web site hit counter Saved in Time: An Escape Story - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Saved in Time: An Escape Story

Availability: Ready to download

The "Time Scope", is a Sci-Fi TV Set that can be tuned to any space and time coordinate and observe events, without sound, as they took place in the past. It has control buttons and dials for 'Power', 'Time', 'Space', 'Zoom', 'Speed', 'Scan' and 'Track'. It is used, among other things, by an American Senator to find out if his party's presidential nominee, a retired genera The "Time Scope", is a Sci-Fi TV Set that can be tuned to any space and time coordinate and observe events, without sound, as they took place in the past. It has control buttons and dials for 'Power', 'Time', 'Space', 'Zoom', 'Speed', 'Scan' and 'Track'. It is used, among other things, by an American Senator to find out if his party's presidential nominee, a retired general is, in fact, a power-mad maniac with dictatorial ambitions. He wants to save his country from a rogue president who could cause immense harm to both the USA and to the rest of the world. This is the smallest of their problems, The bigger one spans the entire galaxy. The novel has two important messages for the reader. The more obvious one is the suggestion that in our current geopolitical reality resurgence of totalitarian fascism is a real possibility. The other, more subtle message is: A stable, sustainable social organization can not be based on any hierarchical, domination-structure such as have ever been tried in human history – they are all inherently self destructive. Any working social organization must be a consensus-based anarchy (as described in the Atlantis chapters) and, for that to be possible, we have to deal with our species-wide genetic brain disorder that drives individuals toward an ultimately suicidal and self destructive domination strategy. If humanity manages to weed these individuals out by education and constant vigilance, the human species may have a chance to avoid extinction.


Compare

The "Time Scope", is a Sci-Fi TV Set that can be tuned to any space and time coordinate and observe events, without sound, as they took place in the past. It has control buttons and dials for 'Power', 'Time', 'Space', 'Zoom', 'Speed', 'Scan' and 'Track'. It is used, among other things, by an American Senator to find out if his party's presidential nominee, a retired genera The "Time Scope", is a Sci-Fi TV Set that can be tuned to any space and time coordinate and observe events, without sound, as they took place in the past. It has control buttons and dials for 'Power', 'Time', 'Space', 'Zoom', 'Speed', 'Scan' and 'Track'. It is used, among other things, by an American Senator to find out if his party's presidential nominee, a retired general is, in fact, a power-mad maniac with dictatorial ambitions. He wants to save his country from a rogue president who could cause immense harm to both the USA and to the rest of the world. This is the smallest of their problems, The bigger one spans the entire galaxy. The novel has two important messages for the reader. The more obvious one is the suggestion that in our current geopolitical reality resurgence of totalitarian fascism is a real possibility. The other, more subtle message is: A stable, sustainable social organization can not be based on any hierarchical, domination-structure such as have ever been tried in human history – they are all inherently self destructive. Any working social organization must be a consensus-based anarchy (as described in the Atlantis chapters) and, for that to be possible, we have to deal with our species-wide genetic brain disorder that drives individuals toward an ultimately suicidal and self destructive domination strategy. If humanity manages to weed these individuals out by education and constant vigilance, the human species may have a chance to avoid extinction.

30 review for Saved in Time: An Escape Story

  1. 5 out of 5

    Stjepan Cobets

    My rating 4.0 Saved in Time: An Escape Story by Francis Mont is a solid story about a time machine that sees the past. Although at first Zack who accidentally discovered the machine behaves a little naive with his thinking and behavior. But as the story goes on, the book gets better. Mostly the story is interesting and I like the alternative history the writer has incorporated into the story. Overall, science fiction lovers who love time travel might enjoy this book. The ideas in the book are int My rating 4.0 Saved in Time: An Escape Story by Francis Mont is a solid story about a time machine that sees the past. Although at first Zack who accidentally discovered the machine behaves a little naive with his thinking and behavior. But as the story goes on, the book gets better. Mostly the story is interesting and I like the alternative history the writer has incorporated into the story. Overall, science fiction lovers who love time travel might enjoy this book. The ideas in the book are interesting, especially the end of the book that I liked and which would be a great solution for the inhabitants of our planet.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    What a fun sci-fi tale this was! A young man. A politician. A mobster. A machine that allows you to look back at any point in time and view events. What could possibly go wrong? I love books that ask interesting “what if?” questions, and this spun out in all sorts of nifty directions from the time Zach takes his garage sale find home to the lab and spins it up. What would you do if you had a machine that could look into the past? Look at famous world events? Check. Try to see if people around yo What a fun sci-fi tale this was! A young man. A politician. A mobster. A machine that allows you to look back at any point in time and view events. What could possibly go wrong? I love books that ask interesting “what if?” questions, and this spun out in all sorts of nifty directions from the time Zach takes his garage sale find home to the lab and spins it up. What would you do if you had a machine that could look into the past? Look at famous world events? Check. Try to see if people around you might be up to no good? Check. Try to see if someone you loved was faithful? Check. See if you could use it for personal gain if your girlfriend was informing you your dorky scientific hobby wasn’t up to snuff? Poor scientists. Without giving away spoilers, because this is a bit like an “Alice in Wonderland” adventure where you start with a simple premise and the rabbit hole just disappears deeper and deeper… the various characters in this one are so different that it quite works, and Mont’s clean storytelling style makes for an especially enjoyable read with good pacing. I had read the previous short story version and I liked the expansions and additions of various characterizations. Part political thriller and part historical mystery as Zach (amateur detective) looks back in time with the Time Scope and discovers its (surprising!) origins. This also had some neat parallels to current-day political events that really worked. Without getting into details due to spoilers, I particularly enjoyed the dual-timeline sections of the book that allowed us glimpses back to the origin of the Time Scope—really cool world building that went in some neat directions. Lots of fun with this one. Please excuse typos/name misspellings. Entered on screen reader.

  3. 5 out of 5

    E.M. Swift-Hook

    Peering Back Through Time - To See The Present Zack buys a box of what looks like random electronics for fifty dollars and it turns out he has purchased the Time Scope - a device that can look back to any point in time and space that the viewer might desire. His first thought is to use it to prove the innocence of his local senator, accused of having dealings with a gangster, but doing so draws him into an odd triangle with them both... This is a book that presents as a science fantasy but is in t Peering Back Through Time - To See The Present Zack buys a box of what looks like random electronics for fifty dollars and it turns out he has purchased the Time Scope - a device that can look back to any point in time and space that the viewer might desire. His first thought is to use it to prove the innocence of his local senator, accused of having dealings with a gangster, but doing so draws him into an odd triangle with them both... This is a book that presents as a science fantasy but is in truth a modern parable using the ideas of the Time Scope and its origins in Atlantis to explore the eternal verities of human relationships. What I enjoyed: The story concept. The idea of being able to witness the past but not interact with it is certainly an intriguing one. It made me think of people shouting at the TV only for historical events actually happening before their eyes. The human commentary. As the story progresses the way the characters are changed and their values and principles challenged is very well handled. In my opinion, the great strength of this book is in its take on people and relationships. The message. The book uses the medium of the story to make some very pointed comments about the modern world. I especially liked the way in which ancient technology is applied by the 'good guys' for a 'good' purpose but is clearly still completely wrong. What I struggled with: The writing style. It is very narrative-based and at times is almost like reading a report, which made me feel distant and uninvolved in the book. This was underlined by the inclusion of several pages of historical dates and events at one point. The Time Scope. I really struggled to believe in this device. If it had been presented as magical I'd have found it easier to go along with, but it was presented as technology. It could somehow see (without any explanation of how) but not hear, which made no sense to me. The anachronisms. Atlantean culture seemed pretty much identical to modern Western culture - identical gender stereotyping ("even historians know how to treat a lady.") and the names of the Atlanteans were modern. This made it very hard to take it seriously in the context of the story. Overall Thoughts: This is a book that will appeal to students of the human condition. It is a fable that uses the cloak of science fantasy to project its message.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Neus

    Saved in Time deals with an interesting concept: a time machine that can show the past. Such an amazing device offers endless story lines and the one followed by the author is particularly creative. Zack, a young tinkerer/geek; Gordon Hopkins, an honest politician; and Joe, a mobster who converted to the law, get together because of the “Time Scope” and stop a fascist ex-general from becoming president. I enjoyed witnessing the unlikely trio coming together, and was pleased with the civic respons Saved in Time deals with an interesting concept: a time machine that can show the past. Such an amazing device offers endless story lines and the one followed by the author is particularly creative. Zack, a young tinkerer/geek; Gordon Hopkins, an honest politician; and Joe, a mobster who converted to the law, get together because of the “Time Scope” and stop a fascist ex-general from becoming president. I enjoyed witnessing the unlikely trio coming together, and was pleased with the civic responsibility that each, in his own way, showed. To my surprise, a secondary story arises regarding the creators of the “Time Scope” and we get to know the historian Ivo, and the physicists Jena and Judd. Here I relished the description of their society and their search for their true origins. What I liked most about the book is how the author masterfully brings these two stories together in a brilliant ending. The message this book sends is also very important. It highlights the current threatening situations on our planet, both politically and environmentally, and helps to visualize how much better off we would be, in all respects, if we relied on a sustainable and cooperative society. I enjoyed this book and would only recommend a proofreading of the text because there are a few typographical errors that, although minor, could be polished. Overall, five stars for this entertaining and creative story with a brilliant ending and such an important background message!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mary Jaimes-Serrano

    The truth be told. This is a tale that is too real for words. The story tells of a machine that allows the user to have a bird's eye view of past events. The story takes the reader on an interesting trek between the moral and ethical implications this type of machine would have on the world and the personal gain that could be had, using it. In the right hands, a machine like this could save the world. The machine is found at the opportune time to stop the political ambitions of a dangerous politic The truth be told. This is a tale that is too real for words. The story tells of a machine that allows the user to have a bird's eye view of past events. The story takes the reader on an interesting trek between the moral and ethical implications this type of machine would have on the world and the personal gain that could be had, using it. In the right hands, a machine like this could save the world. The machine is found at the opportune time to stop the political ambitions of a dangerous politician. The author describes the scenes in great detail. The story changes from Earth to Atlantis and back giving a perspective of what is going on in each world and how the two worlds intertwine. With details needing to be explained by both sides, some of the build up was a bit long for each scene.I found this to be the only drawback to the book. The story has a touch of reality that leaves one hoping for a favourable outcome both in the book and the world in which we live today. Very well written and it definitely leaves the reader wondering what if...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Jones

    An awkward sci-fi version of ‘It Could Happen Here’ When Trevor finds a Time scope, a television-like device that can see through time, his life as a quirky, layabout inventor gets some direction. After trying to use the device to clear the name of the honorable senator Gordon Hoskins from a supposed relationship with mob boss Joe Petuccini he stumbles upon the dictatorial ambitions of Senator Bradley. As he tries to keep Bradley from becoming the next President, Trevor finds hidden secrets about An awkward sci-fi version of ‘It Could Happen Here’ When Trevor finds a Time scope, a television-like device that can see through time, his life as a quirky, layabout inventor gets some direction. After trying to use the device to clear the name of the honorable senator Gordon Hoskins from a supposed relationship with mob boss Joe Petuccini he stumbles upon the dictatorial ambitions of Senator Bradley. As he tries to keep Bradley from becoming the next President, Trevor finds hidden secrets about the origins of the Time Scope and the implications could affect the entire human race across the galaxy. The idea was intriguing and, honestly, I did enjoy this book although probably not for the reasons the author intended. The book has this weird, untethered feel to it. Sometimes a book sucks me in, not because of the characters or the story but because I just have to see where it goes. This is one of those books. As a fan of the madcap and bizarre, I was more than happy to strap on a helmet and let the author take me on a ride. But as a straight-up sci-fi story or political commentary, it’s problematic. For one, the sci-fi element gets completely lost in a narrative that seems fixated on anything but. Imagine if you could see any event in history. Myself, (and, to be fair, I am a huge history nerd) I would watch an ancient battle just to see what they were like. I would find the historical Jesus Christ to see what kind of person he really was. Think about all the historical mysteries that could be solved; the Kennedy Assassination, D.B. Cooper, the Roanoke Colonist, the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, the Sea People, Jack the Ripper, the Arc of the Covenant the life and death of Genghis Khan… the list goes on and on. The main character wants to use the Time Scope to start a detective agency. That’s it. And the characters are more concerned about their romantic relationships. But maybe I’m missing the point. There are a lot of political references in this book so, perhaps, it is meant as a piece of political commentary. But it stumbles there too. Early in the book the characters suspect Senator Bradly of having Nazi leanings due to his racist rhetoric and his desire to start a war of conquest. So, using the Time Scope, they spy on Bradly and find him in his secret Nazi room where he dresses as a Nazi and salutes a picture of Hitler. So it turns out he’s a Nazi. Deeper in the book the author seems to be making a statement about how people gravitate to authoritarianism but it never seems to land. Either it’s way too ‘on the nose’, as in the previous example, or just doesn’t make any sense. About halfway into the book, the author brings the people of Atlantis into the story. Atlantis, it seems, is a slightly creepy college professor’s vision of Utopia where there is no war, hunger or disease and learned men are revered and get to sleep with all the pretty young graduate students. It’s a storyline that runs alongside the main one and seems to make a statement about the slide toward right-wing authoritarianism and the inevitable collapse of society but, again, it feels strange and out of place and I was left wondering ‘why are we even talking about this?’ By the end, the book’s thesis appears to be that all the stupid people just need to be fixed by the elite race of space professors. My rebuttal, however, is that attitude is one of the factors that got us here in the first place. Elitism doesn’t look good at the best of times and, right now, it’s really out of fashion. Add to that characters that feel stiff and wooden, stilted dialog, descriptions of sexual relations that are positively Victorian and a host of other issues and a lot of people will have trouble getting through this book. But, for me, it was a weirdly fun read that I did enjoy and people who like stories that veer out of control with no sense of structure or sanity will probably get a kick out of this book. It’s weird, quite funny (maybe sometimes unintentionally so) and does leave the reader guessing. And there is a level of pure, creative anarchy that I have to respect. The author clearly doesn’t care about what you think sci-fi should be. He knew the story that he wanted to write and, damnit, he wrote it. So, respect. But, if you come into this book with preconceived ideas regarding sci-fi or political commentary you will probably get frustrated. But if you are willing to kick back and go on this journey, you will find yourself in some interesting places indeed.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Greg Allan Holcomb

    This is a fun read that I wish I had on my phone so I can read this anywhere anytime. Much like the time observation machine. I get a Twilight Zone pulp magazine feeling from this story of every 'security cam footage' of all time. om I won this from the give away section of Your Goodreads. This is a fun read that I wish I had on my phone so I can read this anywhere anytime. Much like the time observation machine. I get a Twilight Zone pulp magazine feeling from this story of every 'security cam footage' of all time. om I won this from the give away section of Your Goodreads.

  8. 4 out of 5

    J.P. Willson

    Review to follow...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lucretia

    I'm a huge fan of genre fiction and love when genres blend and bleed into each other. This story is part political thriller and part sci-fi fantasy, with a dash of romance. The premise is a lot of fun. A 'Time Scope, is a Sci-Fi TV Set that can be tuned to any space and time coordinate and observe events.' Can you imagine! Oh my the fun would could have and mysteries we could solve. I liked that the different characters all had different ideas of what they wanted to use it for. The 'do research I'm a huge fan of genre fiction and love when genres blend and bleed into each other. This story is part political thriller and part sci-fi fantasy, with a dash of romance. The premise is a lot of fun. A 'Time Scope, is a Sci-Fi TV Set that can be tuned to any space and time coordinate and observe events.' Can you imagine! Oh my the fun would could have and mysteries we could solve. I liked that the different characters all had different ideas of what they wanted to use it for. The 'do research for a book' appealed to me a lot as I love that part of writing. In this instance the main uses are for political reasons and to solve cold cases. The political parts of this feel a bit too real and brought my mind to current events. I think in another less tense time it wouldn't have been jarring, but I've been so tense about the state of politics I've been avoiding the news and social media and looking to escape into books. Just a heads-up if you too are over saturated with politics there are places in here that make this read like a political statement. I really loved the sci-fi/fantasy aspects. Somewhere about halfway through there is a really interesting viewpoint added. That was a lot of fun to think about. I've always been interested in the possibility of lost technologically advanced civilizations on earth. Who, where, why? I found it interesting that the scope was limited to rolling forward from the back starting point giving some challenge to using it. In all points of view relationships are explored which adds depth to both the story as well as players making them feel more real and giving them unique perspectives on the theories. This is a thought provoking sci-fi adventure with a relevant message in trying times.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Helen Mathey-Horn

    Imagine you find a time viewing machine? What would you use it for? Zach Dougall lucks into a strange contraption at a yard sale. Left by a former tenant, the seller is happy to be rid of the junk for a few bucks. But when Zach starts to play with it he quickly realizes what it shows him was the real past and gives him an ‘idea’ for a potential future. Needing to make a few bucks he decides to set himself up as a detective. Not before he inadvertently makes ‘friends’ with a congressman and a Maf Imagine you find a time viewing machine? What would you use it for? Zach Dougall lucks into a strange contraption at a yard sale. Left by a former tenant, the seller is happy to be rid of the junk for a few bucks. But when Zach starts to play with it he quickly realizes what it shows him was the real past and gives him an ‘idea’ for a potential future. Needing to make a few bucks he decides to set himself up as a detective. Not before he inadvertently makes ‘friends’ with a congressman and a Mafioso who both decide he cannot be left alone with the device. Will they screw history or save it? And who built the thing originally? Interwoven stories make this a fun read and a scary one at the same time. What would you do if you had such a device? And would it really help your life?

  11. 4 out of 5

    Audrey Driscoll

    The main premise behind this book is: what if there was a device that could show past events, and how might it be used to defeat a white supremacist who wants to take over the government of the United States? The main character for most of the book is a young fellow named Zack with an interest in electronic devices. He buys the Time Scope at a garage sale and eventually teams up with reformed Mafioso Joe Pettucini and an incorruptible Senator, Gordon Hopkins. Later on, we meet two other guys and The main premise behind this book is: what if there was a device that could show past events, and how might it be used to defeat a white supremacist who wants to take over the government of the United States? The main character for most of the book is a young fellow named Zack with an interest in electronic devices. He buys the Time Scope at a garage sale and eventually teams up with reformed Mafioso Joe Pettucini and an incorruptible Senator, Gordon Hopkins. Later on, we meet two other guys and a woman, all of whom have their own knowledge of the device. All the men are nice guys and easy to relate to. All of them have girlfriends or wives who act as stabilizing or motivating influences. In fact, the book includes four mini-romances which present a warm and fuzzy element. The bad guy, retired General Norman Brady, is thoroughly bad, with few nuances. Hitler is one of his heroes. Need I say more? The prose is workmanlike, with few errors. Each chapter is told from the point of view of a specific character. The story moves along steadily, presenting the main characters with a series of problems to which Zack and his Time Scope find solutions. About halfway through, a new storyline appears, which adds extra interest in the form of questions about the origins of humanity. At that point, I couldn't imagine how things would play out, and definitely had to keep reading. In the book's description, the author states that it's "blatantly political," and indeed it is, but not in a way I found offensive. Norman Brady and his attitudes are similar to a certain present-day individual, even though the way this story unfolds is startlingly different. This element sort of takes over the plot for the final 30% of the book, however, to the point that some issues remain unresolved and a few characters vanish off the stage. The ending definitely takes care of the central problem. To enjoy this book – and I did enjoy it – requires a massive suspension of disbelief pretty much every step of the way. It's more than the existence of the Time Scope. Once they identify a common objective, the primary characters work together with almost no conflict. Zack and others solve complex technical problems with astonishing ease and little serious effort. No one reveals the existence of the Time Scope to the world in general, and the bad guy's efforts at revenge are singularly feeble. The ending, although global in scope, is absurdly simple, including the way some serious ethical issues are dealt with. This book works as a fun, light, read, but the fundamental premise raises expectations of issues and tensions that are largely brushed aside in order to achieve a satisfying denouement.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Matt Welch

    Great original twist on the idea of time travel. As in the golden age of science fiction, the author took a good imagination to let us enter the world of what if.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Csimplot Simplot

    Great book!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Dalcolle

    First of all, this story made me recall that, very often, I don't want to say always, the real engine of men's actions is the love for a woman. Either conscient or oblivious. Here, the real action begins only when the protagonist's girlfriend threatens to leave him if he doesn't find a regular job. The man, Zack, terrified by the perspective, awakes abruptly from his lazy lifestyle and begins thinking at light speed. Still dazed, he imagines that he could start an investigation agency, using a fant First of all, this story made me recall that, very often, I don't want to say always, the real engine of men's actions is the love for a woman. Either conscient or oblivious. Here, the real action begins only when the protagonist's girlfriend threatens to leave him if he doesn't find a regular job. The man, Zack, terrified by the perspective, awakes abruptly from his lazy lifestyle and begins thinking at light speed. Still dazed, he imagines that he could start an investigation agency, using a fantastic gadget he's just found by chance at a garage sale. It is a sort of super-TV that can show the past. Zack has just discovered the power of the weird machinery that no one else knows or suspects. Apart from his inventor, a penniless genius passed away too soon. The first attempt that Zack makes to use the weird gadget on an investigation plunges him headlong into political intrigue. He will share it with two ill-assorted companions: an honest US senator and a sinister businessman, born in a mafia family. Starting on these premises, the author succeeds in building a story that is undoubtedly entertaining, apart from the underlying sociological or speculative intent. Also, the psychology of all the characters is well rendered and adds substance to the plot. The Time Scope appears more magic than science, like the flying carpets, or the magic jars that imprison powerful Genies in the oriental folkloric tales. There's no clue of the terrific energy levels that any form of space/time warping would involve, in case we'll ever be capable of inducing one. In fact, it is a mere narrative means that allows the author to reveal at ease the political threats behind the ruthless media war for power. And there's another figure, that Science Fiction's lovers know well: the unsung, lonely genius who makes a revolutionary discovery. It took me back to the pleasant memories of the Golden Age Science Fiction—in a particular way to Murray Leinster. But in this case, there's much more behind the icon. It is right by investigating the fantastic discovery of the lone scientist that a universe-size plot will open up in front of Zack's eyes. At this point, I won't add more. Just allow me to say my personal opinion about the likelihood of the two different scenarios depicted in the story. I believe it is by far more likely the allegedly fantastic extra-terrestrial scenario than the terrestrial one suggested here as impending in the USA. All in all, Saved in Time is a pleasant, entertaining read that I recommend in particular to the lovers of classic Science Fiction. Since the narration amused me, I don't care much if the language might deserve a more severe editing regime, and I rate it four stars.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chris Angelis

    There are books that are unique in a bad way, and there are books that are unique in a good way. I think Saved in Time definitely belongs to the latter category—though, as with everything that is unique, there might be readers who will feel pulled outside their comfort zone. In more detail, this novel has a unique approach to its subject matter. It's science fiction, yet it's also a political thriller. It deploys characters that initially appear as one thing, yet events force them to change their There are books that are unique in a bad way, and there are books that are unique in a good way. I think Saved in Time definitely belongs to the latter category—though, as with everything that is unique, there might be readers who will feel pulled outside their comfort zone. In more detail, this novel has a unique approach to its subject matter. It's science fiction, yet it's also a political thriller. It deploys characters that initially appear as one thing, yet events force them to change their outlook. The plot is ingenious, complex enough to be interesting, but linear enough to keep you with it. As a political thriller, it's very engaging and interesting. The pace is excellent, and the balance between descriptions and action is near-flawless. I don't think audiences of political thrillers will feel bored or tired at any point—I finished reading the same day I began, with a couple of short breaks between reading. This is already a huge deal, and together with the chosen topic—a bit too disturbingly relevant to our current reality—all the fundamentals are there for a gripping, thought-provoking story. The ending, though somewhat unexpected, was consistent with the spirit of the novel in general. I sometimes talk about "inevitable" endings, in the sense that the narrative up to that point has to be a logical prerequisite of the ending. I think this is definitely the case here. I did find the novel consistent and plausible. As I said, there will be readers who might feel they're out of their comfort zone in terms of genre, but that is both inevitable with any self-respecting novel, and certainly telling more about modern audiences rather than the book. Ultimately, Saved in Time is a fast-paced, well-written novel that is perfectly balanced in terms of moving forward, and pretty gripping in terms of action. A must for fans of political thrillers and science fiction alike.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Mensinga

    I’d describe this as a thought-provoking time-travel, sci-fi adventure, but I think the most interesting part is that there is no actual “traveling” in the time-travel. Francis Mont puts a unique spin on the time manipulation genre by telling a story about a device that allows a person to view the past but not interact with it. It’s a clever way of avoiding all the time-travel paradoxes that make telling a story about time so challenging. What I liked most about this story was its fast pace and a I’d describe this as a thought-provoking time-travel, sci-fi adventure, but I think the most interesting part is that there is no actual “traveling” in the time-travel. Francis Mont puts a unique spin on the time manipulation genre by telling a story about a device that allows a person to view the past but not interact with it. It’s a clever way of avoiding all the time-travel paradoxes that make telling a story about time so challenging. What I liked most about this story was its fast pace and ambitious storytelling. Mont takes time to give the reader clear details about each character and their varied motivations, but never lingers too long in a scene, and therefore the momentum stays strong. What starts as a story that appears to only involve a handful of characters dealing with a political scandal, quickly becomes a vast, far-reaching tale about who we are as humans, and the ending is satisfying and well-earned. What stopped me from giving this a full five stars were just a couple of small things. I wish the point of view was third-person limited, rather than third-person omniscient. I’m usually not a point of view stickler, but I think it would have made the storytelling that much stronger. I also wish the female characters had more agency in the plot. All of them were well-developed, but they were also all the romantic partners or romantic interests of the male characters, and it was the men’s decisions that propelled the story forward. That said, I enjoyed the romantic subplots, in particular the one about the Senator and his ex-wife. Anyway, I always appreciate a unique, speculative story about time, and I’d recommend Saved in Time to anyone else who does too.

  17. 5 out of 5

    E.A. Wicklund

    Saved in Time explores a fascinating idea, "What if you could witness history exactly as it happened?" Zack is a tinkerer living off an inheritance when he discovers a machine that can do this exact thing. Soon Senator Hopkins--a rare honest politician, and a mobster turned legit named Pettucini learn about the device. This unlikely trio find themselves as the only ones who can stop an ambitious politician, a man who idolizes history's most infamous authoritarians, from becoming president. The bo Saved in Time explores a fascinating idea, "What if you could witness history exactly as it happened?" Zack is a tinkerer living off an inheritance when he discovers a machine that can do this exact thing. Soon Senator Hopkins--a rare honest politician, and a mobster turned legit named Pettucini learn about the device. This unlikely trio find themselves as the only ones who can stop an ambitious politician, a man who idolizes history's most infamous authoritarians, from becoming president. The book doesn't stop there. It goes on to explore the true origins of the machine and the true origins of the human race. This book is full of semi-subtle commentary on the state of our world as it is. The characters are interesting and likable. It reads pretty quickly, owing that rapid pace to a constantly evolving plot. I enjoyed this book. It considers all the woes of the human race as we are now, and addresses how they came to be, and what we might do about it. It's a fun book with a unique premise. Well worth looking at.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jaela Lynndon

    Time travel – almost. You don’t actually go there, you just watch past events happen on a screen that’s like a TV without the T – all Vision, no Tele. What would you do with such a device? Perhaps consort with a pseudo-mafioso and a U.S. Senator? Maybe open your own detective agency, using the machine to watch a crime being committed and find out by whom? Or perhaps search far into the past for the origin of humans on this planet? Our protagonist, Zach, does it all. Three stars, not five, because I Time travel – almost. You don’t actually go there, you just watch past events happen on a screen that’s like a TV without the T – all Vision, no Tele. What would you do with such a device? Perhaps consort with a pseudo-mafioso and a U.S. Senator? Maybe open your own detective agency, using the machine to watch a crime being committed and find out by whom? Or perhaps search far into the past for the origin of humans on this planet? Our protagonist, Zach, does it all. Three stars, not five, because I often found the characters’ behavior unrealistic, and I was frequently thrown out of the story by grammar, spelling and verb tense errors. This could be an excellent book with the help of a good editor.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Carl

    This is a perfect example of why people are wary of self-published books. The book is in desperate need of an editor. Grammar, punctuation and even simple capitalization are all head-scratching problems. The story itself and characters are very limited and juvenile, especially the resolution. It reads as someone attempting to summarize a story rather than an actual one unfolding. The science is also pretty silly. Good science fiction has some grounding in actual science. Childish magic fogs that This is a perfect example of why people are wary of self-published books. The book is in desperate need of an editor. Grammar, punctuation and even simple capitalization are all head-scratching problems. The story itself and characters are very limited and juvenile, especially the resolution. It reads as someone attempting to summarize a story rather than an actual one unfolding. The science is also pretty silly. Good science fiction has some grounding in actual science. Childish magic fogs that cure “brain afflictions” are not that. The author needs to go back and take the time to learn the basics and tighten up the writing and storytelling.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mrs designer

    A delightful story This is a great read...a little simplistic, but very entertaining. The ending was a little short but unexpected. I say simplistic because the device in real life would have been tracked down by other government "spies" due to the two polar opposites, the Senator and the "gangster" continually meeting at Zack's house. It is a fantasy story however, so author's license is allowed. Like the unexpected twists and turns the story takes so the author truly used a great imagination. I A delightful story This is a great read...a little simplistic, but very entertaining. The ending was a little short but unexpected. I say simplistic because the device in real life would have been tracked down by other government "spies" due to the two polar opposites, the Senator and the "gangster" continually meeting at Zack's house. It is a fantasy story however, so author's license is allowed. Like the unexpected twists and turns the story takes so the author truly used a great imagination. I would highly recommend. It IS a true escape story; allowing one to truly "escape" the world's reality for awhile.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Roxie Klinksiek

    Fun What a fun story. This time travel takes place by watching what has happened in the past on a time scope. No moving forward, only back. Two stories overlap between present day earth and a planet in the future. Engaging characters made the story flow and added an individual interest. The story flowed smoothly. If you like sci fi with intellectual interest you will most likely enjoy this book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Read Ng

    This was a GoodReads giveaway of a Kindle ebook. I thought the premise had promise. But the writing was not well developed. Conversations were very unrealistic. This book was just too juvenile and rough. There was no sophistication in the book. The end lacked any credibility, in fact, the entire story lacked any sense of "maybe it could happen?" Mont needs to put in much more effort into their work and storylines. Have a GoodReads. This was a GoodReads giveaway of a Kindle ebook. I thought the premise had promise. But the writing was not well developed. Conversations were very unrealistic. This book was just too juvenile and rough. There was no sophistication in the book. The end lacked any credibility, in fact, the entire story lacked any sense of "maybe it could happen?" Mont needs to put in much more effort into their work and storylines. Have a GoodReads.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Gene Kendall

    There’s an intriguing twist on time travel in this novel, as a random citizen and a Senator are able to observe the past, but not interact with it. The story moves along at a steady pace, and the author takes care to make his leads likable. My major issue was the use of prose, which often came across as stilted and didn’t properly convey the novel’s emotional beats. Still, credit for originality.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Craig Thompson

    Amazing storyline with interesting characters. I don’t see how there could possibly be a sequel but hope there’re is. Won on a Goodreads giveaway

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jack Young

  26. 5 out of 5

    Terry

  27. 4 out of 5

    Shantel

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amber

  29. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

  30. 4 out of 5

    Donna McFarland

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.