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The riveting story of four men—Larry Doby, Bill Veeck, Bob Feller, and Satchel Paige—whose improbable union on the Cleveland Indians in the late 1940s would shape the immediate postwar era of Major League Baseball and beyond. In July 1947, not even three months after Jackie Robinson debuted on the Brooklyn Dodgers, snapping the color line that had segregated Major Leagu The riveting story of four men—Larry Doby, Bill Veeck, Bob Feller, and Satchel Paige—whose improbable union on the Cleveland Indians in the late 1940s would shape the immediate postwar era of Major League Baseball and beyond. In July 1947, not even three months after Jackie Robinson debuted on the Brooklyn Dodgers, snapping the color line that had segregated Major League Baseball, Larry Doby would follow in his footsteps on the Cleveland Indians. Though Doby, as the second Black player in the majors, would struggle during his first summer in Cleveland, his subsequent turnaround in 1948 from benchwarmer to superstar sparked one of the wildest and most meaningful seasons in baseball history. In intimate, absorbing detail, Our Team traces the story of the integration of the Cleveland Indians and their quest for a World Series title through four key participants: Bill Veeck, an eccentric and visionary owner adept at exploding fireworks on and off the field; Larry Doby, a soft-spoken, hard-hitting pioneer whose major-league breakthrough shattered stereotypes that so much of white America held about Black ballplayers; Bob Feller, a pitching prodigy from the Iowa cornfields who set the template for the athlete as businessman; and Satchel Paige, a legendary pitcher from the Negro Leagues whose belated entry into the majors whipped baseball fans across the country into a frenzy. Together, as the backbone of a team that epitomized the postwar American spirit in all its hopes and contradictions, these four men would captivate the nation by storming to the World Series--all the while rewriting the rules of what was possible in sports.


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The riveting story of four men—Larry Doby, Bill Veeck, Bob Feller, and Satchel Paige—whose improbable union on the Cleveland Indians in the late 1940s would shape the immediate postwar era of Major League Baseball and beyond. In July 1947, not even three months after Jackie Robinson debuted on the Brooklyn Dodgers, snapping the color line that had segregated Major Leagu The riveting story of four men—Larry Doby, Bill Veeck, Bob Feller, and Satchel Paige—whose improbable union on the Cleveland Indians in the late 1940s would shape the immediate postwar era of Major League Baseball and beyond. In July 1947, not even three months after Jackie Robinson debuted on the Brooklyn Dodgers, snapping the color line that had segregated Major League Baseball, Larry Doby would follow in his footsteps on the Cleveland Indians. Though Doby, as the second Black player in the majors, would struggle during his first summer in Cleveland, his subsequent turnaround in 1948 from benchwarmer to superstar sparked one of the wildest and most meaningful seasons in baseball history. In intimate, absorbing detail, Our Team traces the story of the integration of the Cleveland Indians and their quest for a World Series title through four key participants: Bill Veeck, an eccentric and visionary owner adept at exploding fireworks on and off the field; Larry Doby, a soft-spoken, hard-hitting pioneer whose major-league breakthrough shattered stereotypes that so much of white America held about Black ballplayers; Bob Feller, a pitching prodigy from the Iowa cornfields who set the template for the athlete as businessman; and Satchel Paige, a legendary pitcher from the Negro Leagues whose belated entry into the majors whipped baseball fans across the country into a frenzy. Together, as the backbone of a team that epitomized the postwar American spirit in all its hopes and contradictions, these four men would captivate the nation by storming to the World Series--all the while rewriting the rules of what was possible in sports.

30 review for Our Team: The Epic Story of Four Men and the World Series That Changed Baseball

  1. 5 out of 5

    Olive Fellows (abookolive)

    Jackie Robinson may have been the first Black player to smash the color barrier and play for the major leagues, but his is not the only story in the era of baseball’s desegregation. The second, less frequently discussed Black player to be invited into the majors, Larry Doby, joined the Cleveland Indians mere months after Robinson historically signed with the Dodgers in 1947. With Doby’s help, the Ohio team would go on to win the World Series the next year. Journalist Luke Epplin tells the thrill Jackie Robinson may have been the first Black player to smash the color barrier and play for the major leagues, but his is not the only story in the era of baseball’s desegregation. The second, less frequently discussed Black player to be invited into the majors, Larry Doby, joined the Cleveland Indians mere months after Robinson historically signed with the Dodgers in 1947. With Doby’s help, the Ohio team would go on to win the World Series the next year. Journalist Luke Epplin tells the thrilling story of the Indians’ 1948 World Series win in “Our Team: The Epic Story of Four Men and the World Series That Changed Baseball.” See the rest of my review in the Christian Science Monitor.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Steven Z.

    Spring has arrived, at least in our minds up in New England, and with it the sounds and hopes generated by a new baseball season which hopefully will not be affected by Covid as it was last year. At the same time, we are experiencing the 100th anniversary of the Negro Leagues, in addition to the tumult that fostered the creation of the Black Lives Matter Movement and its continuing relevancy. Based on time of year and the impact of race on the news on a daily basis Luke Epplin’s new book, OUR TE Spring has arrived, at least in our minds up in New England, and with it the sounds and hopes generated by a new baseball season which hopefully will not be affected by Covid as it was last year. At the same time, we are experiencing the 100th anniversary of the Negro Leagues, in addition to the tumult that fostered the creation of the Black Lives Matter Movement and its continuing relevancy. Based on time of year and the impact of race on the news on a daily basis Luke Epplin’s new book, OUR TEAM: THE EPIC STORY OF FOUR MEN AND THE WORLD SERIES THAT CHANGED BASEBALL seems like an excellent choice to navigate the role of race in baseball history and its impact on our current view of the sport. Epplin’s focus is on four individuals who greatly impacted baseball history apart from the Cleveland Indians magical run to the pennant in 1948. Playing in the cavernous Municipal Stadium its owner Bill Veeck, part showman, shrewd businessman, and baseball lifer introduced a number of changes as to how owners approached their teams. The second impact individual was Bob Feller, an Iowa farm boy who became one of the best pitchers in baseball history, though by 1948 he was on the downside of his career. The last two individuals Larry Doby and Satchel Paige have a special place in baseball history when it comes to the integration of the sport. By the time Paige arrived in Cleveland he was in his early forties and had played in the Negro League for years. Possibly the best pitcher, black or white since the 1930s Paige would make significant contributions in 1948. The last person Epplin focuses on Larry Doby became the first negro player in the American League. In 1947, Jackie Robinson who was groomed to be the first negro player in baseball by Branch Rickey made his debut. When one thinks of the integration of baseball. Robinson and his experiences dealing with racists in out of the game comes to mind, and few think a great deal about Doby. The young Cleveland outfielder was playing in Newark in the Negro League when he was called up in 1948 and did not undergo the “grooming” process that Robinson had. Despite this handicap, after a slow start, Doby, along with Paige and a few other Indians players are responsible for the amazing 1948 season. Epplin explains how the Cleveland Indians and these four individuals captivated the American people in 1948 as baseball had recovered its fan base and put their best product on the field since before World War II. In addition to the economic impact, these men focused on social issues facing the American people as the country was moving closer to the civil rights revolution. Epplin gives justice to the legends and myths relating to Bob Feller and Satchel Paige dating to their confrontations on the diamond beginning in 1936. The pre-1947 era was dominated by barnstorming players competing with each other during the off season to supplement their salaries which were kept low by owners due to the reserve clause. Baseball Commissioner Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis realized that if negro teams defeated white teams on a regular basis, it would be difficult to justify segregation, so he implemented new rules to limit the barnstorming. He wanted people to see them as exhibitions to prove that negro players were inferior to whites. Despite Landis’ attitude players like Lou Gehrig, Dizzy Dean, and Carl Hubbell all believed that Paige belonged in the major leagues. The author effectively integrates the history of Jim Crow laws, and the overt and covert racism that existed in American society throughout the narrative as he focuses on the role race played in these individual lives in addition to the personal competition between Feller and Paige. The subject of race is key. Paige obviously was one of the best pitchers of his generation, but he never had a chance to exhibit his talent because of baseball’s color barrier enforced by its racist Commissioner Judge Keneshaw Mountain Landis who ruled baseball as a dictator after repairing its image following the 1919 Black Sox scandal. When Bill Veeck tried to buy the Philadelphia Phillies in 1942 and Landis learned he would sign negro players he blocked it. When the history of baseball integration is told writers tend to focus on Jackie Robinson and leave out the trials and tribulations highlighted by the demeaning behavior and outright racism suffered by Larry Doby who a year after Robinson broke the color barrier took the field in the American League. Epplin has thoroughly researched his topic and the racist comments by Feller concerning Paige who repeatedly bested him on the mound during the off season are presented clearly and reflect the true character of the Cleveland fireballer. The key figure in integrating the American League and bringing a World Series championship to Cleveland in 1948 was Bill Veeck. Epplin zeroes in on the essence of who Bill Veeck was – his optimism, ingenuity, and ability to convince others of his viewpoints. Ever since I read Ed Linn’s VEECK AS IN WRECK as a boy I have been fascinated by Veeck and his ability to transform baseball franchises be it in Milwaukee, Cleveland, or Chicago. In effect through his desire to sign negro ball players, his promotional creativity, and his willingness to sacrifice his personal life and health Veeck became a sort of “mad scientist” conjuring up new ideas in his baseball laboratory on a regular basis. As Epplin develops his narrative it is interesting as he notes that following World War II part of the reason Veeck signed Paige at the age of forty four was due to the decline of Bob Feller as a pitcher. It was Feller who epitomizes baseball during the era he played. He was baseball’s dominant pitcher in the late 1930s until World War II. Feller was a selfish individual who had difficulty accepting the lost wages because of his four year service in the military. After the war he was hell bent on recouping the money and incorporated himself as RO-FEL Inc. The barnstorming was the key, but his star status meant he had to pitch almost every day, make all arrangements and his commitment to earning as much money as possible and confronting baseball’s hierarchy meant he shortened his career as there are only so many pitches in a person’s arm during the pre-Tommy John surgery era. Feller’s decline and views on race, and his selfishness as viewed by other players detract from his overall reputation as a baseball great. As Epplin correctly points out, “Feller’s swoon, in a sense, facilitated Paige’s rise.” Epplin follows Veeck’s quest to buy the Indians in 1946 in detail. He delves into the roadblocks he faced, his interaction with fans and his promotional ability, and finally deciding to sign Paige and integrate the team with the signing of Larry Doby who after a poor start became one of the dominant sluggers in baseball at that time. Epplin makes the important point that Robinson’s almost immediate success with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947 was due to this preparation in the minor leagues for what he was to expect once he stepped on the field as a Dodger. Secondly, Robinson was used to the publicity surrounding his athletic prowess at UCLA, his maturity from serving in the US Army during the war, and the strategy employed by Branch Rickey. On the other hand, Doby, only twenty three, was forced to change positions, had no seasoning in the minors, and was a quiet introverted type who had never been exposed to the type of racism he would confront once Veeck signed him to a contract. Interestingly, according to Epplin, Veeck developed a wonderful relationship with Doby, but Paige and Doby always seemed to be at loggerheads. The book will take the reader through the 1948 season and Cleveland’s ultimate victory in the World Series. Epplin does bring his focus on others aside from his four major characters to reinforce his views, but it is the role of Feller, Paige, Veeck, and Doby and his focus on the Negro Leagues that allows him to develop a narrative that is both interesting and timely as we confront the same type of covert and overt racism today. It is clear that if Veeck had not signed Doby and Paige the Cleveland Indians quest for a pennant and World Series championship would have come up short in 1948. Overall, Epplin has written a fine baseball history of the Cleveland Indians and their quest for a World Series in 1948. However, apart from some interesting ”nuggets” that the author has uncovered, much of what he explores has been presented by other baseball historians which he acknowldges. Despite this minor flaw Epplin writes well and he has produced an interesting read that should satisfy baseball fans of every generations.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bookreporter.com Biography & Memoir

    Four men, inextricably linked. Two white, two Black. Bob Feller, Satchel Paige, Bill Veeck and Larry Doby. All of them could be said to be pioneers, and each had his own triumphs and disappointments. Bob Feller, signed by the Cleveland Indians, was a “phee-nom,” as they used to say. This teenage farm boy from the heartland of America (Van Meter, Iowa) had a fastball that made grown men beg out of the lineup. Realizing his value --- as well as the short lifespan of an athlete, especially having lo Four men, inextricably linked. Two white, two Black. Bob Feller, Satchel Paige, Bill Veeck and Larry Doby. All of them could be said to be pioneers, and each had his own triumphs and disappointments. Bob Feller, signed by the Cleveland Indians, was a “phee-nom,” as they used to say. This teenage farm boy from the heartland of America (Van Meter, Iowa) had a fastball that made grown men beg out of the lineup. Realizing his value --- as well as the short lifespan of an athlete, especially having lost some prime years to World War II --- he was the first to incorporate himself. He sought endorsement opportunities and produced barnstorming trips, gathering a collection of major leaguers who would travel around the country after the end of the season, giving many fans the only opportunity to see them in person. Feller’s troupe would take on local teams, but the real story was their engagements with players from the Negro Leagues in the years before Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in 1947. It was on these trips that Feller would encourage mano-a-mano duels with Satchel Paige, a beanpole of a pitcher whose speed rivaled Feller’s (Paige also had exceptional control, which Feller did not). These games often showed that players from the Negro Leagues were just as good, if not often better, than their big league counterparts, with Paige up front and center in all of this. Bill Veeck was the P.T. Barnum of baseball. The game was in his blood. His father had been an executive with the Chicago Cubs, and as soon as he was able, he bought himself a team, which turned out to be the Indians after a couple of false starts elsewhere. Veeck was a maverick, bucking tradition with his plans to bring people out to the ballpark, but with the ultimate goal of winning a pennant. That included looking for talent where no one else would (except for the Brooklyn Dodgers’ Branch Rickey, who signed Robinson to a professional contract in 1946). He made Larry Doby, who had been a star with the Newark Eagles in the Negro Leagues, the second African American in the Majors. Despite their renown, Paige and Doby had to deal with the discrimination of their time, the Jim Crow laws of the Deep South, and the attitudes of white teammates, media and fans who perceived Black players as somehow deficient in what it took to be in the Majors. Doby, more than a decade younger than Paige, was more introspective and introverted, while the older man had developed a thicker skin and knew how to “go along to get along.” Like Feller, he was always on the lookout for a bigger paycheck, willing to break contracts and jump from team to team for that larger payday. Ably researched and entertainingly presented by Luke Epplin, OUR TEAM is a painstaking look at the difficulties in the lives of all these men --- Feller’s “lost years,” Veeck’s leg amputation following his own military service, and Paige and Doby trying to make inroads in a sport that did not want “their kind.” But as they worked together for a common goal, many of these differences were set aside. Reviewed by Ron Kaplan

  4. 5 out of 5

    Spiros

    As a rule, I fight shy of books with titles which include phrases such as "the blah-blah-blah that changed Baseball", because. outside of 1901, 1920, 1947, 1962, and 1975, very few years or events have actually changed Baseball. And yet, wave an account of Satchel Paige and Bill Veeck in front of my nose, and I'll jump at the bait. All in all, despite the ridiculous subtitle, this is a very workmanlike account of an extraordinary team, focusing on four men: Bob Feller, perhaps the first Major Lea As a rule, I fight shy of books with titles which include phrases such as "the blah-blah-blah that changed Baseball", because. outside of 1901, 1920, 1947, 1962, and 1975, very few years or events have actually changed Baseball. And yet, wave an account of Satchel Paige and Bill Veeck in front of my nose, and I'll jump at the bait. All in all, despite the ridiculous subtitle, this is a very workmanlike account of an extraordinary team, focusing on four men: Bob Feller, perhaps the first Major League player who managed to curate his own image (you could argue that Christy Mathewson beat him to it); Bill Veeck, the maverick Baseball and promotional genius; Larry Doby, the man called upon to break the color-line in the American League; and Satchel Paige, the master showman of the Negro Leagues. All four men come across as deeply sympathetic, but Veeck and Paige are such outsized characters that they dominate the narrative. Authors are not always in control of the titles of their books, but I'm not sure in what way the 1948 World Champion Cleveland Indians beating the Boston Braves in five games "changed Baseball". Veeck had to sell the team after the 1949 season to pay for his divorce, Paige pitched sparingly in 1949, Feller was on the downside of his career, and Doby remained the only Black American League All-Star for the following decade, while the National League could have fielded a line-up of Black All-Stars. But it's still a pretty good yarn.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ken Heard

    While much of the focus in the baseball world of 1947 was on Jackie Robinson and the Brooklyn Dodgers, Larry Doby was crossing the color barrier in the American League at the same time. Luke Epplin has written an excellent, well-researched book about Doby and the Cleveland Indians as they embarked on their 1948 World Series run. It included some of the more well-known things, like Bob Feller's desire for money and his obsession to promote himself. But Epplin shows plenty of examples to further de While much of the focus in the baseball world of 1947 was on Jackie Robinson and the Brooklyn Dodgers, Larry Doby was crossing the color barrier in the American League at the same time. Luke Epplin has written an excellent, well-researched book about Doby and the Cleveland Indians as they embarked on their 1948 World Series run. It included some of the more well-known things, like Bob Feller's desire for money and his obsession to promote himself. But Epplin shows plenty of examples to further develop that. He does include Bill Veeck's attempt to buy the Philadelphia Phillies with the intent of stocking the roster with Negro League players. That's been refuted in other biographies, but Epplin shows more proof of that intent. Finally, I was struck by how sad Doby's season was. He was cheered in the stadium for his exploits, but then not allowed to eat in restaurants or stay in hotels. He spent much of his time alone, all the while leading his team to the American League pennant. Epplin showed that well, and he also wrote of how good Doby was after a rough rookie season. This was one of the better baseball books I've read this year. We all know the story of Jackie Robinson and of Veeck, but Epplin's work expands that in a very enjoyable read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Andy Grabia

    Baseball rightfully honours Jackie Robinson and Branch Rickey for breaking the game’s colour barrier, but the story of Larry Doby, Bill Veeck and Satchel Paige deserves as much recognition. This is a superb book about a team whose importance has too often been ignored

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dan Trefethen

    This one is for fans of baseball history. Cleveland, 1948. The irrepressible showman Bill Veeck, owner of the Cleveland Indians, relies on his ace (but aging) starter Bob Feller to get the Indians into contention for a pennant. But Veeck also decided in 1947 to break the color barrier in the American League by hiring Black athlete Larry Doby. Finally, Veeck reaches out to add a 42-year-old (maybe, his age is uncertain) Satchel Paige, whose pitches still befuddle hitters. The book is well structure This one is for fans of baseball history. Cleveland, 1948. The irrepressible showman Bill Veeck, owner of the Cleveland Indians, relies on his ace (but aging) starter Bob Feller to get the Indians into contention for a pennant. But Veeck also decided in 1947 to break the color barrier in the American League by hiring Black athlete Larry Doby. Finally, Veeck reaches out to add a 42-year-old (maybe, his age is uncertain) Satchel Paige, whose pitches still befuddle hitters. The book is well structured, providing separate chapters of biography of each man leading up to when they came together on the Indians. The book culminates in a close examination of the games of the 1948 World Series, and how the three players fared. The book especially emphasizes how difficult is was for Doby. Unlike Jackie Robinson who had 18 months in the minors before Branch Rickey called him up to the Dodgers, Veeck yanked Doby directly from the Negro Leagues to the Indians, with little warning for either Doby, the Indians players, or fans. Doby agonized through this time with his treatment by certain other players, fans (especially on away games), and segregation when traveling with the team. Unlike Robinson who received immediate acclaim along with the scorn and soon became a baseball icon, Doby did not receive due recognition for decades. It was a bitter pill to swallow for a man who may have done more than any other single player to propel the Indians to a championship in 1948, and had a long playing career until he retired in 1962. He was not directly elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame but chosen to be inducted in 1998 by the Veterans Committee. Fortunately he received that honor before his death in 2003.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    This book traces the lives of 3 ball players and an owner, who each in his own right have had books written about them. Here Luke Epplin traces their careers as they eventually come together on the 1948 World Series Cleveland Indians. While Jackie Robinson gets most of the credit for being the first African American to play major league ball, the stories of Satchel Paige and Larry Dolby need not take a back seat. Bill Veeck the Cleveland owner deserves a lot of credit for their playing for the s This book traces the lives of 3 ball players and an owner, who each in his own right have had books written about them. Here Luke Epplin traces their careers as they eventually come together on the 1948 World Series Cleveland Indians. While Jackie Robinson gets most of the credit for being the first African American to play major league ball, the stories of Satchel Paige and Larry Dolby need not take a back seat. Bill Veeck the Cleveland owner deserves a lot of credit for their playing for the series bound Indians. Bob Feller the leading Cleveland pitcher is a white Iowa farm boy has mixed feelings about the success of players of color in major league ball in this era. One of the saddest parts of the book comes when Cleveland wins the pennant and the team gathers in a posh downtown Cleveland hotel to celebrate and Dolby and Paige do not come as they were used not being able to be in these settings with their white teammates. Fortunately, their white teammates search them out and bring them to the party. Major League Baseball like America was slow to integrate and this book is a realistic portrait of that historical reality.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Nelson

    A fantastic book that covers the 1948 Indians, the second team to integrate and first in the American league. While Jackie Robinson gets the vast amount of the credit, if Larry Doby had failed he could have been a one off, written off as a fluke, and the integration of baseball could have taken years longer. The book switches focus between Bill Veeck, the Indians canny and flamboyant owner, Larry Doby, legendary black pitcher Satchel Paige, and star white pitcher Bob Feller, who pioneered barnst A fantastic book that covers the 1948 Indians, the second team to integrate and first in the American league. While Jackie Robinson gets the vast amount of the credit, if Larry Doby had failed he could have been a one off, written off as a fluke, and the integration of baseball could have taken years longer. The book switches focus between Bill Veeck, the Indians canny and flamboyant owner, Larry Doby, legendary black pitcher Satchel Paige, and star white pitcher Bob Feller, who pioneered barnstorming tours of black and white players despite being skeptical himself of black players succeeding in the majors. A must read for any baseball fan, but those interested in the civil rights movement and post-war america will find a lot to keep their interest.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mike Lindgren

    An outstanding and deeply enjoyable book. Epplin has used the 1948 Cleveland baseball team, who ended up winning the World Series that year, as a lens through which to look at baseball and at America. Epplin examines the careers of four men, two white -- eccentric owner Bill Veeck and fireballing Cleveland pitcher Bob Feller -- and two black: star outfielder Larry Doby and legendary pitcher Satchel Paige. These four men came together in unpredictable ways to bring a championship to Cleveland in An outstanding and deeply enjoyable book. Epplin has used the 1948 Cleveland baseball team, who ended up winning the World Series that year, as a lens through which to look at baseball and at America. Epplin examines the careers of four men, two white -- eccentric owner Bill Veeck and fireballing Cleveland pitcher Bob Feller -- and two black: star outfielder Larry Doby and legendary pitcher Satchel Paige. These four men came together in unpredictable ways to bring a championship to Cleveland in the dawning days of postwar America. The writing is fresh and vivid. Add it to the short shelf (Eight Men Out, The Glory of Their Times) of indispensable baseball books.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Pete

    this was my mowing the lawn/doing chores audiobook - really satisfying work of sports history that follows larry doby, satchel paige, bob feller and bill veeck up to and through the 1948 world series. well-paced and very fresh (to me) in its account of feller and paige's long-standing barnstorming rivalry. felt a little repetitive, which is sort of unavoidable. baseball, it turns out, is pretty repetitive. also repetitive: racial animus. nicely turned portrait of bob feller as a talented but fat this was my mowing the lawn/doing chores audiobook - really satisfying work of sports history that follows larry doby, satchel paige, bob feller and bill veeck up to and through the 1948 world series. well-paced and very fresh (to me) in its account of feller and paige's long-standing barnstorming rivalry. felt a little repetitive, which is sort of unavoidable. baseball, it turns out, is pretty repetitive. also repetitive: racial animus. nicely turned portrait of bob feller as a talented but fatally uptight weenie.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jaime Dickerson

    I enjoy reading books about the “golden age” of baseball IMHO 1940-mid sixties. This one covers the 1948 Cleveland Indians’ World Series run and 4 men who were key to that success, Bill Veek, Larry Doby, Bob Feller, and Satchel Paige. Everyone knows Jackie Robinson was the first African American to break into the Major Leagues, but Doby was second and faced the same challenges, slights, and indignities. The book covers the post-season “barnstorming” duels between Feller and Paige, and Paige’s ent I enjoy reading books about the “golden age” of baseball IMHO 1940-mid sixties. This one covers the 1948 Cleveland Indians’ World Series run and 4 men who were key to that success, Bill Veek, Larry Doby, Bob Feller, and Satchel Paige. Everyone knows Jackie Robinson was the first African American to break into the Major Leagues, but Doby was second and faced the same challenges, slights, and indignities. The book covers the post-season “barnstorming” duels between Feller and Paige, and Paige’s entry into the majors as a coda to his long and storied career. A really good read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    This is a fantastic, well-written look at one of baseball’s under-appreciated teams—the 1948 Indians. The author provides a “you are there” feel delving into back stories of Doby, Paige, Feller, and Veeck. He then brings the stories together in the magical 1948 season—still the last time the Indians won the World Series.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joann

    Anyone who enjoys baseball will want to read this well researched account of the 1948 season for the Cleveland Indians. Parts of it were very hard to read, the cruel racism which was so much a part of the scene then. It is hard to imagine the isolation of players like Larry Doby, Jackie Robinson and Satchel Paige and the courage it took for them to pursue their dreams.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    An insightful look into four major players on the 1948 world series winning Cleveland Indians team. I really enjoyed reading this book and learning a little more about some big names in Cleveland baseball.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    While certainly not exhaustive concerning Black ball players, this is an informative volume on those players in the early to mid 20th century as they opened up the game.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Budd Margolis

    Wonderful story of the early days and the development of baseball by a marketing genius and three ball player legends whose careers were impacted by segregation of the sport & American society. These four, along with Brooklyn Dodgers Rickey & Robinson, broke the race barrier but what a struggle it was. If you love baseball then this is a must, if you are from Cleveland then it fills in a lot of Cleveland history. Hats off to Luke Epplin, well done!!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

  19. 5 out of 5

    Oliver Samir

  20. 4 out of 5

    Skinny Man

  21. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

  22. 5 out of 5

    Terry

  23. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tim Odzer

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tim Rogers

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alan

  28. 5 out of 5

    TEELOCK Mithilesh

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jerome J.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

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