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Men to Avoid in Art and Life

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Started as a Twitter thread and quickly gained widespread popularity, this book perfectly captures those relatable moments when a man explains to a woman a subject about which he knows considerably less than she does. Situations include these men in art and antiquity sharing keen insight on the female anatomy, an eloquent defense of catcalling, or offering sage advice abou Started as a Twitter thread and quickly gained widespread popularity, this book perfectly captures those relatable moments when a man explains to a woman a subject about which he knows considerably less than she does. Situations include these men in art and antiquity sharing keen insight on the female anatomy, an eloquent defense of catcalling, or offering sage advice about horseback riding to the woman who owns the horse and many more situations.


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Started as a Twitter thread and quickly gained widespread popularity, this book perfectly captures those relatable moments when a man explains to a woman a subject about which he knows considerably less than she does. Situations include these men in art and antiquity sharing keen insight on the female anatomy, an eloquent defense of catcalling, or offering sage advice abou Started as a Twitter thread and quickly gained widespread popularity, this book perfectly captures those relatable moments when a man explains to a woman a subject about which he knows considerably less than she does. Situations include these men in art and antiquity sharing keen insight on the female anatomy, an eloquent defense of catcalling, or offering sage advice about horseback riding to the woman who owns the horse and many more situations.

30 review for Men to Avoid in Art and Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    I read this the day I started it, it's a very quick read -- I'm talking ten minutes -- and I've read it probably three times more since. When it's funny it's very, very funny. I wanted to include screenshots but can't figure it out. Complicating things is that the paintings are identified in the back, in an index. That's a serious pain and makes no sense, showing the art divorced from the name of the painting and the artist. So maybe I'll try again to post the very clever Toulouse-Lautrec caption I read this the day I started it, it's a very quick read -- I'm talking ten minutes -- and I've read it probably three times more since. When it's funny it's very, very funny. I wanted to include screenshots but can't figure it out. Complicating things is that the paintings are identified in the back, in an index. That's a serious pain and makes no sense, showing the art divorced from the name of the painting and the artist. So maybe I'll try again to post the very clever Toulouse-Lautrec caption and the other two or three...or maybe I give up and just provide quotes with links to the paintings. For now I'm giving it a rest and a nonvisual review. Some of it isn't great but the great ones are so worth it. Hahahaha. Tis the season so yes, I'll edit this and share a laugh with you. Speaking of the season, this is very giftable for friends and the condescending men in your life. ⭐ 1/1/21: I promised examples and, hopefully, better late than never. Not being able to show the captions on the painting the way Tersigni has is less than ideal -- but so am I ;) https://www.rct.uk/collection/406925/... "I can't talk to you if you're going to get hysterical" https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collect... "We've been over this a million times: You can't get pregnant if you're on top. It's called gravity" https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Fi... "I only talked over you all night because I didn't want you to embarrass yourself"

  2. 5 out of 5

    Valerity (Val)

    This was indeed funny, and I enjoyed the art. It also made me want to strangle someone at times though :-) The humor was biting, sarcastic, and just what I needed for a change while locked down at home for this virus that seems never ending. I’m thinking I need to read humor more often now. Thanks. Advanced electronic review copy was provided by NetGalley, author Nicole Tersigni, and the publisher. Review of other edition.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    Nicole Tersigni stumbled into fame — and publication — by pairing works by the Great Masters with misogynistic statements on her Twitter feed. Whether mansplainers, patronizers, clowns or self-styled experts, they’re all here. Laugh-out-loud funny, this book was a wonderful way to end 2020.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Glen

    As an artist, I am always looking to find interesting books about visual arts, design techniques and unique takes on the arts. This book, while featuring some great artworks, isn't. While I might be accused of mansplaining, my only intent is to leave a review. The artwork I loved, the humor not so much. Well, maybe it was just a little funny... Than again, should I put myself in their (female) shoes... Thanks for the ARC, which I go in exchange for an honest review. As an artist, I am always looking to find interesting books about visual arts, design techniques and unique takes on the arts. This book, while featuring some great artworks, isn't. While I might be accused of mansplaining, my only intent is to leave a review. The artwork I loved, the humor not so much. Well, maybe it was just a little funny... Than again, should I put myself in their (female) shoes... Thanks for the ARC, which I go in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ivana

    I LOVED this! Since I am an Art History student I enjoyed seeing the art, but what I enjoyed, even more, is the way the author managed to find a fitting and very true caption to put next to the painting! I recommend this one to everyone! To those who will get the joke and to those who won't (in the hope this will open their eyes even a little bit). I might buy this when I get the chance... I LOVED this! Since I am an Art History student I enjoyed seeing the art, but what I enjoyed, even more, is the way the author managed to find a fitting and very true caption to put next to the painting! I recommend this one to everyone! To those who will get the joke and to those who won't (in the hope this will open their eyes even a little bit). I might buy this when I get the chance...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chantal

    An okay book to browse when you have nothing to do. Some funny comments next to the paintings. I do think you should be American to get them all. Don't expect a lot out of this book. An okay book to browse when you have nothing to do. Some funny comments next to the paintings. I do think you should be American to get them all. Don't expect a lot out of this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    David Wineberg

    Nicole Tersigni has been attacking in all directions, for years. Men, life, her husband, her family, men, confinement, men … everything. Now she has collected her thoughts in a cartoonish little book called Men to Avoid in Art and Life. It’s a delightful small collection of scenes magnified out of classic European paintings, with Tersigni’s jaundiced captions over them. Maybe I shouldn’t say jaundiced. That would come from a neutral observer. What they are really are finely targeted and accurate Nicole Tersigni has been attacking in all directions, for years. Men, life, her husband, her family, men, confinement, men … everything. Now she has collected her thoughts in a cartoonish little book called Men to Avoid in Art and Life. It’s a delightful small collection of scenes magnified out of classic European paintings, with Tersigni’s jaundiced captions over them. Maybe I shouldn’t say jaundiced. That would come from a neutral observer. What they are really are finely targeted and accurate attacks on men abusing women out of total ignorance. Very little exaggeration was necessary to make her captions funny; men already provide. Free. The book is divided into chapters of paintings, collecting men’s sins into neat buckets: The Mansplainer, The Concern Troll, The Comedian, The Sexpert, and The Patronizer. The scenes are centered around a woman in a painting, with a man hovering while overexplaining something at her. The really great thing about the paintings is that Tersigni has found women who are just done. Tired of hearing the prattle, fed up with playing the bimbo, or holding off from a slew of expletives for lack of an AR-15 or a Deathstar. They look on, often breaking the fourth wall, like Jack Benny dumbfounded by the noise passing for information. I leave you with a sampling: “We’ve been over this a million times. You can’t get pregnant if you’re on top. It’s called gravity.” “No one wants to see a woman with body hair. It’s unnatural.” “Let me tell you something about the female body…” “I know it’s hard for women to sit quietly. But close your eyes and listen. You might learn something.” “…and women don’t have to be funny, because men are already attracted to them. That’s why only ugly women can tell a joke worth a damn. Anyway, nice to meet you. I’m Bob.” David Wineberg

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lata

    I snickered at a few of the lines—some of the sarcastic statements felt a little, too real...... I also found myself cringing at some of the images; the men in these paintings look really condescending and creepy, which is no doubt why the author paired them with the statements she did.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    It's unfortunate to have to attribute this book such a low rating, but the whole thing feels like a case of half-hearted attempts at humour and political correctness. First of all, the Foreword by Jen Kirkman really does a disservice to this book. Rather than get me excited to read, the tone and forced jokes actually made me want to put the book down. With vague blanket statements like "Twitter is a daily reminder that I'm a woman" and an unnecessary, unfunny tampon joke, I just don't know what t It's unfortunate to have to attribute this book such a low rating, but the whole thing feels like a case of half-hearted attempts at humour and political correctness. First of all, the Foreword by Jen Kirkman really does a disservice to this book. Rather than get me excited to read, the tone and forced jokes actually made me want to put the book down. With vague blanket statements like "Twitter is a daily reminder that I'm a woman" and an unnecessary, unfunny tampon joke, I just don't know what the point of her commentary was. (I also don't really know who she is... I googled her, I guess she's on the cover to help sales?) I would have much preferred something written by Nicole Tersigni herself, perhaps something reflective about the process of revisiting her content and putting the book together. The content of the book is hit-or-miss, though there are some clever pairings made between the gorgeous artwork and comments that I've sure most women have heard from some men before. This could be a good gift book, but unfortunately, I think it lacks substance. Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with an advance copy of this book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Morris

    This collection of famous art mixed with observations and snarky comments about men gave me quite a few laughs. Given the pandemic, that makes it worth a recommendation. Very funny! This unbiased review is based on a complimentary copy provided by the publisher.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Nicole Tersigni has created this little delight, based upon her well-known Twitter thread of the same name. For readers unfamilar with the latter, Tersigni cleverly pairs examples from the last 500 years of European art with appropriately illustrative statements attributed to the male characters. Examples are grouped into the categories "The Mansplainer", "The Concern Troll", "The Comedian", "The Sexpert" and "The Patronizer". Any woman who has lived in the modern world (and by the look of the f Nicole Tersigni has created this little delight, based upon her well-known Twitter thread of the same name. For readers unfamilar with the latter, Tersigni cleverly pairs examples from the last 500 years of European art with appropriately illustrative statements attributed to the male characters. Examples are grouped into the categories "The Mansplainer", "The Concern Troll", "The Comedian", "The Sexpert" and "The Patronizer". Any woman who has lived in the modern world (and by the look of the facial expressions, many in times past, also) will be all-too familiar with the situations and sentiments depicted. The artistic examples Tersigni has chosen are absolutely perfect for her material - the reader can't fail to sympathise (and empathise) with the recipients of all this masculine "insight". Hilarious, and will prove a lovely addition to the collection of art lovers and feminists alike. Also a great gift idea. Thanks to the author, Chronicle Books and NetGalley for the opportunity to review an advance copy. #MentoAvoidinArtandLife #NetGalley

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lu

    Men to Avoid in Art and Life is a title too tempting to resist. I saw it on NetGalley and could not stop myself from having a look at it. The idea is to pair classical paintings of couples with funny captions relating to men's behavior. It is interesting how the author collected paintings where women seemed truly annoyed, bored, astonished or simply fed up. Some jokes were better than others, but overall I enjoyed this book. On a side note, I wish the information about the paintings was easily acces Men to Avoid in Art and Life is a title too tempting to resist. I saw it on NetGalley and could not stop myself from having a look at it. The idea is to pair classical paintings of couples with funny captions relating to men's behavior. It is interesting how the author collected paintings where women seemed truly annoyed, bored, astonished or simply fed up. Some jokes were better than others, but overall I enjoyed this book. On a side note, I wish the information about the paintings was easily accessible. I had to keep going to the end of the book to find the names of those unknown to me.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Radwa

    This is a wonderful hilarious book for all women suffering from the men of the internet. It got that classical art memes feel to it, as the author chose a number of beautiful classic paintings to add some common sentences used by different types of men, online or IRL. They're split into: The mainsplainer, The concern troll, The "comedian", The sexpert, and The patronizer. It was fun and I thank netgalley for the digital arc. This is a wonderful hilarious book for all women suffering from the men of the internet. It got that classical art memes feel to it, as the author chose a number of beautiful classic paintings to add some common sentences used by different types of men, online or IRL. They're split into: The mainsplainer, The concern troll, The "comedian", The sexpert, and The patronizer. It was fun and I thank netgalley for the digital arc.

  14. 4 out of 5

    sologdin

    Develops Solnit's signature polemic into effective internet-style captions of classical paintings. Witty and cool. Develops Solnit's signature polemic into effective internet-style captions of classical paintings. Witty and cool.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Paula (lovebookscl)

    Thanks Netgalley for the ARC! I laughed a lot. The game between what you see and the phrases is interesting and I liked the millennial humor (although the phrases are horrible but so ridiculous that it makes you laugh). The paintings are beautiful and I loved each one of them... i just love art. It's one of those books that you have on the living room, ready to be read by anyone and surely creates interesting conversations! Thanks Netgalley for the ARC! I laughed a lot. The game between what you see and the phrases is interesting and I liked the millennial humor (although the phrases are horrible but so ridiculous that it makes you laugh). The paintings are beautiful and I loved each one of them... i just love art. It's one of those books that you have on the living room, ready to be read by anyone and surely creates interesting conversations!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    I really enjoyed this funny look at mansplaining. I love those internet memes where people caption classical paintings and this book delivered much of the same humor. It has me rolling my eyes and busting out laughing in equal measure. A fun, quick look at one of the most annoying issues women have faced throughout history.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Annie Lee Phillips

    5 freaking stars!! I want to gift this book to all of my lady friends!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Two things I wasn't overly fond of first to get it out of the way. 1) The titles of the artworks and the artists were included in the back of the book, not in a caption under the artwork. The back also included the location of the original artwork, but not the year it was created. I rather have the date, title and artist under the picture for immediacy, rather than having to flip back and forth, which is really annoying in an eBook. 2) I seriously hope that the captions were jokes and not things Two things I wasn't overly fond of first to get it out of the way. 1) The titles of the artworks and the artists were included in the back of the book, not in a caption under the artwork. The back also included the location of the original artwork, but not the year it was created. I rather have the date, title and artist under the picture for immediacy, rather than having to flip back and forth, which is really annoying in an eBook. 2) I seriously hope that the captions were jokes and not things the author and other women have actually heard from men, because if so, we are doomed as a society. Now, for the good. The artworks were all new to me, and they were enchanting and excellent choices IMHO. I plan on looking into them more fully, to learn about the artists, the history of the paintings, etc. So HUGE bonus for not choosing works that have been done to death already. Also, some of the pictures were just PERFECT to go with the caption. For example, on page 14, "At Mouquin's" by William Glackens, the female in the picture, her body language, the look on her face, the way she is gripping her right arm with her left hand as if she is struggling not to back-hand the man next to her, it is absolutely gorgeous and perfect with any caption of a man being insulting and annoying. Page 87, "The Duet" by Charles van Bevern, the lady looks PISSED. Again, perfect compliment to the words put into the man's mouth. I will be looking at all artwork in a different way now, focusing on the faces and body language of the women and imagining what they may be feeling under what the artist was trying to portray, or maybe actually trying to portray. This book is rather harsh towards men, but the forward makes it clear that it's not directed to all men, just those who actually think like the comments in the book. Which I severely hope is only a few, really vocal, clueless idiots, and not the majority of them. Honestly, the comments kind of irked me, but the artwork saved this book from dislike on my part. I have a soft spot for art, having studied it in school many moon ago, so this book was a favorable "read" for me. I am glad that the information on the artwork was given, despite it being at the end of the book. I wish they included how they came across these particular pieces and why they were chosen over others. I would like to know the thought process behind the decision making for what would be paired with what. This may not be for everyone, I can see the comments irking some and if art isn't your thing, then this might be a pass for you. But if you love art, even if the humor doesn't tickle your funny bone, the art and the rabbit hole it may lead you down could be well worth your time. 3.5 stars, 5 for the art, 2 for the commentary, to average to 3 stars. My thanks to NetGalley and Chronicle Books for an eARC copy of this book to read and review.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Oooof! some relatable, hilarious memes in this one.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey

    This was a hoot. I thoroughly enjoyed myself. I did not care for the last section, it just wasn't my style of comedy. This was a hoot. I thoroughly enjoyed myself. I did not care for the last section, it just wasn't my style of comedy.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte Jones

    *Disclaimer: I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I love art and I am actually studying A level History of Art online at the moment. The author pairs traditional paintings with Twitter-worthy captions explaining the female experience and some men's patriarchal comments that are just plain ridiculous. I really enjoyed the pairings of old art with new media. I can't really say much about this as it is more of what I would class as a gift book but it's someth *Disclaimer: I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I love art and I am actually studying A level History of Art online at the moment. The author pairs traditional paintings with Twitter-worthy captions explaining the female experience and some men's patriarchal comments that are just plain ridiculous. I really enjoyed the pairings of old art with new media. I can't really say much about this as it is more of what I would class as a gift book but it's something that I would buy someone for Christmas and would recommend to art lovers. 3 out of 5 stars!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Devann

    I received an ARC copy of this book from NetGalley This was pretty good but it could have been so much better. I feel like a lot of the comments were either not as funny as they could have been [although still very true] or either felt like they were repeating themselves a lot. Also while there were a lot of really great pieces of art chosen, there were also several that didn't really feel like they fit with the comment that was put with them. It's a great idea but probably just needed a bit more I received an ARC copy of this book from NetGalley This was pretty good but it could have been so much better. I feel like a lot of the comments were either not as funny as they could have been [although still very true] or either felt like they were repeating themselves a lot. Also while there were a lot of really great pieces of art chosen, there were also several that didn't really feel like they fit with the comment that was put with them. It's a great idea but probably just needed a bit more editing with the comments and more time looking for appropriate pictures. It's really ridiculous how many old paintings have women in them that just look so entirely bored or annoyed and you have to wonder if that is because men saw that look on women's faces and went 'that must mean she's into me' or if the painter used a model and they were so annoying during the process that the model just had that look on her face the whole time. Overall pretty interesting but also I feel like I've seen better compilations of this on Tumblr so [shrug].

  23. 5 out of 5

    Terry ~ Huntress of Erudition

    Hahaha - It is so satisfying to see the annoyed, yet jaded expression on the woman's face in great works of art when the man is being so infuruatingly patronizing! Nicole Tersigni's inventive book reminds me of reading a narrative by the great comedienne, Jane Austen. I especially liked the foreword by Jen Kirkman, very funny! Hahaha - It is so satisfying to see the annoyed, yet jaded expression on the woman's face in great works of art when the man is being so infuruatingly patronizing! Nicole Tersigni's inventive book reminds me of reading a narrative by the great comedienne, Jane Austen. I especially liked the foreword by Jen Kirkman, very funny!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Deborah van den Berg

    I never saw the viral tweets of Tersigni, so I went in with an open mind. I looked forward to this one, as it is a combination of things I enjoy a lot (or are interested in): art and feminism. The artwork on the cover is appealing, and so is the description of it. I commend all books that make people look at art, as I believe more people should do so in the first place. The title sounded intriguing, and I couldn't wait to get started. However, it just wasn't for me. Maybe it was because of my bac I never saw the viral tweets of Tersigni, so I went in with an open mind. I looked forward to this one, as it is a combination of things I enjoy a lot (or are interested in): art and feminism. The artwork on the cover is appealing, and so is the description of it. I commend all books that make people look at art, as I believe more people should do so in the first place. The title sounded intriguing, and I couldn't wait to get started. However, it just wasn't for me. Maybe it was because of my background in art history that I couldn't put my mind off the idea a lot of the as quotes presented texts felt misplaced. During my studies, I might have been ruined to read books like this, because I was always encouraged to find the story behind the paintings. In this case, it felt the quotes didn't have any link with the paintings, and they often left me kind of confused. If the paintings and quotes would have been matched better, I would have loved it. The same goes for adding the paintings information at the page where it was shown, so I wouldn't have to go back and forth to the list in the back. Also, the foreword made the lighthearted book much more heavy to start with, and got me up to the point I actually wasn't interested anymore in reading any further. It read like an ongoing attack to men in general and myself as a reader, and the tone just didn't do it for me. If you don't think that much about the backstory of the paintings and want a fun, light read; go ahead, this one is for you. If you are ruined by your schooling just like I was, maybe pick up another book. - Thanks to Netgalley and Chronicle Books for an ARC in exchange for my honest review -

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    This was hilarious. The captions are on point. They aren't unrealistic; these sentiments are thrown out there into the world in real life. The art choices for the captions are perfect. I'll probably end up buying this one. It's just a fun book to have around. I think my only complaint is I wish it were bigger. Not even more images, but generally larger. This was hilarious. The captions are on point. They aren't unrealistic; these sentiments are thrown out there into the world in real life. The art choices for the captions are perfect. I'll probably end up buying this one. It's just a fun book to have around. I think my only complaint is I wish it were bigger. Not even more images, but generally larger.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joy (Books with Joy)

    This was an amusing and light-hearted read featuring short feminist commentary accompanied by classic art pieces. I particularly liked how it covered concepts such as ‘The Mansplainer’, ‘The Concern Troll’, ‘The Comedian’ and so on. The captions were brutal and witty. Although, it was a sad comfort realising how relatable some of these experiences were with others. However, I appreciate how well matched the women’s facial expression were to the captions. If you’re looking for a quick and fun read This was an amusing and light-hearted read featuring short feminist commentary accompanied by classic art pieces. I particularly liked how it covered concepts such as ‘The Mansplainer’, ‘The Concern Troll’, ‘The Comedian’ and so on. The captions were brutal and witty. Although, it was a sad comfort realising how relatable some of these experiences were with others. However, I appreciate how well matched the women’s facial expression were to the captions. If you’re looking for a quick and fun read, a fan of art and memes, this may be for you! Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Fraenkel

    This sassy art book takes beautiful paintings and pairs them with statements from fed up women dealing with mansplaining, trolls, sexperts, and patronizers. Funny and thought provoking, Men to Avoid in Art and Life would make a great coffee table book or gift. ARC Provided by NetGalley

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

    Mansplaining with classic paintings? Yes please. Hysterical.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kirsti

    Oh, I love these. The chapter on women and comedy is especially great. Some of these captions are extremely specific and (unfortunately) most likely came from actual experience. And it's always good to gaze at a painting and wonder what the participants were really thinking. Oh, I love these. The chapter on women and comedy is especially great. Some of these captions are extremely specific and (unfortunately) most likely came from actual experience. And it's always good to gaze at a painting and wonder what the participants were really thinking.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rosa

    Yes this was hilarious and perfect and combines two of my favourite things (art memes and books). Love being able to “scroll” through aesthetically pleasing memes without having to deal with aggressive Insta advertising either, a privilege to experience.

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