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This educational and interactive picture book immerses the reader in the strange and interwoven lifecycles of a tropical fig tree in the rainforest, and the tiny insects and colorful creatures that call it home. Following the growth of a seed haphazardly dropped into the canopy of a rainforest tree by a flying toucan, Something Wonderful teaches the interdependence of rain This educational and interactive picture book immerses the reader in the strange and interwoven lifecycles of a tropical fig tree in the rainforest, and the tiny insects and colorful creatures that call it home. Following the growth of a seed haphazardly dropped into the canopy of a rainforest tree by a flying toucan, Something Wonderful teaches the interdependence of rainforest ecology in an easy-to-follow, captivating story. Flip the beautifully illustrated pages and experience the journey of the fig seedling making its own roots and leaves, growing strong, eventually replacing the giant tree that was its host, making figs, attracting pollinators, and developing its life-giving seeds. Something Wonderful happens next. The delectable fig fruit is hungrily eaten by a passing toucan who, upon flight, aimlessly drops a seed from its poop into the treetops below, beginning the fig’s lifecycle once again. Discover additional scientific information about the pollination process, insects, and animals found in the story in an illustrated section at the end of the book. Readers can play a “seek and find” game of locating the elusive red-eyed tree frog on each page of the story. Take a journey, from the tiny to the grandiose, while making your way through the tropical rainforest on the path to uncover Something Wonderful…


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This educational and interactive picture book immerses the reader in the strange and interwoven lifecycles of a tropical fig tree in the rainforest, and the tiny insects and colorful creatures that call it home. Following the growth of a seed haphazardly dropped into the canopy of a rainforest tree by a flying toucan, Something Wonderful teaches the interdependence of rain This educational and interactive picture book immerses the reader in the strange and interwoven lifecycles of a tropical fig tree in the rainforest, and the tiny insects and colorful creatures that call it home. Following the growth of a seed haphazardly dropped into the canopy of a rainforest tree by a flying toucan, Something Wonderful teaches the interdependence of rainforest ecology in an easy-to-follow, captivating story. Flip the beautifully illustrated pages and experience the journey of the fig seedling making its own roots and leaves, growing strong, eventually replacing the giant tree that was its host, making figs, attracting pollinators, and developing its life-giving seeds. Something Wonderful happens next. The delectable fig fruit is hungrily eaten by a passing toucan who, upon flight, aimlessly drops a seed from its poop into the treetops below, beginning the fig’s lifecycle once again. Discover additional scientific information about the pollination process, insects, and animals found in the story in an illustrated section at the end of the book. Readers can play a “seek and find” game of locating the elusive red-eyed tree frog on each page of the story. Take a journey, from the tiny to the grandiose, while making your way through the tropical rainforest on the path to uncover Something Wonderful…

30 review for Something Wonderful

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alicia Bayer

    This is a well illustrated nature book that tells the story of a fig tree growing from a seed deposited on another tree in the rain forest. It goes into detail about how interconnected the wasps are in its life cycle, laying their eggs in the fig fruit in order to help both species. The tone is lovely with this "and then something wonderful happened" aspect for each step. Children may feel a little less lovely about the whole thing since the original fig tree kills off the tree its hosted on and This is a well illustrated nature book that tells the story of a fig tree growing from a seed deposited on another tree in the rain forest. It goes into detail about how interconnected the wasps are in its life cycle, laying their eggs in the fig fruit in order to help both species. The tone is lovely with this "and then something wonderful happened" aspect for each step. Children may feel a little less lovely about the whole thing since the original fig tree kills off the tree its hosted on and the wasp eggs and wasps are detailed as part of the fig fruit. I've always heard that vegetarians can't eat figs because of the wasps and their eggs and understand that better now. I suspect many children will be off of figs for life after reading this, but it does a wonderful job of teaching about this natural cycle. Hidden tree frogs and other little elements further elevate the story. I read a temporary digital ARC of this book for the purpose of review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Etienne

    I didn't enjoy this one much. I try to represent some kind of natural cycle of life, which is cool, but the way it presented it... just makes it boring. The presentation of the actual interesting content should have needed a bit more work and a bit more love in my opinion! I didn't enjoy this one much. I try to represent some kind of natural cycle of life, which is cool, but the way it presented it... just makes it boring. The presentation of the actual interesting content should have needed a bit more work and a bit more love in my opinion!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Carla Johnson-Hicks

    This is a beautiful book showing the life cycle of the fig tree in the rainforest. The illustrations are wonderful, showing life changing in the forest. The text describes what is happening with the seed that plopped onto the branch of a tree, right through until the Chestnut Mandibled Toucan pooped out a seed and started the process all over again. I learned a lot from this simple book about the wasps, the strangling of the original tree, the pollination, and the interdependence of life in the This is a beautiful book showing the life cycle of the fig tree in the rainforest. The illustrations are wonderful, showing life changing in the forest. The text describes what is happening with the seed that plopped onto the branch of a tree, right through until the Chestnut Mandibled Toucan pooped out a seed and started the process all over again. I learned a lot from this simple book about the wasps, the strangling of the original tree, the pollination, and the interdependence of life in the rainforest. I loved the theme of "and then something wonderful happened" as nature really is a wonderful thing. The back of the book gives more information about the wasps, the fig, the toucan and the small frog that is hidden in each illustration throughout the book. I can see children going back to find it on each page, thus reading the book again. A great book for schools to teach about ecosystems, specifically the rain forest, and the interdependence of life. This would be a good resource for any library. I loved the quote from Sir. Richard Attenborough at the beginning of the book, "An understanding of the natural world and what's in it is the source of not only a great curiosity but great fulfillment." The author provided me with a copy of this book upon request. The rating, ideas and opinions shared are my own.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Eule Luftschloss

    This was fun! In this picture book, the life cycle of the fig tree is explained, from a seed landing on a tree onwards till we arrive, again, at a fig seed landing on a tree. The detailed pictures are stunning and fun to look at. There even is a game hidden in this book: Can you find the frog on every page? At the end of the book there is a short section with the scientific names of the species and a short text relating the most important facts, without a story. I already knew all of this, but was This was fun! In this picture book, the life cycle of the fig tree is explained, from a seed landing on a tree onwards till we arrive, again, at a fig seed landing on a tree. The detailed pictures are stunning and fun to look at. There even is a game hidden in this book: Can you find the frog on every page? At the end of the book there is a short section with the scientific names of the species and a short text relating the most important facts, without a story. I already knew all of this, but was entertained nonetheless and I'd recommend this for both adults and children alike. I'd have loved this as a child, as the rainforest was to me like an enchanted forest in which all seasons happen at the same time. I recieved a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Something Wonderful takes the reader on the journey through the lifecycle of a fig tree in an easy-to-follow charming ecology lesson as something wonderful happen at every stage of life. My 3-year-old son and I loved Something Wonderful. He enjoyed finding the tree frog on each page and we both loved learning about figs, bees, and toucans. The beautiful illustrations kept my son fully engaged. I loved the simplicity to the information, yet how informative it was. Both my son and I learned somethi Something Wonderful takes the reader on the journey through the lifecycle of a fig tree in an easy-to-follow charming ecology lesson as something wonderful happen at every stage of life. My 3-year-old son and I loved Something Wonderful. He enjoyed finding the tree frog on each page and we both loved learning about figs, bees, and toucans. The beautiful illustrations kept my son fully engaged. I loved the simplicity to the information, yet how informative it was. Both my son and I learned something new. We highly recommend this book! Thank you NetGalley for providing an advance copy for review. All opinions are my own.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Fatima Anwar

    Name: Something Wonderful Author: Matt Ritter Illustrator: Nayl Gonzalez Genre: Children Fiction Source: Netgalley Summary: The story is about the life of a fig seed which fell on a giant tree and how it replaced the giant tree, grew big, reproduced and again its seeds fell on a giant tropical tree. And a wonderful life again bloomed. My Opinion.: It has beautiful illustrations. I really like the background art because it gave me manga kind of vibes (even though it is very different). The story was ra Name: Something Wonderful Author: Matt Ritter Illustrator: Nayl Gonzalez Genre: Children Fiction Source: Netgalley Summary: The story is about the life of a fig seed which fell on a giant tree and how it replaced the giant tree, grew big, reproduced and again its seeds fell on a giant tropical tree. And a wonderful life again bloomed. My Opinion.: It has beautiful illustrations. I really like the background art because it gave me manga kind of vibes (even though it is very different). The story was rather simple, I would say this book is for a much younger age group. I liked the fact that the book was quite informative and would encourage people to know more about nature.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Britt

    I personally enjoyed Something Wonderful but I'm not sure I would read it to my children if I had any. But I do think this would make a nice book for children to read on their own when they start learning to read, especially when they are interested in nature. I personally enjoyed Something Wonderful but I'm not sure I would read it to my children if I had any. But I do think this would make a nice book for children to read on their own when they start learning to read, especially when they are interested in nature.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Isabelle

    Something Wonderful by Matt Ritter is a book that describes the life cycles of two very different beings whose lives are closely intertwined. This beautifully illustrated book (by Nayl Gonzales) explains the life cycles of a fig tree in the jungle and the wasps that adapted to grow and live with just this one tree. As he has with many others, David Attenborough inspired a deep fascinating with nature in both my fiance and me. This book is dedicated to this wonderful human being and the entire ti Something Wonderful by Matt Ritter is a book that describes the life cycles of two very different beings whose lives are closely intertwined. This beautifully illustrated book (by Nayl Gonzales) explains the life cycles of a fig tree in the jungle and the wasps that adapted to grow and live with just this one tree. As he has with many others, David Attenborough inspired a deep fascinating with nature in both my fiance and me. This book is dedicated to this wonderful human being and the entire time, I was imagining him reading it to me. The book is interesting and the illustrations really enhance the experience. This book is a great way to inspire interest in the natural world in a child. The life cycle of the wasp and a closer description of other animals are included in the back of the book. It also included a cute "find me" feature on every page of the book that isn't as easy as you would think.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shrabastee Chakraborty

    In his book “Something Wonderful,” Matt Ritter narrates a beautiful story about a fig tree in a tropical rainforest. Starting as a tiny seed, it eventually develops into a magnificent tree. With the assistance of a group of wasps and a chestnut-mandibled toucan, it then proceeds to produce more fig trees. This cycle of life and death maintains the perpetuity of the forest. The illustrations by Nayl Gonzalez do more than providing a mere backdrop to the story. The readers feel they are present in In his book “Something Wonderful,” Matt Ritter narrates a beautiful story about a fig tree in a tropical rainforest. Starting as a tiny seed, it eventually develops into a magnificent tree. With the assistance of a group of wasps and a chestnut-mandibled toucan, it then proceeds to produce more fig trees. This cycle of life and death maintains the perpetuity of the forest. The illustrations by Nayl Gonzalez do more than providing a mere backdrop to the story. The readers feel they are present in the scene, witnessing the life cycle of the fig tree and the wasps. The extremely detailed pictures tell many stories, should you be observant enough to perceive them. I do not want to spoil anything for the prospective readers, but keep an eye out for the frog, will you? In addition to the aesthetic beauty, I was amazed by the way Gonzalez scales the pictures up or down. This provides a magnified view or a birds’ eye view, as required. The topic of the book represents a textbook example of mutualism that renders the fig tree and the wasp partners for life. Incredibly, Ritter could describe this ninety-million-years-old phenomenon in a way that would appeal to children and teenagers, not to mention the adults. This book will enlighten the readers about the intricately entwined life stories and interdependence of different life-forms. The glimpses of biodiversity in a tropical rainforest will not only educate them but also help them appreciate the natural resources our earth so generously provides. Children of the age group of 8 to 12 years will be able to read this work on their own. Additionally, the parents might consider reading the book aloud to younger children. However, adults will also enjoy the book, especially if they are interested in the biological world. This book is, true to its title, something wonderful.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Tyler

    Something Wonderful, written by Matt Ritter and illustrated by Nayl Gonzalez, is a children's nonfiction picturebook that is currently scheduled for release on April 22 2020. This educational and interactive picture book immerses the reader in the strange and interwoven lifecycles of a tropical fig tree in the rainforest, and the tiny insects and colorful creatures that call it home. The delectable fig fruit is hungrily eaten by a passing toucan who, upon flight, aimlessly drops a seed from its Something Wonderful, written by Matt Ritter and illustrated by Nayl Gonzalez, is a children's nonfiction picturebook that is currently scheduled for release on April 22 2020. This educational and interactive picture book immerses the reader in the strange and interwoven lifecycles of a tropical fig tree in the rainforest, and the tiny insects and colorful creatures that call it home. The delectable fig fruit is hungrily eaten by a passing toucan who, upon flight, aimlessly drops a seed from its poop into the treetops below, beginning the fig’s lifecycle once again. Discover additional scientific information about the pollination process, insects, and animals found in the story in an illustrated section at the end of the book. Readers can play a “seek and find” game of locating the elusive red-eyed tree frog on each page of the story. Take a journey, from the tiny to the grandiose, while making your way through the tropical rainforest on the path to uncover Something Wonderful… Something Wonderful is a picturebook that informs and entertains. The life cycle of the fig is odd, and while I knew bits of it, which honestly has me less than eager to actually eat a fig, but I learned much more here. I liked the balance of text on each page, and the information was interesting and well worded. I appreciated the artwork, and thought that the book is worth a look just for the images in the book. I liked the hunt for the tree frog on each page, it adds a layer of inter-activeness that will keep readers interested and engaged. I think this book will appeal to a number of readers, would be a good addition to libraries and classrooms as well as personal collections.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ilana

    It starts with a fig seeds that lands on a big tree in the rainforest. It grows into a tree of its own, part of the eco-system. Something Wonderful - written by Matt Ritter, illustrated by Nayl Gonzalez - features a tiny sparkle of daily life in the rainforest. Through colourful images and simple words, it makes everything clear, from children to curious adults trying to catch up with some bits of information. However, the book requires attention and observation, when it comes to recognizing all It starts with a fig seeds that lands on a big tree in the rainforest. It grows into a tree of its own, part of the eco-system. Something Wonderful - written by Matt Ritter, illustrated by Nayl Gonzalez - features a tiny sparkle of daily life in the rainforest. Through colourful images and simple words, it makes everything clear, from children to curious adults trying to catch up with some bits of information. However, the book requires attention and observation, when it comes to recognizing all the elements - to read, inhabitants - of the eco-system. Although it is a very fast read, Something Wonderful is good enough to make you think and encourages further interest into the topic. The most important, in my opinion, is that it challenges the reader, regardless his or her age, to reckon to the wonderful - yet cruel sometimes - laws of nature. It might be the first step towards rising awareness towards changing the attitude of nature in general, by understanding that every single thing we do in and to our environment matters. And, unfortunatelly, it is not always something wonderful. The illustrations are catching up, appropriate for both the topic featured and the aimed audience. This book is a recommended read for nature-related classes but also as individual bedtime and activity stories because no matter the reason, it is never too late or too early to learn about nature, particularly the rainforest eco-system. Disclaimer: Book offered by the publisher in exchange for an honest review

  12. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    I have always found that the magic of the circle of life is always "Something Wonderful."And Matt Ritter strives to demonstrate this in his book that chronicles the life cycle of the fig tree. Now, I've been eating figs my whole life. (OK, read Fig Newtons, but whatever.) And I've learned a lot about the rainforest over my years of teaching, but wasn't aware of how fig trees actually grow. Apparently the seed falls onto a tree, and as the roots grow and the fig tree grows, it actually takes over I have always found that the magic of the circle of life is always "Something Wonderful."And Matt Ritter strives to demonstrate this in his book that chronicles the life cycle of the fig tree. Now, I've been eating figs my whole life. (OK, read Fig Newtons, but whatever.) And I've learned a lot about the rainforest over my years of teaching, but wasn't aware of how fig trees actually grow. Apparently the seed falls onto a tree, and as the roots grow and the fig tree grows, it actually takes over the host tree. And I never realized the part that wasps played in fertilizing the fig blossoms so that the fruit can grow. Plus the figs provide a sort of nest for the wasp offspring to hatch and grow. It's absolutely fascinating and I will never look at figs the same way again. The drawings are definitely appealing and help to chronicle the life cycle. For added fun, a red-eyed tree frog is hidden on several of the pages for kids to find. (I love red-eyed tree frogs!) Following the story is more detailed information about the lifecycle of the fig wasp, red-eyed tree frogs, and the chestnut-mandibled toucan, who is responsible for spreading the fig trees throughout the rain forest. It's also dedicated to Sir David Attenborough, which is fun. I think this book would make an excellent addition to a science area in the classroom, or just as a fun read at home.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gretel

    I received a review copy from the publisher via Netgalley. This picture book is absolutely lovely. It explains the life cycle of fig trees in the tropics and how other animals contribute to the life of figs and how figs, in turn, help them as a food source. I was especially intrigued by the wasps. A female wasp covered in pollen and carrying eggs, enters an unripe fig fruit. There, she lays eggs and dies. The male wasps fertilize the female wasps who are still in their eggs and then chew holes ou I received a review copy from the publisher via Netgalley. This picture book is absolutely lovely. It explains the life cycle of fig trees in the tropics and how other animals contribute to the life of figs and how figs, in turn, help them as a food source. I was especially intrigued by the wasps. A female wasp covered in pollen and carrying eggs, enters an unripe fig fruit. There, she lays eggs and dies. The male wasps fertilize the female wasps who are still in their eggs and then chew holes out of the fruit, dying inside the fruit without ever leaving. The female wasps then collect pollen, eat as much as they can, and then fly out of the fig to find a new unripe fig, beginning the cycle anew. It was also interesting to see how fig seeds can grow into existing trees and ultimately outgrow and kill them, even gigantic ones. The pictures were simple but cute and effective. And I really like how the illustrator made a little hide and seek game with the frog, drawing your attention carefuly but subtle to the frog. You instantly get that he's playing a game with you and you start searching for the frog on every page. All in all, a wonderful and fun read. Perfect for kids and adults.

  14. 4 out of 5

    J

    This particular book explores thes cycle of a fig seed and the animals that help to disperse it within their ecosystem. The writing is quite brief and simplistic but still fascinating us to keep the reader's attention. And anytime there is a major change it is announced by the titular words, which are also printed in a completely different font and style. The illustrations are a bit muted for a tropical jungle scene, which is a bit disappointing when compared to some other stories about the jun This particular book explores thes cycle of a fig seed and the animals that help to disperse it within their ecosystem. The writing is quite brief and simplistic but still fascinating us to keep the reader's attention. And anytime there is a major change it is announced by the titular words, which are also printed in a completely different font and style. The illustrations are a bit muted for a tropical jungle scene, which is a bit disappointing when compared to some other stories about the jungle. Furthermore since the book is only focusing on one species and its supportive cast the rest of the unique fauna of the jungle is also missing. But to give it a nice complete feel, though, the book hides a red-eyed tree frog on most of the pages that was kind of fun to look out for even though in some pictures you could just see the toes. At the end of the book the reader gets a more detailed cycle of the fig wasp and the fig fruit. Plus there are in-depth looks at the toucan and the frog. This is one book that I would definitely recommend, especially for science classes and home-schools needing some good science books. ***I received a free copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review***

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    Something Wonderful by Matt Ritter is a book every elementary teacher and library will want to own. Anytime I come across a book that can be used across the curriculum my radar is in high alert! This book meets the needs of teaching many instructional concepts from text features to rich grammar examples itching to notice and mimic. The mentor text this book provides makes it a value most books can not boast. Starting with the obvious, the author is a genius using an engaging way to allow us to s Something Wonderful by Matt Ritter is a book every elementary teacher and library will want to own. Anytime I come across a book that can be used across the curriculum my radar is in high alert! This book meets the needs of teaching many instructional concepts from text features to rich grammar examples itching to notice and mimic. The mentor text this book provides makes it a value most books can not boast. Starting with the obvious, the author is a genius using an engaging way to allow us to see a small piece of an ecosystem in the rainforest as if we were looking through a pair of binoculars. Ritter pulls us into the life cycle of a fig seed and captivates us with the intricate role it plays within its own ecosystem surprising us with wasps and a toucan as supporting characters. The illustrations are mesmerizing, enticing you to follow along from the beginning and leaves you never wanting it to end. There is even a fun game of hide and seek with a tree frog along the way to keep the most reluctant reader engaged.. Much to this teacher’s delight, there are kid-friendly pages at the end with diagrams for teaching moments.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Out of all the copious food chains in the rainforests of South America I was a little surprised to see this book pick this one, but it is extraordinary, and doesn't involve any animals being eaten. A tree does die, however, as it gets strangled by above-ground fig tree roots. The fig tree produces figs, which attract fig wasps, which have their own life cycle inside the fruit, long before it gets eaten by a fig-eating bird that comes along to start the chain off anew. The text is quite gentle an Out of all the copious food chains in the rainforests of South America I was a little surprised to see this book pick this one, but it is extraordinary, and doesn't involve any animals being eaten. A tree does die, however, as it gets strangled by above-ground fig tree roots. The fig tree produces figs, which attract fig wasps, which have their own life cycle inside the fruit, long before it gets eaten by a fig-eating bird that comes along to start the chain off anew. The text is quite gentle and poetic, ambling through the wonders of the title in quietly scholarly fashion, before the true science almost comes to bludgeon us in comparison at the end. The young eye is never really shown the interconnectedness of things beyond this chain, which might be a missed opportunity, but is guided around the page in search of a tree frog in every scene, and any tutor at whom this is targeted should be able to convey that there are endless such cycles in such invaluably rich landscapes. A success.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Disclaimer: I received a free digital copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I LOVE this book. I have read it multiple times with my 4 year old. The first time we focused on the story- which she thought was hilarious because it began and ended with poop- even though that wasn't the focus! She found the idea of wasps living in fruit on the gross side- but that's because she's terrified from flying insects. The illustrations were a tiny bit busy for her 4 year old brain Disclaimer: I received a free digital copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I LOVE this book. I have read it multiple times with my 4 year old. The first time we focused on the story- which she thought was hilarious because it began and ended with poop- even though that wasn't the focus! She found the idea of wasps living in fruit on the gross side- but that's because she's terrified from flying insects. The illustrations were a tiny bit busy for her 4 year old brain when we were focusing on the story being told- but she loved them all the same. Especially the 2nd time through when we hunted for the frog on every page. The story was told in a straight forward way and engaged my preschooler in the idea of a life cycle and how different life-forms rely on each other to survive- while at the same time death happens so that other organisms can live. All in all this is a truly wonderful book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    April Gray

    There is so much going on here, but it comes together so well! We have an interesting and informative text about the life of a strangling fig tree, from the moment a seed is dropped into the jungle canopy and it lands on a tree branch, to the moment a fig is eaten by a toucan to have new seeds pooped out to grow elsewhere. The beautiful artwork is lush and inviting, and combined with the text, it feels like a documentary in book form- I swear I heard it narrated by David Attenborough (to whom th There is so much going on here, but it comes together so well! We have an interesting and informative text about the life of a strangling fig tree, from the moment a seed is dropped into the jungle canopy and it lands on a tree branch, to the moment a fig is eaten by a toucan to have new seeds pooped out to grow elsewhere. The beautiful artwork is lush and inviting, and combined with the text, it feels like a documentary in book form- I swear I heard it narrated by David Attenborough (to whom the book is dedicated) in my head! Along the way we learn about the unusual way the tree grows, wrapping its host tree in a cage of roots, and the life cycle of the wasps that pollinate the fruit. At the end of the book, there is more information about the creatures shown, including the red-eyed tree frog that can be found hiding on each page of the story- seriously, find the hidden object/s is always fun! Great book for kids interested in nature and ecosystems. #SomethingWonderful #NetGalley

  19. 4 out of 5

    Effy

    Following an humble strangling fig tree seed from the sky throughout its life cycle right until until the fruit from the tree it grows into is eaten and another seed falls from the sky, this book is a great way of engaging children in life cycles and mutualism. Being about the strangling fig trees, it does feature the death of another tree as well as the deaths of fruit wasps but they are presented very plainly and as the natural order of things. Gonzalez has done a wonderful job with the artwork Following an humble strangling fig tree seed from the sky throughout its life cycle right until until the fruit from the tree it grows into is eaten and another seed falls from the sky, this book is a great way of engaging children in life cycles and mutualism. Being about the strangling fig trees, it does feature the death of another tree as well as the deaths of fruit wasps but they are presented very plainly and as the natural order of things. Gonzalez has done a wonderful job with the artwork of this book, especially the sneaky Red-Eyed Tree Frog who is hiding on every page. I loved the find the frog feature and thought it was a great way to further engage children in this book as well as showing camouflage in practice.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Words & Nocturnes

    An informative look at the life cycle of fig trees and the role other animals and insects play in maintaining this cycle. The information is presented in a simple way that is easy to understand, which is perhaps the best way to learn new things. The book is visually appealing. Its illustrations by Nayl Gonzalez are detailed, the colours are lush, and the font matches the overall tone set by the art and the content. That sneaky tree frog that turns up in every page is a fun bit that would probably An informative look at the life cycle of fig trees and the role other animals and insects play in maintaining this cycle. The information is presented in a simple way that is easy to understand, which is perhaps the best way to learn new things. The book is visually appealing. Its illustrations by Nayl Gonzalez are detailed, the colours are lush, and the font matches the overall tone set by the art and the content. That sneaky tree frog that turns up in every page is a fun bit that would probably be great at attracting the attention of young readers (though older readers might enjoy it all the same). A book to pick up when you're in for learning something new (and if you want to gaze at the great illustrations).

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Haider

    Something Wonderful is a picture book about the life cycle of a fig tree. The book is written by a botany professor so is full of facts about the fig tree but in the context of a story. The book starts with a seed falling from the sky about a rainforest canopy. The seed nestles in the nook of a tree and germinates eventually becoming a fig tree. The illustrations were very well done and there was the added fun of trying to spot the tree frog hidden in the pictures. I read this to my 6 year old a Something Wonderful is a picture book about the life cycle of a fig tree. The book is written by a botany professor so is full of facts about the fig tree but in the context of a story. The book starts with a seed falling from the sky about a rainforest canopy. The seed nestles in the nook of a tree and germinates eventually becoming a fig tree. The illustrations were very well done and there was the added fun of trying to spot the tree frog hidden in the pictures. I read this to my 6 year old and he stayed interested throughout though I did have to explain a few words to him. I received a digital review copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    ALiteracyTeacher

    Something Wonderful - Matt Ritter Pub Date: 22 Mar 2021 Published by Pacific Street Publishing This picture book would fit in well with a topic on: life cycles, rainforests, habitats, plants, eco-systems, bugs, fruit - all kinds of things! It’s ingenious because it covers so many bases! The story revolves around the life cycle of a fig tree and wasps. The pictures are cleverly put together in a way that if the child was not sure about what was happening within the text, it can be easily explained Something Wonderful - Matt Ritter Pub Date: 22 Mar 2021 Published by Pacific Street Publishing This picture book would fit in well with a topic on: life cycles, rainforests, habitats, plants, eco-systems, bugs, fruit - all kinds of things! It’s ingenious because it covers so many bases! The story revolves around the life cycle of a fig tree and wasps. The pictures are cleverly put together in a way that if the child was not sure about what was happening within the text, it can be easily explained using the pictures beside it. There’s an abundance of writing opportunities linked to this book too - including information texts, diaries as the wasp, report on the life cycle of a fig etc! A really good book for Geography and Science. Defo take a look!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sally

    Something Wonderful is fantastic. I’m a sucker for wildlife-based children’s books. The illustrations are simple but beautiful and the information is interesting without being overly complicated (while still using some scientific language). I enjoyed that there was more information on the central flora and fauna after the story was done. There’s really not anything I could fault the book on. It had the right amount of detail within the story, with more included if the children were interested. Th Something Wonderful is fantastic. I’m a sucker for wildlife-based children’s books. The illustrations are simple but beautiful and the information is interesting without being overly complicated (while still using some scientific language). I enjoyed that there was more information on the central flora and fauna after the story was done. There’s really not anything I could fault the book on. It had the right amount of detail within the story, with more included if the children were interested. The use of specific common names will help readers look up the species they’re interested in. Overall, I think this is a great book for parents or teachers to introduce ecology to children. I was given a copy of Something Wonderful by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  24. 5 out of 5

    I'mogén

    Actual rating: 3.5 / 5 Thank you to Netgalley for the e-arc. All opinions are 100% my own. I loved that this is dedicated to Sir David Attenborough. There's so much to look at and I loved the little hidden frogs. This was a lovely way to teach children about the lifecycle of a fig tree in one of its most natural environment. We got cameos from other species too (fauna), and a little bit about each of them at the end. I reckon this would be a lovely learning tool for teachers in earlier learning yea Actual rating: 3.5 / 5 Thank you to Netgalley for the e-arc. All opinions are 100% my own. I loved that this is dedicated to Sir David Attenborough. There's so much to look at and I loved the little hidden frogs. This was a lovely way to teach children about the lifecycle of a fig tree in one of its most natural environment. We got cameos from other species too (fauna), and a little bit about each of them at the end. I reckon this would be a lovely learning tool for teachers in earlier learning years. Pick it up, give it a go and enjoy! >(^_^)< Gén

  25. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    Something Wonderful by Matt Ritter is a lovely educational book for children. There is so much information here, from how plants are pollinated and germinate, to how ecosystems depend on even it's smallest members for wonderful things to happen. The illustrations are beautiful and the pages all have a tree frog hidden in the pictures- something little ones will love going back to hunt for. They'll also learn about the frog and a number of other animals and plants mentioned in the book in a fun w Something Wonderful by Matt Ritter is a lovely educational book for children. There is so much information here, from how plants are pollinated and germinate, to how ecosystems depend on even it's smallest members for wonderful things to happen. The illustrations are beautiful and the pages all have a tree frog hidden in the pictures- something little ones will love going back to hunt for. They'll also learn about the frog and a number of other animals and plants mentioned in the book in a fun way. Many thanks to Pacific Street Publishing and NetGalley for the advance copy.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tea sipper

    It was an informative and beautifully illustrated book. Kids would love this book, as it is informative yet simple. I loved the little game in the book, it helps the reader get more engaged with the illustrations and spot the details. Also i learnt new things from this book as an adult, it sure will teach even more to a child reading it. I recommend this book to all children who are fascinated by nature and ecosystem.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gracie

    This is a beautifully illustrated book about the life cycle of the fig tree. It explains the life cycle in a clear understandable way whilst still being educational and interesting for kids. I really liked the extra information pages at the end about the animals and insects featured and I think it would be a perfect book for 5-6 year olds in schools. The hidden frog on every page was fun too and helped me to look at the illustrations with more focus!

  28. 5 out of 5

    kepz_lovesreading

    This is a great book to teach children about the cycle of life in nature. The story features the life cycle of fig trees which rely on fig wasps and toucans to spread its seeds and pollen whilst animals use the fig tree to survive. I like the find a frog on each page and the simple writing that tells the story. A great way to see the bigger picture in nature whilst enjoying the beautiful drawings. Thanks to Netgalley.com and Pacific Street Publishing for my complimentary eARC copy.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    This was a simple story about the life cycle of a fig tree. I really enjoyed the premise because I think it's interesting and I think the execution was good as well. I think this story will hopefully help inspire children to learn more about nature. The illustrations were beautiful and I especially enjoyed trying to find the frog on every page. This was a simple story about the life cycle of a fig tree. I really enjoyed the premise because I think it's interesting and I think the execution was good as well. I think this story will hopefully help inspire children to learn more about nature. The illustrations were beautiful and I especially enjoyed trying to find the frog on every page.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Julia Hall

    Thank you NetGalley for this eARC in exchange for an honest opinion. The first thing myself and my small kids loved was all of the bright colors on the pages and the illustrations. Bugs are never a favorite subject of mine but my 6 year old loved it. Anytime I can introduce my kids to nature and different parts of the world. This story was really full of Something Wonderful!

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