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The Love That Remains: An extraordinary memoir about secrets, life's shocking twists and unconditional love

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How could I write about the importance of truth and not tell the whole truth myself? After twenty years spent searching for her biological parents, 52-year-old Susan Hull unexpectedly meets the great love of her life - a goldminer named Wayne Francis. He is a gentle giant of a man, who promises Susan the world. Two years later, they throw in their jobs, marry and sell everyt How could I write about the importance of truth and not tell the whole truth myself? After twenty years spent searching for her biological parents, 52-year-old Susan Hull unexpectedly meets the great love of her life - a goldminer named Wayne Francis. He is a gentle giant of a man, who promises Susan the world. Two years later, they throw in their jobs, marry and sell everything they own, embarking on an incredible adventure, to start a new life in the romantic city of Granada, where they learn Spanish and enjoy too much tapas. In love, and enthralled by the splendour of a European springtime, the pair treasure every moment together. Until a shocking series of events alters everything. Riveting, heartfelt and remarkably honest, Susan Francis The Love that Remains explores unconditional love and the lies we tell to safeguard our happiness.


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How could I write about the importance of truth and not tell the whole truth myself? After twenty years spent searching for her biological parents, 52-year-old Susan Hull unexpectedly meets the great love of her life - a goldminer named Wayne Francis. He is a gentle giant of a man, who promises Susan the world. Two years later, they throw in their jobs, marry and sell everyt How could I write about the importance of truth and not tell the whole truth myself? After twenty years spent searching for her biological parents, 52-year-old Susan Hull unexpectedly meets the great love of her life - a goldminer named Wayne Francis. He is a gentle giant of a man, who promises Susan the world. Two years later, they throw in their jobs, marry and sell everything they own, embarking on an incredible adventure, to start a new life in the romantic city of Granada, where they learn Spanish and enjoy too much tapas. In love, and enthralled by the splendour of a European springtime, the pair treasure every moment together. Until a shocking series of events alters everything. Riveting, heartfelt and remarkably honest, Susan Francis The Love that Remains explores unconditional love and the lies we tell to safeguard our happiness.

30 review for The Love That Remains: An extraordinary memoir about secrets, life's shocking twists and unconditional love

  1. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Robson

    Whilst reading a well written narrative I often wonder how did the writer come up with that plot line or that character. Whilst reading the memoir The Love That Remains I can’t help but wonder how did the author live through all this? And this is what memoirs are really about to my mind. To bring us closer to other people’s lives. In some instances we might choose a particular memoir because it touches on issues that we ourselves are struggling with. In other cases because the memoir deals with e Whilst reading a well written narrative I often wonder how did the writer come up with that plot line or that character. Whilst reading the memoir The Love That Remains I can’t help but wonder how did the author live through all this? And this is what memoirs are really about to my mind. To bring us closer to other people’s lives. In some instances we might choose a particular memoir because it touches on issues that we ourselves are struggling with. In other cases because the memoir deals with experiences that are completely different to our own. Many reviewers have mentioned how raw and powerful the writing is. And it is that but what struck me more was how well constructed the narrative is, dealing as it does, with so many competing issues. Francis has broken up the book into three parts: Finding My Past, Finding Love and Finding Myself. Immediately we understand how important is Susan Francis’s quest to find her biological parents. All the barriers that are put in her way, at times seemingly insurmountable, are overcome with the faithful, indomitable Wayne by her side. In the second part when the author and her husband Wayne escape to Grenada, Francis’s descriptive powers really come to the fore: “I remember the Castenada as a haven of warmth and noise. People were squeezed in so tightly that many had their arms wrapped about the shoulders of the person beside them just to be able to fit. The bar staff shouted across the room to each other through the stink of cigarettes; the chefs sang loudly and out of key while they shoved each other about the kitchen. Crumpled paper serviettes were discarded over the stone floor, flattened under a hundred pairs of boots. We’d read about this tradition before we’d left home, had expected it, but seeing the nonchalance of it all was glorious. It was all so Spanish!” And then even more so when tragedy strikes: “My skin peels off my bones. My soul fuses to these strange surroundings. For hours, the bodies about me are people with whom I’m unfamiliar-who speak a language to me I can’t understand. Their mouths open and shut and I can’t hear them. I am looking at the rest of the world through a thick pane of glass and nothing seems tangible.” There are many instances of strong, heart-rending and powerful writing that I don’t know how the author was able to set them down on the page. I commend her searing honesty but also her skill at foreshadowing, little glimpses that everything was not picture perfect. These glimpses the author herself disregarded in the early days but I’m sure came back to haunt her after everything changed. Here is my favourite example: “This man was secure in his footing on the earth. I loved that strength and that certainty about him. I loved how we fitted together so easily. I loved that he loved me. That this was the man I was travelling to Spain with made the world more miraculous. My happiness was secured, my future guaranteed. Love. Travel. Adventure. All the good things in the world were finally mine. So, I set aside my misgivings about what he was saying, about forgetting the past, and instead fixed my mind on us being together.” An amazing and moving memoir. Highly recommended.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kellie Cathcart

    I went to the book launch for this one and to be honest the hype about controversy and the author talking about blaming herself for the death of her husband had me desperate to read it. Throw in the search for her natural parents and the fact that she was born and now lives in Newcastle and it seemed like a done deal. Then the warning not to expect too much came and lessened my expectations a little but I was still hopeful. Now I’m finished the words “is that it?” And “where is the rest of the s I went to the book launch for this one and to be honest the hype about controversy and the author talking about blaming herself for the death of her husband had me desperate to read it. Throw in the search for her natural parents and the fact that she was born and now lives in Newcastle and it seemed like a done deal. Then the warning not to expect too much came and lessened my expectations a little but I was still hopeful. Now I’m finished the words “is that it?” And “where is the rest of the story?” Are burning in my mind. It’s not that Susan isn’t a good writer, despite getting lost in some of her thoughts at times and thinking these descriptive paragraphs about Spain are getting a little boring, she was easy to read. I was however wondering what she was really feeling at times. It was good to see her reflect more on her husband later in part three but I felt that she glossed over her own earlier journey’s and feelings about those in order to tell her story of her husband. I didn’t feel her pain not her happiness when she was trying to convey these in the book. I wonder if her speaking of them in the ABC conversations may have elicited emotion within me? Susan said at the book launch you should write the story you are afraid to write. It struck me so deeply when she said that and I constantly battle in my own writing to tell that story. I can’t help but feel that Susan has hidden like I do in telling other people’s stories, specifically her husbands and avoided either partly or altogether telling her own. I wouldn’t rush to read this one, but I did finish it and given my new (due to the worst book I’ve ever struggled through to read last year) “if I’m still struggling 50 pages in then give it up” policy this does say there was something about the book that made me read it to the end.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sheree | Keeping Up With The Penguins

    Susan Francis’ self-declared “obsession” with writing about the truth began with her search for her biological parents. She was privately adopted as an infant, and with her adoptive mother declining in late-stage Alzheimer’s, she went searching for answers about her past. Along the way, she found Wayne, the love of her life. Don’t make any snap judgements or assumptions, though: the story that unfolds in The Love That Remains is not the one that you’d expect. The fine folks at Allen And Unwin we Susan Francis’ self-declared “obsession” with writing about the truth began with her search for her biological parents. She was privately adopted as an infant, and with her adoptive mother declining in late-stage Alzheimer’s, she went searching for answers about her past. Along the way, she found Wayne, the love of her life. Don’t make any snap judgements or assumptions, though: the story that unfolds in The Love That Remains is not the one that you’d expect. The fine folks at Allen And Unwin were kind enough to send me a copy for review. These events – finding and meeting her birth parents (“Finding My Past”), and finding and meeting Wayne (“Finding Love”) – unfold in the first two parts of the book. The third part (“Finding Myself”), is something different entirely. Francis is confronted with new truths that challenge everything she thought she knew about the man she married. She’s forced to confront uncomfortable questions: how well can we ever really know a person? Where are love’s bounds? Should we seek out our past to find peace, or focus on the present? The Love That Remains will be a great late-summer read for any fan of Liz Gilbert’s memoirs, with an interest in the big Ls (love, loss, and lies). An extended review will be available to subscribers at .

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    I read this book after a friend recommended it to me and I'm so glad I did! Heartbreaking, beautiful, and mesmerising, the author paints a picture of her life that feels absolutely and completely relatable whilst also being absolutely and completely unique. The lessons around the value of truth and identity are profound, and the books third section is completely unexpected but propels the novel into an absolutely wonderful and satisfying conclusion. I can't wait to read more from this author. I read this book after a friend recommended it to me and I'm so glad I did! Heartbreaking, beautiful, and mesmerising, the author paints a picture of her life that feels absolutely and completely relatable whilst also being absolutely and completely unique. The lessons around the value of truth and identity are profound, and the books third section is completely unexpected but propels the novel into an absolutely wonderful and satisfying conclusion. I can't wait to read more from this author.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carly Findlay

    The love that remains This past year I’ve heard the saying “grief is the pride you pay for love” a lot. I think this saying sums up Susan Francis’ Memoir, The love that remains. I had first heard Susan on ABC Conversations in 2017. It was a riveting conversation then. An unexpected mid-life love story - Conversations - ABC Radiowww.abc.net.au › radio › programs › conversations › susan-francis-rpt I immediately followed her public Facebook page and sent her a message telling her I enjoyed the conv The love that remains This past year I’ve heard the saying “grief is the pride you pay for love” a lot. I think this saying sums up Susan Francis’ Memoir, The love that remains. I had first heard Susan on ABC Conversations in 2017. It was a riveting conversation then. An unexpected mid-life love story - Conversations - ABC Radiowww.abc.net.au › radio › programs › conversations › susan-francis-rpt I immediately followed her public Facebook page and sent her a message telling her I enjoyed the conversation. I was thrilled when I saw the news she had a book deal. We became online friends, which has been lovely. The memoir starts when Susan is searching for her birth mother in Brisbane. She is abruptly rejected by her birth mother, and then travels to Perth to meet her birth father, who makes her feel very uncomfortable. Once she sees who they really are, she doesn’t feel the need to have any more to do with them. The story of her birth family is complicated, and I was glad to have listened to her conversation with Mia Freedman to make sense of it all. The book is mostly focused on Susan’s romance with Wayne Francis, a miner she met on an online dating site for seniors. She and Wayne fall in love immediately, and they have a passionate but all too brief romance. Wayne helps Susan find her birth family, and then they move to Spain to live in Grenada for a year. However, tragedy strikes on a trip to Portugal, where Wayne dies suddenly. She finds herself having to negotiate her husband’s death in a foreign country - it’s complex and lonely, and anger inducing. After his death, she finds out a dark secret about Wayne - one he kept from her probably because he was scared he’d lose her love. Susan is persistent - in finding her birth parents, and also tracing Wayne’s past. Her love for Wayne is fierce, ongoing and also forgiving. He’s the love of her life, and I suspect he always will be. She is a beautiful writer - the scenes in Spain are evocative, and the way she writes about Wayne is every romantic. She idolises him, and he feels the same way about her. It was easy to feel a part of Susan’s life and relationships through her writing. She’s also very measured in her reactions to the harshness she’s been dealt - especially in trying to understand her birth mother’s reaction to her contact. Susan’s is a story we don’t hear a lot of - new love in peoples’ 50s and 60s, and also a different perspective on adoption. It certainly was a read out of my own experience. The truth is stranger than fiction - what Susan has endured is quite unbelievable - and also very sad. I really hope she is ok. I imagine retelling the story for media appearances would be quite exhausting for her - I sent her some self care tips to help her get through. I heard Susan on my friend Sandy’s podcast - I can highly recommend the listen. https://www.facebook.com/GoodGirlConf... I do recommend listening to Susan’s chat with Mia Freedman on No Filter - but not before reading the book, as it reveals a lot of the book’s content - which I think should be a surprise as you read it. Listen to those podcast episodes after you read the book. I listened to the audiobook, narrated by Rachel Tidd, but I do have the paperback as well (I lent it to my Mum who is loving it too). Rachel was a fantastic narrator, really providing the dramatic effects and pause when needed. It was a quick listen - I powered through it in less than two days. Well done Susan on such a beautiful, memorable and romantic book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Louise

    I was recommended this book to buy as a gift when the one I wanted had sold out but it never made it to the recipient. I feel a bit guilty giving a review when I otherwise would probably never have bought this book. It was ok but pales in comparison to say Magda Szubanski’s Reckoning.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Damien Barrett

    The Love That Remains is truly one of the most beautifully written memoirs I have read in recent years. It is both a love story and a detective story as the author Susan Francis searches for her birth parents and falls in love with the man of her dreams who has a dark secret which she discovers after his unexpected death. Francis' captivating descriptions of the many locations in the story (of Granada in Spain particularly), made me feel as though as I was there with her. The writing evokes a ve The Love That Remains is truly one of the most beautifully written memoirs I have read in recent years. It is both a love story and a detective story as the author Susan Francis searches for her birth parents and falls in love with the man of her dreams who has a dark secret which she discovers after his unexpected death. Francis' captivating descriptions of the many locations in the story (of Granada in Spain particularly), made me feel as though as I was there with her. The writing evokes a very tangible sense of both place and time. The story is told with much love and care and the reader certainly needs to have a box of tissues close by when reading this beautifully crafted and remarkable memoir which is a testament to love, grief, uncovering secrets and finding out who you really are.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Clare Myers

    I loved this book. Easy to ready- finished it in a weekend. I hope there is more from this author

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sally Wilson

    Thoroughly enjoyed this book,

  10. 5 out of 5

    Grace Leask

    Once I started reading, I could not put this book down! While reading, I laughed, I cried and at times bawled. It is a beautifully evocative story written incredibly well and I 100% recommend!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Such a powerful, compelling read An incredible story so bravely told. I found it hard to put down. Can’t wait to read her next book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Liz Derouet

    An intriguing read, full review on my blog early Feb.

  13. 5 out of 5

    S.D. Scott

    I’m relatively new to memoirs. Many years ago, I used to devour autobiographies or biographies, eager to learn more about public figures who may have piqued my interest. I enjoyed the ‘inside scoop’, poring over others’ lives in the context of the particular social and political period. Memoirs, however, are very different. They’re not about setting the record straight or documenting a history. Memoirs are reflective pieces, striving to make sense of memories, events, feelings and experiences. I I’m relatively new to memoirs. Many years ago, I used to devour autobiographies or biographies, eager to learn more about public figures who may have piqued my interest. I enjoyed the ‘inside scoop’, poring over others’ lives in the context of the particular social and political period. Memoirs, however, are very different. They’re not about setting the record straight or documenting a history. Memoirs are reflective pieces, striving to make sense of memories, events, feelings and experiences. I first heard Susan Francis speak on the ‘So You Want To Be A Writer’ podcast, having no idea who she was. She was not, at that stage at least, a renowned public figure or celebrity. She sounded very much like a “normal” woman. It was astonishing, then, when she alluded to a number of family secrets and mysteries that would take her not only across the country, but across the world. She faced her fears head-on, aware that she could uncover events that might rattle her to the core and question everything she held dear. Mark Twain once wrote, “The only difference between reality and fiction is that fiction needs to be credible.” Susan Francis’ memoir is, indeed, incredible. After grappling for many years with notions of identity and belonging, her peace and joy was shortlived, and abruptly followed by a complicated grief. This is so much more than a retelling and unravelling of family secrets, or a recount of shocking events. This is an intimate, honest and at times confronting piece of writing. There is a sense that this memoir was a cathartic experience, and consequently as a reader, I travelled the highs and lows of delight and pain right by her side. Susan Francis might sound like a “normal” woman, but her determination, sense of purpose and courage are extraordinary.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

    A very personal and very detailed memoir. I found it did not hold my attention and was repetitive at times. Maybe it would have been better as a much shorter book. I attended the Zoom interview with the author and I lost interest there too.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Roger Douglas

    Rubbish Just wanted a book to read sitting at airport, wasted my money , an easy book to read, it took me 20 minutes , felt uneasy with some of it, the little part about sexual infections I felt totally unneeded , I mean , really , no real meaning to it all

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sally Pratt

    More like a 3.5

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lesley Moseley

    3 1/2 more likely. Well written, bit too long, but held my interest.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sammy Mac

    The Love that Remains by Susan Francis “You can’t shut off the risk and the pain without losing the love that remains” – Bruce Springsteen The Love That Remains is the extraordinary debut memoir by Australian Author Susan Francis. Susan Francis has spent over 20 years searching for her biological parents, desperate to learn the truth about she is, to understand the past so she can move freely into the future. At the age of 52, having divorced three times, she meets Wayne, a miner from Papua New Gu The Love that Remains by Susan Francis “You can’t shut off the risk and the pain without losing the love that remains” – Bruce Springsteen The Love That Remains is the extraordinary debut memoir by Australian Author Susan Francis. Susan Francis has spent over 20 years searching for her biological parents, desperate to learn the truth about she is, to understand the past so she can move freely into the future. At the age of 52, having divorced three times, she meets Wayne, a miner from Papua New Guinea whose dreams echo her own. With his cautious support, they journey across Australia to meet her biological parents with emotionally fraught results. Determined to live for now, they marry, leave their jobs and embark on a year abroad in Spain. Enthralled by their European surroundings, they devoted couple are at peace, until a devastating event alters everything. Susan is once again plunged into a heart wrenching quest as she desperately tries to comprehend the truth of her husbands’ past. With her trademark determination, she journeys across countries as she strives to understand his secrets and make peace with his demons. The narrative is effortlessly readable, constructed in three parts: Finding My Past, Finding Love and Finding Myself. Told in the first person by Susan, the tone is impassioned and intimate which is further enriched in the audio version with voice actor Rachel Tidd. The memoir encompasses the authors life in Australia and journey’s to Spain and Papua New Guinea with stunning detailed depictions of each, so vivid the reader journeys through these destinations with her. A complicated cast of characters have touched Susan’s life. Her childhood kinship with Liz and Di was heart-warming as was her enduring affection for her adoptive parents. The prevailing reliability of her brother Pete and her son Johnno was comforting against the background of Susan’s tragic experiences. Wayne, a quiet and stoic man with a past, Susan considered him her Pablo fated half soul. It was ultimately his workmates and family who shared astonishing insights into the man Susan thought she knew. Once exposed, it is understandable why the author desperately sought closure and justly wrestled with publishing the third part of the memoir. Susan has constantly wrangled with the sense of uncertainty that adoption instilled in her. The memoir primarily focuses on her unending quest to reconcile not so much with others, but with her own identity. It is the secrets that other people have kept, that are part of her past too, who make her who she is. She is determined to know the truth of them, to finally be set free. The writing was well-paced and skilfully foreshadowed events, whilst maintaining a keen level of interest throughout. I listened to the audiobook and have since reviewed the paperback. Whilst a convenient listen at 7.5 hours, the paperback allows the reader to fully appreciate this authors talented, rich writing and stunning literary prose. Overall, this was a beautifully crafted, heart-breaking memoir. A testament to love, grief and finding out who you really are. Susan is now working on her first fictional novel regarding the Balibo Five. Rating 4/5 stars Just a heads up, this memoir deals with adoption, death, grief and murder, For more So You Want To Be A Wrtier Podcast – *no spoilers https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast... Mia Freedman No Filter Podcast – *spoilers https://www.mamamia.com.au/podcasts/n...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bree T

    One of my reading goals this year was to add more non-fiction into my reading. I did read quite a bit last year and found a lot of books that I enjoyed so this year I wanted to broaden my horizons even more. And one of those reading ‘wants’ that I had, was to read more memoirs of everyday ordinary people, not celebrities or sportspeople or someone that was famous for being in a reality show. In this book, Australian woman Susan met the love of her life in her 50s, a miner named Wayne. He support One of my reading goals this year was to add more non-fiction into my reading. I did read quite a bit last year and found a lot of books that I enjoyed so this year I wanted to broaden my horizons even more. And one of those reading ‘wants’ that I had, was to read more memoirs of everyday ordinary people, not celebrities or sportspeople or someone that was famous for being in a reality show. In this book, Australian woman Susan met the love of her life in her 50s, a miner named Wayne. He supported her whilst she searched out her biological parents, having been adopted as a baby in Newcastle. And after Susan had her somewhat unsatisfactory answers, they threw in their jobs and went to live overseas. They lived in Spain and made various forays to other countries, exploring places like Croatia and Portugal. Whilst in Portugal, the unthinkable happened and Susan found herself alone and faced with the unenviable task of repatriating her husband’s remains back to Australia. This was a really interesting story. Susan herself is a very interesting woman – she’s frank about the fact that she’s been divorced several times and the baggage of being adopted. She’s the sort of person that wants answers, even if it’s just some medical history, especially as her adoptive mother has been ill with Alzheimers for some time. The sort of information about things that potentially are genetic is important but Susan doesn’t find much from her biological parents – her mother is clearly hiding something and wants Susan gone as quickly as possible and her father operates under a false name with the sort of manner that makes her uncomfortable. I think Susan realises that the information she has is about as good as she’s going to get and perhaps it’s time to do as Wayne says and put the past behind her and live in the moment. Their European life seems ideal – a beautiful but snug home on a steep hill, drinks and tapas at local bars, being close enough to hop to other countries whenever the mood takes them, which is something we definitely lack here in Australia. However there are several incidences with Wayne that cause Susan some pause before the tragic event happens. After that, Susan is confronted with information about him that makes her wonder if she ever really knew him at all. And so she undertakes a journey that is both a quest for the truth and a way to lay everything to rest. I found myself admiring Susan and her quiet determination quite a lot at several points during this story. She faces a lot of disappointments from her biological parents but she keeps persevering, even though she’s never going to be satisfied with the outcome. She’s obviously kept putting herself out there for relationships too and it seems to pay off when she finds Wayne and the two of them seem to be very likeminded souls. He’s happy to accompany her on trips to gather information about her birth parents, even if I don’t think he really understand the need she has for this. They seem to enjoy similar things, want the same lifestyle as they move through their 50s. Travel is obviously a high priority for them and they immerse themselves in Spanish culture, learning the language and trying to understand the people. Even when Susan is grieving, she shows a lot of strength. What happens to her is quite devastating and where it happens just makes everything so much more difficult. And then a cousin of Wayne’s makes some cryptic comments that lead her to discover something about him that she never knew, something that is incredibly shocking. It doesn’t gel with the man she knew and so she is determined to find out the truth, by which she has to undertake a journey travelling to a country where she has to hire private security. I think that she was so desperate for the answers that would shape how she felt about Wayne that she would’ve been willing to do anything in order to get them. I really enjoyed this – I thought it was well told and that the author gave a very good picture of her life, the ups and the downs. I loved the portrayal of her friendship with the girls she’d gone to school with and how that had changed when one of them passed away as well as her relationship with her ill adoptive mother and also her brother. It wasn’t just about Wayne and the lives together, it was about her life as a whole and everything that had shaped it. ***A copy of this book was provided by the publisher for the purpose of an honest review***

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ike Levick

    Book 38 The love that remains After hearing Susan speak at Anna’s at the weekend, I had to buy the book. She is a smart, retired school teacher who has always felt a little lost as she was adopted at only a few days or weeks old (no one is exactly sure of the details). Her memoir has pace, is easy to read and interesting. It’s nostalgic but purposeful, heartbreaking but hopeful. It is about unconditional, true love. I really enjoyed it, especially as I heard Susan talking about it first. I loved Book 38 The love that remains After hearing Susan speak at Anna’s at the weekend, I had to buy the book. She is a smart, retired school teacher who has always felt a little lost as she was adopted at only a few days or weeks old (no one is exactly sure of the details). Her memoir has pace, is easy to read and interesting. It’s nostalgic but purposeful, heartbreaking but hopeful. It is about unconditional, true love. I really enjoyed it, especially as I heard Susan talking about it first. I loved that the title was inspired by a singular Portuguese word which couldn’t actually be translated into an equivalent singular word in English. I can’t remember the Portuguese word, but hearing about it sounded just perfect for this book – something along the lines of belonging together, soulmates, loving someone forever… 8/10 #memoir #australianauthor #lovestory #debutnovel #bookreview

  21. 4 out of 5

    R.W.R. Mcdonald

    Finished reading this beautiful memoir, Susan Francis writing is so brave - revealing a depth of feeling that was honest, unvarnished and compelling. THE LOVE THAT REMAINS explores the complexities of love - the truth of who it is we really fall in love with and ourselves in that process - and the constant discovery of who we are, who our partners are and how the two are intertwined. Plus she has all the perfect attributes for a detective! A great read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Elaine Burrows

    Enjoyed reading this book a true story. Many of the places mentioned I have either lived myself or visited ie Dubbo Orange Newcastle even a couple of the places in Spain and Portugal. A great recommendation by Lee Salter.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    I didn’t realise until the end if this book that it was a true story. You have had to face many challenges in your life Susan that I can’t even begin to imagine. Good on you for searching the truth, I think I would have done the same and hopefully you have found peace from doing so x

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lyn

    This was an interesting memoir about finding your own identity, as well as confronting your demons.Susan's story is amazing because of her own back story and Wayne's was similarly incredible,stretching all the way to Papua New Guinea and a murder charge. This was an interesting memoir about finding your own identity, as well as confronting your demons.Susan's story is amazing because of her own back story and Wayne's was similarly incredible,stretching all the way to Papua New Guinea and a murder charge.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    This is the kind of book that hooks you in and makes you want to uncover the mysteries that plague Susan - namely, the truth about her biological parents and something hidden in her husband's past that she doesn't discover until after his death. On the whole - well-crafted and a page-turner. This is the kind of book that hooks you in and makes you want to uncover the mysteries that plague Susan - namely, the truth about her biological parents and something hidden in her husband's past that she doesn't discover until after his death. On the whole - well-crafted and a page-turner.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Wow....an amazing memoir of a unique life. This is well written and kept me wanting more. I had to keep turning the page to find out what happened next. Thank you Susan for sharing your astonishing life.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    Susan struggles to let go of the past. But new love, Wayne, helps her move on and they move to Spain. When her world crashes down, her family and friends are a strong support network, but she doesn't realise that til it's almost too late. Finally, in PNG, she finds some peace. A well told memoir. Susan struggles to let go of the past. But new love, Wayne, helps her move on and they move to Spain. When her world crashes down, her family and friends are a strong support network, but she doesn't realise that til it's almost too late. Finally, in PNG, she finds some peace. A well told memoir.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Maya Linnell

    A brave, moving and beautifully-written memoir that has stayed with me in the weeks after finishing. Sometimes the truth is much more interesting than fiction. I rarely read memoir, but this one was enthralling.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jackie Hardwick

    I couldn't put this book down, it's a real page-turner. Susan is so brave, strong and driven yet vulnerable and heartbroken. A search for truth and love. A must read. I couldn't put this book down, it's a real page-turner. Susan is so brave, strong and driven yet vulnerable and heartbroken. A search for truth and love. A must read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Christa

    I couldn’t put this book down! An “ordinary” woman’s extraordinary memoir. I highly recommend this book!

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