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The remarkable true story of a mild-mannered French husband and wife who become the world's most revered pair of Nazi hunters. For more than five decades, Serge and Beate Klarsfeld have devoted their lives to seeking justice for the victims and survivors of the evils wrought upon humanity by the Holocaust. Over the years, they have received numerous national awards for thei The remarkable true story of a mild-mannered French husband and wife who become the world's most revered pair of Nazi hunters. For more than five decades, Serge and Beate Klarsfeld have devoted their lives to seeking justice for the victims and survivors of the evils wrought upon humanity by the Holocaust. Over the years, they have received numerous national awards for their lifetime of work hunting down Nazi war criminals and forcing Europe to face the horrors of its past. For Justice: The Serge and Beate Klarsfeld Story is the tale of their relentless crusade for justice and their emergence as a voice for the voiceless. Written in partnership with Serge and Beate Klarsfeld.


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The remarkable true story of a mild-mannered French husband and wife who become the world's most revered pair of Nazi hunters. For more than five decades, Serge and Beate Klarsfeld have devoted their lives to seeking justice for the victims and survivors of the evils wrought upon humanity by the Holocaust. Over the years, they have received numerous national awards for thei The remarkable true story of a mild-mannered French husband and wife who become the world's most revered pair of Nazi hunters. For more than five decades, Serge and Beate Klarsfeld have devoted their lives to seeking justice for the victims and survivors of the evils wrought upon humanity by the Holocaust. Over the years, they have received numerous national awards for their lifetime of work hunting down Nazi war criminals and forcing Europe to face the horrors of its past. For Justice: The Serge and Beate Klarsfeld Story is the tale of their relentless crusade for justice and their emergence as a voice for the voiceless. Written in partnership with Serge and Beate Klarsfeld.

30 review for For Justice: The Serge & Beate Klarsfeld Story

  1. 5 out of 5

    Fran

    "I sought justice passionately and I hope I contributed to establishing historical truth". "Remember those who fight can lose...but those who never fight have already lost". Beate Kunkel, an au pair and Serge Klarsfeld, a political science university student have a chance encounter at a Paris Metro station in 1960. Coffee, conversation and an exchange of ideas follow. Serge, of French Jewish descent, shares his family history. His father was rounded up by the German police in Nice in 1943 while Se "I sought justice passionately and I hope I contributed to establishing historical truth". "Remember those who fight can lose...but those who never fight have already lost". Beate Kunkel, an au pair and Serge Klarsfeld, a political science university student have a chance encounter at a Paris Metro station in 1960. Coffee, conversation and an exchange of ideas follow. Serge, of French Jewish descent, shares his family history. His father was rounded up by the German police in Nice in 1943 while Serge, his sister and mother hid behind a partition in a small closet. "I was supposed to be on the same deportation. I wasn't, thanks to my father. I had the feeling of having this supplementary life. I had to use it" [Serge Klarsfeld]. Beate, a Lutheran German stated, "Where I come from, no one ever talks about what the Third Reich did, we bury our heads in the sand and pretend we've moved on" [Beate Karsfeld]. Serge and Beate team up in marriage and in a tireless attempt to "help restore the truth". Starting in the late 1960's, although WW II had ended two decades before, Serge and Beate Karsfeld embarked upon a crusade to unmask Nazi war criminals, some convicted in absentia. Many were living "cushy" lives, some in plain sight, others in foreign countries under new identities. In 1968, it started with a slap. "The slap was symbolic, Kiesinger's crimes were real". At a full session of the Bonn Parliament, Chancellor Kiesinger was speaking. Beate had "the audacity to interrupt his speech shouting, 'Kiesinger, Nazi, Resign'." "...many people consider [her] a hero with one slap...". Their lives often in danger, their finances stretched beyond belief, however, they persevered in hunting for the biggest bureaucratic criminals, those whose signatures were placed on deportation convoys. Finally, a game changer! An order signed by Klaus Barbie to transfer a convoy of 44 children and 7 teachers from a children's home in Izieu to Auschwitz. In 1993, "French Children of the Holocaust: A Memorial" was published in France. "The world knows the face of Anne Frank. Here are the faces of children,...a tiny fraction soon to be killed". "For Justice: The Serge & Berte Klarsfeld Story" by Pascal Bresson is a historical graphic novel describing the Klarsfeld's quest to bring Nazi criminals to justice and to hold the Vichy government accountable for the role it played in WW II. The artwork by Sylvain Dorange is finely detailed in muted colors, adding to the eye appeal of the novel. Author and illustrator are to be commended. Thank you Humanoids Inc, Life Drawn and Net Galley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Start off by slapping a Nazi and then chase other Nazi assholes all over Europe and South America in order to bring them to justice? Hell yeah! I was not familiar with the Klarsfelds before this book, but now I'm a big admirer. Even though this is an authorized story, it is not afraid to make them look a little off-kilter and even incompetent in their crusade to bring Nazis to trial even decades after the end of World War II. It's disheartening to see the wheels of justice turn so slowly, but ins Start off by slapping a Nazi and then chase other Nazi assholes all over Europe and South America in order to bring them to justice? Hell yeah! I was not familiar with the Klarsfelds before this book, but now I'm a big admirer. Even though this is an authorized story, it is not afraid to make them look a little off-kilter and even incompetent in their crusade to bring Nazis to trial even decades after the end of World War II. It's disheartening to see the wheels of justice turn so slowly, but inspiring to see people committed to seeing it through to the end. Superhero writer Mark Waid helped with the English translation of this French graphic novel adapted from the memoirs of Serge and Beate Klarsfeld.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Peacegal

    I loved this graphic biography. Once again, we really see what this medium can do as we follow the bold and determined career of a married couple who also happen to be experts at tracking down former Nazis who shirked courtroom trial.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Maya Norton

    Gripping, page-turner of a story that I read in one sitting. This book is non-fiction. I put no spoiler alerts in this review as these are historical facts that we should all have known before reading it and my remarks are more about history than the progression of "For Justice." The section about Papon (enclosed below) is told in the last few pages of the book and is not a central part of "For Justice," although it was to the Klarsfeld's history of Nazi hunting. This is the story of Beate and Se Gripping, page-turner of a story that I read in one sitting. This book is non-fiction. I put no spoiler alerts in this review as these are historical facts that we should all have known before reading it and my remarks are more about history than the progression of "For Justice." The section about Papon (enclosed below) is told in the last few pages of the book and is not a central part of "For Justice," although it was to the Klarsfeld's history of Nazi hunting. This is the story of Beate and Serge Klarsfeld who devoted every fiber of their being to bring Nazi's to justice from the 1960s through the late 1980s. (Beate, the woman, should have her name come first in the title as the focus of the action is her story in this retelling.) Significant research shows a worldwide dearth of education, understanding, or memory about the Holocaust (Jews use the word "Shoah"). While I was a teenager in the 1990s, living in a community with high Jewish representation in the United States and well read on the Shoah (certainly in relative terms) before reading this book, I had never heard of the French trial of Maurice Papon, which lasted from 1997-1998. I cannot understand how this could have escaped the attention of my community, at least in the sense that it was not mainstream news that people were talking about at the time. Maurice Papon - Papon, who was convicted of Crimes Against Humanity, "was Chief of Police in Paris from 1958-1967. He played a key role in the extremely violent repression of the protests against the war in Algeria on October 17, 1961 and February 8, 1962" (p. 189). He later went on to serve as the Minister of Budget from 1979-81. As with myriad others, his past as a Nazi official was well known. After decades of dedication to bring Papon to trial, led by French Jews Michel Slitinsky and Michel Berges, Papon was convicted and sentenced to 10 years in prison, of which he served four, released to his home for ill health. Chronologically, it is disturbing to think that Papon's conviction in 1998 happened four years after the Rwandan genocide in 1994. Has history no memory? No conscience? US Role in Recruiting High-Ranking Nazis as American Spies After World War II - I now newly know that the United States actively recruited Nazis - not 'Hitler's willing executioners'* - but, as this book reports, Klaus Barbie, a Nazi official of the highest rank, to serve as a CIA informant, fearing the spread of French Communism. As an American Jew, an Israeli, and a human being, I find this unforgivable. In 1987: "The United States officially apologized to France for having recruited this Nazi as an informant after the war [World War II]" (p. 186). Apologized to France. Not the Jews, but a nation-state ruled by the Vichy government who Wikipedia calls, "the collaborationalist ruling regime... in Nazi-occupied France."** Klaus Barbie, known as the "Butcher of Lyon," was sentenced to death in France "for his involvement in 4,000 murders. For sending 16,000 Jews to gas chambers in Auschwitz. For arresting and torturing 14,000 members of the Resistance, all under the collaborationist Vichy regime. Barbie was the head of the Gestapo in Lyon, France" (p. 119). On Nazi Hunting (p. 186): Quote sourced from an interview with the Klarsfelds - "From 1940-1945, the Nazis killed two-thirds of the Jews living in Europe [6 million Jews, 10 million people total], using the most horrible methods. Earth has never seen anything like it, by both its nature and its size. That governments hunted war criminals is a myth. Despite what journalists, writers, and filmmakers would have you believe, Nazis in hiding, believed impotent, were of a relatively low priority. We must face the facts. Only during the very short period of cooperation between the East and the West between 1945 and 1947 was was there a 'hunt' worth mentioning. The Cold War put an end to it. At that time, the nations-- especially America-- began pardoning and recruiting [RECRUITING] former Nazis as spies, if you can believe it." Critique: Historical Documentation - If I had a critique of this book, it would be this. The story itself is about the importance of documentation, and we see in the visuals many press clippings showing events of the day. But the source information for this story is not provided. To use this book as a historical record - is it a primary source from the Klarsfelds, for instance? One should know this without a doubt upon completing the book, but I'm not sure - the history needs to be cited meticulously. * Quoting Daniel Goldhagen who has a book by this name ** Wikipedia: "Government of Vichy France"

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shawn

    Sometimes you stumble upon a book, and after reading it, you ask yourself, "How did I not know about this?!" Not necessarily the book - but the topic. Throughout the 60's, 70's, and 80's, Serge and Beate Klarsfeld sought justice for tens of thousands of Jewish men, women, and children who suffered and/or were murdered at the hands of the Nazis. Serge had lost his father at Auschwitz. He (French) and Beate (German) married in 1963, and he helped open her eyes to the atrocities of the Holocaust. T Sometimes you stumble upon a book, and after reading it, you ask yourself, "How did I not know about this?!" Not necessarily the book - but the topic. Throughout the 60's, 70's, and 80's, Serge and Beate Klarsfeld sought justice for tens of thousands of Jewish men, women, and children who suffered and/or were murdered at the hands of the Nazis. Serge had lost his father at Auschwitz. He (French) and Beate (German) married in 1963, and he helped open her eyes to the atrocities of the Holocaust. The couple relentlessly sought out and requested extradition and/or trials for those who had gleefully signed death orders, then lived freely post-war despite some having death in absentia warrants already against them. The Klarsfeld's often risked their own lives and the lives of other family members by refusing to back down even after Beate was kidnapped, their car exploded, and they were arrested. Honestly, this reads like an action movie - only better. They did succeed in bringing several former Nazi torturers to justice, and they continue their work by honoring and bringing to light the lives and memories of individuals lost in the Holocaust. Definitely want to learn more about this daring couple and their fight for justice.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    For Justice: The Serge and Beate Klarsfeld story is a graphic novel adaptation of the memoirs of the Klarsfelds, looking at the years of work they did hunting nazis, as well as revealing personal aspects of their lives. The story of the Klarsfelds is a fascinating one and it adapts well to the comics format. I felt like I really got to be a part of the history they made and to understand their lives. The art was solid, the writing was solid, and the book told a completely engrossing story. I did For Justice: The Serge and Beate Klarsfeld story is a graphic novel adaptation of the memoirs of the Klarsfelds, looking at the years of work they did hunting nazis, as well as revealing personal aspects of their lives. The story of the Klarsfelds is a fascinating one and it adapts well to the comics format. I felt like I really got to be a part of the history they made and to understand their lives. The art was solid, the writing was solid, and the book told a completely engrossing story. I did find that it jumped around in the timeline in ways I didn't love, but truly a minor complaint in the grand scheme of things. I felt like this book (along with other books on nazis and fascism I have read recently) really helped me unpack my incorrect ideas about what happened to the nazis after WWII (they did not disappear as I've often been led to believe). It's overall a great book, and I definitely recommend it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kiri

    Thank you NetGalley for allowing me to read a digital copy of this book in exchange for a review. All opinions are my own. The remarkable, true story of Nazi hunters Serge & Beate Klarsfeld! I had never heard of them prior to reading this story. I'm very glad to have read this book, knowing now what amazing work they did in helping to bring prominent Nazis to justice. Thank you NetGalley for allowing me to read a digital copy of this book in exchange for a review. All opinions are my own. The remarkable, true story of Nazi hunters Serge & Beate Klarsfeld! I had never heard of them prior to reading this story. I'm very glad to have read this book, knowing now what amazing work they did in helping to bring prominent Nazis to justice.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Maria Rowe

    The remarkable and inspiring true story of Nazi hunters, Beate and Serge Klarsfeld. I only wish that Beate’s name had gone first in the title because the book seemed to focus much more on her.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    ***Thank you NetGalley for proving me access to this preview. This review is based on an ARC. *** After various surveys that have been introduced that showed that people had no knowledge of the Holocaust, this is an incredible story of perseverance for justice in a graphic novel format for people of all ages. On a personal level, I appreciate any real life ‘power couple’ story.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

  11. 4 out of 5

    Karen Thornton

  12. 5 out of 5

    Matt Piechocinski

  13. 4 out of 5

    The Bibliopossum

  14. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

  16. 5 out of 5

    Hattie

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Koblank

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tad

  19. 5 out of 5

    Themegalomaniac

  20. 5 out of 5

    Heather Troglin

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kennedy

  22. 4 out of 5

    Fariha

  23. 4 out of 5

    Llyr Heller-Humphreys

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

  25. 5 out of 5

    Maggie

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maike

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dawnicole

  28. 5 out of 5

    Valerie Lewis

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lacy

  30. 5 out of 5

    Marni

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