in therapy with Dix and has come to understand Jenn's behavior better. He realizes how Jenn takes advantage of the fact he loves her. If things go badly, she calls him and he rescues her, always ready with a welcoming safety net. But Jesse has had enough and tells Jenn he wants her out of his life. What makes things easier is that Sunny Randall has returned to Paradise. Her friend Spike is opening up a restaurant in town and this gives Sunny and Jesse an opportunity to reconnect. Parker provides coherence to the novel by seamlessly linking the cases as Jesse, along with Molly and “Suitcase” Simpson bring things to a successful conclusion. Jesse remains a likeable and complex character, a competent police chief who struggles with his personal life. Parker continues to develop the relationships Jesse has with his staff at the police station, especially those of Molly Crane and “Suitcase” Simpson and the witty dialogue between the three always provides a good laugh. This is a quick, entertaining read and a good addition to the series.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hunter Shea

    Not your typical Parker-esque crime in this one. Great read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bing Gordon

    A bit too twisted, but... If you are a fan of Parker’s world, you should plow through this. It’s a Jesse story with Suit and Molly as co-stars, but a bit of Susan Silverman, a dash of Spike, some Sunny as clean-up hitter, a bit of sizzling fastballs, and the ending I was hoping for.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Janie Johnson

    This is book #8 in the Jesse Stone series. Looking forward to all the other books that remain. I plan on purchasing all the hard backs for this series since I enjoy it so much. Synopsis Things are getting strange in Paradise, Massachusetts. Police Chief Jesse Stone is called to the junior high school when reports of lewd conduct by the school’s principal, Betsy Ingersoll, filter into the station. Ingersoll claims she was protecting the propriety of her students when she inspected each girl’s under This is book #8 in the Jesse Stone series. Looking forward to all the other books that remain. I plan on purchasing all the hard backs for this series since I enjoy it so much. Synopsis Things are getting strange in Paradise, Massachusetts. Police Chief Jesse Stone is called to the junior high school when reports of lewd conduct by the school’s principal, Betsy Ingersoll, filter into the station. Ingersoll claims she was protecting the propriety of her students when she inspected each girl’s undergarments in the locker room. Jesse would like nothing more than to see Ingersoll punished, but her high-powered attorney husband stands in the way. At the same time, the women of Paradise are faced with a threat to their sense of security with the emergence of a tormented voyeur, dubbed “The Night Hawk.” Initially, he’s content to peer through windows, but as times goes on, he becomes more reckless, forcing his victims to strip at gunpoint, then photographing them at their most vulnerable. And according to the notes he’s sending to Jesse, he’s not satisfied to stop there. It’s up to Jesse to catch the Night Hawk, before it’s too late. Two different stories run parallel with one another. The plotline was pretty in intriguing to me and in my mind I had a perfect scenario picked out for how this one would proceed and end, but unfortunately it did not go the way I planned. LOL I think it would have been to obvious of an outcome. The story once again is pretty fast paced and such an easy read because of Parker's use of dialogue. I much prefer to read people that are speaking to one another consistently, rather than reading what is on someone's mind and the author gives me that. The characters, what can I say, I love Jesse Stone more and more with each book. He is someone who I could imagine telling my deepest darkest secrets to and know they would be safe with him. I also love Molly and Suit, his side kicks in this series. All 3 of them are well developed, likeable, relatable and totally believable. All great qualities for protagonists. They are flawed and gritty and make mistakes. Give me those characters over 'perfect' characters any day. I recommend this to anyone who likes mystery. If you want a quick fluid and fast paced read, then Parker's books are great for you. If you like a lot of dialogue, as I do, then Parker is definitely a must read. I look forward to more from this author and this series.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    Poor Jesse, what would you think when confronted with a report of strange conduct from the principal of a junior high school? Prior to a dance, the principal called all the girls into a room to inspect their underwear, telling them beforehand that if any of them were wearing thongs, they might as well just go home. Well, maybe she had a plan, her defense was that she was protecting the young students’ reputations, but it sounds pretty fishy to Police Chief Jesse Stone. Then her husband, a partne Poor Jesse, what would you think when confronted with a report of strange conduct from the principal of a junior high school? Prior to a dance, the principal called all the girls into a room to inspect their underwear, telling them beforehand that if any of them were wearing thongs, they might as well just go home. Well, maybe she had a plan, her defense was that she was protecting the young students’ reputations, but it sounds pretty fishy to Police Chief Jesse Stone. Then her husband, a partner in a big law firm applies political pressure and Jesse is forced to drop the investigation, officially that is. But we know nothing is over for Jesse until he decides. Then it seems a voyeur is living in Paradise, Jesse receives a report of an intruder who forces women to strip naked and then photographs them. He dubs himself The Night Hawk, at least in his correspondence to Jesse, it seems he needs a father confessor, even while he stays hidden in their town he sends letters with photos attached to explain himself. Jesse feels he’s escalating his actions, from simple peeper to voyeur to intruder, there’s no telling where he’s headed. To totally complicate matters more, Jesse finds out about a local club of “swingers” and there’s no doubt that they have more information about the sexual proclivities of the members. Jesse and Molly delve ever deeper into the mechanics of the club, interview the members and devise a tricky plan to force the perpetrator to reveal himself. Meanwhile, Jenn’s gone, she has accepted a big job in the city and Jesse’s dealing with her absence, as well, Dix is helping him deal with the fallout of Jenn’s and lending professional opinions about the voyeur and the principal and the swingers, an all-purpose psychologist. The deeper Jesse goes into the voyeur’s obsession, the more he starts to understand his own feelings for Jen.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mahoghani 23

    Yes! Yes! Yes! Jesse Stone is evolving. He's beginning to see that he's just a puppet for Jenn; the fallback guy when things don't work her way. Mrs. Ingersoll, the high school principal, decides it's her responsibility to look under the dresses the girls are wearing for a school dance to ensure they're all wearing "appropriate" underwear. The parents are in an uproar. In Mrs. Ingersoll's eyes, she's done nothing wrong & her husband, Jay Ingersoll is the managing partner of the biggest law firm Yes! Yes! Yes! Jesse Stone is evolving. He's beginning to see that he's just a puppet for Jenn; the fallback guy when things don't work her way. Mrs. Ingersoll, the high school principal, decides it's her responsibility to look under the dresses the girls are wearing for a school dance to ensure they're all wearing "appropriate" underwear. The parents are in an uproar. In Mrs. Ingersoll's eyes, she's done nothing wrong & her husband, Jay Ingersoll is the managing partner of the biggest law firm in Boston, considers the situation harmless & wants the matter dropped. Jesse is not intimidated & continues to keep the case open. At the same time all that is happening, a peeping tom, who calls himself the Nighthawk, is cruising the community & watching women disrobe because it's a fetish he can't control. Now he's escalated to breaking in & making the women undress while he takes pictures of them but never touches or hurts them in any way. He assumes that Jesse is a small town, country cop that has no skills in determining who he is and what his next step will be. However, Jesse not only resolves the issue at the high school in a compassionate way but catches the nighthawk in the act of his crime. The book was full of activity from the beginning. I like the banter between Jesse & his subordinates and vice versa. I love the way he does not allow anyone to intimidate him nor provoke him to anger. He's slowly, with the help of Dix (the psychiatrist) coming to the realization of the role he plays in Jenn's life as well as see her shortcomings.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    This was one of the laziest books I have read in a long time. Compared to earlier Jesse Stone books, which were highly descriptive and put you right there in the action with the imagery created through great writing, this book read more like a script with all the set, production and costuming direction removed. This book is almost all dialogue. If you haven't watched any of the telemovies starring Tom Selleck as Jesse Stone, you would have little to no idea of what anyone looks like, what the tow This was one of the laziest books I have read in a long time. Compared to earlier Jesse Stone books, which were highly descriptive and put you right there in the action with the imagery created through great writing, this book read more like a script with all the set, production and costuming direction removed. This book is almost all dialogue. If you haven't watched any of the telemovies starring Tom Selleck as Jesse Stone, you would have little to no idea of what anyone looks like, what the town of Paradise is like, or what anything else such as the Grey Gull (bar/restaurant) is like. There is absolutely no mood in this book. It's a series of conversations without much visual or other context. I was able to get through it because I have seen many of the Jesse Stone telemovies and was able to create in my head all the missing pieces, which were plentiful. And what is it with Jesse grinning all the time in this book? In the earlier books and certainly in the telemovies, Jesse Stone is a well named, as a serious man with serious thoughts and with a stony facial expression. I cannot recall one instance in the telemovies where Jesse Stone even smiles, let alone grins. Only read if you are a die hard fan of the Jesse Stone stories and you have a great imagination to make the other elements apart from the snappy dialogue come to life.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    Paradise Police Chief Jesse Stone prevails again. Robert Parker’s wonderfully human character proves an entertaining guide through some of the best mystery stories in the genera and this one is no different. An unhappy and slightly disturbed junior high school principal takes discipline one step over the line with her female students and a tormented voyeur who calls himself “The Night Hawk” and who seems about to upgrade from “peeping” to more active forms of personal invasion provide the chemis Paradise Police Chief Jesse Stone prevails again. Robert Parker’s wonderfully human character proves an entertaining guide through some of the best mystery stories in the genera and this one is no different. An unhappy and slightly disturbed junior high school principal takes discipline one step over the line with her female students and a tormented voyeur who calls himself “The Night Hawk” and who seems about to upgrade from “peeping” to more active forms of personal invasion provide the chemistry for Jesse’s particular brand of detective work and small town justice. Jesse’s flawed character as a troubled, small town cop with personal issues make him extremely believable and now that Parker is gone I’m curious what will eventually happen to him---post Tom Selleck.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    3.5 A short, simple story that isn't so much mystery as it is a study of characters, personalities, and situations. It includes a high school principal checking her female student's underwear, a peeping Tom, a swinger's club, and the thought processes that Stone goes through as his ex-wife, Jen, leaves him once again. Perfect easy listening for the first five hours of my road trip. James Naughton read it perfectly, and I pictured Tom Selleck as Jesse Stone throughout. A TV show in my head, as th 3.5 A short, simple story that isn't so much mystery as it is a study of characters, personalities, and situations. It includes a high school principal checking her female student's underwear, a peeping Tom, a swinger's club, and the thought processes that Stone goes through as his ex-wife, Jen, leaves him once again. Perfect easy listening for the first five hours of my road trip. James Naughton read it perfectly, and I pictured Tom Selleck as Jesse Stone throughout. A TV show in my head, as the miles progressed....

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michael P.

    For once the plot and subplot work nicely together, mostly because Parker finally decided to develop his protagonist a little. The story is not very interesting, but that is normal, and is improved by not having every third chapter be a conversation with a psychiatrist. The dialog is good even for Parker. This is one of his better books. As usual there is an unacknowledged Hamlet quotation. This one is on page 302.

  28. 4 out of 5

    C.L. Hoang

    This was my summer read. No heavy brainer, no complicated plot. Lots of dialogue. The whole book is like a screenplay. In fact, I wanted to read this book after seeing a TV movie version of the author's Paradise series. It's remarkable how his terse, mono-syllabic dialogue can convey so much about the characters. And how the simple plot can still explore more than skin-deep issues while keeping the story thoroughly enjoyable. This was my summer read. No heavy brainer, no complicated plot. Lots of dialogue. The whole book is like a screenplay. In fact, I wanted to read this book after seeing a TV movie version of the author's Paradise series. It's remarkable how his terse, mono-syllabic dialogue can convey so much about the characters. And how the simple plot can still explore more than skin-deep issues while keeping the story thoroughly enjoyable.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Richard Ritenbaugh

    I enjoy all the Jesse Stone books, and this one did not disappoint. In this one, Jesse has to outwit a serial peeping tom and a prudish principal, and of course, the two story lines converge. I like Parker's simple style and great characterization. I enjoy all the Jesse Stone books, and this one did not disappoint. In this one, Jesse has to outwit a serial peeping tom and a prudish principal, and of course, the two story lines converge. I like Parker's simple style and great characterization.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    This book is hysterical! I thoroughly enjoyed all the little cat and mouse games and sexual humor. Loved the way intimacy morals ran through all the situations and how Parker worked the system to get satisfactory resolution.

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