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The Noble Train: The Story of a Boston Bookseller's Heroic Expedition That Saved the American Revolution

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The inspiring story of a little-known hero's pivotal role in the American Revolutionary War During the brutal winter of 1775-1776, an untested Boston bookseller named Henry Knox commandeered an oxen train hauling sixty tons of cannons and other artillery from Fort Ticonderoga near the Canadian border. He and his men journeyed some three hundred miles south and east over fr The inspiring story of a little-known hero's pivotal role in the American Revolutionary War During the brutal winter of 1775-1776, an untested Boston bookseller named Henry Knox commandeered an oxen train hauling sixty tons of cannons and other artillery from Fort Ticonderoga near the Canadian border. He and his men journeyed some three hundred miles south and east over frozen, often-treacherous terrain to supply George Washington for his attack of British troops occupying Boston. The result was the British surrender of Boston and the first major victory for the Colonial Army. This is one of the great stories of the American Revolution, still little known by comparison with the more famous battles of Concord, Lexington, and Bunker Hill. Told with a novelist's feel for narrative, character, and vivid description, The Noble Train brings to life the events and people at a time when the ragtag American rebels were in a desperate situation. Washington's army was withering away from desertion and expiring enlistments. Typhoid fever, typhus, and dysentery were taking a terrible toll. There was little hope of dislodging British General Howe and his 20,000 British troops in Boston--until Henry Knox arrived with his supply convoy of heavy armaments. Firing down on the city from the surrounding Dorchester Heights, these weapons created a decisive turning point. An act of near desperation fueled by courage, daring, and sheer tenacity led to a tremendous victory for the cause of independence. This exciting tale of daunting odds and undaunted determination highlights a pivotal episode that changed history.


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The inspiring story of a little-known hero's pivotal role in the American Revolutionary War During the brutal winter of 1775-1776, an untested Boston bookseller named Henry Knox commandeered an oxen train hauling sixty tons of cannons and other artillery from Fort Ticonderoga near the Canadian border. He and his men journeyed some three hundred miles south and east over fr The inspiring story of a little-known hero's pivotal role in the American Revolutionary War During the brutal winter of 1775-1776, an untested Boston bookseller named Henry Knox commandeered an oxen train hauling sixty tons of cannons and other artillery from Fort Ticonderoga near the Canadian border. He and his men journeyed some three hundred miles south and east over frozen, often-treacherous terrain to supply George Washington for his attack of British troops occupying Boston. The result was the British surrender of Boston and the first major victory for the Colonial Army. This is one of the great stories of the American Revolution, still little known by comparison with the more famous battles of Concord, Lexington, and Bunker Hill. Told with a novelist's feel for narrative, character, and vivid description, The Noble Train brings to life the events and people at a time when the ragtag American rebels were in a desperate situation. Washington's army was withering away from desertion and expiring enlistments. Typhoid fever, typhus, and dysentery were taking a terrible toll. There was little hope of dislodging British General Howe and his 20,000 British troops in Boston--until Henry Knox arrived with his supply convoy of heavy armaments. Firing down on the city from the surrounding Dorchester Heights, these weapons created a decisive turning point. An act of near desperation fueled by courage, daring, and sheer tenacity led to a tremendous victory for the cause of independence. This exciting tale of daunting odds and undaunted determination highlights a pivotal episode that changed history.

59 review for The Noble Train: The Story of a Boston Bookseller's Heroic Expedition That Saved the American Revolution

  1. 5 out of 5

    Grady

    ‘No one believed the Americans could beat the British’ Chicago author William Hazelgrove has developed a significant following as the author of ten novels and six works of nonfiction - Ripples, Tobacco Sticks, Mica Highways, Rocket Man, The Pitcher, Real Santa, Jack Pine, Hemingway’s Attic, My Best Year, The Bad Author, Madam President, Forging a President, Al Capone and the 1933 World’s Fair, Wright Brothers Wrong Story, Shots Fired in Terminal 2, and now Henry Knox’s Noble Train. While his boo ‘No one believed the Americans could beat the British’ Chicago author William Hazelgrove has developed a significant following as the author of ten novels and six works of nonfiction - Ripples, Tobacco Sticks, Mica Highways, Rocket Man, The Pitcher, Real Santa, Jack Pine, Hemingway’s Attic, My Best Year, The Bad Author, Madam President, Forging a President, Al Capone and the 1933 World’s Fair, Wright Brothers Wrong Story, Shots Fired in Terminal 2, and now Henry Knox’s Noble Train. While his books have received starred reviews in Publisher Weekly and Booklist, Book of the Month Selections, ALA Editors Choice Awards Junior Library Guild Selections and optioned for the movies, his major appeal is in his humanitarian approach to stories. William stays close to the heart in each of his stories, making each tale he spins one with which everyone can relate on an immediate or a remembered level. In this particular book he is reporting an incident of special significance in American history – and that is as accurate reportage as possible! The story is well summarized as follows: ‘The inspiring story of a little-known hero's pivotal role in the American Revolutionary War. During the brutal winter of 1775-1776,an untested Boston bookseller named Henry Knox commandeered an oxen train hauling sixty tons of cannons and other artillery from Fort Ticonderoga near the Canadian border. He and his men journeyed some three hundred miles south and east over frozen, often treacherous terrain to supply George Washington for his attack on the British troops occupying Boston. The result was the British surrender of Boston and the first major victory for the Colonial Army.’ William Hazelgrove continues to grow as a writer of importance whose breadth of interest in topics for novels is truly astonishing. He is one of the big ones!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    I learned so much about the man that Fort Knox was named after. Who knew he was so interesting and so important to our country. This book is very detailed about Knox's life and his trip to Boston to bring the much needed ammo and hardware to save the American Revolution. Such interesting facts about George Washington also. This is a must read for any one interesting in history. I liked a couple of quotes: George Washington " liked to say many mickle makes a muckle" ie: tiny things add up. Henry I learned so much about the man that Fort Knox was named after. Who knew he was so interesting and so important to our country. This book is very detailed about Knox's life and his trip to Boston to bring the much needed ammo and hardware to save the American Revolution. Such interesting facts about George Washington also. This is a must read for any one interesting in history. I liked a couple of quotes: George Washington " liked to say many mickle makes a muckle" ie: tiny things add up. Henry Knox "nobility really was a willingness to sacrifice everything for something not yet seen"

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dave E

    I enjoy most books about the American Revolution, and this book does help to fill in the blanks of what enabled Washington's Army was able to force the British out of Boston in the winter of 1775-76. The telling of the story however wasn't as smooth as I would have hoped. I most enjoy histories that transport me to the time and place and that allow me to get into the head of the main character(s), but in this case it just didn't happen for me. I enjoy most books about the American Revolution, and this book does help to fill in the blanks of what enabled Washington's Army was able to force the British out of Boston in the winter of 1775-76. The telling of the story however wasn't as smooth as I would have hoped. I most enjoy histories that transport me to the time and place and that allow me to get into the head of the main character(s), but in this case it just didn't happen for me.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chris Longmoon

    Yet another story of how an individual overcame impossible circumstances and contributed a critical service to the Revolution, a war effort composed of a series of fortunate events, pure luck, and people doing extraordinary things when most indicators pointed toward failure.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Susan Ferguson

    The story of Knox's rescue of cannons from a northern fort and moving them to George Washington in New York in the winter, through ice and snow, and the attendant catastrophes of ice not frozen firm enough and the trails through the woods and mountains being very narrow, ill-defined and treacherous. A story of determination. And Henry Knox had no experience with cannon or artillery except such as he gained through studying books of warfare that he bought to sell in his bookstore. He became Washi The story of Knox's rescue of cannons from a northern fort and moving them to George Washington in New York in the winter, through ice and snow, and the attendant catastrophes of ice not frozen firm enough and the trails through the woods and mountains being very narrow, ill-defined and treacherous. A story of determination. And Henry Knox had no experience with cannon or artillery except such as he gained through studying books of warfare that he bought to sell in his bookstore. He became Washington's general in charge of artillery.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    So irritating that a Massachusetts town which was very important in the history of the American Revolution is frequently misspelled!! It’s “CHARLESTOWN” not “CHARLESTON” !! The Battle of Bunker Hill happened in Charlestown, Massachusetts!!! Not Charleston !!! Uaargghh. !!!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nick

  8. 4 out of 5

    Munchkinisbest

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  10. 5 out of 5

    Heather

  11. 5 out of 5

    Homer

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tim Crowley

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brad Bowen

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  15. 4 out of 5

    S

  16. 5 out of 5

    Betty

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lori

  18. 5 out of 5

    William

  19. 4 out of 5

    ANITA SUE H. MORRIS

  20. 4 out of 5

    Steve Peterson

  21. 4 out of 5

    James Snyder

  22. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Cheresnick

  23. 5 out of 5

    E

  24. 4 out of 5

    Adam Kerekes

  25. 4 out of 5

    John

  26. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Leopardi

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bob

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mollie

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rich

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jerome

  31. 4 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

  32. 5 out of 5

    Linda Shepherd

  33. 5 out of 5

    Paul Mastin

  34. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

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    Nicole Bannister

  36. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

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    Lydia Wallace

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    Jimmy

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    Frederick Rotzien

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    Shantel

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    Bill Schlott

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    Vic

  43. 5 out of 5

    Carol

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    Douglass Abramson

  45. 4 out of 5

    Susan The Book Dragon Campton

  46. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Adams

  47. 5 out of 5

    Doris Moore

  48. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  49. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

  50. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Peterson

  51. 4 out of 5

    Sam

  52. 4 out of 5

    Sherri

  53. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

  54. 4 out of 5

    Christine Eckstein

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    Joyce

  56. 5 out of 5

    Bettye Short

  57. 4 out of 5

    Jeanna Massman

  58. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

  59. 5 out of 5

    Micielle

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