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Can you change your fate—and the fate of those you love—if you return to the past? Journey to 1939 Harlem in this time-travel adventure with an inspiring message about believing in yourself.   Eleven-year-old Ailey Benjamin Lane can dance—so he’s certain that he'll land the role of the Scarecrow in his school’s production of The Wiz. Unfortunately, a talented classmate and Can you change your fate—and the fate of those you love—if you return to the past? Journey to 1939 Harlem in this time-travel adventure with an inspiring message about believing in yourself.   Eleven-year-old Ailey Benjamin Lane can dance—so he’s certain that he'll land the role of the Scarecrow in his school’s production of The Wiz. Unfortunately, a talented classmate and a serious attack of nerves derail his audition: he just stands there, frozen. Deflated and defeated, Ailey confides in his Grampa that he’s ready to quit. But Grampa believes in Ailey, and, to encourage him, shares a childhood story. As a boy, Grampa dreamed of becoming a tap dancer; he was so good that the Hollywood star and unofficial Mayor of Harlem, Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, even gave him a special pair of tap shoes. Curious, Ailey tries on the shoes  . . . and instantly finds himself transported to 1930s Harlem. There he meets a young street tapper and realizes that it’s his own grandfather! Can Ailey help the 12-year-old version of Grampa face his fears? And, if Ailey changes the past, will he still be able to get home again? Featuring an all-African-American cast of characters, and infused with references to black culture and history, this work of magical realism is sure to captivate and inspire readers.    


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Can you change your fate—and the fate of those you love—if you return to the past? Journey to 1939 Harlem in this time-travel adventure with an inspiring message about believing in yourself.   Eleven-year-old Ailey Benjamin Lane can dance—so he’s certain that he'll land the role of the Scarecrow in his school’s production of The Wiz. Unfortunately, a talented classmate and Can you change your fate—and the fate of those you love—if you return to the past? Journey to 1939 Harlem in this time-travel adventure with an inspiring message about believing in yourself.   Eleven-year-old Ailey Benjamin Lane can dance—so he’s certain that he'll land the role of the Scarecrow in his school’s production of The Wiz. Unfortunately, a talented classmate and a serious attack of nerves derail his audition: he just stands there, frozen. Deflated and defeated, Ailey confides in his Grampa that he’s ready to quit. But Grampa believes in Ailey, and, to encourage him, shares a childhood story. As a boy, Grampa dreamed of becoming a tap dancer; he was so good that the Hollywood star and unofficial Mayor of Harlem, Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, even gave him a special pair of tap shoes. Curious, Ailey tries on the shoes  . . . and instantly finds himself transported to 1930s Harlem. There he meets a young street tapper and realizes that it’s his own grandfather! Can Ailey help the 12-year-old version of Grampa face his fears? And, if Ailey changes the past, will he still be able to get home again? Featuring an all-African-American cast of characters, and infused with references to black culture and history, this work of magical realism is sure to captivate and inspire readers.    

30 review for The Magic in Changing Your Stars

  1. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    "It's an awful feeling to know you didn't give the things you love a true try." p.59 "It's an awful feeling to know you didn't give the things you love a true try." p.59

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    Ailey Lane is excited to audition for his school's production of "The Wiz." He wants to play the Scarecrow. However, when he gets on-stage for his try-out, he freezes. Not one step or song lyric remains in his head. So, he goes home in humiliation. That's when his grandfather tells him a story about how he, too, had frozen when he had a chance to audition. He was given a pair of tap shoes by Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, and told to come with them at a certain time -- and he chickened out. Benjamin Ailey Lane is excited to audition for his school's production of "The Wiz." He wants to play the Scarecrow. However, when he gets on-stage for his try-out, he freezes. Not one step or song lyric remains in his head. So, he goes home in humiliation. That's when his grandfather tells him a story about how he, too, had frozen when he had a chance to audition. He was given a pair of tap shoes by Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, and told to come with them at a certain time -- and he chickened out. Benjamin tells Ailey where the shoes are hidden, and explains his shame. Well, Ailey goes and puts on the shoes -- and winds up back in 1930s Harlem, where he meets his grandfather as a young boy. This is where the history comes in, as we get a look at life for African Americans during the time period. Almost all of the characters are either named after or actually are important Black figures from the arts and sciences (there is a listing at the back of the book). We get to see them as young people, for the most part, and read about their struggles, challenges, and triumphs through Ailey's eyes. Of course, one of Ailey's greatest concerns is getting home -- so we also see what he goes through as a kid out of place and time. Time-slip historical fiction is, I think, a great way to help modern people relate to history. It puts contemporary concerns and mores in conflict with those of the past, and shows how we've grown and changed. This book adds the importance of confidence and kindness to the lessons. Highly recommended for the 12 and up set.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    a nice retelling of "Back to the Future" from a different perspective. I began to wonder about the names being used when Mahalia Jackson was the protagonist's classmate who could really sing. This was purely intentional which made the book more meaningful. a nice retelling of "Back to the Future" from a different perspective. I began to wonder about the names being used when Mahalia Jackson was the protagonist's classmate who could really sing. This was purely intentional which made the book more meaningful.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kimberley

    Back to the Future meets The Wiz!!! If you haven't seen The Wiz, stop reading my reviews!!!!! Joking, but seriously stop. Back to the Future meets The Wiz!!! If you haven't seen The Wiz, stop reading my reviews!!!!! Joking, but seriously stop.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus In 2010, Ailey decides to try out for his school's production of The Wiz, and feels that he would make a great Scarecrow. He can't necessarily sing or memorize lines, but he loves to dance, and thinks that that talent, along with his sharp dressing, will be enough. His classmate Mahalia disagrees, and states that SHE is the one who should get the part. When tryouts go badly, Ailey is devastated. His grandfather, whom he adores, counsels him a bit, and alludes to h E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus In 2010, Ailey decides to try out for his school's production of The Wiz, and feels that he would make a great Scarecrow. He can't necessarily sing or memorize lines, but he loves to dance, and thinks that that talent, along with his sharp dressing, will be enough. His classmate Mahalia disagrees, and states that SHE is the one who should get the part. When tryouts go badly, Ailey is devastated. His grandfather, whom he adores, counsels him a bit, and alludes to his own dancing, which included meeting Bill "Mr. Bojangles" Robinson in his Harlem neighborhood when he was young. There's some mystery surrounding why his grandfather doesn't dance any more and instead runs a hardware store, and when Ailey is snooping through Gramps' closet, he finds a pair of tap shows that Robinson had given to Gramps. When he puts them on, he finds himself transported to Harlem in 1939, where he immediately stands out, thanks to his pajamas and microfiber robe! He obtains new threads, and sees several boys dancing. Sure enough, one of them is Gramps, who is known as Taps. Ailey witnesses the interaction with Robinson, and knows he has been sent back in time to help his grandfather out. Taps gets the shoes from Robinson, but is supposed to meet the dancing legend at a theater to return them and audition, but he is chickening out in a way that Ailey understands. Ailey is taken in by Taps' family, but a misunderstanding threatens to derail his mission to encourage his grandfather. Will Ailey be successful in his mission? Will it make a difference in his life in 2010 if he can help someone else overcome the stage fright he feels? Strengths: Tap dancing AND time travel? Sign me up! Along with the great time travel method of Bill Robinson's tap shoes, this had a lot of great history in it, plus the very compelling mission of making the grandfather's regret go away. I loved Ailey's supportive family in his present, and he is appreciative of meeting his family in the past as well. Details about daily life in Harlem, as well as some African American entertainment history, make this a great read for those interested in books like Curtis' The Might Miss Malone or Tubbs' Selling Hope. Weaknesses: One small historical error-- it's specifically stated that this is set in 2010, which was great, because it's a necessary adjustment in order for his grandfather to be the right age in 1939. However, "Teach me how to Dougie" seems to have been released in 2011. Also, Ailey is cocky about his abilities without the talent to back this up. This is absolutely how tweens operate, but makes him a bit less likable. What I really think: Definitely purchasing, and I can see this being a big hit with the right reader.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Imagene Wonders

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Ailey really likes to tap dance, and he is really good, too! He tries out to be The Scarecrow in his school play, but he freezes, forgets his lines, forgets the dance, and one of his (kinda mean) classmates wins the part. But one day, his Grandpa gets injured when he gets dizzy and falls. He tells Ailey that up on a shelf there lies a box of regrets, and tells Ailey to look there. Ailey goes and looks there, to find a pair of tap dancing shoes. He puts them on. They are way too big. He just taps Ailey really likes to tap dance, and he is really good, too! He tries out to be The Scarecrow in his school play, but he freezes, forgets his lines, forgets the dance, and one of his (kinda mean) classmates wins the part. But one day, his Grandpa gets injured when he gets dizzy and falls. He tells Ailey that up on a shelf there lies a box of regrets, and tells Ailey to look there. Ailey goes and looks there, to find a pair of tap dancing shoes. He puts them on. They are way too big. He just taps around for a bit, when he suddenly finds himself back when his grandpa was his age. He tries to get his Grandpa onstage so that he doesn't stop tap dancing. In the end, he succeeds and his Grandpa gets to tap dance with Bill "Bojangles" Robinson himself! And both Ailey and his grandpa learn that believing in yourself is important. I think you will like this book if you like fiction with a touch of nonfiction (some of the characters are based on or named after real people) and a tiny little pinch of sci-fi (traveling back in time). I would say the age range for this book is 9 or 10+ because of some scary parts.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Maeve

    Ailey is excited when he learns his school will be putting on a production of The Wiz. He wants to be the Scarecrow, but he freezes at the auditions. But something even worse happens, his grandfather becomes seriously ill. While confiding in him about his auditions, Ailey's grandfather shares a story about his biggest regret: not taking the chance to perform in front of Mr. Bojangles Robinson. This leads Ailey on a time-traveling adventure to change his grandfather's stars. It was very cool to re Ailey is excited when he learns his school will be putting on a production of The Wiz. He wants to be the Scarecrow, but he freezes at the auditions. But something even worse happens, his grandfather becomes seriously ill. While confiding in him about his auditions, Ailey's grandfather shares a story about his biggest regret: not taking the chance to perform in front of Mr. Bojangles Robinson. This leads Ailey on a time-traveling adventure to change his grandfather's stars. It was very cool to read a story inspired by so much Black excellence (the author includes a list of the real people and places that were mentioned in the story)...but the writing style made it hard for me to stay engaged. It was a struggle to finish.

  8. 4 out of 5

    J.L. Slipak

    Can you change your fate—and the fate of those you love—if you return to the past? Journey to 1939 Harlem in this time-travel adventure with an inspiring message about believing in yourself. Eleven-year-old Ailey Benjamin Lane can dance—so he’s certain that he’ll land the role of the Scarecrow in his school’s production of The Wiz. Unfortunately, a talented classmate and a serious attack of nerves derail his audition: he just stands there, frozen. Deflated and defeated, Ailey confides in his Gra Can you change your fate—and the fate of those you love—if you return to the past? Journey to 1939 Harlem in this time-travel adventure with an inspiring message about believing in yourself. Eleven-year-old Ailey Benjamin Lane can dance—so he’s certain that he’ll land the role of the Scarecrow in his school’s production of The Wiz. Unfortunately, a talented classmate and a serious attack of nerves derail his audition: he just stands there, frozen. Deflated and defeated, Ailey confides in his Grampa that he’s ready to quit. But Grampa believes in Ailey, and, to encourage him, shares a childhood story. As a boy, Grampa dreamed of becoming a tap dancer; he was so good that the Hollywood star and unofficial Mayor of Harlem, Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, even gave him a special pair of tap shoes. Curious, Ailey tries on the shoes . . . and instantly finds himself transported to 1930s Harlem. There he meets a young street tapper and realizes that it’s his own grandfather! Can Ailey help the 12-year-old version of Grampa face his fears? And, if Ailey changes the past, will he still be able to get home again? Featuring an all-African-American cast of characters, and infused with references to black culture and history, this work of magical realism is sure to captivate and inspire readers. Out April 2020 304 Pages MY THOUGHTS: I received this book in exchange for my honest review. The 1930s were not a great time for African Americans. Because of the Great Depression, jobs were scarce for whites and almost impossible to find for African Americans. The south was worse. Most African American dancers, honed their craft on the streets, dancing for change to survive. The biggest form of dance was eccentric tap which was athletic and accompanied by contortion and rubber leg movements or other movements like high kicking. A lot of the dance involved elements of comedy too. Its origins in the USA were through the fusion of many ethnic styles that included Scottish, Irish, English, and African tribal dances. Cutting contests were common in the Five Points District in New York City. Henry Lane and Master Juba’s challenge is one of the very known firsts. As more and more mastery of techniques occurred, tap became more recognized and seen in the primary showcase of the time–minstrel shows (1850 to 1870). From that time on, more styles entered the mix, including: buck tapping, soft-shoe and buck and wing dancing. The tap as we know today didn’t come into play until the 1920s. This is when pennies, screws and taps were screwed onto the toe and heels of shoes to make better sounds. Harland Dixon and Jimmy Doyle were well-known for the buck and wing style of dancing during this time. Many other emerging dancers influenced music and dance over the next several decades. I loved how most of the characters were named after a famous and influential dancer of the 1930s and the use of time travel to educate readers about them. The further use of accurate historical facts throughout, built the story’s creditability and added to my liking of the author’s ingenuity and creativity. Very effective and affective. Put that together with a fantastic writing style and pleasant author’s voice… I was greatly entertained. I can see this book in school libraries as an educational tool.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Ailey is set on being the Scarecrow in his schools production of “The Wiz”, which is a retelling of The Wizard of Oz with African American culture. One thing that really appeals to Ailey is the dancing that goes along with Scarecrow’s part. In the real-life movie of “The Wiz”, the scarecrows part is played by Michael Jackson, who we all know is remarkably light on his feet. Unfortunately for Ailey, this part in the play comes with quite a few speaking lines. He’s got some nice moves but when it Ailey is set on being the Scarecrow in his schools production of “The Wiz”, which is a retelling of The Wizard of Oz with African American culture. One thing that really appeals to Ailey is the dancing that goes along with Scarecrow’s part. In the real-life movie of “The Wiz”, the scarecrows part is played by Michael Jackson, who we all know is remarkably light on his feet. Unfortunately for Ailey, this part in the play comes with quite a few speaking lines. He’s got some nice moves but when it comes to audition time, he goes up on stage, he gets psyched out and can’t perform anything. Not the song, not the dance and definitely not the lines. When Ailey tells his grandfather about his disastrous audition and that he’s thinking about giving up dancing for good, his grandfather confides in Ailey about a huge opportunity that he gave up because he was afraid. Ailey’s grandfather loved to tap dance, a little different from Ailey’s hip-hop routines but it’s through this secret that Grampa shares that Ailey is magically transported to Harlem in 1939. And Harlem in 1939 is filled with prominent African American figures. They’re sprinkled throughout this entire book like Madame CJ Walker, Billie Holiday, Joe Louis and Bill “Bojangles” Robinson (who danced alongside Shirley Temple) just to name a few. One thing that I really enjoyed about this book was the message. Overcoming your fear to try new things and stepping out of your comfort zone are themes in this book that we all need to hear sometimes. But the point is, you’ve got to keep going because if you don’t the fear that keeps you from doing something turns into regret. This is a fantastic book for tweens with a great message of trying your best. If you read this book and walk away without having learned something, you might have read it wrong.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Melanie Dulaney

    The basic plot of righting a mistake in the past might make it seem like Leah Henderson’s book will be redundant, a rehash of an over-used storyline, but several factors make “The Magic in Changing Your Stars” unique and well worth the read. First, icons in current and past black history are sprinkled throughout the text, sometimes the names are merely included in passing, but most have a direct connection to the historical figure or are an actual representation of the famous person. Back matter The basic plot of righting a mistake in the past might make it seem like Leah Henderson’s book will be redundant, a rehash of an over-used storyline, but several factors make “The Magic in Changing Your Stars” unique and well worth the read. First, icons in current and past black history are sprinkled throughout the text, sometimes the names are merely included in passing, but most have a direct connection to the historical figure or are an actual representation of the famous person. Back matter lists all notable POC names and briefly describes their contribution. The tightly woven storyline with its interesting characters and similar difficulties across multiple generations is a strong second reason for trying this book with students in grades 4-6. While my copy was an ARC, if the final edition uses the same font and spacing, readers will find it to be easy on the eyes. Thanks for the advance copy, Amazon Vine.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jenna Grodzicki

    When Ailey bombs his audition for his school's production of The Wiz, Grampa shares with him the story of his life's biggest regret. A pair of tap shoes with a "smidgen of magic" later, Ailey finds himself in Harlem in 1939 and in front of his then 12 year old Grampa. Ailey knows this is his chance to help Grampa forget his fears, get on that stage, and change his stars. This is a story filled with love, family, hope, tap dancing, rapping, Black Excellence, and a little bit of magic. I especiall When Ailey bombs his audition for his school's production of The Wiz, Grampa shares with him the story of his life's biggest regret. A pair of tap shoes with a "smidgen of magic" later, Ailey finds himself in Harlem in 1939 and in front of his then 12 year old Grampa. Ailey knows this is his chance to help Grampa forget his fears, get on that stage, and change his stars. This is a story filled with love, family, hope, tap dancing, rapping, Black Excellence, and a little bit of magic. I especially loved the strong bond Ailey had with Grampa and the scenes where Ailey was in the apartment in 1939 with his family (unbeknownst to them). I could feel the love coming right off the pages. This book will surely resonate with anyone who has ever let the fear of failure prevent them from following their dreams. Definitely a must read!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alex Baugh

    I've always been a fan of Leah Henderson, but this book just didn't work for me. After messing up an audition to play the Scarecrow in The Wiz, his school’s annual play, Ailey, 11, is ready to give up. His grandfather, in the hospital, tells him how he had also give up his dream and lived to regret. He gives Ailey custody of a pair of tap shoes that belonged to Bojangles Robinson, which sends him back to 1939 Harlem, where he tries to change his grandfather’s fate, but learns a lesson about not I've always been a fan of Leah Henderson, but this book just didn't work for me. After messing up an audition to play the Scarecrow in The Wiz, his school’s annual play, Ailey, 11, is ready to give up. His grandfather, in the hospital, tells him how he had also give up his dream and lived to regret. He gives Ailey custody of a pair of tap shoes that belonged to Bojangles Robinson, which sends him back to 1939 Harlem, where he tries to change his grandfather’s fate, but learns a lesson about not giving up. This felt like a dated first draft that needing some editing. Ailey’s time is 2010 and he listens to a Nano - will anyone know what those are nowadays? The story is interesting, the execution not so much. A little more editing and this would be a 4 star book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie P (Because My Mother Read)

    I received a free copy of this book from the publisher for review. This charming middle grade novel is full of heart and spirit. It follows a boy who loves to dance but freezes up when it is his chance to audition for his dream role in the school musical. After some encouraging words from his grandpa and a shared secret he suddenly finds himself thrown back in time to 1939 Harlem where he has to encourage his grandpa to overcome his fears and prevent a life long regret. It is a beautiful story of I received a free copy of this book from the publisher for review. This charming middle grade novel is full of heart and spirit. It follows a boy who loves to dance but freezes up when it is his chance to audition for his dream role in the school musical. After some encouraging words from his grandpa and a shared secret he suddenly finds himself thrown back in time to 1939 Harlem where he has to encourage his grandpa to overcome his fears and prevent a life long regret. It is a beautiful story of family, believing in yourself, and not holding yourself back from reaching for your dreams. It is also sprinkled with actual figures in Black history with additional information shared about all of them in the back.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Terry

    There is so much to love about the story and its characters that it is hard to know where to begin. Ailey takes center stage, but he isn't the only star of the show. His relationship with his grandfather is special and their bond is palpable. Family dynamics and interactions with kids at school also come across as authentic and genuine. The time travel component of the story is integrated flawlessly. Even though you know it is historical and science fiction, it still feels real and "in the momen There is so much to love about the story and its characters that it is hard to know where to begin. Ailey takes center stage, but he isn't the only star of the show. His relationship with his grandfather is special and their bond is palpable. Family dynamics and interactions with kids at school also come across as authentic and genuine. The time travel component of the story is integrated flawlessly. Even though you know it is historical and science fiction, it still feels real and "in the moment." Highly, highly recommended for home, school, and public libraries.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Eileen Winfrey

    Ailey bombs his audition for the school play, as everyone expected he would, and learns that paralyzing stage fright also robbed his beloved Grampa of living out his dreams. Thanks to a hidden family heirloom, Ailey finds himself traveling back in time to a key moment in his grandfather’s life to try and erase what became a lifelong regret. I was surprised by the storyline and kept reading to see what would happen next. The family scenes in the past and in the future are very cozy and the settin Ailey bombs his audition for the school play, as everyone expected he would, and learns that paralyzing stage fright also robbed his beloved Grampa of living out his dreams. Thanks to a hidden family heirloom, Ailey finds himself traveling back in time to a key moment in his grandfather’s life to try and erase what became a lifelong regret. I was surprised by the storyline and kept reading to see what would happen next. The family scenes in the past and in the future are very cozy and the setting in late 1930s Harlem is romantic. A solid read for older elementary students.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    An entertaining read about Ailey who loves to dance and rap, yet freezes with stage fright. This story twists when he discovers Grampa had a dream to tap dance but fear stopped him from trying. In his Gramps' tap dancing shoes, Ailey time-travels back to Harlem in 1939 and changes his grandfather's destiny. Henderson had fun re-purposing the names of famous Blacks throughout the book, and it was fun recognizing them. An entertaining read about Ailey who loves to dance and rap, yet freezes with stage fright. This story twists when he discovers Grampa had a dream to tap dance but fear stopped him from trying. In his Gramps' tap dancing shoes, Ailey time-travels back to Harlem in 1939 and changes his grandfather's destiny. Henderson had fun re-purposing the names of famous Blacks throughout the book, and it was fun recognizing them.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    With Harlem and African American history baked into the characters’ names and the plot, Henderson’s main character, Ailey, takes an unexpected trip to 1939 Harlem to meet his grandfather and change a crucial moment in the past so they can both realize their dreams for the future. A little slow to start but fun and full of hope!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

    Fast-paced, heartwarming, filled with suspense and love and Black excellence. Ailey is a lovable character and I adored his Grampa. All the characters are named for famous Black people, not just dancers like Alvin Ailey, but inventors, historians, authors, politicians, athletes, teachers, entrepreneurs. Perfect for libraries and schools!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ellon

    This was a pretty great book about trying your best (but actually putting forth the effort). I do struggle with the time travel aspect because of the butterfly effect but I’m willing to mostly over look that. I loved that the author named the characters based off notable Black figures and explained the connections in the back matter.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Hoover Public Library Kids and Teens

    Black excellence, black fantastic, and black family combine for a transformational story of passion and persistence. (from Kirkus Reviews)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Karin

    Sweet middle-grade family story with some time travel, a bit of history (1920's Harlem), and plenty of Black excellence. Plus a beautiful cover. Sweet middle-grade family story with some time travel, a bit of history (1920's Harlem), and plenty of Black excellence. Plus a beautiful cover.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Thomas

    A fun time-travel tale that takes readers to 1930's Harlem. The everyday diversity and interweaving of the author's "Black Excellence List" into the story make this a highly recommendable book. A fun time-travel tale that takes readers to 1930's Harlem. The everyday diversity and interweaving of the author's "Black Excellence List" into the story make this a highly recommendable book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Sweet, suspenseful, and a celebration of black culture

  24. 5 out of 5

    Melinda

    A magical little book about time travel and family.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Take a trip back in time to help Ailey change his grampa’s stars.

  26. 5 out of 5

    PottWab Regional Library

    SM

  27. 5 out of 5

    The Marvelous Ms. Kaia

    Amazing! I love the characters, and the author was very clever with his names! This deserves and award , so hopefully nest year when I go to the library I see this with a Bluestem tag in it. 12+

  28. 4 out of 5

    N.

    3.5/5

  29. 4 out of 5

    Blakely Smith

    This was a cute MG read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    Top 10 SF/Fantasy & Horror for Youth 2020 (Booklist)

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