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Nicky & Vera: A Quiet Hero of the Holocaust and the Children He Rescued

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In 1938, twenty-nine-year-old Nicholas Winton saved the lives of almost 700 children trapped in Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia—a story he never told and that remained unknown until an unforgettable TV appearance in the 1980s reunited him with some of the children he saved. Czech-American artist, MacArthur Fellow, and Andersen Award winner Peter Sís dramatizes Winton’s story i In 1938, twenty-nine-year-old Nicholas Winton saved the lives of almost 700 children trapped in Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia—a story he never told and that remained unknown until an unforgettable TV appearance in the 1980s reunited him with some of the children he saved. Czech-American artist, MacArthur Fellow, and Andersen Award winner Peter Sís dramatizes Winton’s story in this distinctive and deeply personal picture book. He intertwines Nicky’s efforts with the story of one of the children he saved—a young girl named Vera, whose family enlisted Nicky’s aid when the Germans occupied their country. As the war passes and Vera grows up, she must find balance in her dual identities—one her birthright, the other her choice. Nicky Vera is a masterful tribute to a humble man’s courageous efforts to protect Europe’s most vulnerable, and a timely portrayal of the hopes and fears of those forced to leave their homes and create new lives.


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In 1938, twenty-nine-year-old Nicholas Winton saved the lives of almost 700 children trapped in Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia—a story he never told and that remained unknown until an unforgettable TV appearance in the 1980s reunited him with some of the children he saved. Czech-American artist, MacArthur Fellow, and Andersen Award winner Peter Sís dramatizes Winton’s story i In 1938, twenty-nine-year-old Nicholas Winton saved the lives of almost 700 children trapped in Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia—a story he never told and that remained unknown until an unforgettable TV appearance in the 1980s reunited him with some of the children he saved. Czech-American artist, MacArthur Fellow, and Andersen Award winner Peter Sís dramatizes Winton’s story in this distinctive and deeply personal picture book. He intertwines Nicky’s efforts with the story of one of the children he saved—a young girl named Vera, whose family enlisted Nicky’s aid when the Germans occupied their country. As the war passes and Vera grows up, she must find balance in her dual identities—one her birthright, the other her choice. Nicky Vera is a masterful tribute to a humble man’s courageous efforts to protect Europe’s most vulnerable, and a timely portrayal of the hopes and fears of those forced to leave their homes and create new lives.

30 review for Nicky & Vera: A Quiet Hero of the Holocaust and the Children He Rescued

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alex Baugh

    I remember reading about Nicholas "Nicky" Winton (1909-2015) while I was doing some dissertation research on Czechoslovakia. Nicholas is credited with saving 669 children in 1938, separate and apart from those children saved through the Kindertransport program. Now, Nicholas's act of heroism has been made accessible to today's young readers, thanks by the very talented Czech-born American artist Peter Sís. Sís begins Nicky's story with a brief biography of Nicky's early life. Then, in December 19 I remember reading about Nicholas "Nicky" Winton (1909-2015) while I was doing some dissertation research on Czechoslovakia. Nicholas is credited with saving 669 children in 1938, separate and apart from those children saved through the Kindertransport program. Now, Nicholas's act of heroism has been made accessible to today's young readers, thanks by the very talented Czech-born American artist Peter Sís. Sís begins Nicky's story with a brief biography of Nicky's early life. Then, in December 1938, a friend of Nicky's told him to come to Prague, Czechoslovakia. Earlier, in October 1938, Adolf Hitler's army had marched into the Sudetenland on the Czechoslovakian border. As soon as he arrived in Prague, Nicky realized that something had to be done. The world would soon be at war, but he knew that England would accept children under 17 if sponsors could be found for them and travel could be arranged, and so he set to work. In a town outside of Prague, 10-year-old Vera Diamantova's mother heard about an Englishman who was trying to get Jewish children out of harm's way, and her parents decided to see if Vera could be one of those children. Nicky spent most of 1939 in Prague and London preparing everything that was needed to get the children out of Czechoslovakia - making lists and getting photographs of the children, finding train connections, getting visas and advertising for families to take them in. Nicky paid for all of this himself. Meanwhile, in March, 1939, Germany invaded the rest of Czechoslovakia, and Vera's family were told they must give up their home to the occupying German army. Finally, though, the day came for Vera to leave, and her father gave her a diary to record memories so they could read them after the war. Three days later, Vera arrived safely in London, one of the 669 children Nicky rescued. After the war, Nicky lived a quiet life and no one would have learned about his act of heroism if his wife had not found his old records. Now, the world knows what this quiet, kind, unassuming man managed to accomplish against all odds. Sadly, when Vera returned to Czechoslovakia, she learned her parents and most of her family had perished in the Holocaust. Although I knew Nicky's story, there are lots of details I hadn't known before in this beautifully render picture book biography for older readers. And I loved the way Peter Sís intertwined Nicky's story with Vera's making it more personal and emotional, sensitive without being sentimental. Sís tells Nicky and Vera's stories using spare text and simple declarative sentences. Using stylized maps (see illustration above), cutaways, and color, the illustrations really moves the story along, providing a multitude of images to pour over and discuss. I'm sure you will notice immediately that blue is the dominant color for Vera, while a light green is used for Nicky, and gray for the Nazis. Two of my favorite illustrations show the readers the internal memories that are carried by Nicky after the war (above) and Vera arriving in London. I found this to be exceptionally moving and poignant. Nicky & Vera: A Quiet Hero of the Holocaust and the Children He Rescued in a compelling look at these to lives. If you read the Author's Note, you will learn how and what motivated Peter Sís to write Nicky and Vera's stories. This book is recommended for readers age 7+ This book was gratefully received from Edelweiss+

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Parvin

    This is a deceptively simply told story, illustrated with deceptively naïve images both exquisitely combined to tell the story of Nicky (Sir Nicholas Winton) and Vera, a young Jewish child from a village outside Prague. Nicky was an unassuming British born man of Jewish heritage who, while on a visit to Prague in 1938, quietly set about organising the removing of 669 Jewish children from Czechoslovakia to safety in Britain: the Kindertransport. A story of this magnitude, depth and complexity is This is a deceptively simply told story, illustrated with deceptively naïve images both exquisitely combined to tell the story of Nicky (Sir Nicholas Winton) and Vera, a young Jewish child from a village outside Prague. Nicky was an unassuming British born man of Jewish heritage who, while on a visit to Prague in 1938, quietly set about organising the removing of 669 Jewish children from Czechoslovakia to safety in Britain: the Kindertransport. A story of this magnitude, depth and complexity is one that would be difficult to convey to young children, but Sis does so with a lexical ease and simplicity of structure that can only be admired. It is a story simply told. The illustrations, although equally unsophisticated and portrayed with a child-like naivety lend an emotive depth to the story. The image of Vera standing small and alone in the vast and empty train station serves to enhance the enormity of the situation to which these children were exposed. They were saved, but their lives would never be the same. That Peter Sis himself was moved by the heroic actions of Nicholas Winton is evident in the pages beyond the story where we are given the historical back story and the potted biographies of both Nicky and Vera. As experienced readers, we can appreciate that this story just needs to be told, retold, and kept alive… to become a part of the fabric of our understanding of human courage. And Sis is the only author who could have presented it with such heart-felt beauty for our young readers.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

    This book is as stunning, as is usual from Peter Sis. And if it doesn't move you to tears, I don't know what will. This book is as stunning, as is usual from Peter Sis. And if it doesn't move you to tears, I don't know what will.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Emily Quinn

    This book had me wiping the tears from my eyes. I knew the story would be a beautiful thing to experience after hearing it was based around the story of Nicholas Winton’s selfless acts in 1938, but I wasn’t quite prepared for how moving and how compelling it was, even as a children’s book. The history surrounding the Holocaust has always interested me, and this book places focus on both Nicky and one girl whose life was about to change in the most enthralling way. The book is written in simple t This book had me wiping the tears from my eyes. I knew the story would be a beautiful thing to experience after hearing it was based around the story of Nicholas Winton’s selfless acts in 1938, but I wasn’t quite prepared for how moving and how compelling it was, even as a children’s book. The history surrounding the Holocaust has always interested me, and this book places focus on both Nicky and one girl whose life was about to change in the most enthralling way. The book is written in simple terms for children to read and understand, but also well enough for adults to fully appreciate exactly what Nicholas did for those 669 children and just how he saved their lives. Reading this book combined with watching the actual video footage of Nicholas Winton being reunited with those whose lives he saved was incredibly powerful and beautifully memorable. Peter Sís has written an absolute masterpiece of a children’s story which should take pride of place on any bookshelf, child or adult, to remind us all what a wonderful person he was. Learning about Nicky and Vera’s lives in this book was as heartwarming as it was upsetting, but we can all take an awful lot of lessons away from his actions. A perfect story with a beautiful message that I’ll most certainly be passing down in generations. Read my full review over on my blog: https://aquintillionwords.com/2021/01...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    You may have read of the Kindertransport, but not of Nicholas Winton, called Nicky, who visited Prague in 1938 where he discovered Jewish refugees from the recent take-over of the Sudetenland and the recent tragic Kristallnacht. He did not hesitate but went to work organizing paperwork (legal and illegal) and eight trains to transport and rescue 669 children, sending them to Great Britain. Veruška “Vera” Diamantova was a 10-year-old Jewish girl whose parents made the wrenching decision to send You may have read of the Kindertransport, but not of Nicholas Winton, called Nicky, who visited Prague in 1938 where he discovered Jewish refugees from the recent take-over of the Sudetenland and the recent tragic Kristallnacht. He did not hesitate but went to work organizing paperwork (legal and illegal) and eight trains to transport and rescue 669 children, sending them to Great Britain. Veruška “Vera” Diamantova was a 10-year-old Jewish girl whose parents made the wrenching decision to send her away on one of those trains. After the war, Nicky never spoke of it and put the papers in his attic. His wife found those papers fifty years later and a TV show reunited Nicky and surviving children. Peter Sis is Czech-born, tells the story in his incredible dream-like illustrations accompanied by this story. He color-codes the pages: blue for Nicky, gold for Vera, and gray for the war scenes. Both the goodness of Nicky's quiet action and the tragedy that caused his acts can become a beginning of learning about this sad time in history. A new story from the terrible days of the Holocaust is one you don't want to miss.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jolynne Dougherty

    Heroes, Refugees, World War II - Moving true story about Nicholas Winton who rescued 669 Czechoslovakian children at the beginning of WWII quietly. Introduces these subjects to children in an appropriate way.

  7. 4 out of 5

    I _teach_muggles

    I love books by Peter Sís. The Wall: Growing Up Behind the Iron Curtain and Tibet: Through the Red Box are two of my favourite books of his and I strongly suggest you read them if you haven’t already. Nicky & Vera: A Quiet Hero of the Holocaust and the Children He Rescued tells the incredible story of a silent hero of World War II who saved the lives of nearly seven hundred children by organising secret evacuations from Prague to England. Nicholas (Nicky) Winton was born in London in 1909 into a I love books by Peter Sís. The Wall: Growing Up Behind the Iron Curtain and Tibet: Through the Red Box are two of my favourite books of his and I strongly suggest you read them if you haven’t already. Nicky & Vera: A Quiet Hero of the Holocaust and the Children He Rescued tells the incredible story of a silent hero of World War II who saved the lives of nearly seven hundred children by organising secret evacuations from Prague to England. Nicholas (Nicky) Winton was born in London in 1909 into a free-world where children could do anything and be anything they wanted to be. As a child and young adult he embraced his passions and travelled over Europe. All this would change though as in Germany a dangerous leader and his Nazi party were growing stronger. In a small town in Czechoslovakia on the fringes of Prague, a ten-year-old girl named Vera was busy enjoying her childhood and lived happily with her Jewish family. 1938 was a dangerous time to be a Jew and as the German army marched into border region of Czechoslovakia, Nicky pre-empted the dangers that lay ahead. From a hotel in Prague, he worked tirelessly helping children escape on his ‘special trains’ under the ever watchful eyes of spies and with the Nazi’s closing in Vera made her escape. Nicky & Vera tells the story of a remarkable man and the children he rescued with a focus on one particular child, Vera. Their stories are expertly intertwined with the pair finally meeting many years later in life. Incredibly, Nicky never told anyone about his secret mission during the war and it wasn’t until much later in life that his wife found the paper records that he had kept and an appearance on a British TV show would reunite him with many of the children that he had saved. Not only did Nicky organise this incredible rescue mission he also served in the war, to quote Nicky, “I only saw what needed to be done.” Tragically for Vera, on returning to her homeland she found that her family had been victims of the war and that there was nothing left for her and in the end she moved back to England where she would marry and have a family of her own. Peter Sis handles the topic of the holocaust and the atrocities of war in such a sensitive way and this makes for the perfect book to introduce younger readers to the tragic events of World War II. The prose tell the important parts of the story without going into too much detail and the accompanying artwork is stunning. The author’s note at the back of the book provides plenty of additional information which makes for an interesting read in itself for adults and older children. This is an incredible story and I had to keep reminding myself that these events actually happened as it is all seems so impossible and improbable. Nicky was determined to overcome the odds that were stacked against him. He was a man doing what needed to be done. He was the quiet hero whose actions saved the lives of 669 children. Nicky & Vera: A Quiet Hero of the Holocaust and the Children He Rescued is due for publication on 26th January 2021. Recommended for 7+. With thanks to Norton Young Readers for the advanced reader copy which was obtained via Netgalley.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    Nicky & Vera: A Quiet Hero of the Holocaust and the Children He Rescued is written by Peter Sis. This is a picture book and it is illustrated “by an internationally renowned artist” who is not named. I wish he was because the illustrations are spectacular. This book tells the story of Sir Nicholas Winton of England who saved 669 children from the Nazis in Prague in 1938-1939. Nicholas did this on his own. He found the children, found sponsors, found the money needed, found the paperwork needed, Nicky & Vera: A Quiet Hero of the Holocaust and the Children He Rescued is written by Peter Sis. This is a picture book and it is illustrated “by an internationally renowned artist” who is not named. I wish he was because the illustrations are spectacular. This book tells the story of Sir Nicholas Winton of England who saved 669 children from the Nazis in Prague in 1938-1939. Nicholas did this on his own. He found the children, found sponsors, found the money needed, found the paperwork needed, found the train, and escorted the children out. When the war broke out and he was no longer able to get children out, he placed all the paperwork and pictures in his attic and never talked about it. He served as an ambulance driver for the British. He was evacuated from Dunkirk. After the war, he worked raising money for refugees and the disabled. After the war, he married and raised his family. Fifty years after the war, his wife found the papers in the attic and asked him about them. After explaining, he told her to trash them. Luckily, she didn’t listen to him and thinking they might be useful in history, contacted the government and turned the papers over. He was honored for what he did. He appeared on the television show “That’s Life” and when he was introduced, he stood up. When the audience was asked ”who owed their life to Nicholas Winton?” most of the audience stood. He was surrounded by “his children.” The lady next to him was Veruska (Vera) Diamantova who is Vera in the book. Nicholas then began telling his story. He was knighted by the Queen. Nicholas died in 2015 at age 106. Vera was born and lived outside Prague. On July1, 1939, she and her sister were placed on the seventh train out of Prague by their parents. Their Father survived several camps but was shot just before liberation. Their Mother was liberated but contracted typhus and died before being reunited with her daughters. In 1945, Vera returned to Prague where she found her aunt, the only family survivor. In 1949, she returned to England where she lived out her life. Among the 669 children Nicholas Winton saved were: a film director, the founder of the Israeli Air Force, a geneticist, a poet, and politicians. One of the politicians introduced legislation “to protect and provide for migrant children during the European refugee crisis of 2015-16. Can you imagine who the children on the last train that did not get out might have grown up to be? All of the 669 children have a story much like Vera’s and many lost their entire families in the Holocaust. However, thanks to Nicholas Winton, the families live on. The book is very well written and illustrated. At the end of the book, the author tells how he came to write the story and goes into more detail about Nicholas’s exploits. The book is well worth using in elementary schools and above. It always amazes me how impactful picture books can be.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Linda Hill

    The true story of Sir Nicholas Winton. Oh my word. What a moving, beautiful book Nicky & Vera is. I must mention the wonderful physical quality of Peter Sis’s book. The slip cover is smooth and luxurious with flaps that give readers critical information both about the author and Nicholas Winton. Underneath the slip cover is a robust hard backed book that has the ghostly indented imprint of a train that I found very affecting. Nicky & Vera is a book that will withstand much use in the home or clas The true story of Sir Nicholas Winton. Oh my word. What a moving, beautiful book Nicky & Vera is. I must mention the wonderful physical quality of Peter Sis’s book. The slip cover is smooth and luxurious with flaps that give readers critical information both about the author and Nicholas Winton. Underneath the slip cover is a robust hard backed book that has the ghostly indented imprint of a train that I found very affecting. Nicky & Vera is a book that will withstand much use in the home or classroom. In the author’s note there is further information that can be read independently by more confident young readers or by older readers. Within the pages of Nicky & Vera the story of Sir Nicholas Winton and one of the children he rescued, Vera Gissing, is simply written with an accessible font and sentence structure. This simplicity not only makes the book appeal to young readers, but it enhances the depth of the story too by way of contrast between presentation and subject. What Peter Sis has managed to do is to bring to life, and make personal, a story that was reality to so many during WW2. Indeed, although I understand the reading age of the story is around 6-8, the manner of presentation means this book would afford the opportunity for older, less confident, readers to succeed in reading a complete book and gain a positive sense of success. However, it is the illustrations that are magical in conveying the real narrative. There’s a softness and ghostliness to them that is so moving. It feels slightly embarrassing to say that an illustration in a child’s picture book moved me to tears, but when I turned the page to see the pictures of the children Nicholas Winton saved within the adults standing up for him, it really brought home to me just what a hero this man was. As Peter Sis himself says, we talk very loosely about heroes – a young man scoring a goal in football perhaps, or a cricketer scoring a century, but Nicky & Vera teaches children (and adults) the true meaning of the word – Nicholas Winton was an unassuming young man whose actions saved the lives of 669 children. That’s a real hero. Nicky & Vera is a lovely, lovely book. It is historically accurate, engaging, beautifully illustrated and very moving. Peter Sis has created a book that will endure every much as well as Raymond Briggs’ When the Wind Blows and is every bit as important.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    As Czechoslovakia is taken over by the Nazis in 1938, one quiet man stepped forward and saved almost 700 children. At age 29, Nicky was invited to visit Prague while on a ski trip. At the same time, Vera was growing up outside of Prague, happily adopting stray cats. They were one of the only Jewish families in the town, but that didn’t matter in their lives. The in October the German army marched into Czechoslovakia and Vera’s parents learned of a British man who was saving children. That man wa As Czechoslovakia is taken over by the Nazis in 1938, one quiet man stepped forward and saved almost 700 children. At age 29, Nicky was invited to visit Prague while on a ski trip. At the same time, Vera was growing up outside of Prague, happily adopting stray cats. They were one of the only Jewish families in the town, but that didn’t matter in their lives. The in October the German army marched into Czechoslovakia and Vera’s parents learned of a British man who was saving children. That man was Nicky. Understanding that he could do something, he worked in Prague making lists of children and finding train connections. When he returned to London, he found foster families for the children and acquire visas and tickets with his own money, sometimes needing to create his own stamps. Vera left home with 76 other children on a train. In total, 669 children reached London safely. No one heard of Nicky’s quiet work until his wife found the records. Then Nicky’s work was revealed to everyone on a popular TV show, and his life is still celebrated. Sís has created a haunting yet also celebratory nonfiction picture book that describes the Nazi invasion of Czechoslovakia through a child’s eyes and also offers the lens of a man who realizes the potential human disaster about to occur and does something to rescue the children. The tension between the two is beautifully done, creating a deep understanding of what was at stake and the speed at which something needed to happen. The book is one that will make you actually cry, particularly towards the end when the survivors are there to thank Nicky for what he did for them. Crushingly moving. As always Sís’s art is entirely its own style. He offers overhead maps of Vera’s small town and her life. He also shares maps of Europe and whimsical images that are almost folkloric in their storytelling. It’s a lovely mix of story, truth and heroism. Truly remarkable, this is a picture book to read with tissues nearby. Appropriate for ages 7-10.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Roben

    Peter Sis grew up in Czechoslovakia. He had heard stories of a man named Nicky who managed to rescue 669 Jewish children from the Nazis. But it was many years before he heard the full story and, as a result, wrote this book. Nicky (Sir Nicholas Winton) had not set out to rescue children. He had planned on going skiing. But his friend asked him to come to Prague. They realized that Czechoslovakia would soon be overtaken by the Nazis and so Nicky made a plan to get Jewish children out of Czechoslo Peter Sis grew up in Czechoslovakia. He had heard stories of a man named Nicky who managed to rescue 669 Jewish children from the Nazis. But it was many years before he heard the full story and, as a result, wrote this book. Nicky (Sir Nicholas Winton) had not set out to rescue children. He had planned on going skiing. But his friend asked him to come to Prague. They realized that Czechoslovakia would soon be overtaken by the Nazis and so Nicky made a plan to get Jewish children out of Czechoslovakia and into England. He made lists, took reservations, got permits (sometimes forged permits if the government moved too slowly). Then he went to England and advertised for foster families. He returned to Prague and started putting children on trains. A train was scheduled to leave the end of August but the war started, the borders closed, and those children never made it to England. Nicky was always upset that the last train didn't make it out so he never told anyone about his heroic efforts. If only there had been more people like Nicky! Vera was born in Czechoslovakia in a small town near Prague. She was Queen of the Cats! She rescued all of the strays. She was Jewish so her parents decided to send her to England. She was on the 7th train that left Prague. She made it to England and survived the war. Her father had asked her to keep a diary. She did - and eventually wrote her own story.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Bange

    Sís again shows us why he is the most amazing author/illustrator of non-fiction for upper elementary and middle grade students. Picture book biography weaving the lives of Nicholas Winton, a British citizen who helped 669 children escape Prague before the Nazis shut down the country, and Vera Gissing, one of the children he arranged safe passage. Sís alternates back and forth in these parallel biographies - first about Winton, then about Vera - when the action and time shift. The text is smooth to Sís again shows us why he is the most amazing author/illustrator of non-fiction for upper elementary and middle grade students. Picture book biography weaving the lives of Nicholas Winton, a British citizen who helped 669 children escape Prague before the Nazis shut down the country, and Vera Gissing, one of the children he arranged safe passage. Sís alternates back and forth in these parallel biographies - first about Winton, then about Vera - when the action and time shift. The text is smooth to read. There are two font sizes used throughout the book; it can be read by only reading the large font (1 sentence/page), however reading the smaller text adds great depth and fleshes out information. His illustrations are steeped with hidden symbolism and detail. On the title page are stamps of labyrinths and a map of Europe, with the borders written with a very fine print of what I suspect are the names of children Winton saved. An outstanding add to units of study about European history and the Holocaust and also as an exemplar about caring for your fellow man. Highly Recommended for grades 4-8.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nads

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. There are many childrens books out there linked to World War 2 and it's atrocities and many of them handles details well but none so tenderly as Nicky and Vera written by Peter Sis. This book tells the story of the quiet hero Nicholas Winton who travelled to Prague in 1938 to visit a friend. Whilst there, he senses the impending danger that Germany will bring. With the help of his friend, he starts compiling lists and photos of children whose parents wish for them to be re-homed until the war is There are many childrens books out there linked to World War 2 and it's atrocities and many of them handles details well but none so tenderly as Nicky and Vera written by Peter Sis. This book tells the story of the quiet hero Nicholas Winton who travelled to Prague in 1938 to visit a friend. Whilst there, he senses the impending danger that Germany will bring. With the help of his friend, he starts compiling lists and photos of children whose parents wish for them to be re-homed until the war is over. He found them homes in England and arranged the transport just before the dreaded Kristallnacht. In doing so, he saved the lives of 669 children. This book is written so cleverly. It writes just enough for a parent/educator to say to tell the basics of the story however the illustrations give extra details so that if an adult could explain more details based the maturity of the children. The illustrations are absolutely stunning. I highly recommend this book and would happily read this to my class and my own children.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Skip

    The remarkable story of Nicholas "Nicky" Winton. An English banker, Winton was asked to skip a ski vacation and come to Prague in 1938, where he was convinced to help save Jewish children, including Vera, who left her entire family in Czechoslovakia. Winton is widely credited with saving 669 children over the spring/summer of 1938, with support placing them all in foster homes. Perhaps more remarkably, he sought no credit for his selfless heroism, and his wife found the records while cleaning th The remarkable story of Nicholas "Nicky" Winton. An English banker, Winton was asked to skip a ski vacation and come to Prague in 1938, where he was convinced to help save Jewish children, including Vera, who left her entire family in Czechoslovakia. Winton is widely credited with saving 669 children over the spring/summer of 1938, with support placing them all in foster homes. Perhaps more remarkably, he sought no credit for his selfless heroism, and his wife found the records while cleaning the attic. There is a British TV program, where he received long overdue credit where about 100 of the saved children attended. A beautiful story written and illustrated by Czech-born artist, Peter Sís.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    When a writer offers long descriptions of people and places, my mind rarely forms a visual image from the text. Instead those words create an emotional mood – one that may not be completely faithful to the author’s intent. That’s one reason I enjoy books with drawings or photographs: the pictures offer me a different way to understand the story, letting me experience how the author/artist visualizes the characters and situations. This review features works for all ages that combine text and imag When a writer offers long descriptions of people and places, my mind rarely forms a visual image from the text. Instead those words create an emotional mood – one that may not be completely faithful to the author’s intent. That’s one reason I enjoy books with drawings or photographs: the pictures offer me a different way to understand the story, letting me experience how the author/artist visualizes the characters and situations. This review features works for all ages that combine text and images to enhance the readers’ enjoyment. See the rest of my review at https://www.thereportergroup.org/past...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Iris

    An inspiring story about the remarkable man who saved over 600 children from the Nazis. In 1938, Nicholas Winton set up an office in Prague to help Jewish children escape to London and connect them with families that will care for them. The Winton Trains operated until 1939 and saved hundreds of lives. Winton did not speak about these events until 1989, claiming that he only saw what needed to be done and that he was not a hero. Veruska (Vera) Diamantova, along with all the other children who su An inspiring story about the remarkable man who saved over 600 children from the Nazis. In 1938, Nicholas Winton set up an office in Prague to help Jewish children escape to London and connect them with families that will care for them. The Winton Trains operated until 1939 and saved hundreds of lives. Winton did not speak about these events until 1989, claiming that he only saw what needed to be done and that he was not a hero. Veruska (Vera) Diamantova, along with all the other children who survived, would probably claim otherwise. This book is a celebration of the quiet heroes of the war, deserving of as much praise and recognition as those who fought with guns and steel.

  17. 4 out of 5

    suzie almond

    This beautiful, poignant book and the story it tells needs to be on every bookshelf and read in every school. It tells the story of a remarkable man and his determination and commitment to doing the right thing. It allows the reader to access this story and the utterly amazing illustrations draw the reader further in and open the door for so much thought, talk and discussion This is a part of history which we must never forget and this book will allow younger children, their families,carers and This beautiful, poignant book and the story it tells needs to be on every bookshelf and read in every school. It tells the story of a remarkable man and his determination and commitment to doing the right thing. It allows the reader to access this story and the utterly amazing illustrations draw the reader further in and open the door for so much thought, talk and discussion This is a part of history which we must never forget and this book will allow younger children, their families,carers and teachers to talk about this difficult subject within the safe context of this perfectly constructed book. As an educator I simply cannot recommend this book highly enough

  18. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    An amazing story of the heroic deeds of one man and the legacy he left! Many of us are familiar with Oskar Schindler and how he helped to save 1,200 Jews in Poland during the Second World War. However, little has been said or written about Englishman Nicholas (Nicky) Winton, and how he had a hand in rescuing 669 Czech children from the invading Nazis in the months leading up to the war. Despite his efforts, Winton never considered himself a hero, and in fact, never even talked about what he did u An amazing story of the heroic deeds of one man and the legacy he left! Many of us are familiar with Oskar Schindler and how he helped to save 1,200 Jews in Poland during the Second World War. However, little has been said or written about Englishman Nicholas (Nicky) Winton, and how he had a hand in rescuing 669 Czech children from the invading Nazis in the months leading up to the war. Despite his efforts, Winton never considered himself a hero, and in fact, never even talked about what he did until his wife stumbled across a scrapbook in the late 1980s. Czech-born Peter Sis was inspired to write and illustrate this book when he learned of Winton's tale during a visit to Prague.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Beverly

    Read for the Mock Caldecott Awards which will be conducted in January 2022. A wonderful book for a wonderful story. Nicholas Winston saved the lives of 669 Czechoslovkian children by creating his own style of Kindertransport from the city of Prague. He never took any credit for himself and I remember crying when I saw the celebration of his life on television. He was surrounded by the grownup children that he had rescued...never realizing it until when asked for everyone who had been saved by Ni Read for the Mock Caldecott Awards which will be conducted in January 2022. A wonderful book for a wonderful story. Nicholas Winston saved the lives of 669 Czechoslovkian children by creating his own style of Kindertransport from the city of Prague. He never took any credit for himself and I remember crying when I saw the celebration of his life on television. He was surrounded by the grownup children that he had rescued...never realizing it until when asked for everyone who had been saved by Nicholas to stand, everyone else in the auditorium stood to recognize him. Beautifully presented.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    I am a big fan of Peter Sis and bought a few of his books when our son was young. I heard about this book, so I wanted to see it. Like his other books, the illustrations are intricate and engaging. You could spend a long time looking at each page. This is the heroic story of a normal man who saved hundreds of child from Czechoslovakia during WW II. The story covers him and one girl he saved. Really beautiful and a touching story.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Patti Sabik

    In true Peter Sis style, the book pays tribute to Nicholas Winton, who rescued 669 children from Czechoslovakia during Germany’s invasion in World War II. His heroic actions were quietly unnoticed until his wife found papers many years later. The beautiful artwork Peter Sis creates to illustrate Nicky’s efforts and Vera’s life, as one of the rescued is compelling.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    A modest man who made a HUGE impact. He saved 669 Czech children, finding them foster homes and sending them to England. He didn't tell others about his humanitarian efforts. He did what was right. Many years later he was reunited with some of the children. Such a moving story. We should hold him up as an example, someone to emulate and strive to be like. A modest man who made a HUGE impact. He saved 669 Czech children, finding them foster homes and sending them to England. He didn't tell others about his humanitarian efforts. He did what was right. Many years later he was reunited with some of the children. Such a moving story. We should hold him up as an example, someone to emulate and strive to be like.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brandee

    I know I will go back and reread this beautiful book. Peter Sis is gifted at art and storytelling. This beautiful story of Nicholas Winton inspires us to become heroes in our daily lives. What an amazing man!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    This was WONDERFUL. It was so gentle, but so honest about the heroism of Winton and the horrors of the Holocaust. Every school library and every classroom needs a copy. Highly recommended! Q2021 book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen

    A story about how Nicky Winton was able to save 669 children in Czechoslovakia from the Nazi camps during WW2 by finding them refuge in England. Vera is one of the children he saved. Lovely illustrations.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    When was the last time you teared up over a book? Here's one that will do that to you, the story of a quiet hero who saved the lives of over 600 Czechoslovakian children in 1939. The artwork is beautiful, the story transcendent. When was the last time you teared up over a book? Here's one that will do that to you, the story of a quiet hero who saved the lives of over 600 Czechoslovakian children in 1939. The artwork is beautiful, the story transcendent.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Margie

    Throughout human history, during the worst of times the best kind of individual will step forward to make every effort possible to fight against evil. Sometimes this individual will shout from the rooftops rallying others to resist the attacks on fundamental human rights. There are other people who work with more discretion. While their efforts are not unknown by those they help, they accomplish great things in relative silence. One of these people was Nicholas Winton. One of the people he helpe Throughout human history, during the worst of times the best kind of individual will step forward to make every effort possible to fight against evil. Sometimes this individual will shout from the rooftops rallying others to resist the attacks on fundamental human rights. There are other people who work with more discretion. While their efforts are not unknown by those they help, they accomplish great things in relative silence. One of these people was Nicholas Winton. One of the people he helped was a child, Veruska Diamantova. Nicky & Vera: A Quiet Hero of the Holocaust and the Children He Rescued (Norton Young Readers, an imprint of W. W. Norton & Company, January 26, 2021) written and illustrated by Peter Sis is their story. It is a story of service and survival during the darkness of World War Two. My full recommendation: https://librariansquest.blogspot.com/...

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Stern

    This book is beautifully written and illustrated. It tells the story of Nicolas Winston in a very simple moving way. It needs to be looked at a few times to understand the color and the illustrations. It is a great introduction to a horrible time in the world.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Panda Incognito

    This nonfiction picture book is deeply moving, and the text and illustrations work together perfectly to tell this story of courage and rescue without making it overly sentimental or glossing over the pain that these children and families suffered.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This is a beautifully illustrated and clearly written story about an amazing man. Nicholas Winton is a true hero. Peter Sis provides the perfect book to introduce younger students to the Holocaust and the Kindertransport.

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