web site hit counter How to Pack for the End of the World - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

How to Pack for the End of the World

Availability: Ready to download

The Breakfast Club meets We Are the Ants in this timely story for a generation of young activists. If you knew the world was going to end tomorrow, what would you do? This is the question that haunts Amina as she watches new and horrible stories of discord and crisis flash across the news every day. But when she starts at prestigious Gardner Academy, Amina finds a group of li The Breakfast Club meets We Are the Ants in this timely story for a generation of young activists. If you knew the world was going to end tomorrow, what would you do? This is the question that haunts Amina as she watches new and horrible stories of discord and crisis flash across the news every day. But when she starts at prestigious Gardner Academy, Amina finds a group of like-minded peers to join forces with—fast friends who dedicate their year to learning survival skills from each other, before it’s too late. Still, as their prepper knowledge multiplies, so do their regular high school problems, from relationship drama to family issues to friend blow-ups. Juggling the two parts of their lives forces Amina to ask another vital question: Is it worth living in the hypothetical future if it’s at the expense of your actual present?


Compare

The Breakfast Club meets We Are the Ants in this timely story for a generation of young activists. If you knew the world was going to end tomorrow, what would you do? This is the question that haunts Amina as she watches new and horrible stories of discord and crisis flash across the news every day. But when she starts at prestigious Gardner Academy, Amina finds a group of li The Breakfast Club meets We Are the Ants in this timely story for a generation of young activists. If you knew the world was going to end tomorrow, what would you do? This is the question that haunts Amina as she watches new and horrible stories of discord and crisis flash across the news every day. But when she starts at prestigious Gardner Academy, Amina finds a group of like-minded peers to join forces with—fast friends who dedicate their year to learning survival skills from each other, before it’s too late. Still, as their prepper knowledge multiplies, so do their regular high school problems, from relationship drama to family issues to friend blow-ups. Juggling the two parts of their lives forces Amina to ask another vital question: Is it worth living in the hypothetical future if it’s at the expense of your actual present?

30 review for How to Pack for the End of the World

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ellie M

    I tried multiple times over the past few months to get this book and I'm so glad I did. But the description doesn't say much about the actual plot, so I guess I'll describe it here. It's not actually a survival or apocalyptic story, but more of a contemporary with some mystery elements. Which is my favorite type of book. And it's set at a boarding school. Not the usual stuffy, strict kind, but more like the kind from the show "Zoey 101." Amina Hareli is starting her sophomore year there because o I tried multiple times over the past few months to get this book and I'm so glad I did. But the description doesn't say much about the actual plot, so I guess I'll describe it here. It's not actually a survival or apocalyptic story, but more of a contemporary with some mystery elements. Which is my favorite type of book. And it's set at a boarding school. Not the usual stuffy, strict kind, but more like the kind from the show "Zoey 101." Amina Hareli is starting her sophomore year there because of the constant anxiety and nightmares she suffers from at home, as well as her obsession with reading about potential impending disasters, that caused her parents to send her away. At the beginning of the year, she is invited to the school's "game night" (which my middle school/high school actually did) where she is introduced to a group that seems to share her obsessions, but all for different reasons: environmental activist Hunter, who tries as hard as possible to distance himself from his dad's oil corporation, fashion-blogger Chloe, who grew up poor in rural Pennsylvania and has a fear of nuclear accidents, tough-girl Jo, an orphan who was once homeless and appears very secretive to most of the school, and athletic Wyatt, a former commune member who was raised by doomsday preppers. They are inspired to start a club after one of them asks the question, "If the world were ending, would you rather die with your family and friends or have to survive on your own and build a completely new life?" They name themselves the Eucalyptus Society and meet in the school's old bomb shelter, where they take turns challenging themselves to increasingly difficult survival-based games and simulations. Hunter takes the group out into the woods to gather plants and determines who would have the most edible ones, Amina hypothesizes a dramatically split country where money is very scarce, Chloe gets everyone to find an abandoned room and decorate it for a secret end-of-the-world party, and Jo's approach is possibly the most intense of them all: a challenge to see who can go the longest without using electricity. Meanwhile, someone is targeting the group anonymously by publicly humiliating them one-by-one. It's not likely that someone from the group is involved, but does Amina really know her new friends as well as she thinks she does? Trigger warning: Anti-Semitic hate crime mentioned towards the beginning, not in too much detail I related a lot to Amina and her constant "doom-scrolling" as I've struggled with anxiety for the majority of my life and tend to fixate on what could possibly go wrong. There was a part of every Eucalyptus Society member that I loved (such as Jo's nicknaming everyone!) and wanted to keep reading about. I definitely was hoping that none of them were behind the pranks. That reveal, speaking of, was satisfying.as well. I just wish that there was more closure with how the Eucalyptus Society dealt with the perpetrator.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Vee

    (33%) A second DNF today, this one, I felt, was falsely advertised. I thought it was going to be about a bunch of prepper kids, but I realised that that idea was quickly scrapped, most of the kids had little interest in the club and most of the story seemed to be focused on the main character running for student council or something, but I cannot explain why she chose to. On top of that, the characters felt very fake to me, they never felt like real people I could relate to.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jypsy

    Thank you Iread Book Tours for a complimentary copy. I voluntarily reviewed this book. All opinions expressed are my own. How To Pack For The End Of The World By: Michelle Falkoff REVIEW ☆☆☆☆ There is no literal end of the world or apocalypse happening in How To Pack For The End Of The World. The story throws Amina, a new scholarship student suffering from paranoia about the world ending, and a few other boarding school teens with a shared interest in prepping together, and as friends, they face Thank you Iread Book Tours for a complimentary copy. I voluntarily reviewed this book. All opinions expressed are my own. How To Pack For The End Of The World By: Michelle Falkoff REVIEW ☆☆☆☆ There is no literal end of the world or apocalypse happening in How To Pack For The End Of The World. The story throws Amina, a new scholarship student suffering from paranoia about the world ending, and a few other boarding school teens with a shared interest in prepping together, and as friends, they face the challenges of teenage life. Dramatic in true teen fashion with no major surprises, Amina and friends create and enact situations that mimic possible apocalyptic scenarios to determine what the reality of such a situation might be like. Personally, I like this idea for real because it could be tailored to teach survival skills for apocalyptic possibilities. Let's be honest, we live under the constant threat of world ending and/or altering scenarios every single day. But, I digress. The story strikes me as a sort of metaphorical ending of one stage of life for these teens, and as the hopeful seeds of adulthood are planted, each character must carry on into the unknown grownup world. It's not so different from starting over after the end of the world because it all involves taking chances, having faith in yourself and believing tomorrow will be a better day. No zombies are present, and no life and death chases or contests are held. Amina grows into a young woman who recognizes the skillset necessary to survive and thrive on any given day is just as vital as prepper knowledge. For the most part, the story is one of character growth, self realization and acceptance of inevitable change. But, Amina knows she need not face the future alone. How To Pack For The End Of The World is an insightful and clever, contemporary, young adult novel from Michelle Falkoff that works on many levels. It is appropriate for young adults and adults with an interest in dystopian and apocalyptic fiction. I highly recommend this thought provoking story!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Frances Bland

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I got this book as an ARC from Harper Collins. Amina and her friends at their new school decide to create a survivalist group. Throughout the first half of the school year, they each come up with different games, encompassing things they each think would be important if the world ended. When someone seems to be attacking members of their group, they all have to figure out who and why this is happening to him. There are some twists and surprises along the way. Overall, I thought this was a good b I got this book as an ARC from Harper Collins. Amina and her friends at their new school decide to create a survivalist group. Throughout the first half of the school year, they each come up with different games, encompassing things they each think would be important if the world ended. When someone seems to be attacking members of their group, they all have to figure out who and why this is happening to him. There are some twists and surprises along the way. Overall, I thought this was a good book. I was surprised by several things in the story, which doesn’t happen very often. I’d definitely recommend it to just about everyone.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Ever since an attack on her synagogue, Amina becomes obsessed with anti-Semetic behavior and has begun to live in fear with recurring nightmares.  When a scholarship position to the prestigious Gardner Academy opens up, Amina's parents send her in order to change her mindset.  Amina is very unsure about Gardner, but attends a pre-orientation game night where an interesting question in Would You Rather captures her interest.  The question leads to a gathering of five people from the game night: W Ever since an attack on her synagogue, Amina becomes obsessed with anti-Semetic behavior and has begun to live in fear with recurring nightmares.  When a scholarship position to the prestigious Gardner Academy opens up, Amina's parents send her in order to change her mindset.  Amina is very unsure about Gardner, but attends a pre-orientation game night where an interesting question in Would You Rather captures her interest.  The question leads to a gathering of five people from the game night: Wyatt, Hunter, Chloe, Jo and Amina.  Amina finds that she has plenty in common with the group, they all have fears.  Moreso, she finds a group of friends that she is comfortable with.  However, someone seems to be targeting their small group with very personalized attacks and Amina has a new set of fears to deal with. How to Pack for the End of the World is a contemporary Young Adult fiction that deals with a lot of issues in a unique way.  None of the issues become too heavy and none of the characters are designed around their fear, social standing, sexuality or mental health.  They are all just regular teens dealing with everyday issues.  Each character was well developed and unique.  While their backstories and challenges weren't all divulged at once, this added another layer of mystery to the story.  I loved the idea of the Eucalyptus Group and how each game they played helped them develop more as well as get to know one another.  The personal attacks were another added layer that almost seemed like a side story to me but were really more at the heart.  It was difficult for me to forget that this story took place at a high school and involved kids that were 16 to 17 years old as some of the situations felt more at a college level and classwork seemed to take a back seat.  Overall, an entertaining young adult story with amazing characters. This book was received for free in return for an honest review. 

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ibjoy1953

    This is a very different book than what I usually read, and though I have a much different viewpoint on what will happen at the end of the world, I did the different aspects of the story the students have kind of interesting. Amina’s parents sends her to a prestigious boarding school because she is obsessed with the end of the world and they are hoping this will help with the anxiety she has been having. After there a few days at the school she is invited to a mysterious meeting along with four o This is a very different book than what I usually read, and though I have a much different viewpoint on what will happen at the end of the world, I did the different aspects of the story the students have kind of interesting. Amina’s parents sends her to a prestigious boarding school because she is obsessed with the end of the world and they are hoping this will help with the anxiety she has been having. After there a few days at the school she is invited to a mysterious meeting along with four other with somewhat the same anxiety problems and the same reasons for their anxiety. As they discuss their anxieties, they each contribute with their survival skills and help with ways to survive when the day happens. I liked the students in this group. They were a little weird at times, but they are not the usually boarding school students. It was sometimes difficult for me to keep listening because the story doesn’t have a lot going on except for the survival skills of the group. I would have liked more depth to the story. There wasn’t a lot of wow there. I have the audio version of this book. I really enjoyed listening to the Narrator, Stacey Glemboski. She has an excellent smooth voice for audiobooks. Her dynamics and expressions are just perfect. I hope to find more books that she is narrating. She is one voice I could listen to all day! This book is a four star for me. And if I could rate the narration, I would rate it a 5 plus Stars! A special thanks to the author/publisher for a copy of this book. I am not required to write a positive review, the opinions here are mine alone. I am disclosing this with my review in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Paige (pagebypaigebooks)

    As soon as I heard the premise of this book I knew I had to read it. The title drew me in immediately and I thought it would be the perfect read, considering everything going on at the moment. The writing made for a fast and enjoyable read. I found the main character Amina to have a very interesting perspective on life, and I completely understood everything she was worried about. It was refreshing to see a contemporary combine important aspects like climate change while also making it fun. I en As soon as I heard the premise of this book I knew I had to read it. The title drew me in immediately and I thought it would be the perfect read, considering everything going on at the moment. The writing made for a fast and enjoyable read. I found the main character Amina to have a very interesting perspective on life, and I completely understood everything she was worried about. It was refreshing to see a contemporary combine important aspects like climate change while also making it fun. I enjoyed learning more about Judaism through Amina as she talks about her customs and about how an attack on her synagogue sparked her fear of chaos around the world. I have definitely found out that I love boarding school settings. It adds another level of closeness to the characters and I think it builds stronger relationships because of it. There isn't much conflict in this book aside from anonymous pranks being pulled. I found the ending to be a bit predictable concerning that point. However I did like the unique aspect of the group members playing survival games together. Seeing what they came up with was definitely intriguing and I liked how each character made it their own. I would have loved to see more of the characters' backstories in order to get closer to them, and possibly to see more of their growth. The romance was also very cute. I felt that the couple went well together and it was a gradual building to their relationship as opposed to instant love. Overall it was a fun escape from everyday life. For anyone looking for a fun and engaging story while talking about important world issues, How To Pack For the End of the World is one to consider!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Angel

    The mention of The Breakfast Club is what sold me on this one right away. The title itself felt like the perfect read considering the current state of everything. I was expecting a sort of dystopian novel, and it definitely isn't, but I think I like it better this way. It was a quick read that I found myself invested in from the start. The main character, Amina, was relatable, which made it easy to connect with her. I loved Wyatt and Jo, but I had mixed feelings on Hunter and Chloe; they were tol The mention of The Breakfast Club is what sold me on this one right away. The title itself felt like the perfect read considering the current state of everything. I was expecting a sort of dystopian novel, and it definitely isn't, but I think I like it better this way. It was a quick read that I found myself invested in from the start. The main character, Amina, was relatable, which made it easy to connect with her. I loved Wyatt and Jo, but I had mixed feelings on Hunter and Chloe; they were tolerable at times and frustrating at others. I also liked Brianna, Amina's roommate, but we didn't see too much of her. The two get off on the wrong foot straight away, and though they do reconcile in the end, it felt forced and rushed. I loved the friendship and romances the group formed over the course of the book. There was constant drama amongst the Eucalyptus group, and it was easy to get swept up in that. The chemistry between the characters, both platonically and romantically, felt natural and realistic. I did guess who would end up together in the beginning, but I'm fairly pleased with it either way. Though there's not much of a mystery other than the pranks, the idea is still present. It didn't feel like the main focus of the book until the very end, but I often found myself trying to figure it out. The revelation was also pretty predictable, but I still enjoyed the ending. Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book via iRead Book Tours. This did not influence my opinion in any way.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Colette

    Michelle Falkoff has written a timely, thoughtful, provocative book that I couldn’t put down. The plot is filled with unexpected, compelling twists, each character is vividly imagined, and Amina’s narrative voice is a beautiful balance of innocence and intellect. HOW TO PACK FOR THE END OF THE WORLD gave me hope that there is a path forward from these precarious times to a place where empathy instead of rancor reigns.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Thindbooks

    *This e-arc was given to me by the publisher to give an honest review in return* I like this book. It's about Amina joins Gardner Academy and finds a group that is all haunted by worldwide crises. They become fast friends and start learning survival skills together but there is one person targeting them by causing drama and pranks. I enjoyed the author's writing for this book but the plot structure wasn't well. There wasn't really a huge conflict in the book other than that one person pulling pra *This e-arc was given to me by the publisher to give an honest review in return* I like this book. It's about Amina joins Gardner Academy and finds a group that is all haunted by worldwide crises. They become fast friends and start learning survival skills together but there is one person targeting them by causing drama and pranks. I enjoyed the author's writing for this book but the plot structure wasn't well. There wasn't really a huge conflict in the book other than that one person pulling pranks but mostly the survival games. The story was unique but also basic. Kind of hard to explain. I haven't read any books like this so it was unique but I think there could have been more to it. I did like how it took place at a boarding school but the pacing of this book was a little off in some places. This book is in Amina POV. She transfers to Gardner Academy and has questions about surviving the world. She develops a lot throughout the book alongside her new friends. There are 4 other supporting characters in this book. Mysterious Jo who only wears black, Chloe the famous fashion blogger, athletic Hunter, and Wyatt who asks the questions and started the group. Each character plays a role in this book but also develop throughout the story. I loved their friendship in the book and how much they tried to learn more about each other. This book is mostly about friendship and survival. I enjoyed this book but wish there was more to it and that the plot was well structured. I wished this book had a better ending because I felt that it was just cut off. I recommend this book to those who love survival games! Mini-blog tour coming on Thindbooks Blog (www.thindbooks.blogspot.com) on the week of the release date.

  11. 4 out of 5

    BreeAnn (She Just Loves Books)

    Amina has just started a new school due to her anxiety and consistent focus on dooms-day situations. She finds some like-minded friends, and they create a new group where they focus on survivalist techniques. They create increasingly intense and difficult challenges that the group needs to succeed in. Someone is attacking the group one by one on social media though, and the need to figure out who it is. I really enjoyed this story. I thought the plot was intriguing, and I found myself surprised o Amina has just started a new school due to her anxiety and consistent focus on dooms-day situations. She finds some like-minded friends, and they create a new group where they focus on survivalist techniques. They create increasingly intense and difficult challenges that the group needs to succeed in. Someone is attacking the group one by one on social media though, and the need to figure out who it is. I really enjoyed this story. I thought the plot was intriguing, and I found myself surprised over and over again by what was going on. It was easy to become invested in what was happening! This wasn’t a stressful read, and I appreciated that. My favorite parts were when the group played their survival games. I thought they were so interesting! I really enjoyed the main character, Amina. She was relatable, and I understood her continued focus and anxiousness about the what-if scenarios. Overall, this was a fun, easy read that I would recommend to anyone! Content Warning: There is a situation that involves some anti-semitic actions. I was provided a gifted copy of this book for free. I am leaving my review voluntarily. All of my reviews can be found at https://shejustlovesbooks.com/all-boo...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I liked this book and the different ways that the kids tried living while on campus. I liked the group of friends and how they solved and tried to plan for the end of the world. Slight romance but overall it was a good book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Rideout

    I would like to thank the author Michelle Falkoff, the publisher HarperCollins, and iReads Book Tours for access to an eARC of this title in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to iReads for the opportunity to participate in the blog tour for this title. Thank you to Michelle Falkoff for trying your best to get me hooked up with a copy through NetGalley. Thank you to my influencer program contacts at HarperCollins for hooking me up via Edelweiss when we ran into regional troubles with the N I would like to thank the author Michelle Falkoff, the publisher HarperCollins, and iReads Book Tours for access to an eARC of this title in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to iReads for the opportunity to participate in the blog tour for this title. Thank you to Michelle Falkoff for trying your best to get me hooked up with a copy through NetGalley. Thank you to my influencer program contacts at HarperCollins for hooking me up via Edelweiss when we ran into regional troubles with the NetGalley listing. It was an adventure, for sure! This has not swayed my opinion on the review. My thoughts are my own and my review is honest. This book is not at all what I thought it would be from the title and official synopsis, but I wouldn't say that's a bad thing. I may not have read the book I thought I was going to read, but the book I read was excellent none the less! Amina is entering 10th grade at Gardner Academy, a private boarding school you generally either attend because you earned a scholarship or because something went wrong and you've been sent away. On the first night Amina attends a "game night" for incoming first years that's full of the typical icebreakers and the predictably gross and scandalous teenage questions in "Would you rather?" until someone asks the group about the end of the world. If the world were to end tomorrow and no one you knew and loved would survive, would you choose to die with them or survive and rebuild? In the coming days, Amina and four other students (including Wyatt, the boy who posed the question) form the Eucalyptus Society, a club that I like to think of as "Doomsday Preppers Lite." Over the course of their first two quarters, each of the club's five members holds a "game" to determine who would be best prepared for their end of the world scenario. This book tackles non-Christian religion in a Christian dominated setting (specifically Judaism,) BIPOC issues and inter-racial relationships, LGBTQIA issues, and characters learning to trust and how to deal with betrayal. Content warnings for building fire linked to a hate crime (remembered event pre-book timeline), character recalling sexual and physical assault, racism, bullying, protests, and various reasons that some characters have "run away" in various degrees from their families and previous environments to this school. This book also features characters experiencing symptoms of PTSD and depression. If I were any of the teenage club members in this book I would be Jo, the closed-off and mysterious tough girl with rainbow boot laces and an obviously tragic back story that she doesn't care to share. I adored optimistic and genuinely kind Wyatt. I was occasionally frustrated with Amina for how socially blind she was about her friends and classmates, but it did make sense as a character flaw for a 16 (15?) year old girl from a secure and unbroken family. The nativity of youth! The hate crime that drove her to anxious doomsday research is the only smudge on her rose-coloured glasses so far, and it shows. She's afraid of the system imploding in on itself, but trusts individuals implicitly. The other two cub members are Hunter, the climate activist born with a silver spoon in his mouth, and Chloe, the Instagram model who's all about influence. What holds me back from rating this book a full five stars is that this book almost seems to forget that these are high school students attending school. Classes hardly factor into the story at all, and once Amina has won the student council election we don't see or hear what her meetings and duties are like. Her Jewish club meetings only come up when she's campaigning for student council, when Eucalyptus Society might interfere, and when the plot requires that she talk to a friend who isn't in the Eucalyptus Society. Her roommate is relevant three times, despite this taking place over half a school year. I understand that this book is about the Eucalyptus Society games and social unit, but like other YA titles I've read that take place in a boarding school setting that don't remind the reader about classes and roommates and such, it starts to feel more like college kids on a college campus. These are 15/16-year-old teens making age-appropriate snap decisions. It's important to remember how young they are. I expected a book with outdoorsy events and actual survival situations. I got a book about troubled teens at a boarding school learning how to thrive in a found family, and I loved it! I read it in one day and really enjoyed the experience. It was well-paced (despite the lack of class & student council interludes I would have liked for the high school feel reminders) and the characters were all relatable in different ways. I will definitely be keeping my eye out for novels by Michelle Falkoff in the future! -- Note: I wrote this review for a blog tour. If you're interested in the full post and quick access to the rest of the tour, visit: westveilpublishing.com/?p=3597

  15. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

    YA and clever, engaging premise. Amina has become obsessed with tragedy and global fascism and disasters after her hometown synagogue was firebombed. No one was hurt, but at age 15/16 it has made a huge impression and has kept her from feeling safe. In an effort to give her some remove from the situation, her parents send her to Darden Academy, (maybe not the best plan) and she is furious. Darden is a pretentious school that fell prey to scandal, so now admits both rich kids no one else will tak YA and clever, engaging premise. Amina has become obsessed with tragedy and global fascism and disasters after her hometown synagogue was firebombed. No one was hurt, but at age 15/16 it has made a huge impression and has kept her from feeling safe. In an effort to give her some remove from the situation, her parents send her to Darden Academy, (maybe not the best plan) and she is furious. Darden is a pretentious school that fell prey to scandal, so now admits both rich kids no one else will take due to bad behavior and scholarship kids who can only go with a full ride the school offers. Interesting combo. Amina falls in the second group and that gives her a bit of a chip on her shoulder, but to her credit, she puts herself out there by attending Game Night at first-year orientation and there she meets her posse. After the various scheduled activities have finished, a boy, Wyatt stands up and asks: "If you knew the world was going to end tomorrow, would you rather die along with your friends and family and everyone you've ever known, or live among strangers to rebuild civilization?" The few who answer his question seriously, Amina, Hunter, Chloe, and Jo also get a mysterious invite to meet at the 'safest place on campus' a week later, and through some sleuthing this group finds the school bomb shelter and start a survival club (not prepper, but a little more thoughtful and intelligent as they take on some of the issues in our times) Each gets to design a "game" that requires some kind of strategy, knowledge and action that the others must play. They call themselves Eucalyptus because of the plant's hardiness and multiple uses. And the group becomes fast friends, despite Jo's prickliness and aura of mystery. She is the least known. Chloe is an Insta fashion influencer with multiple sponsorships and a savvy world view, Wyatt lived on a commune and is probably the best equipped for survival, Hunter is an athlete who comes from money, but wants to distance himself from his father's oil industry and find his underground activist brother. They all have various talents and secrets that are rudely exposed through the semester -but they don't know who the perpetrator is: Wyatt is baited because he is black, Amina's journal is poached and made public (to Wyatt, her love interest), Hunter's family ties are outed, Chloe has incriminating pictures circulated and Jo's hidden history is revealed. So in addition to doing their survival game, trying to keep up with studies at the demanding school, and figuring out who is targeting them, they have a lot on their plate. Some usual teenage drama, but nothing to eye-rolling, and an endearing message of hope for the next generation to tackle some of the mess left to them by their elders, as well as learn the proper attitude to apply to it. Instead of competition, maybe they need teamwork, forgiveness, community values. Great ending message without being too heavy-handed and moralistic.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Arlen

    How to Pack for the End of the World by Michelle Falkoff Pub Date: 10 Nov 2020 read courtesy of http://netgalley.com Put five different competitive high schoolers together to see who can survive hypothetical apocalyptic disasters, and you get five unique interesting challenges. Falkoff crafted an entertaining story that expertly incorporated five different characterizations into the survival scenarios. I found some fairly profound truths in this story that resonated with me: (1) "I hated that I tend How to Pack for the End of the World by Michelle Falkoff Pub Date: 10 Nov 2020 read courtesy of http://netgalley.com Put five different competitive high schoolers together to see who can survive hypothetical apocalyptic disasters, and you get five unique interesting challenges. Falkoff crafted an entertaining story that expertly incorporated five different characterizations into the survival scenarios. I found some fairly profound truths in this story that resonated with me: (1) "I hated that I tended to assume people were straight unless they indicated otherwise." (2) "Funny how different it felt, having a crush versus liking someone who liked you back. I'd had butterflies with Hunter, but they'd made me feel a little bit sick. Wyatt made me feel nothing but happy." (3) "We'd been so fixated on managing big-picture problems that we hadn't yet learned how to deal with the day-to-day complexities of being ourselves..." Unfortunately, the author used some standard YA story formulas that I tend to dislike. For example the characters don't tell others how they feel but then expect others to be mind readers and act a certain way. In addition, this author actually comes out and has a character articulate another overused plot line "...where we need to help ourselves because the adults weren't going to be of much use." Throughout the book, the lead character Amina frequently claims she doesn't know her friends as well as they know her. The purpose of this characterization is so she can eventually prove she does end up knowing one her friends better than her other friends do. The repetitive self-deprecation, however, is annoyingly tedious. Nonetheless, I like the ending in which the characters learn to be " ...less concerned with what we put in our go-bags and more about how to use cooperation and empathy to prevent the things we were so scared of from happening." I only wish that Falkoff had listened to her own advice. Why was it necessary for her to call out 'Republican' vs. 'Democrat' in a doomsday scenario in which a Republican was so "unpopular" that he got elected for a third and fourth term? Since the good messages outweigh the trite precepts, I will enjoy putting this book into the hands of my high schoolers.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Aoife

    Prepping is edging into the mainstream, especially after the year we've had. Everyone is starting to see that having a few packs of toilet paper and some cans put by isn't such a bad idea, and more novels are starting to reflect that. Including this odd duck. If you're reading it looking for survival tips, you won't get any, except maybe during Wyatt's game. This novel isn't actually about survivalism, you see; that's just the hook that drew the characters together. Each character has an interest Prepping is edging into the mainstream, especially after the year we've had. Everyone is starting to see that having a few packs of toilet paper and some cans put by isn't such a bad idea, and more novels are starting to reflect that. Including this odd duck. If you're reading it looking for survival tips, you won't get any, except maybe during Wyatt's game. This novel isn't actually about survivalism, you see; that's just the hook that drew the characters together. Each character has an interest that's relevant a few times, depending on who they are. Amina's interest is 'being Jewish'. Chloe's is 'being internet famous'. Hunter wants to pretend he isn't his father's son, and Jo and Wyatt are mysteries most of the way through. It's not an awful read, it's just that nothing seems to have any weight. They go to an oil line protest at Hunter's bequest, but we never find out if they were successful or not ... because, again, the protest wasn't the point, it was just a way for Hunter to get a tiny crumb of information about his brother. Chloe's naked pictures are sent all around the school and apart from her hiding away for a day or two, there's nothing. No investigation, no sideways looks, not even a ribald comment from the jocks. Amina is dead set against going to the school at first, but within two weeks she loves it there and admits ... to herself, not to her parents. ... that they were right to send her. There's no consistency. Even at the very end; the actions of one character should have massive consequences, so everyone splits off, goes for a holiday, promises to think and make a decision afterwards, and on the next page it's a year later and as far as we can tell nothing at all happened to the character. It's extremely frustrating, because the bones of a great story are there. There's a wonderful moment where Amina talks to her roommate and they realise that they've been seeing the same events through different lenses, lenses which have left them thinking that the other doesn't like them. It's very cleverly written and really made me think. It's just a shame the whole book wasn't like that.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Angela Thompson

    How to Pack for the End of the World Takes a Fictionalized Look at Teen Pressures. This book takes a group of teens from various lifestyles and life experiences and bonds them within a boarding school setting. The outside pressures and fears of both the external world events and daily teen insecurities and struggles are presented via the group's individual personalities, values, and pasts. As the teens work through various challenges to prepare themselves for the end of the world, they share and How to Pack for the End of the World Takes a Fictionalized Look at Teen Pressures. This book takes a group of teens from various lifestyles and life experiences and bonds them within a boarding school setting. The outside pressures and fears of both the external world events and daily teen insecurities and struggles are presented via the group's individual personalities, values, and pasts. As the teens work through various challenges to prepare themselves for the end of the world, they share and learn survival skills for both real-world, day-to-day dilemmas and the hypothetical demise of the outside world. How to Pack for the End of the World isn't Action-Packed--But, Realization Packed. This book doesn't have any real suspense-filled mystery or any life-or-death action adventures. What it offers is a fictionalized look at life with relatable characters and teen drama. Readers won't find a big secret to solve (though there is a prankster to be caught)--and they won't see substantial plot twists or thrills. Readers will find many scenes and events leading to some self-realization, character growth, and life skill learning. Would I Recommend How to Pack for the End of the World by Michelle Falkoff? While I didn't love any of the characters in this book--I found them to be reasonably realistic teens with real-world problems combining with self-esteem/self-doubt and fears of the future. Older readers may find some of the dialogue and thought processes immature--but I think that adds to this book's unique character/storyline flow. For fans of young adult, dystopian fantasy novels--this book is a unique look at planning for the end of the world--while living life as real-world teens. I think it would appeal to a variety of teen readers. I received a copy of this book from the author or publisher. All opinions are my own.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Ward

    This realistic fictional YA novel follows five high school sophomores as they attend their first year at Gardner Academy — all from various backgrounds, but all with fears of what the future holds. Starting a club called Eucalyptus, the group meets to play survival games and readers slowly find out their secrets and pasts. In parallel, the new friends form bonds and crushes, friendships and romantic relationships as they adjust to life away from home. When they each become victims of various pra This realistic fictional YA novel follows five high school sophomores as they attend their first year at Gardner Academy — all from various backgrounds, but all with fears of what the future holds. Starting a club called Eucalyptus, the group meets to play survival games and readers slowly find out their secrets and pasts. In parallel, the new friends form bonds and crushes, friendships and romantic relationships as they adjust to life away from home. When they each become victims of various pranks, they confront the person responsible to uncover the truth. This contemporary story follows a group of young survivalists through their high school trials and tribulations. While I found some of the characters seemed much older than high schoolers, I would recommend the book for a slightly older age group than the 13-17 range stated. It was fun to follow relatable school antics and overblown dramas that often occur in this setting. It was refreshing to see a flawed protagonist whose negative traits actually come back to bite her, not just as quirks that we grow to love. At times, there are quite heavy concepts for these characters to consider, but this could prompt discussions of timely topics within this age group. While there were a few loose ends that I wish had been addressed, the story buzzes along in a quick pace that makes for an enjoyable, compelling read. Sincere thanks to the publisher for a copy of the book. The full review can be found on my blog: https://stephaniemward.com/2020/11/23....

  20. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Amina is preoccupied with all that is wrong with society and the many ways the world could end. So her parents send her to a private boarding school hoping she will shed her anxiety. It doesn’t take her long to find like-minded friends who form a sort of dooms-day club and they each find ways to turn their obsessions into elaborate games. Halfway through the semester, Amina realizes that someone is dead set on humiliating her new friends, exposing their darkest secrets to everyone on campus. Tho Amina is preoccupied with all that is wrong with society and the many ways the world could end. So her parents send her to a private boarding school hoping she will shed her anxiety. It doesn’t take her long to find like-minded friends who form a sort of dooms-day club and they each find ways to turn their obsessions into elaborate games. Halfway through the semester, Amina realizes that someone is dead set on humiliating her new friends, exposing their darkest secrets to everyone on campus. Though she’s learned to worry less about Armageddon, she realizes she has to be on guard for someone who wants to see her suffer extreme embarrassment. I liked that Amina isn’t too angsty or sullen. She begrudges her parents for sending her away to school, but she understands the importance of making friends and studying hard, so her negativity doesn’t linger. I enjoyed the dynamic of the relationships between Amina and her core group of friends as they learn to let their guard down and trust each other. Every teenager over analyzes their own faults when no one else really notices them, but Amina allows herself to let her good qualities shine despite her insecurities. Despite the apocalyptic nature of the title, it had a much more positive message for the younger generation. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amber (Books of Amber)

    I requested How to Pack for the End of the World kind of on a whim because I really liked the title, and I also like to plan for the apocalypse. I wasn’t really expecting this book to be so contemporary, but it is, and I still ended up very much enjoying it! One of the reasons I enjoyed How to Pack so much was the boarding school setting. Rich people drama? Sign me UP. I used to love daydreaming about going to boarding school as a kid, and while I’m pretty sure it’s something parents could threat I requested How to Pack for the End of the World kind of on a whim because I really liked the title, and I also like to plan for the apocalypse. I wasn’t really expecting this book to be so contemporary, but it is, and I still ended up very much enjoying it! One of the reasons I enjoyed How to Pack so much was the boarding school setting. Rich people drama? Sign me UP. I used to love daydreaming about going to boarding school as a kid, and while I’m pretty sure it’s something parents could threaten their kids with if they’re misbehaving, I actually asked to be sent to one. Unfortunately, I was not a Rich Person. I loved the dynamics between all of the main characters, as their friendships were developed so nicely and I loved that they all felt slightly differently about one another but were still very close. Also, I LOVED the main relationship! It wasn’t your usual ship and it was a little unexpected, so I thought it was pretty great. In addition to loving the post-apocalyptic talk and discussions, I also loved the mystery elements throughout. The author pulled the mystery off very well and I was super impressed by it! There was a lot packed (ha!) into this book and I was intrigued and immersed the entire time. I’d recommend it to all contemporary fans, and even people who enjoy some apocalyptic stories and cosy mysteries too!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    How to Pack for the End of the World is my first introduction to the work of Michelle Falkoff. The genre of it is teen and young adult fiction. It is a little different than what I am used to. Right from the beginning, I was not sure what to expect. The writing style was unique and it did take me a little while to get into it. It was about a third of the way through the book, I was hooked. I am glad that I continued to hang in there and kept reading or I would have missed a good read. I believe How to Pack for the End of the World is my first introduction to the work of Michelle Falkoff. The genre of it is teen and young adult fiction. It is a little different than what I am used to. Right from the beginning, I was not sure what to expect. The writing style was unique and it did take me a little while to get into it. It was about a third of the way through the book, I was hooked. I am glad that I continued to hang in there and kept reading or I would have missed a good read. I believe that many readers would be able to relate and feel connected to the main character, Amina. Her worried parents send her away because of her anxiety. This leads her to new friendships. It was fun getting to know them all. The four new friends were interesting addition to the story and helped make it flowed quite a bit faster and harder to put down. I am giving How to Pack for the End of the World three and a half stars. I would be interested in reading more by Michelle Falkoff in the future. I would recommend this one for readers who are in their teens and for those who enjoy young adult reads. I believe that it is worth a read. I received How to Pack for the End of the World from the publisher. This review is one honest opinion.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Elise

    3.5 stars. I enjoyed 99.9% of this book. The concept was really cool. I loved the club that the characters formed and the games they made up/played. Each person's game revealed a little more about backstory and fears. Amina had a solid character arc as she reevaluated what she thought she knew and reconsidered her perspective on herself and others. The drama, friendships, and relationships were awesome too. The only part I did not like was the very, very end. (view spoiler)[I understand that the 3.5 stars. I enjoyed 99.9% of this book. The concept was really cool. I loved the club that the characters formed and the games they made up/played. Each person's game revealed a little more about backstory and fears. Amina had a solid character arc as she reevaluated what she thought she knew and reconsidered her perspective on herself and others. The drama, friendships, and relationships were awesome too. The only part I did not like was the very, very end. (view spoiler)[I understand that the characters coming to terms with Chloe's actions and deciding whether or not to forgive her could be a whole book on its own. However, all five of them were there at game night at the end. So did they reconcile? That's how it felt. But I don't understand how they could. Chloe's actions - especially what she did to Wyatt - were abhorrent. Her confession, while fascinating, made her sound like a sociopath. I would have preferred a completely open-ended ending where she wasn't included at all, or at least some detail about how everyone forgave her. Her presence at the end felt weird. (hide spoiler)]

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gina R Mitchell

    How to Pack for the End of the World is an interesting tale of teens at a private school. They come together to form a group of “preppers” planning for the end of the world as we know it. They use elaborate games to help them along the way. When someone begins to play devious pranks on each person, the typical high school drama and angst makes its presence known. When you mix the jock, the nerd, a social influencer, and a girl traumatized by a fire at her former Jewish school, the story is bound How to Pack for the End of the World is an interesting tale of teens at a private school. They come together to form a group of “preppers” planning for the end of the world as we know it. They use elaborate games to help them along the way. When someone begins to play devious pranks on each person, the typical high school drama and angst makes its presence known. When you mix the jock, the nerd, a social influencer, and a girl traumatized by a fire at her former Jewish school, the story is bound to be diverse and entertaining. I enjoyed the mystery of this tale. It does rely on the trope of misunderstandings between the characters, but that is true to form for this age group. The pacing felt off in a few spots, but I know reading books like this during a pandemic certainly plays into my concentration. Overall, I believe young adults will relate to the characters and situations and should find this story to their liking.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jo Ann

    I received this book as an ARC from NetGalley. Amina is a new 10th grader at the prestigious, private Gardner Academy. She is a scholarship student, rather than one of the rich kids who generally inhabit the campus. She feels isolated. She is haunted since her synagogue burned down and suffers from nightmares. As orientation begins, she joins four other student to form a club. The purpose of the club is two-fold: to provide them with something interesting for their college applications and to hel I received this book as an ARC from NetGalley. Amina is a new 10th grader at the prestigious, private Gardner Academy. She is a scholarship student, rather than one of the rich kids who generally inhabit the campus. She feels isolated. She is haunted since her synagogue burned down and suffers from nightmares. As orientation begins, she joins four other student to form a club. The purpose of the club is two-fold: to provide them with something interesting for their college applications and to help them prepare for the catastrophes they are all sure they will ultimately have to face. They decide to create survival games. Each one, in turn, sets the rules for the challenge. As the weeks progress and they become better at "packing for the end of the world," they learn about each other and themselves. This book was excellent, not only for young adults, but for mature readers, as well. The characters are well drawn and the scenarios they create are realistic.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chris G.

    There’s a mixer the first night at boarding school, and that’s when Amina notices composed Jo, glamorous Chloe, cute and sporty Hunter, and charmingly naive Wyatt who asks the group an intriguing question - if there was a apocalypse, would they rather die with their family or survive to build a new world without any family? A few nights Amina accepts a mysterious invitation to a meet up at the most secure room on campus and the other four are there as well. They form a club and decide to take tu There’s a mixer the first night at boarding school, and that’s when Amina notices composed Jo, glamorous Chloe, cute and sporty Hunter, and charmingly naive Wyatt who asks the group an intriguing question - if there was a apocalypse, would they rather die with their family or survive to build a new world without any family? A few nights Amina accepts a mysterious invitation to a meet up at the most secure room on campus and the other four are there as well. They form a club and decide to take turns creating some type of survival game for the rest of the group. As the contests play out, secrets are revealed, alliances shift, and friendships are tested. Some of the situations described are ripped from the 2020 headlines which will keep readers turning pages. E-ARC provided by Edelweiss.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nyeree

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Review: I enjoyed this YA read about a group of “misfit” kids at a private school who meet and become friends despite their differences. They discover that they all have a common interest, they all like to “play games”. Hence, the Eucalyptus gamer club is started. The teens each take turns coming up with a survivalist type game to answer the question of “what would you do if the world were to end?” The best end of world “prepper” wins. As the semester progresses an insidious threat begins to pick Review: I enjoyed this YA read about a group of “misfit” kids at a private school who meet and become friends despite their differences. They discover that they all have a common interest, they all like to “play games”. Hence, the Eucalyptus gamer club is started. The teens each take turns coming up with a survivalist type game to answer the question of “what would you do if the world were to end?” The best end of world “prepper” wins. As the semester progresses an insidious threat begins to pick them off one by one exposing their deepest, darkest secrets. But who could know such intimate details? And do they really want the answer to that question? Set in modern time, friendships develop as the group shares their struggles of school life and love interests while learning about each other and themselves through their gamer style.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mojohand

    Read half of this book. When I got to the drivel about Amina describing her "game" where the nation collapses after the re-election of a certain unpopular president, I had to quit. Unpopular is a relative term and more than 74,000,000 people would beg to disagree with her assertion. I was willing to give it a pass when one of the students was willing to play a game of domestic terrorism, hoping that more level heads would prevail in coming games, but the author was not hiding her TDS by the half Read half of this book. When I got to the drivel about Amina describing her "game" where the nation collapses after the re-election of a certain unpopular president, I had to quit. Unpopular is a relative term and more than 74,000,000 people would beg to disagree with her assertion. I was willing to give it a pass when one of the students was willing to play a game of domestic terrorism, hoping that more level heads would prevail in coming games, but the author was not hiding her TDS by the half way point and I'd had enough. TDS is a terrible malady to have to suffer from and the author should seek medical attention as soon as possible. I'm a big fan of dystopian fiction and really had high hopes for this one when I started it, but I wouldn't recommend it to anyone looking for a GOOD story.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kara

    Okay. I had a totally planned out review that centered around the word “nice”. Because this book was nice. A solid storyline, wild side plot that turned out to be the plot twist, and characters generic enough that anyone could see something of themselves in at least one of them. See? Nice. But then I read the final paragraph and holy crap. Chef’s kiss. Heart eyes emoji. I can’t explain why. It just literally gave me an entirely new perspective on the book overall. I was ready to drop a solid 3 s Okay. I had a totally planned out review that centered around the word “nice”. Because this book was nice. A solid storyline, wild side plot that turned out to be the plot twist, and characters generic enough that anyone could see something of themselves in at least one of them. See? Nice. But then I read the final paragraph and holy crap. Chef’s kiss. Heart eyes emoji. I can’t explain why. It just literally gave me an entirely new perspective on the book overall. I was ready to drop a solid 3 star review, but that new question needed it’s own star!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Amy Potts Ostrowski

    Clever, relevant, and fun, How to Pack for the End of the World will leave the reader plenty to talk about and think about. Oh...and it's wildly entertaining along the way! For the classroom, I would say some 7th grade and up. There is a small amount of drinking and references to sex (both very mild) but nothing that would keep this off my 6th grade shelf, although the book , conceptually, might be over the heads of many 6th graders. Clever, relevant, and fun, How to Pack for the End of the World will leave the reader plenty to talk about and think about. Oh...and it's wildly entertaining along the way! For the classroom, I would say some 7th grade and up. There is a small amount of drinking and references to sex (both very mild) but nothing that would keep this off my 6th grade shelf, although the book , conceptually, might be over the heads of many 6th graders.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.