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Autism and Girls: World-Renowned Experts Join Those with Autism Syndrome to Resolve Issues That Girls and Women Face Every Day! New Updated and Revised Edition

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Winner of the Gold Award in the 2006 ForeWord Book of the Year competition, this groundbreaking revised and updated book describes the unique challenges of women and girls with Autism Syndrome Disorder. In it, you’ll read candid stories written by the indomitable women who have lived them. You’ll also hear from experts who discuss whether “ASD girls” are slipping under the Winner of the Gold Award in the 2006 ForeWord Book of the Year competition, this groundbreaking revised and updated book describes the unique challenges of women and girls with Autism Syndrome Disorder. In it, you’ll read candid stories written by the indomitable women who have lived them. You’ll also hear from experts who discuss whether “ASD girls” are slipping under the radar, undiagnosed; practical solutions school systems can implement for girls; social tips for teenage girls, navigating puberty, the transition to work or university, and the importance of careers.


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Winner of the Gold Award in the 2006 ForeWord Book of the Year competition, this groundbreaking revised and updated book describes the unique challenges of women and girls with Autism Syndrome Disorder. In it, you’ll read candid stories written by the indomitable women who have lived them. You’ll also hear from experts who discuss whether “ASD girls” are slipping under the Winner of the Gold Award in the 2006 ForeWord Book of the Year competition, this groundbreaking revised and updated book describes the unique challenges of women and girls with Autism Syndrome Disorder. In it, you’ll read candid stories written by the indomitable women who have lived them. You’ll also hear from experts who discuss whether “ASD girls” are slipping under the radar, undiagnosed; practical solutions school systems can implement for girls; social tips for teenage girls, navigating puberty, the transition to work or university, and the importance of careers.

39 review for Autism and Girls: World-Renowned Experts Join Those with Autism Syndrome to Resolve Issues That Girls and Women Face Every Day! New Updated and Revised Edition

  1. 5 out of 5

    Graham Vingoe

    This review is of a book which was offered free and unsolicitated by the Publisher via Netgalley and is not unduly influenced in any way by them. Disclaimer: I am a parent of a teenage daughter with Autism but in addition to other issues which may also affect her development As a parent of an autistic girl myself, this title was an automatic draw for me as I’m aware from the screening process and personal experience that autism and related syndromes amongst girls are seen as increasingly prevalent This review is of a book which was offered free and unsolicitated by the Publisher via Netgalley and is not unduly influenced in any way by them. Disclaimer: I am a parent of a teenage daughter with Autism but in addition to other issues which may also affect her development As a parent of an autistic girl myself, this title was an automatic draw for me as I’m aware from the screening process and personal experience that autism and related syndromes amongst girls are seen as increasingly prevalent but almost criminally unrecognised amongst educators, the medical fraternity and society which views autism as a primarily “male-only” phenomenon. So, on this basis I was hoping for a good overview of the issues affecting girls with Autism, and some good advice for helping them cope with life. Overall, I do not feel this book has met those expectations. The initial chapter by Tony Attwood and Michelle Garnett was excellent giving a brief run-through of the fact that girls use specific techniques to camouflage autism in order to cope with social and interpersonal norms, and how they adapt to these throughout the various stages of their childhood through to adulthood. The outing of Hermione Granger as a potential autistic person was an interesting surprise and one I would personally not have thought of! The chapter doesn’t necessarily tell me anything new but summarised things nicely. Catherine Faherty’s chapter points out the scary reality that many autistic girls and women are particularly vulnerable to sexual and physical abuse but lack the tools to be able to communicate this. Whilst I think this does need to be pointed out I feel the placement of the chapter itself sdo early in a book which may be used by parents of newly diagnosed autistic girls is unfortunate and could lead to unnecessary worry by many parents. Placing it later in the book when the needs and characteristics of autistic girls are clearer may have helped ease some unnecessary concerns. The fact that Faherty then goes on to outline a specific communication tool ( communication forms) in great detail with example questions, may also reinforce those worries, and is also much better suited to a publication aimed at educators and practitioners rather than one for public consumption. Sheila Wagner writes her chapter from the POV of an educator and it is aimed quite specifically at the situation in American schools as opposed to the UK. Not being an expert in the field, I assume that the lessons learnt are transferrable to our system and her suggestions are clear and concise. I did particularly like the suggested descriptive statements designed to help autistic students to define the various stages of relationships from strangers through to life partners with one proviso- it does skip from best friends to life partners without detailing what you could define as a boyfriend/girlfriend relationship, or even casual sexual relationships. It is one of the stronger chapters in the book, however so this is a comparatively small oversight in the overall book. Lisa Iland is a practitioner with experience in developing individualised programmes aimed at supporting autistic people to navigate the world of relationships, employment and social inclusion by reducing barriers. Much of her work has come from direct communication with autistic people of both sexes including her own brother. She sets out her stall early in her chapter that her aim is to provide advice and information aimed at professional’s, parents and young people with autism and she succeeds with a very general approach- making it clear that social relationships are complicated for everyone including so-called neurotypical people. She concentrates on advice rather than hard advocacy or specific suggested solutions, and this makes the advice much more universal than Flaherty’s chapter did. She also outlines a relationship hierarchy that typical teens experience, which is simpler and much more tailored towards young people themselves than Sheila Wagner's earlier version. What follows is a relatively detailed look at various aspects of relationships in general and friendships. Some reviewers felt that this chapter tries to teach autistic girls to confirm with high school norms and expected behaviours rather than treat them as individuals. I personally didn’t feel this was necessarily the case but in the interest of fairness point this out so that you can treat with caution as appropriate. Next up, Mary Wrobel deals with the issues surrounding puberty and autism. It's very detailed and comprehensive – perhaps a little bit too forceful in tone rather than encouraging – telling parents that autistic girls must be instructed to tell trusted adults when they are being physically bullied, which (as Flaherty’s chapter says) is something that is completely alien to many and extremely difficult to do if that person doesn’t understand where the problem is. Overall the chapter felt too heavy-handed and badgering in tone for me so works against the goal of helping to deal with the issues surrounding puberty. Rather off-putting to say the least. By this point it is unfortunately very clear to me that the book does not work as a cohesive whole and really lacks any common viewpoint- You have writers suggesting that autistic girls need to essentially mimic neurotypical girls in order to function in society but other writers suggesting that they can have meaningful relationships only if they embrace their individuality and go against the norm. It also doesn't seem to be clear on who the audience is for this book- is it practitioners in schools and education, parents or autistic girls themselves? It also is badly organised and that could have detrimental affects on people who have just been diagnosed with the condition. From my perspective, it's a real shame that this title is so disappointing considering how little-known it is that girls with autism are a lot more common than has initially been thought due to their ability to mask the condition effectively, and there is relatively little in the way of information and guidance open to parents of girls with autism designed to help them get to grips with the effects that can result from late diagnosis. I appreciate the aim of the book to be a general guide but the execution lets it down a lot.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    This title is more directed at young and teenage girls and/or their parents, or psychologists and educators, but still has content that can be of interest to adult women on the autistic spectrum. There are many well-known authors from the field here, who cover a good variety of topics including adaptations to autism, camouflaging/masking, psychological effects, asking for help, education, friendships, bullying, puberty, dating, relationships, motherhood, celibacy and careers. A great collection This title is more directed at young and teenage girls and/or their parents, or psychologists and educators, but still has content that can be of interest to adult women on the autistic spectrum. There are many well-known authors from the field here, who cover a good variety of topics including adaptations to autism, camouflaging/masking, psychological effects, asking for help, education, friendships, bullying, puberty, dating, relationships, motherhood, celibacy and careers. A great collection of chapters that should be widely read. Thanks for Netgalley and Future Horizons for the advanced digital copy in return for an honest and unbiased review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bookwormbadger

    Thanks to Netgalley and Future Horizons for this book. Although primarily written for those caring for / teaching autistic girls / teenage girls, this book also has some useful and interesting insights and advice for adults with ASD. It is easy to read and definitely worth a read for anyone who either is an autistic female, lives with one, parents one, teaches one and so on.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Becki

    This book contains stand-alone chapters written by several authors who have studied and worked in the study of autism- many of whom are autistic themselves. Some chapters read more like clinical briefs, some authors shared narrations of life experiences. The chapters are not cohesive with each other, but each one held specific value. Nearly all chapters focused on how best to help and support females with autism- particularly in middle school/high school/young adult years. I was particularly shoc This book contains stand-alone chapters written by several authors who have studied and worked in the study of autism- many of whom are autistic themselves. Some chapters read more like clinical briefs, some authors shared narrations of life experiences. The chapters are not cohesive with each other, but each one held specific value. Nearly all chapters focused on how best to help and support females with autism- particularly in middle school/high school/young adult years. I was particularly shocked (and dismayed) by a statistic shared multiple times in this book- "The incidence of sexual molestation for girls with special needs, including ASD, is 80% before the age of eighteen." Because of that factor, a large goal of the book is to aid parents, teachers and caregivers in helping autistic girls to learn social cues about appropriate sexual behavior and about how to ask for help. The book also address issues such as menstruation hygiene, developing friendships with other girls, romantic relationships, launching into adulthood, etc. There are nine chapters in this book- eight of them were very good. I did feel like one of the chapters was somewhat scattered, but there was value in that chapter, as well. 4 stars. I received an ARC of this book in exchange for my honest opinion. Many thanks to the publisher and the authors for this opportunity. #NetGalley #AutismAndGirls

  5. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    This book wasn't what I expected at all. I'd hoped for more insight on how autism manifests in girls and women throughout the various stages of their lives. Although I think this book is designed to help parents of girls with autism, I found a lot of the advice very unhelpful, essentially telling a girl with autism how to 'fit in', rather than accept herself as she is. This is with the exception of the chapter written by Jennifer McIlwee Myers, who gave a good account of why girls and women with This book wasn't what I expected at all. I'd hoped for more insight on how autism manifests in girls and women throughout the various stages of their lives. Although I think this book is designed to help parents of girls with autism, I found a lot of the advice very unhelpful, essentially telling a girl with autism how to 'fit in', rather than accept herself as she is. This is with the exception of the chapter written by Jennifer McIlwee Myers, who gave a good account of why girls and women with autism may find dating difficult. The chapter on 'Maternal Instincts and Autism' seemed only to talk about the writer's personal challenges, rather than addressing how autism may affect motherhood more generally. The book as a whole also failed to address some of the acknowledged issues around girls, women and non-binary folk with autism, namely gender dysphoria and eating disorders. Interestingly, I've seen reviews of the first edition of this book which raise some of the same points as I have. On the whole I wouldn't recommend this book. While there may still be a dearth of literature on this topic, it needs to be addressed thoroughly and not given lip service. This was an opportunity to fully update the book on the progress that has been made over the past ten years and unfortunately I feel that didn't happen here.

  6. 5 out of 5

    MayorEmma

    I received an arc of this book from netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I can't say I liked this one. I think some of it could have been revised to say ''many but not all'' as in ''all aspies need a lot of alone time after social situations.'' that is not true for everyone. A couple of other things made me not really care for this book. I received an arc of this book from netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I can't say I liked this one. I think some of it could have been revised to say ''many but not all'' as in ''all aspies need a lot of alone time after social situations.'' that is not true for everyone. A couple of other things made me not really care for this book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    HK

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Gerdin

  9. 4 out of 5

    Eliani Rawi

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Baker

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alice Jardine

  12. 4 out of 5

    Caitlyn Andrea

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marian

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dani

  16. 5 out of 5

    Just me

  17. 4 out of 5

    Robin Maner

  18. 5 out of 5

    Abidaymi Agidee-A

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cristie Underwood

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sara Yezefski

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sheena Stewart

  22. 5 out of 5

    Desi

  23. 4 out of 5

    Máithrín

  24. 4 out of 5

    Shawn

  25. 5 out of 5

    Annie

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten is tired

  27. 4 out of 5

    Katie Roberts

  28. 4 out of 5

    Caitlyn

  29. 5 out of 5

    Annie

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kathi

  31. 4 out of 5

    sunflower

  32. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Taylor

  33. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  34. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

  35. 5 out of 5

    Sofie Gedde

  36. 5 out of 5

    Fiona

  37. 5 out of 5

    Eleanor Bensted

  38. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Callister

  39. 4 out of 5

    Maria

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