web site hit counter Your Corner Dark - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Your Corner Dark

Availability: Ready to download

American Street meets Long Way Down in this searing and gritty debut novel that takes an unflinching look at the harsh realities of gang life in Jamaica and how far a teen is willing to go for family. Things can change in a second: The second Frankie Green gets that scholarship letter, he has his ticket out of Jamaica. The second his longtime crush, Leah, asks him on a date, American Street meets Long Way Down in this searing and gritty debut novel that takes an unflinching look at the harsh realities of gang life in Jamaica and how far a teen is willing to go for family. Things can change in a second: The second Frankie Green gets that scholarship letter, he has his ticket out of Jamaica. The second his longtime crush, Leah, asks him on a date, he’s in trouble. The second his father gets shot, suddenly nothing else matters. And the second Frankie joins his uncle’s gang in exchange for paying for his father’s medical bills, there’s no going back...or is there? As Frankie does things he never thought he’d be capable of, he’s forced to confront the truth of the family and future he was born into—and the ones he wants to build for himself.


Compare

American Street meets Long Way Down in this searing and gritty debut novel that takes an unflinching look at the harsh realities of gang life in Jamaica and how far a teen is willing to go for family. Things can change in a second: The second Frankie Green gets that scholarship letter, he has his ticket out of Jamaica. The second his longtime crush, Leah, asks him on a date, American Street meets Long Way Down in this searing and gritty debut novel that takes an unflinching look at the harsh realities of gang life in Jamaica and how far a teen is willing to go for family. Things can change in a second: The second Frankie Green gets that scholarship letter, he has his ticket out of Jamaica. The second his longtime crush, Leah, asks him on a date, he’s in trouble. The second his father gets shot, suddenly nothing else matters. And the second Frankie joins his uncle’s gang in exchange for paying for his father’s medical bills, there’s no going back...or is there? As Frankie does things he never thought he’d be capable of, he’s forced to confront the truth of the family and future he was born into—and the ones he wants to build for himself.

30 review for Your Corner Dark

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    The title Your Corner Dark comes from a Jamaican saying that means "between a rock and a hard place." Frankie is a smart and talented young man who has just won a full scholarship to his dream school. Just as he is about to realize that dream his father is gunned down. He doesn't have the money to pay for his medical expenses but his Uncle Joe, the don, does. The price for his uncle's financial assistance is that Frankie join his posse. For life. No school. No leaving for America. His hopes dash The title Your Corner Dark comes from a Jamaican saying that means "between a rock and a hard place." Frankie is a smart and talented young man who has just won a full scholarship to his dream school. Just as he is about to realize that dream his father is gunned down. He doesn't have the money to pay for his medical expenses but his Uncle Joe, the don, does. The price for his uncle's financial assistance is that Frankie join his posse. For life. No school. No leaving for America. His hopes dashed. In Your Corner Dark we get to see the effects of government corruption and gang life on the "everyday man". You are genuinely scared for Frankie as he really has few options and fewer people to count on. I loved all of the turns of phrases and felt that this was a solid debut. I look forward to seeing more from Desmond Hall.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    In this YA novel we follow Frankie a teenager growing up in rural Jamaica, who has recently been accepted to University in the United States. However a gang attack results in his father being shot and hospitalized requiring expensive treatment. Frankie makes a deal with the devil (his Uncle) leader of a “posse” and we watch as his path changes drastically. This was a sad story filled with family turmoil and unconventional displays of love, as well as the portrayal of life growing up in the shadow In this YA novel we follow Frankie a teenager growing up in rural Jamaica, who has recently been accepted to University in the United States. However a gang attack results in his father being shot and hospitalized requiring expensive treatment. Frankie makes a deal with the devil (his Uncle) leader of a “posse” and we watch as his path changes drastically. This was a sad story filled with family turmoil and unconventional displays of love, as well as the portrayal of life growing up in the shadows of violence and corruption. It showed a very dark side to Jamaica, made all the more vivid because of its closeness to the true life experienced by inner city youths. I did feel at times the author took an “all or none” approach to his story telling, which did make me uneasy. The major problem I had was with the language. Although some semblance of patois was used in conversations in the book, the body of the book and inner musings of Frankie felt inauthentic with expressions which would not be used here in Jamaica. Thanks to Simon and Schuster as well as Hear Our Voices Book tours for this gifted ARC. I

  3. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    4.5 but I’m rounding up because it is such a unique YA book! Thank you Caitlyn Dlouhy Book for an ARC to review. This wasn’t on my radar for 2021. But it should absolutely be on yours. I knew nothing about Jamaican posses before this book - now I have a deeper understanding of Jamaica. But more than that, it looks into the question of what do you do when there are no good answers? When everything is the decision between bad or worse? Frankie is a teen who is faced with those questions. This book h 4.5 but I’m rounding up because it is such a unique YA book! Thank you Caitlyn Dlouhy Book for an ARC to review. This wasn’t on my radar for 2021. But it should absolutely be on yours. I knew nothing about Jamaican posses before this book - now I have a deeper understanding of Jamaica. But more than that, it looks into the question of what do you do when there are no good answers? When everything is the decision between bad or worse? Frankie is a teen who is faced with those questions. This book had me feeling so many emotions! The plot is fast-paced and you’ll want to stay up late reading it. But even though it’s fast-paced, it never really loses the emotional heart at the center of the story. My main issue is that Frankie’s schooling isn’t resolved as a storyline, which is a bummer because I’m rooting for Frankie and want him to make it. But otherwise, this is a book for older teens (think 11th or 12th grade) and even good for adults who like an action-packed story with deep family storylines.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Charlie

    Very interesting novel. Easy read. Keeps you going on what's next. Page turner. So, I gave it a 5. That's about how this book reads. You keep thinking about how this is going to end. Does it really end? Perhaps a sequel is in the making. Well, my sentences are short and easy to read. That is how this interesting story goes. This book should do well in the sales market. Good luck, Desmond Hall. Very interesting novel. Easy read. Keeps you going on what's next. Page turner. So, I gave it a 5. That's about how this book reads. You keep thinking about how this is going to end. Does it really end? Perhaps a sequel is in the making. Well, my sentences are short and easy to read. That is how this interesting story goes. This book should do well in the sales market. Good luck, Desmond Hall.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Glenda Nelms

    “This is as dark as I get, and as light as I get.” “Out of many, one people.” "The job is forever, Frankie. People don't leave my posse, not alive." "His father imagination was his gift, and Frankie's curse." "Owning money to that man is like owning the devil himself" Gritty, emotional and action-packed #Ownvoices Caribbean novel. This book is a definite page turner. High school Senior Frankie is about to leave his home to attend college in the United States to become an engineer. I had the feels fo “This is as dark as I get, and as light as I get.” “Out of many, one people.” "The job is forever, Frankie. People don't leave my posse, not alive." "His father imagination was his gift, and Frankie's curse." "Owning money to that man is like owning the devil himself" Gritty, emotional and action-packed #Ownvoices Caribbean novel. This book is a definite page turner. High school Senior Frankie is about to leave his home to attend college in the United States to become an engineer. I had the feels for Frankie, he really wanted to get that engineering scholarship to make his father proud and create a better life for himself. His life takes a turn for the worse when he joins his uncle's gang. By joining the posse, Frankie made a huge sacrifice to give up his scholarship and trying to save his father's life. Most of the adults in this book choose being selfish over deciding on what's best for Frankie. Aunt Jenny was the only adult who is smart and not a fool. Frankie has a girlfriend named Leah, she's trying to get Frankie out of the posse. Your Corner Dark gives readers a different side of Jamaica that people don’t see often. The beauty and richness in lieu of the day to day struggles by citizens.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    Your Corner Dark is a debut, Own Voices novel that illustrates the harsh social, political, and economic realities of many Jamaicans. We meet Frankie Green, a top student who receives a scholarship letter to university in the US, and is close to fulfilling his departed mother's dream for her son to live a better life. But after his father is shot, Frankie is forced to join his uncle's gang to pay for his dad's medical bills. Your Corner Dark tells a dark story of loss, hope, love, and sacrifice. A Your Corner Dark is a debut, Own Voices novel that illustrates the harsh social, political, and economic realities of many Jamaicans. We meet Frankie Green, a top student who receives a scholarship letter to university in the US, and is close to fulfilling his departed mother's dream for her son to live a better life. But after his father is shot, Frankie is forced to join his uncle's gang to pay for his dad's medical bills. Your Corner Dark tells a dark story of loss, hope, love, and sacrifice. As a Jamaican who studied in the US on a scholarship, it made me reflect on the privileges that I've had. And a lot of that comes down to being raised in a supportive family. Frankie is surrounded by adults who see his potential as a tool for their own success. It was disheartening, but also entirely realistic. I had some issues with the language and references, but overall, I look forward to reading more of Desmond's work! -- Thanks again to Hear Our Voices Tours and Simon and Schuster for sending me a free copy of the ARC for YOUR CORNER DARK by Desmond Hall!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tianna || One Page at a Time

    Thank you to Hear Our Voices and the publisher for the chance to read this book in exchange for my honest opinions. Three stars is being nice. The story was very hard to get into as the beginning of the story tended to drag and didn’t seem very cohesive. I think the plot or at least the idea of the plot was very interesting and is what made me want to read the story but I don’t feel as if the story was properly executed.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Vivid and brilliant, Desmond Hall transports his reader to the parts of Jamaica no tourist ever sees.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dahlia

    One of those books that slowly settles onto your chest until you can't breathe. (In a good way, of course.) Also, I'm pretty sure the first YA I've read entirely set in Jamaica. It was definitely enlightening and interesting, but my favorite aspect is the way it plays with different relationships and how they have their beautiful and ugly sides, both of which can sneak up on you when you least expect it. One of those books that slowly settles onto your chest until you can't breathe. (In a good way, of course.) Also, I'm pretty sure the first YA I've read entirely set in Jamaica. It was definitely enlightening and interesting, but my favorite aspect is the way it plays with different relationships and how they have their beautiful and ugly sides, both of which can sneak up on you when you least expect it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    mia :)

    *I received an arc in exchange for an honest review* I really liked this! I don't think I've really ever read a book set in Jamaica before, and I learned a lot about some of the social issues there. Frankie was a wonderful character and it was so nerve-wracking to read about his journey. *I received an arc in exchange for an honest review* I really liked this! I don't think I've really ever read a book set in Jamaica before, and I learned a lot about some of the social issues there. Frankie was a wonderful character and it was so nerve-wracking to read about his journey.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Peta

    When an adult reads a YA and had too many questions at the end...well review here -> https://youtu.be/2k7XIHQsSK8 When an adult reads a YA and had too many questions at the end...well review here -> https://youtu.be/2k7XIHQsSK8

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Thank you SimonTeen and Hear Our Voices Book Tours for sending me an advance readers copy of Your Corner Dark by Desmond Hall in exchange for a honest review. This book truly gutted my heart and soul. It had me shook by how much I was able to relate to the main character, Frankie. The little side remarks, the arguments used and portrayed throughout the book were all to familiar to me. The scene between Frankie and his father at the beginning of the book reminded me so much of my relationship with Thank you SimonTeen and Hear Our Voices Book Tours for sending me an advance readers copy of Your Corner Dark by Desmond Hall in exchange for a honest review. This book truly gutted my heart and soul. It had me shook by how much I was able to relate to the main character, Frankie. The little side remarks, the arguments used and portrayed throughout the book were all to familiar to me. The scene between Frankie and his father at the beginning of the book reminded me so much of my relationship with my mother . Then when Frankie mentions that when his father offered to shave his head was his father's way of apologizing, I was just like "Bruh! This is the same thing my mother does”. I loved this story because it was able to depict the struggle of being a teen in Jamaica. I felt myself cheering Frankie on for every win he had throughout this read, hoping that he can figure out a way out of each situation he found himself in. He was just a teen with a lack of options and was trying to find the best way to survive. I respect that about Frankie as a main character and his character development was not alway a straight line going upwards towards success. I appreciate the fact that Frankie had moments where he stumbled because life is just not easy, especially in Jamaica. I did enjoy how politics played a part in this book but I did feel that some of the views were outdated in a way. I enjoyed the ending of the book as well because I found it to be bittersweet. Totally recommend for everyone to pick up and read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gabbie

    Your Corner Dark was an engrossing story of a Jamaican youth facing limited options and endless challenges as he seeks to overcome the circumstances of his birth. In Jamaica, you often get told that education is your way out. A way out of poverty and into middle class life, a way out of middle class life and into the uptown, or even a way out of Jamaica. Frankie has worked hard to make his way out of his rural neighbourhood, pushing himself as his mother pushed and encouraged him. Now, he's final Your Corner Dark was an engrossing story of a Jamaican youth facing limited options and endless challenges as he seeks to overcome the circumstances of his birth. In Jamaica, you often get told that education is your way out. A way out of poverty and into middle class life, a way out of middle class life and into the uptown, or even a way out of Jamaica. Frankie has worked hard to make his way out of his rural neighbourhood, pushing himself as his mother pushed and encouraged him. Now, he's finally making his way out and has got a scholarship to go to his dream university, and then in a second everything changes when his father gets shot. Now Frankie is on his own and has to make decisions no child should ever be faced with. I was completely taken up with the story, however as a Jamaican there were things that were distinctly not Jamaican referenced in the ARC. For non-Jamaican readers it's not anything they'd likely notice. Full review & Author Interview: https://gabsi77.wordpress.com/2021/01...

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    This is a book on a topic I knew next to nothing about. While I was definitely into Frankie’s story of joining a posse or gang in Jamaica as a way to save his father, giving up a full scholarship to the US, I wasn’t a huge fan of the writing style. It felt a little jumpy in places as far as plot and a bit of excessive detailing. But the base of the book and it’s main character stand out. This is a book that delves into the Jamaican posse culture and highlights it not just as a means of survival This is a book on a topic I knew next to nothing about. While I was definitely into Frankie’s story of joining a posse or gang in Jamaica as a way to save his father, giving up a full scholarship to the US, I wasn’t a huge fan of the writing style. It felt a little jumpy in places as far as plot and a bit of excessive detailing. But the base of the book and it’s main character stand out. This is a book that delves into the Jamaican posse culture and highlights it not just as a means of survival for many boys, but as a place to belong; a family not tied by blood. But that life can often be short and extremely dangerous, especially when politics and posse rivalries get involved.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gina Malanga

    Franklyn is about to do something no one he knows has ever done, get out of Jamaica, go to university in American and make his dreams come true. Frank un wants to come back and help Jamaica be better because he loves his island but he knows staying there will mean an early grave. With his full ride scholarship his dreams are within reach until his whole world turns upset down. He has to learn to make difficult decisions to save yourself and the ones you love. A love letter to the island he wants Franklyn is about to do something no one he knows has ever done, get out of Jamaica, go to university in American and make his dreams come true. Frank un wants to come back and help Jamaica be better because he loves his island but he knows staying there will mean an early grave. With his full ride scholarship his dreams are within reach until his whole world turns upset down. He has to learn to make difficult decisions to save yourself and the ones you love. A love letter to the island he wants Jamaica to be and a tale of sadness for what Jamaica is makes this book heart wrenchingly beautiful.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    In this gut punch of a book, Desmond Hall gives us a window into a Jamaica that’s very different from the swaying palm trees and sparkling blue surf we see in ads for resorts and cruises. The natural beauty of the beloved island is there (along with the dreadlocks, reggae and ganja), but we also peek behind the façade, where locals have to cart a bucket of water two miles a day so they can cook and use the toilet. For many young people the only way to pay the rent is to join a gang, or posse, a In this gut punch of a book, Desmond Hall gives us a window into a Jamaica that’s very different from the swaying palm trees and sparkling blue surf we see in ads for resorts and cruises. The natural beauty of the beloved island is there (along with the dreadlocks, reggae and ganja), but we also peek behind the façade, where locals have to cart a bucket of water two miles a day so they can cook and use the toilet. For many young people the only way to pay the rent is to join a gang, or posse, a dangerous proposition they embrace as the surest means to make money. But posses offer a lot more than a paycheck. They become a surrogate family, providing companionship, shelter, and a gun, which becomes their best friend and protector. People join because there’s no other option and stay for the lifestyle: violent and dangerous, but also thrilling. Poor people with few choices are handed a gun and suddenly they are powerful and excited to be part of a community that accepts them, hands them responsibility, loves them, even. When we meet high school student Frankie, he’s waiting to find out if he’s won a scholarship to study engineering in the U.S.—his ticket out. He dreams of earning his degree and coming back to improve the infrastructure of the island he loves, despite its shortcomings. But when his father gets shot, Frankie is forced to choose between the fantasy that’s finally within reach and a darker fate that starts to feel like destiny. Hall doesn’t pull punches. This is brutal stuff. Once the story gets going, Frankie is forced to make one crappy, rock and a hard place decision after another. As a reader, your heart doesn’t stop pumping. Even as Frankie gets sucked into one situation after another that offers no good options, he remains focused on the prize and determined to do what’s best. He’s the kind of scrappy, smart protagonist we can’t help but root for. He’s a good kid who’s ready to do what it takes to get by in this world—even if he worries his soul might be crushed. Reading Frankie’s story, I was agonized and elated, charged up by this racing tale and dismayed by the state of Jamaica, at once so beautiful and desperate. Desmond Hall knows how to spin a yarn and he knows how to ratchet up tension till you think it might pop. Take a deep breath and dive into this harrowing debut from a writer we’ll be hearing a lot more from in the future.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Latoya Jamaicangirlreads

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Frankie, Frankie, Frankie. As I turned the pages of this book, I kept wondering, when will Frankie catch a break? Here's an ambitious high school senior being raised by a poor single father and has high hopes of escaping the Jamaica you do not see on tourist pamphlets; the Jamaica riddened with poverty, corruption and gang violence. Frankie is smart, he exels academically and earns himself a prestigious scholarship in the U.S. but an ill fated tragedy puts his plans on hold. We find the true tes Frankie, Frankie, Frankie. As I turned the pages of this book, I kept wondering, when will Frankie catch a break? Here's an ambitious high school senior being raised by a poor single father and has high hopes of escaping the Jamaica you do not see on tourist pamphlets; the Jamaica riddened with poverty, corruption and gang violence. Frankie is smart, he exels academically and earns himself a prestigious scholarship in the U.S. but an ill fated tragedy puts his plans on hold. We find the true test of family loyalty, sacrifice and even some deception coming into play as Frankie is forced to make some unimaginable decisions. The life he's running from is the life he's forced into by the people who should be helping him to have a better future. This made me reflect on the reality that being family or close friends is never a promise of good intentions. I cursed Uncle Joe and Bradford so many times throughout this book, I had to remind myself they were fictional characters. What's remarkable about these characters though, is the stark similarity to much of life as we know it. Unfortunately, politics breeds violence and corruption and innocent voters are still caught in the midst of this. The criminal justice system is corrupt and children continue to slip through the cracks of the education system daily. As an immigrant and a school social worker, I see the injustice. I enjoyed the cultural aspects introduced in the scenes; playing dominoes, eating bully beef sandwich under a tree, carrying water in a bucket, an adult who is always trying to give you cerasee tea, going to Hellshire Beach are all things that are embedded in Jamaican childhood experiences. I loved that Frankie embraced these as a part of who he is even while striving for better. Frankie is a fighter. Well, he's more than a fighter but I won't give too many spoilers. He's an inherently good young man who is punished for putting the needs of others before himself. For me, the pacing was a bit slow and I would've liked more of my raw, uninhibited patois but overall strong character development and there were some surprising twists that I didn't see coming. I'd be excited to have more of Leah and Frankie in the future.

  18. 5 out of 5

    D. Evans

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Frankie Green is a senior in high school living with his father in the small town of Troy, Jamaica. Since losing his mother to cancer he’s had his heart set on receiving an engineering scholarship to study at the University of Arizona. Surrounded by gang violence, poverty, and political corruption, Frankie knows his only way of escape to a better life and future is in America. But when his father ends up in the hospital in need of costly antibiotics he knows they can’t afford, Frankie must make Frankie Green is a senior in high school living with his father in the small town of Troy, Jamaica. Since losing his mother to cancer he’s had his heart set on receiving an engineering scholarship to study at the University of Arizona. Surrounded by gang violence, poverty, and political corruption, Frankie knows his only way of escape to a better life and future is in America. But when his father ends up in the hospital in need of costly antibiotics he knows they can’t afford, Frankie must make a choice. Accept the scholarship or join his uncle’s gang in exchange for payment of the treatment. It broke my heart and downright pissed me off when Joe gave Frankie such an unfair ultimatum. But I think he could sense the street smarts and loyalty his nephew possessed and he really wanted someone like that on his team. He’d been trying to recruit Frankie for years but Frankie always brushed him off to stay focused on his goals. Now that an opportunity has presented itself and he realizes that Franklyn has no one else to turn to, he wastes no time taking advantage. I really admired Frankie’s dedication to his father in making his decision. Their relationship had become rocky after his mother’s passing but he still respects the man who raised him and he’s willing to do whatever it takes to save his life. Even if that means giving up his dream and getting caught up in a lifestyle he absolutely hates. This book gives us a glimpse into the nitty gritty side of Jamaica. The description of the mountainside having no electricity, the size and the colors of the houses in Troy, the patois, the food, the Rasta lifestyle, and the music references painted such a vivid picture of the reality of life outside the tourist parts of the island. Truly eye opening to the social and political issues that aren’t discussed in mainstream media. An easy read that will have your heart doing all kinds of palpitations.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chris Johnson

    SO DAMN GOOD! Absolutely adored this book. Your Corner Dark is such a compelling, contemplative and dramatic novel. Yet another book I would LOVE to see as a movie! Premise: College bound high school senior Franklyn Green's dream of going to university in America is upended when tragedy strikes and gut-wrenching choices must be made. In an instant Frank goes from top student to gun toting posse member. Your Corner Dark transported me to Jamaica and immersed me in a world where political machinat SO DAMN GOOD! Absolutely adored this book. Your Corner Dark is such a compelling, contemplative and dramatic novel. Yet another book I would LOVE to see as a movie! Premise: College bound high school senior Franklyn Green's dream of going to university in America is upended when tragedy strikes and gut-wrenching choices must be made. In an instant Frank goes from top student to gun toting posse member. Your Corner Dark transported me to Jamaica and immersed me in a world where political machinations and corruption bred and fed posse crime and violence, and the sense of despair was just as thick as the humidity in the mountain air. Where just like the close knit communities in the country side, the posse became your family, your support, your pride. Climbing out of poverty and legitimately making a better life felt like an impossibility. Every choice you made bore a cost. The undeniable beauty and richness of the land and culture marred and blurred in the background in lieu of the heavy day to day struggles that burdened the majority of citizens. Desmond Hall excellently built a rich, colorful world and birthed a complicated and nuanced cast of characters. I was excitedly entangled and entrenched in the drama of it all. Most of all I developed such a soft spot for main character Frank and his plight. It made me think what sacrifices would I be willing to make for my parents our beloveds. What could I give of myself to make someone's life better? Frank was such a compassionate and altruistic soul and I truly admired him for it. I was rooting for him from the beginning and still haven't stopped. Characters like Frank and bad ass Aunt Jenny feel so real and stay with me even after the story has ended. Your Corner Dark was a fantastic read and I would highly recommend it. A dope read to start off my 2021 Reading Challenge:) **Please note I won a paperback ARC in a Goodreads Giveaway. (Thank you!) This review is my own honest opinion.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Melancholic Blithe ⚡

    I am at a loss of words to describe this book. When I read the blurb, I wasn’t expecting anything, I was totally blank as to which direction the book was going to take, but when I started reading the book, I was hooked from the page one. I wanted to stop reading, think and analyze whatever was going on but at the same time I couldn’t actually make myself do that. The story starts with Frankie waiting for his scholarship letter and everything feels bright and good. There’s hope given to the reader I am at a loss of words to describe this book. When I read the blurb, I wasn’t expecting anything, I was totally blank as to which direction the book was going to take, but when I started reading the book, I was hooked from the page one. I wanted to stop reading, think and analyze whatever was going on but at the same time I couldn’t actually make myself do that. The story starts with Frankie waiting for his scholarship letter and everything feels bright and good. There’s hope given to the readers that things will turn out well for him but slowly and gradually we see the realities of a third world countries being introduced to us. There were instances of street fights, gang wars, random shooting, domestic physical beatings, colorism, class divide and so much more. I didn’t know much about the posse system in Jamaica but the story described it in such a way that it seemed as if I already knew all the customs and everything. Every new mission or chapter made me think and anticipate what would happen next. The best thing about this book was the character development. One could clearly see Frankie’s struggles and the way he dealt with them was no joke. No child deserves to make such rash, no choice decisions that he had to make on a whim. He sacrificed a lot. Through all of this I really liked how he came with terms to him understanding himself and his decisions much more wisely. Somehow there was no way I was able to sympathize with his uncle. Like seriously why in the world would he make his nephew give up full scholarship to join in posse where his life was almost always at stake? All in all, I totally loved the book and would honestly highly recommend it! ** Trigger Warnings: Death of a loved one, Colorism, Fights and violence, Gun firing, Domestic physical abuse (beatings with belt) ** I was provided with an advance review copy via netgalley for this tour in exchange for an honest review!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Linda Cutting

    It’s not often you read a novel this gritty, action-packed, and heart-wrenching, but Desmond Hall’s YOUR CORNER DARK is all of these. Add in Jamaican flora, fauna, food, and patois and it’s a novel that takes you right there, up close and personal. Hall’s edgy prose makes you feel as if you’re seeing, smelling, and tasting the life on this Caribbean island, with a local access never granted a tourist. Frankie Green, who learns early on that he’s earned a full scholarship that will take him from It’s not often you read a novel this gritty, action-packed, and heart-wrenching, but Desmond Hall’s YOUR CORNER DARK is all of these. Add in Jamaican flora, fauna, food, and patois and it’s a novel that takes you right there, up close and personal. Hall’s edgy prose makes you feel as if you’re seeing, smelling, and tasting the life on this Caribbean island, with a local access never granted a tourist. Frankie Green, who learns early on that he’s earned a full scholarship that will take him from a life of poverty in Jamaica to the University of Arizona, gets his good news sidelined by a stray bullet to his father’s chest. In the hospital on the edge of death, with a dire diagnosis, and no means to pay for the expensive treatment that could save his life, Frankie’s father turns down a loan from his brother, calling it “dirty money.” Frankie goes around his father, and secretly asks this same Rastafarian uncle who runs a posse to lend him the money. Uncle Joe agrees to give it to Frankie on one condition: to repay him, his nephew must join the posse, for life. Frankie has to balance his future against his father’s chance to live, and his decision about whether to give up the scholarship and join the posse forms the dark corner of the book’s title. Add in Frankie’s talented artist girlfriend whose father is a cop tied to posse business, and Frankie’s bad-ass “hips forward” Aunt Jenny, who proves stronger than either of her brothers and really runs the family, and the novel has dimensions which move it well beyond the scope of young adult fiction. YOUR CORNER DARK is a layered, multi-dimensional, raucous read for any age. I could not put this book down, nor could I more strongly recommend it. Read it and weep, while laughing, cheering, and sitting on the edge of your seat with your stomach in perpetual knots to the very last page. When you finish, don't despair, as there's another novel set in Jamaica by the same author coming soon!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sasha (bahareads)

    4.5 stars "'Yes, yu' corner dark,' she said" Your Corner Dark is a book I could not put down. From the first few pages I was hooked!! It legitimately made me start tearing up within the first ten pages. Desmond Hall writes a book with characters you are invested in. They are complex and contradictory- human in every way. Frankie is my heart; I was cheering for him throughout the whole book. I laughed for him and I cried for him. AUNT JENNY IS MY GIRL; I WON'T HEAR ANY SLANDER PERIOD. Samson an 4.5 stars "'Yes, yu' corner dark,' she said" Your Corner Dark is a book I could not put down. From the first few pages I was hooked!! It legitimately made me start tearing up within the first ten pages. Desmond Hall writes a book with characters you are invested in. They are complex and contradictory- human in every way. Frankie is my heart; I was cheering for him throughout the whole book. I laughed for him and I cried for him. AUNT JENNY IS MY GIRL; I WON'T HEAR ANY SLANDER PERIOD. Samson and Uncle Joe both cared for Frankie in their own way and it was interesting to see how the choices they pushed Frankie to do played out. Your Corner Dark showed how politics and gang life in Jamaica are interconnected. "It wasn't about who had the better plan or better idea; it was all about connections. He had guessed at this before but now it was bone-chillingly clear." Frankie as a dark-skinned young man does face some discrimination from some of the other characters in the story. He is "black boy" and sneered at. Your Corner Dark shows the struggle for international students when it comes to going off to college. There are some dark scenes in this book that are very vivid and tense. It shows the dark side of inner-city life to the full extent. quotes I liked from the book "Jamaica was like a messed-up parent: You loved it, but at the same time you wanted to leave it. You said bad things about it, but you'd get mad if anyone else said anything bad about it." "Exhaling, he was oddly proud of Aunt Jenny, the way he had been of his mother. They were Jamaican women, hips forward." "...The sweet mountain breeze caressed his face. He could smell the positivity. All Jamaicans breathed it. Out of many, one people." Thanks to Hear Our Voices Book tour and Atheneum for the ARC. *Quotes taken are from an ARC; may not match with final copy.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chris G.

    Though she has been dead for three years, Frankie is just about to make his mom’s dreams come true. He is nearly done with the exclusive high school that’s a long daily bike ride from his mountain home. With a scholarship to the University of Arizona, Frankie has a way out of the poverty and gang warfare that make up his life in Jamaica. Frankie has kept his head down and has gotten his work done, and he’d like to celebrate the arrival of his scholarship letter beyond the sullen and taciturn resp Though she has been dead for three years, Frankie is just about to make his mom’s dreams come true. He is nearly done with the exclusive high school that’s a long daily bike ride from his mountain home. With a scholarship to the University of Arizona, Frankie has a way out of the poverty and gang warfare that make up his life in Jamaica. Frankie has kept his head down and has gotten his work done, and he’d like to celebrate the arrival of his scholarship letter beyond the sullen and taciturn response from his dad, so he accepts an invitation to a party thrown by Rasta Uncle Joe and Aunt Jenny, leaders of the local gang. Dad is furious at Frankie’s choice and he shows up at the party, presumably to drag Frankie home, but there’s an attack from a rival gang that leaves his dad seriously injured. Dad’s recovery is uncertain; expensive antibiotics might make all the difference. Frankie’s only choice is to ask Uncle Joe for the money. Joe comes through on the condition that Frankie give up his scholarship and join the gang. Desperate, Frankie is jumped in, but dad dies anyway. Frankie has already been doing gang business and pursuing a romance with classmate Leah, whose dad is a corrupt policeman with ties to Uncle Joe. With his dad gone and no resources, what choices can Frankie make for his future? Frankie is a strong, complicated character, well-supported by more privileged Leah, powerful Uncle Joe, and wily Aunt Jenny. The beauty and travail of life in Jamaica undergirds all the action. A well-written page turner.

  24. 4 out of 5

    AJ

    I have an advanced readers copy from Goodreads, part of my review may only apply to that. Though this is not my usual type of story to pick up, I was really excited to read this one. Our protagonist is Frankie - a Jamaican boy on the edge of becoming an adult. He’s hoping to get a scholarship to the United States to study engineering. Unfortunately life, as it does, takes a bad turn and suddenly Frankie has to join his uncle’s posse (or gang). Frankie has to make tough decision after tough decisi I have an advanced readers copy from Goodreads, part of my review may only apply to that. Though this is not my usual type of story to pick up, I was really excited to read this one. Our protagonist is Frankie - a Jamaican boy on the edge of becoming an adult. He’s hoping to get a scholarship to the United States to study engineering. Unfortunately life, as it does, takes a bad turn and suddenly Frankie has to join his uncle’s posse (or gang). Frankie has to make tough decision after tough decision, feeling like he’s losing himself all the while. I can definitely see this book becoming a required reading some day in schools. I think it would be a good read for many young adults going through hard times. I’m currently going through a rough time (though my situation is no where comparable to Frankie’s) and it was nice to read about how someone else handled their’s. Most of the adults in this book seriously fail Frankie. They often prioritize their selfishness over what would be best for Frankie. The only saving grace is Frankie’s Aunt Jenny who is an amazing character. I also liked Frankie’s girlfriend Leah. She felt like a real 17 to 18 year old girl trying to navigate a harsh world. My main critique would be to have an editor go over the novel one or two more times. I’m assuming they will before the release date. The story could have also started a few chapters sooner, but the early section established place and a few characters who play a minor role in the later story. Overall a good YA.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amy Watkins

    I just love Amanda Gorman's line, "There is light if we are brave enough to see it." As I read this amazing book, I was struck by how much more brave Frankie is than I could ever be even as his corner just kept getting darker. He constantly fought to find his light. This novel brought me to Jamaica like I'd never envisioned it. The wealth disparities, the corruption, the lack of options are all just parts of Frankie's life that he seems to handle in stride, looking for a way to get through. Hall I just love Amanda Gorman's line, "There is light if we are brave enough to see it." As I read this amazing book, I was struck by how much more brave Frankie is than I could ever be even as his corner just kept getting darker. He constantly fought to find his light. This novel brought me to Jamaica like I'd never envisioned it. The wealth disparities, the corruption, the lack of options are all just parts of Frankie's life that he seems to handle in stride, looking for a way to get through. Hall's characters ring true because their flaws are so genuinely human and there is such a richness to their personalities. I listened to the audiobook too, so I was able to appreciate the beauty of the Jamaican Patois even more. Sampson, Aunt Jenny, Joe, Winston, Ice Box, Leah, and Bradford have such unique approaches to surviving the challenges of their dark corners. Frankie's determination and dedication are an inspiration. He never gives up. So often, when our corners seem dark, our instincts are to surrender, but not Frankie. Maybe it's his engineer's brain that gives him such a practical approach and strength; maybe it's his family or his love for his island. Maybe it's all of these things and more. Move this book to the top of your TBR pile and see for yourself. The generosity of the author in sharing his story and his books is truly appreciated, and I can't wait to offer this in book clubs in my classes.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ahtiya (BookinItWithAhtiya)

    YOUR CORNER DARK is a touching and poignant story about a young Jamaican man who simply wants to make something of his life so that he can help the country he loves so much. Trying to fulfill the wishes of his late mother and live up to the expectations of his demanding father, Frankie has been fastidiously dedicating himself to school and applying for an engineering scholarship in America. Frankie’s entire world is flipped on its axis one day after Frankie attends a party hosted by his uncle Jo YOUR CORNER DARK is a touching and poignant story about a young Jamaican man who simply wants to make something of his life so that he can help the country he loves so much. Trying to fulfill the wishes of his late mother and live up to the expectations of his demanding father, Frankie has been fastidiously dedicating himself to school and applying for an engineering scholarship in America. Frankie’s entire world is flipped on its axis one day after Frankie attends a party hosted by his uncle Joe.. Joe is the leader of a powerful and expanding posse, his entire intent on helping his people in ways that the local politicians don’t. Being in a posse is no joke: once you’re in, you’re never allowed back out. Author Desmond Hall does an excellent job portraying the difficulties Frankie has dealt with and continues to deal with. It is clear from the beginning that Frankie feels some anger about the death of his mother, as well as some regret and guilt. This is a common theme throughout the book as Frankie movies through grieving people, memories, and hopes and dreams. We see Frankie, who is a determined character from the beginning of the book, cope with the reality of having to reimagine what he wants for himself. This is not an easy journey for Frankie; he’s broken apart several times throughout the novel and must put himself back together. What Frankie realizes quite quickly is that when you’re forced to piece yourself back together, you look a tad bit different than when you first started your journey. And Frankie learns to love and embrace every reconstructed version of himself and his reality.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kendall |ashandtheink

    Thank you to Hear Our Voices Tours and Simon & Schuster for giving me an ARC in exchange for an honest review. Frankie Green is awarded a full-ride scholarship to the university of his dreams in America. But when his father is suddenly hospitalized, Frankie must stay in Jamaica and pay for his father's medical treatment the only way he knows how-- by joining his uncle's gang. I appreciated that the author offered an alternative to the stereotypes we are often fed about gangs. Multiple characters Thank you to Hear Our Voices Tours and Simon & Schuster for giving me an ARC in exchange for an honest review. Frankie Green is awarded a full-ride scholarship to the university of his dreams in America. But when his father is suddenly hospitalized, Frankie must stay in Jamaica and pay for his father's medical treatment the only way he knows how-- by joining his uncle's gang. I appreciated that the author offered an alternative to the stereotypes we are often fed about gangs. Multiple characters pushed back (as much as they could) against committing acts of violence within their community, and it's clear that their affiliation offers them a sense of safety and protection. It's also been nice to hear from Jamaican reviewers who enjoyed this book a great deal. However, I just don't think this book worked for me. I was excited to read the book because of it's unique setting, but I found the writing style hard to get into and caught myself skimming large portions of the text. I was rooting for Frankie, but I felt little to no empathy for him the entire book. He's a child with a deceased mother, a dying father, and an uncle forcing him toward a life he's fought hard to avoid for so long...and still! I felt nothing for him. I do hope that this book finds its audience though. It's certainly an important story that deserves to be told.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Maggie Mattmiller

    *I received a free copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaeay. This is an honest review. I am trying to be mindful in my review that I am likely not the target audience. I don't want to give a poor review because I did not receive something well, that was really not designed for me. This book was advertised as "American Street meets Long Way Down" - (American Street is on my to read list, but I love another by the same author, and I'm also a HUGE fan of Long Way Down.) I was really hopeful. It als *I received a free copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaeay. This is an honest review. I am trying to be mindful in my review that I am likely not the target audience. I don't want to give a poor review because I did not receive something well, that was really not designed for me. This book was advertised as "American Street meets Long Way Down" - (American Street is on my to read list, but I love another by the same author, and I'm also a HUGE fan of Long Way Down.) I was really hopeful. It also advertises itself as "an unflinching look at the harsh realities of gang life in Jamaica"- something I really don't know anything about and figured it would be good for me to learn. The story itself, the plotline, I think was good. I was interested in seeing the reality for young folks in Jamaica. Where I struggled was the writing. It jumped a bit for me, felt disconnected at times, and just lost me at times. I found myself skimming because I wasn't pulled in close to the text. I really wanted to love this one, but the writing itself just didn't do it for me. I probably would lean more to two stars, but again, I want to be mindful that I'm likely not the target audience. I liked some parts more than others. Would maybe be a two and a half for me.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tania (SorryImAlwaysBooked)

    ✨Fav Quote ✨ “ Jamaica was like a messed up parent: You loved it, but at the same time you wanted to leave it. You said bad things about it, but you would get mad if anyone else said something about it” I mean how true is this quote for anything you love in life. I feel like only I can talk bad about something I love, that’s not anyone else’s place 😂 ✨Reflection✨ This Book Is Suitable For It’s YA Audience, It Showcases What Has Turned Boys Into Men Before Their Time. This Novels Follows Frankie, Wh ✨Fav Quote ✨ “ Jamaica was like a messed up parent: You loved it, but at the same time you wanted to leave it. You said bad things about it, but you would get mad if anyone else said something about it” I mean how true is this quote for anything you love in life. I feel like only I can talk bad about something I love, that’s not anyone else’s place 😂 ✨Reflection✨ This Book Is Suitable For It’s YA Audience, It Showcases What Has Turned Boys Into Men Before Their Time. This Novels Follows Frankie, Who Has Worked Hard & Earned A Scholarship To Go To The U.S For School, Things Are Looking Up For Him Until His Father Gets Shot. This Changes Everything For Him. His Father Requires Costly Medical Treatment & In Order To Help With That Makes A Deal With His Until Who Is The Leader Of A Dangerous Gang. I Think The Author Showcased What Can Happen When You Have To Make Hard Decisions To Help Someone Before You Help Yourself. Frankie Story Hurt & What Hurt Me Most Is That His Uncle Took Advantage Of Him. He Could Have Easily Supported Him & Let Him Follow His Dreams Of Becoming A Engineer. My Only Gripe With This Book Is The Patios. I Feel Like The Author Turned It Down, This Could’ve Been Because It Was For Young Adults But They Should Still Be Granted The Right To See How The Language Is Truly Used.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Esta Montano

    Your Corner Dark is a thought provoking novel that takes place in Jamaica. The main character, Frankie, is about to leave his village home for the first time in his life, until his entire existence tumbles out of control, and he finds himself obliged to make decisions that derail him. The story follows Franky as he negotiates his new life, and as he attempts to grapple with his many losses. The book is intriguing and there are many times that the reader wants to jump into the book to shake the c Your Corner Dark is a thought provoking novel that takes place in Jamaica. The main character, Frankie, is about to leave his village home for the first time in his life, until his entire existence tumbles out of control, and he finds himself obliged to make decisions that derail him. The story follows Franky as he negotiates his new life, and as he attempts to grapple with his many losses. The book is intriguing and there are many times that the reader wants to jump into the book to shake the characters in hopes of stopping them from what they are about to do. The realities of Jamaican politics are displayed in full force, as is the way that gangs, or posses as they are referred to, play a part in managing the public on behalf of the corrupt police and politicians. Franky is a fascinating character, and on a human level it is easy to identify with him in his suffering. The ending leaves the reader hopeful but wondering. While written for a YA audience, the book is easily appreciated by adults as well.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.