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The Liar's Guide to the Night Sky

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Perfect for fans of the New York Times bestselling novel, Love & Gelato by Jenna Evans Welch It's no one’s fault that Hallie Jacob is alone. That her grandpa got sick half a world away and so her parents yanked her to Colorado the last semester of her senior year. That career-wise, she’s specialized in fighting fire, and now she’s surrounded by ice, snow, and a thousand co Perfect for fans of the New York Times bestselling novel, Love & Gelato by Jenna Evans Welch It's no one’s fault that Hallie Jacob is alone. That her grandpa got sick half a world away and so her parents yanked her to Colorado the last semester of her senior year. That career-wise, she’s specialized in fighting fire, and now she’s surrounded by ice, snow, and a thousand cousins she’s half-banned from hanging around with. But that’s what's happened. That's what her December looks like. On one big family weekend in the freaking tundra, Hallie sneaks off with those cousins to an abandoned ski slope. But they get caught in a random mudslide, and what started as a Secret Bonfire Party goes in a Potential Donner Party direction real fast. With some cousins in desperate need of medical attention, Hallie leaves their camp for help—and is surprised when Jonah Ramirez (her cousin's extremely off-limits—absurdly hot—best friend) joins her. Facing paralyzing temperatures, sharp-toothed animals strong enough to survive a climate with hardly any water or air, and weather phenomena so wicked they’ll wreck a mountain before you can blink, Jonah and Hallie have no choice but to trust each other as they search for the way to town to send help back to their stranded friends and family. And THAT may be more impossible, even, than making it out alive.


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Perfect for fans of the New York Times bestselling novel, Love & Gelato by Jenna Evans Welch It's no one’s fault that Hallie Jacob is alone. That her grandpa got sick half a world away and so her parents yanked her to Colorado the last semester of her senior year. That career-wise, she’s specialized in fighting fire, and now she’s surrounded by ice, snow, and a thousand co Perfect for fans of the New York Times bestselling novel, Love & Gelato by Jenna Evans Welch It's no one’s fault that Hallie Jacob is alone. That her grandpa got sick half a world away and so her parents yanked her to Colorado the last semester of her senior year. That career-wise, she’s specialized in fighting fire, and now she’s surrounded by ice, snow, and a thousand cousins she’s half-banned from hanging around with. But that’s what's happened. That's what her December looks like. On one big family weekend in the freaking tundra, Hallie sneaks off with those cousins to an abandoned ski slope. But they get caught in a random mudslide, and what started as a Secret Bonfire Party goes in a Potential Donner Party direction real fast. With some cousins in desperate need of medical attention, Hallie leaves their camp for help—and is surprised when Jonah Ramirez (her cousin's extremely off-limits—absurdly hot—best friend) joins her. Facing paralyzing temperatures, sharp-toothed animals strong enough to survive a climate with hardly any water or air, and weather phenomena so wicked they’ll wreck a mountain before you can blink, Jonah and Hallie have no choice but to trust each other as they search for the way to town to send help back to their stranded friends and family. And THAT may be more impossible, even, than making it out alive.

59 review for The Liar's Guide to the Night Sky

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lea (drumsofautumn)

    “It’s freezing and dark because this is how it is with us; this is how we connected, so it’s fitting that this is where we wind up, kissing each other like we are both hungry.” The Liar's Guide to the Night Sky is YA Survival Story that had some very promising aspects to it but ultimately ended up not delivering when it came to unpacking them. The story starts with a group of teens, most of them cousins, who all got together because of a sickness in the family, sneaking out to an aband “It’s freezing and dark because this is how it is with us; this is how we connected, so it’s fitting that this is where we wind up, kissing each other like we are both hungry.” The Liar's Guide to the Night Sky is YA Survival Story that had some very promising aspects to it but ultimately ended up not delivering when it came to unpacking them. The story starts with a group of teens, most of them cousins, who all got together because of a sickness in the family, sneaking out to an abandoned ski slope, when they get hit with a sudden mudslide and are stranded on this mountain with nobody knowing where they are. Our main character Hallie decides that she doesn't wanna sit around and wait for help but to go and search for it herself. Jonah, her cousin Jaxon's best friend, joins her and we follow them on their survival journey but also them getting to know each other better. I have read two other books by Brianna Shrum that I really loved, so I was very excited to pick this novel up, even if it was slightly out of my comfort zone, as I do not usually reach for (Contemporary) Survival stories. But I was excited by the diversity aspects in this story and my love for the author's earlier books, so I wanted to give it a chance. Sadly, I did not end up being very satisfied with this novel and the elements in it. I think that there are a lot of intriguing aspects to it but ultimately the things that I would've wanted to read more about were either not talked about enough or just didn't get the on-page time they deserved. “We touch each other, under the black sky and a million stars that shine a million miles away, stars that make up the backdrop of this crucial twenty-four hours, this life-altering turn of a night, and that do not give a single shit about us. We are not imprinted in the memory of the stars. Anyway, it’s the vastness of the black that’s imprinted in mine.” One of the very promising aspects of this story are the complex family dynamics that are portrayed. Hallie lived away from the rest of her big family for a long time and feels out of place in between them, even when she wants to be part of this cousin group so very badly. She struggles with not getting inside jokes and just feeling like she doesn't know everyone as well as they all know each other. On top of that, whenever there were family gatherings in the past, it seemed like her parents wanted to mostly keep her away from the rest of the family and making her feel like they would have a bad influence on her. One aspect that plays into this is racism, which absolutely did not get unpacked enough in regards to Hallie's parents. We find out about a conversation between Hallie's dad and his brother, that Hallie overheard when she was younger, where they are having a fight and Hallie's uncle asks if this is about him being married to a Black woman. And in that moment Hallie even thinks to herself that her uncle is probably right. But that is the most that this ever really gets talked about. I know that it can be hard to challenge your parents about their racism, especially when it has to do with family relationships and it being something that you think might be out of your lane. But apart from the fact that Hallie is acknowledging this and being upset by it, this is never really brought up again, even by anybody else. And it is not like Hallie is the picture-perfect daughter in this novel who never says anything against her parents.. the fact that the racism is never brought up by her, was really disappointing. It seemed like the author was making a point later on in the novel about how the main character in general didn't seem to be super well informed about (anti-Black) racism, when she has a conversation about the racism in Denver and other "liberal-leaning" cities with Jaxon, who is Afro-Latinx and studies Political science. And while that obviously would be a very valid point to make, especially considering Hallie's parents, there was not enough substance to this conversation and, again, the topic is never really brought up again when it comes to her parents and the fact that they have basically completely separated themselves from the rest of the family due to racism. Plus, the conversation ends with Hallie making heart eyes at Jason because he is so passionate about fighting racism... instead of her actually processing what he said. And the topic gets brought up again later, when Jaxon tells Hallie about his dad having been in jail for 10 years for smoking weed and how that is a systematic issue that many Black men have to face. All Hallie has to say about this is that it “fucking sucks”. I am going to talk about the Black character doing all the explaining to the white character later in the review but the thing is that there is just such a wasted opportunity here. The least Hallie could've done is to really listen and learn and to later on confront her parents about their racism and how it kept her from being close to her family. It honestly feels like Hallie doesn't take anything away from this conversation whatsoever. “When he pulls me toward him with the smallest pressure in the tips of his fingers and kisses me. It is so slow that it fucking hurts. I think that maybe I’ve never kissed anyone in my life.” Now while I don't think that the racism was handled very well, I think that a lot of the representation was done much better. There is Hallie being Jewish (which is ownvoices) and I liked that this novel used lots of Jewish terms and talked about traditions, while also acknowledging that there is a lot of layers to being Jewish and practising (or not practising) Judaism. Jonah and Hallie also have a really great conversation about romantic and sexual attraction. Hallie identifies as bisexual and Jonah identifies as pansexual and aromantic and the aromantic and bisexual representation is an ownvoices aspect. Now while I cannot speak for any of these identities, I liked that the author took the time for the characters to really have a conversation about this. This is one of the few novels that actually explains what pansexual means, while also acknowledging that sexuality is a spectrum, which made me really happy to read about. Jonah also talks about being aromantic and what that means for him. There was definitely an emphasis put on the fact that it does not mean that he is broken or incapable of love, which is so very important to point out. Jonah also mentions that he is not monogamous and explains it to Hallie too because she basically immediately assumes what he means is cheating, when he is talking about consensual polygamy. Now I am grateful for these barely represented identities to be so well-explained in a novel but especially as I was writing this review, I realized how much explaining there was within this novel and that most of it came from Jonah. He keeps educating Hallie about all of these different things and the author even makes a point for Hallie to point out that she would do research herself, if she had internet, but it is a really cheap excuse for the one, main person of colour in this story to do all of the explaining. “I am absolutely suffocated by the fact that I seem to have changed utterly while my parents simply have not. Nothing else has. Nothing but me.” Apart from all of those glaring issues with this book, I also just didn't enjoy the Survival part of this story much. I will say that that very well might be a me-problem because I obviously didn't really go into this novel because of that aspect but because I was interested in the author's work in general and the character dynamics. But I just ended up being bored by the Survival aspect because, while the stakes were supposed to feel high, they never really did. I also couldn't handle the stupidity of the main character and her companion leaving the group in the first place. Throughout this story I kept thinking about there being a good chance that this group had already been found while these two people are still wandering around, with absolutely no indication of where they could be for any help on the way. The really interesting aspect of this story could've been the aftermath of this traumatic event. The last part of this book was so fucking good because it dealt with the main character trying to live a normal life after her time hiking through these mountains, fearing for her life. But sadly that was truly only on the last couple of pages. The main character very clearly suffers from PTSD and depression and it is so interesting to read her inner monologue and her not understanding how everybody else can just move on with their lives when she just has been through such a life-altering event. I absolutely wish that this aspect would've taken up so much more time of this novel. Especially as this is also where the relationship between Hallie and Jonah truly becomes fascinating because they have been through this together and understand each other better than anybody else. This is where we could've really discovered the bond between them and if and how their relationships develops. “I care that, for this second, all there is is me and Jonah and a hundred trees that have no opinion, a solid dark that surrounds us, that lets us both just exist in a way that is shockingly alive. Shockingly … connected.” I will say that I liked the nature of their relationship a lot and it is something that we really do not get to see in Young Adult. They had a strong bond, were physically affectionate and had sex but this is not a Romance. I think it is so important to show that two people can have a genuine connection with each other and have a physical relationship too, without them having romantic interest in each other or falling in love. Lastly I do want to say that Hallie is 17 and in high school and Jonah is almost 20 and in college. I feel like I have become very aware of age in YA relationships and do find it important to point it out, even though I struggle to talk about it, especially as someone who did not grow up or has ever lived in the US. But I know that for a lot of people, while this age gap isn't big, it makes a huge difference that one is in college and one is in high school. There is even a conversation in the beginning where Jaxon says to Jonah “stay away from the high schooler” and while I understand that this was more like some kind of protective older sibling joke, it immediately left a bad taste in my mouth about their relationship. Overall, I finished this novel feeling disappointed and that is very much the lingering feeling after writing my review too. I feel like this had a lot of potential and I do believe that the author had good intentions but ultimately, this sadly missed a mark.. or many. Trigger and Content Warnings for underage cannabis use and drinking, blood, injury, loved one with a terminal illness, PTSD, depression. Instagram | Blog | Booktube Channel | Twitter I received an ARC through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review!

  2. 4 out of 5

    charlotte, (½ of readsrainbow)

    So what I’m saying is, if you told Jorgenvalder that today sucked, Jorgenvalder would probably say, IT DOES SUCK, JONAH RAMIREZ. FUCK THIS MOUNTAIN. WHERE IS MY BOAT. On my blog. Rep: Jewish bi mc with anxiety, Afro-Latino pan aro li, Jewish side characters, lesbian side characters CWs: descriptions of injury and infection Galley provided by publisher The Liar’s Guide to the Night Sky is probably one of my favourite YA contemporaries of the year. Granted, this may not be a high bar to clear i So what I’m saying is, if you told Jorgenvalder that today sucked, Jorgenvalder would probably say, IT DOES SUCK, JONAH RAMIREZ. FUCK THIS MOUNTAIN. WHERE IS MY BOAT. On my blog. Rep: Jewish bi mc with anxiety, Afro-Latino pan aro li, Jewish side characters, lesbian side characters CWs: descriptions of injury and infection Galley provided by publisher The Liar’s Guide to the Night Sky is probably one of my favourite YA contemporaries of the year. Granted, this may not be a high bar to clear in 2020, I don’t know, but the fact remains. The book is a survivalist novel which follows Hallie, whose family has come out to Colorado to be close to her grandfather, as she and her cousins are stuck in the Rockies after a mudslide. Along with her cousin’s best friend, Jonah, Hallie sets out to find help. A survivalist fiction is never going to be good if you don’t actually want the characters to survive, and what this book does so well is makes you fall in love fast and early with Hallie, all her cousins, and Jonah. And, to add to that, there’s a real tension in the book, like, you’re fairly sure no one’s going to die, but equally you can’t be fully certain. It makes you just want to keep reading and reading. It’s a great thing, then, that the characters in this book are so strong because, for a large chunk of it, the only characters are Hallie and Jacob (and the moose). They bounce off each other so well, too – you can feel their chemistry almost physically. The banter is excellent, for a start, but they also have deep conversations with one another which not only serve to strengthen their relationship in the book, but to give them added depth to a reader. And I think that’s why I loved them so much. In a way, I think that’s part of the reason I didn’t mind the somewhat open ending. It wasn’t so open, really, but you could definitely see threads that the story didn’t quite tie up. But that didn’t matter, because it also made sense within the context of the book. And, you know, left a path for something more… So really, if you’re on the fence about this book for whatever reason, let this be a sign to read it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    kory.

    jonah ramirez owns my heart content/trigger warnings; ableism, kissing, marijuana use, alcohol consumption, discussions of racism, discussions of nazis, injury, infection, blood, hospital, ptsd, depression, anxiety, asthma attack, loved one with a terminal illness, discussions of parent being incarcerated, discussions of religion, survival, gendered slur, rep; hallie (mc) is jewish, bisexual, and has anxiety. jonah (li) is aromantic, pansexual, polyamorous, and afro-latino. jewish side characters. jonah ramirez owns my heart content/trigger warnings; ableism, kissing, marijuana use, alcohol consumption, discussions of racism, discussions of nazis, injury, infection, blood, hospital, ptsd, depression, anxiety, asthma attack, loved one with a terminal illness, discussions of parent being incarcerated, discussions of religion, survival, gendered slur, rep; hallie (mc) is jewish, bisexual, and has anxiety. jonah (li) is aromantic, pansexual, polyamorous, and afro-latino. jewish side characters. queer characters. this book. this fucking book. i knew about it for a while because of the pansexual rep, but didn't really look into it. i saw the author shared an excerpt of the love interest talking about being aromantic and i was like, yes, sign me up, i am there. and all i knew going in was the few little descriptions the author has shared on twitter. and i'm not someone who goes into a book not knowing as much as i possibly can about it. but for some reason, i just dove into this book. and whew was it a ride. i guess i sort of forgot that the book is a survival story, because when that first mudslide happened, i was like ohhhh right that's what this book is about lmao but i fucking loved it. the characters, the relationships, the topics, the development, the queerness, the friendship, everything. hallie thinks a lot about her lack of friends, specifically friends who actually matter and stick around, a friend who is hers more than they are anyone else's. and i really loved that. it a bit of a change from the typical ya book. even if the main character is shy or introverted or socially anxious, all things that tend to lead to not having a packed social schedule, they always have a best friend or two. but hallie doesn't, and it brings such a loneliness and longing to her character that made me hurt. and the friendship between hallie and jonah is so wonderful. the majority of the book is only a few days and they're in pretty bad circumstances that forces them to rely on each other, but god. the friendship. the platonic love. the openness. the trust. i just love them. i love seeing this kind of relationship at the center of a ya book. it's not just a platonic relationship, it's a platonic (and sometimes sexual) relationship between two people who know that romance isn't the be all end all love, isn't the Most Important type of love. and that ending? the "he keeps kicking me under the table. i light up at the touch. i laugh when he says something stupid, and he laughs when the waitress spills water on me" bit? amazing. not only because they're both finally with someone who gets it and are able to relax and feel, but the small part about lighting up at his touch and laughing at each other, it's just so pure. we stan. another aspect of hallie that you don't often see in ya books is her working to become a firefighter. i've seen a bunch of different career paths in ya, but this definitely wasn't one of them. and because of this career path, hallie is (as jonah says) absolutely jacked. her muscles are mentioned throughout the book and i think it's kind of awesome? i've seen a variety of different body types represented in ya, but i don't think a muscular teen girl has been among them. as much as i loved this, there are some things that bothered me, though. i wish there had been more resolution. i wish there had been more scenes and bonding between hallie and jonah before the end. i get why it ended that way, but i just wanted a little bit more before it. i wish there had been follow up on the whole "hallie's dad thinks his brother's kids are bad kids and tries to keep hallie from spending time with them, because his brother married a black woman and he's racist" thing. it's a pretty big part of the book, in the sense that it hangs over everything. it's brought up a lot and hallie thinks about it a lot. but it's literally never called out. hallie agrees that her dad is probably racist, but nothing comes of it. even when she has her moment near the end of telling her dad to fuck off, it isn't brought up. there's so much family shit that's never dealt with that it's a bit unsatisfying. and lastly, i seem to be in the minority when it comes to the short bi/pan discussion. everyone loves it and thinks it's handles wonderfully. but i found it disappointing. it reminded me of the more subtle panphobia i've come across. when jonah says he's pansexual, the first thing out of hallie's mouth is a question about how it's different from bi and points out that she's bi and doesn't only like two genders...which makes it seem like pansexuality is says something bad or restrictive about bisexuality, as opposed to them just neutrally coexisting. it just felt less like a natural conversation between two queer people, and more like a forced "discourse" scene where the bisexual is demanding the pansexual justify and explain their sexuality to "satisfy" them, as hallie literally thinks that jonah's explanation wasn't satisfying to her. and when jonah says that gender doesn't factor in for him, hallie asks "you don't see gender?" and her mouth "curls" and i honestly don't know what that means. is it curling as in a smile and she's teasing him, or is it curling as in disgust and she's challenging him? his response is a sigh that's "somewhere between snarky and indulgent" so that could really go either way. idk. this definitely isn't a big thing, as it didn't affect my rating. it was just a tad :// jonah talking about being pansexual: "i've come to the conclusion that i'm pansexual." "for me, it just like...it fits." "like, i don't know how it is for everyone else. or for all the pansexuals in the world or whatever. but i just...don't give a fuck about gender. like it doesn't even factor in." "it's like...i just literally don't care about. i'm into people, that's it." while some people might cringe at "i'm into people", i find it realistic. even with having the word for what you are, trying to explain it beyond textbook definitions can be hard. because it's not always about that. it's about trying to put confusing, complicated, complex personal feelings into a simple statement that make sense to others. when you keep asking "what is that" and "what does that mean" and "well what about this" and "i still don't get it" you're going to get frustrated, simplified, personal explanations. policing those only further limits how pansexual people express their personal experiences. when it comes to rep, it shouldn't be the status quo, but i don't mind it here and there. jonah talking about being aromantic is a long paragraph or two that i don't want to type out, so here's the tweet the author shared about it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    El Hyrst

    Rating: 2.5 rounded up to 3 In hindsight the title is cute as hell for this, referencing one of the scenes I did find genuinely cute in this book. Overall, though, it didn't really work for me. But before I get into that, I want to say how much I *adored* the representation in this book, specifically the allosexual-aromantic rep. I've been fed excellently with aro-ace rep lately, but as an allo-aro myself I'm always missing that real connection with the characters. Jonah is pansexual aromantic an Rating: 2.5 rounded up to 3 In hindsight the title is cute as hell for this, referencing one of the scenes I did find genuinely cute in this book. Overall, though, it didn't really work for me. But before I get into that, I want to say how much I *adored* the representation in this book, specifically the allosexual-aromantic rep. I've been fed excellently with aro-ace rep lately, but as an allo-aro myself I'm always missing that real connection with the characters. Jonah is pansexual aromantic and I love the way it's explained and the way that the main character handles both that explanation and the bisexual/pansexual discussion. It was so validating to read such easy acceptance and I loved the confidence with which Jonah was able to talk about it. The main character, Hallie, is Jewish and her thoughts about her faith play a large part of the book. I really enjoyed reading about it, and I actually spent some time between chapters googling Jewish traditions that were unfamiliar to me and learning more. The rest of the story, unfortunately, just didn't quite click with me. In all honesty, it felt a lot like some of the trapped-in-the-woods, huddle-for-warmth fanfiction I've read, which isn't necessarily a bad thing. That feeling is probably why I devoured the whole thing in one day, it was super easy to read. But while it focused a lot on dialogue and conversation, and the developing friendship between the two awkward near-strangers, I didn't have the kind of depth of character understanding to make me *really* care about Hallie and Jonah. I wanted to care deeply about seeing them become close, but I really didn't know either character well enough to care. Right at the end there was more danger just kind of shoe-horned in, and I didn't feel like it was particularly necessary. There wasn't a huge emotional pay off and we were so close to the end I knew it would be fine. A lot of the sense of danger in this story actually distracted me from the developing friendship. I was getting so annoyed that they were having these moments of intimacy when their friends and family were injured and trapped and relying on them - I would have liked it a lot better if they'd been trapped alone and it was about them getting to know each other in their camp. Maybe it's just my under-treated anxiety, but the thought of being distracted by sex when my fourteen year old cousin is in mortal peril just didn't work for me. All that being said, this *was* fun to read and I did read it all super fast so I'd still pick it up if you get a chance to, it's interesting and has great aro rep - I think I wanted a slightly different book, that's all.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Danika at The Lesbrary

    Usually about half the books I read for All the books are queer, but I was having difficulty finding any that I was clicking with this time, so I picked up this title on a whim. It felt like a fun, quick read--I’ve been watching Alone, which is a survival competition reality show, so that probably influenced my decision. Little did I know that this ended up being pretty queer itself! Both Hallie and Jonah are attracted to multiple genders: Hallie is bisexual and Jonah is pansexual, aromantic, an Usually about half the books I read for All the books are queer, but I was having difficulty finding any that I was clicking with this time, so I picked up this title on a whim. It felt like a fun, quick read--I’ve been watching Alone, which is a survival competition reality show, so that probably influenced my decision. Little did I know that this ended up being pretty queer itself! Both Hallie and Jonah are attracted to multiple genders: Hallie is bisexual and Jonah is pansexual, aromantic, and polyamorous. There are some other queer cousins as well. It's also diverse in that the whole family is Jewish, and two of the cousins are mixed race. Jonah is Afro-Latinx. Hallie has anxiety. They end up discussing race, religion and politics quite a bit, which I enjoyed. It feels completely silly to comment on the realism of teen dialogue as a 30 year old, but I do teach high school, so maybe I can? My point is, it felt realistic to how teens actually interact with each other, especially family and close friends. They are constantly teasing each other good-naturedly. And they talk about important things! They say ACAB and talk about white apathy. Hallie talks about her relationship to Judaism: her parents aren’t practicing, but she feels a deep connection to it as part of her identity. She talks about how her worldview is influenced by concepts in Judaism. This is definitely a survival story: Jonah and Hallie wade through snow and look for water, they huddle together for warmth in caves, they McGuyver firestarters, and they get chased by wildlife. And there’s absolutely a will they-won’t they plot between them, which of course intensifies when you’re trying to share body heat to stay alive. But it’s the everyday interactions between the characters that really brought this story to life for me. They make the kind of jokes that queer people make, like saying that astrology jokes make them seem gay. Also, I appreciated reading a realistic YA novel about a physically strong woman main character. Hallie has been training to be a firefighter for years. She has muscles! That’s something I don’t see a lot in books. So if you’re looking for a survival story with sexual tension and a sprinkling of politics, religion, and queer stuff, give this one a try!

  6. 5 out of 5

    The Reading Raccoon

    Thank you Edelweiss for this review copy of The Liar’s Guide to the Night Sky by Brianna R Shrum. The Liar’s Guide to the Night Sky is a survival story about Hallie Jacob a Massachusetts transplant to Colorado. Hallie is excited and nervous to be included in an outdoor bonfire adventure with her cousins in the snowy woods of Colorado. Her father has spent the last few years at odds with his family which has made it difficult for her to bond with her cousins even though they are all the same age. Thank you Edelweiss for this review copy of The Liar’s Guide to the Night Sky by Brianna R Shrum. The Liar’s Guide to the Night Sky is a survival story about Hallie Jacob a Massachusetts transplant to Colorado. Hallie is excited and nervous to be included in an outdoor bonfire adventure with her cousins in the snowy woods of Colorado. Her father has spent the last few years at odds with his family which has made it difficult for her to bond with her cousins even though they are all the same age. A landslide forces Hallie and family friend Johan out on their own and fighting for their lives. I appreciated the survival aspect of the story and there were a lot of humorous moments. I also like how forthright Hallie was and how she made choices that moved the story forward. I will add that there was effort put in to the characters to make them as inclusive as possible which some readers may enjoy for representation. But, I actually found it made them less relatable for me on a personal level. Along with that there are a few labels discussed about sexuality such as bisexual, pansexual and aromantic and discussions about what that means to each character. Jonah also has some very strong ideas about monogamy that are a little tiresome coming out of the mouth of a 20 year old but these concepts might be revolutionary to see on the page for some YA readers. Most of those revelations are within two pages so it’s a lot to digest at once. Along with language and sexual content I will also put this on the upper end of YA because there are a few times that I wondered if it was sponsored by a marijuana cooperative because there were SO MANY weed references. I recommend The Liar’s Guide to the Night Sky for YA and New Adult readers who are looking for an intense survival story with representation of POC, LGBQT and the Jewish faith.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Energy

    Hallie feels like an outsider with her cousins. She doesn’t see them often living on the other side of the country. With her strict parents, Hallie doesn’t have a sense of adventure like they do. She errs on the side of caution which will serve her well as a future firefighter. Spending time with her extended family is especially hard because she has a crush on their best friend Jonah, even though she doesn’t know him all that well. So when all the kids decide to have an adventure, she does the Hallie feels like an outsider with her cousins. She doesn’t see them often living on the other side of the country. With her strict parents, Hallie doesn’t have a sense of adventure like they do. She errs on the side of caution which will serve her well as a future firefighter. Spending time with her extended family is especially hard because she has a crush on their best friend Jonah, even though she doesn’t know him all that well. So when all the kids decide to have an adventure, she does the most un-Hallie thing ever, she joins them. Little do any of them know the trouble that lay ahead. I started this one yesterday and could not put it down. I loved how inclusive the characters are and how well they all get along. I think it’s easy to judge Hallie for being weak in the face of her parents, in not challenging them when they are clearly in the wrong. But bending to their will is her life, and it’s not easy to break out of that shell. I loved Hallie and Jonah together. This book has me alternating between the feels and laughing out loud. If I could wish for anything more in this book, it would be a book 2, with not only more of Hallie and Jonah and their new dynamic, but more of the whole crew. I guess I wasn’t quite ready to let them go. A fun read from start to finish.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gretal

    This isn't really a genre I read or like that much, but I still enjoyed this. This isn't really a genre I read or like that much, but I still enjoyed this.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ellie M

    If you liked Starry Eyes by Jenn Bennett, you'll love The Liar's Guide to the Night Sky. It's like the slightly more intense cousin of Starry Eyes. I never get bored of survival books, even if two have the exact same location, cause or reason for survival, or type of character. I've sorted these books into many categories, but the main ones are "main character is a complete idiot about their surroundings and has no idea what they're doing, came with no supplies" and "character has supplies, as th If you liked Starry Eyes by Jenn Bennett, you'll love The Liar's Guide to the Night Sky. It's like the slightly more intense cousin of Starry Eyes. I never get bored of survival books, even if two have the exact same location, cause or reason for survival, or type of character. I've sorted these books into many categories, but the main ones are "main character is a complete idiot about their surroundings and has no idea what they're doing, came with no supplies" and "character has supplies, as they have experience in the wilderness or were already out hiking, and they know all the best tips." I myself know way too many. This book is closer to the second category, which I appreciated, because sometimes it's exhausting to read the same helpless characters over and over again. Hallie Jacob has just moved from Massachusetts to Colorado because of her sick grandfather. Although she didn't have anything particularly memorable about MA, she still misses it, even though being in Colorado means that she can frequently see her favorite cousins, Jolie and Jaxon, more often, as well as Jaxon's friend Jonah Ramirez. On one night, when the Jacobs' house is occupied by many cousins and friends, they decide to sneak out and go to Jaxon's favorite mountain location, which is notorious for parties. The group, ranging from age 14 to 21, only intends to stay a few hours, play some games and have fun. But when a landslide hits and Hallie, Tzipporah, Sam, Jolie, Jaxon, Jonah, Lydia and Oliver all have to run, they can't find the cars or their trail markings. To make matters worse, Lydia has injured her ankle and Sam is suffering from severe asthma. None of them see help coming as a possibility. Hallie, an EMT with lots of first-aid and survival skills, volunteers to separate from the group to look for help herself, and Jonah comes with her. What follows is a week in the freezing ski slope weather, high altitudes, possible hypothermia, sleeping in a hunting blind, the threat of mountain lions and moose, and maybe, just maybe, a new romance. I compared this book to Starry Eyes in the beginning, rather than a more gruesome story like Be Not Far From Me. For the most part, it was similar, except for the fact that the characters in Starry Eyes had more camping supplies and weren't in any danger of actually dying. This book added the threat of the cold weather, and towards the end, it does take a more dramatic turn. If you like a more intense survival story, you'll still like this one. Okay, one of my favorite things about this book was the LGBT representation! Hallie is bisexual, Jonah is pansexual, and Tzipporah, Sam, and Jolie all fit somewhere in the community as well. As far as I remember, there aren't any harmful stereotypes or tropes, and nobody treats these characters like they're any kind of outsider. Another favorite thing was that Hallie was able to do things for herself. Even if I thought her wanting to leave the group was a bad idea. She never relied on Jonah to take care of her.

  10. 5 out of 5

    paula (ノ◕ヮ◕)ノ*:・゚✧

    Thank you Edelweiss and the publisher for giving me a copy in exchange of a honest review. 4.25 TW: INJURIES, INFECTION,PTSD Halli is forced to move just when she is about to finish high school. The thing is the only people she knows there are her family with whom she has always had a complicated relationship. Her dad has a bad relationship with his brother and it makes things complicated between Hally and her cousins. One day some of her cousins and their friends decide to go to the mountain and ex Thank you Edelweiss and the publisher for giving me a copy in exchange of a honest review. 4.25 TW: INJURIES, INFECTION,PTSD Halli is forced to move just when she is about to finish high school. The thing is the only people she knows there are her family with whom she has always had a complicated relationship. Her dad has a bad relationship with his brother and it makes things complicated between Hally and her cousins. One day some of her cousins and their friends decide to go to the mountain and explore and everything goes downhill. I will briefly talk about the plot because i think there are more important things. A disaster happens and we see how Hallie goes in search of help with Jonah a friend of her cousin Jax. From here their little adventure turns into a survival story. Jonah is Pansexual and Aromantic. Not a lot of young adult books dare to mention those words. So thank you so much for doing so. Jonah explains how he feels regarding his sexuality and what it is to be part of that community. He explains how being an Aromantic person is and what are his feelings towards people. Hallie is part of the LGBTQ+ community as well, but i dont know her labels so i wont say anything. There is a f/f side relationship and we know that her cousin Jolie is atractted to girls. Jonah is a poc as are Jolie and Jax who are bicerial children. There is also discussion of Religion and Hallie is Jewish. What i liked the most was how Hallie and Jonah both found what could be calld a soulmate. It doesnt have to be love related but soul related. They get to know eachother and they feel understood. Their conection is more than just physical or whatever. It was amazing to see two people just clicking in that way. This book is also sex positive and once again i appreciate that. Teenagers have sex. Thats something not a lot of people want to talk about. There is also no slut shaming and no weird conversations about the people they have liked or had sex with. It just something that happened and should be important to other people. I just can't say how helpful this book is and how much it explains and contains.

  11. 4 out of 5

    More Bedside Books

    The Liars Guide to the Night Sky by Brianna R. Shrum is a YA novel that has several queer characters stranded in the Colorado backcountry in December. Hallie (bisexual) is adjusting to moving to Colorado her senior year of high school, while also navigating the acrimonious relationships of her Jewish family once more during the annual family ski trip. It did take me a bit of pages to settle into the narration with Hallie. I was surprised her character was more naïve and ill-informed than I was e The Liars Guide to the Night Sky by Brianna R. Shrum is a YA novel that has several queer characters stranded in the Colorado backcountry in December. Hallie (bisexual) is adjusting to moving to Colorado her senior year of high school, while also navigating the acrimonious relationships of her Jewish family once more during the annual family ski trip. It did take me a bit of pages to settle into the narration with Hallie. I was surprised her character was more naïve and ill-informed than I was expecting as it’s written she’s been to Colorado regularly and has education pursuing EMT/Paramedic certification. I could predict many of the of events in the plot too because it’s just common sense if you know the mountains. (Wolves are rather scarce though, unlucky teenagers when it comes to the wildlife.) None of that however stopped me from finding Hallie engaging. I was invested with her family issues, and spiritual desires and need to do something in the life-threatening circumstances she and her cousins and their friends are in. Even though she’s mostly making bad choice after bad choice. And Jonah (polyamorous aromantic pansexual) who is an Eagle Scout, political science major in his sophomore year, not to mention Hallie’s crush, is delightful. This Arfo-Latino young man is passionate with good reason. I was appreciative for the passage about the deep roots and underbelly of indifference, hate and white supremacy that also run throughout the politically blue areas, in case a color on a map or some legislation gives the impression of a progressive paradise. And I love to see pan rep. Even more when the bi/pan question is so accepting. Last I’m amused that for a survivalist novel, the book made me miss the high country. I thoroughly love The Liars Guide to the Night Sky, and am marking it as one of my best reads of 2020. (cw: alcohol and drug use, blood, depression, infection, injury, hospital, mention of parent being incarcerated, PTSD, mention of racism, terminally ill grandparent)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Stewart

    She’s right you know, who orders steak at a diner? My favorite part of this book is how it didn’t end. It could have come to a predictable and safe landing we’re all expecting in a book like this, but it didn’t. This book isn’t predictable and that makes it a run book to read. I like a good survival in the woods story and this hit a lot of good notes. The author places characters into the story that move it along, give it good context and information without being Hermione “Well Actually” Grange She’s right you know, who orders steak at a diner? My favorite part of this book is how it didn’t end. It could have come to a predictable and safe landing we’re all expecting in a book like this, but it didn’t. This book isn’t predictable and that makes it a run book to read. I like a good survival in the woods story and this hit a lot of good notes. The author places characters into the story that move it along, give it good context and information without being Hermione “Well Actually” Granger. If you’re looking for an enjoyable, tense, and unpredictable book to read this is the one.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This was a fast read and I was invested in them getting to safety. I was also invested in the romance. However, there were a few twists in the story that didn't work for me. But they were enough to put me off it. This was a fast read and I was invested in them getting to safety. I was also invested in the romance. However, there were a few twists in the story that didn't work for me. But they were enough to put me off it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kristīne Vītola

    Aromantic pansexual LI https://twitter.com/BriannaShrum/stat... Aromantic pansexual LI https://twitter.com/BriannaShrum/stat...

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ciara

    saw a five star review and enjoyed the premised which prompted me to read, but overall this didnt hit the mark for me

  16. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Love the inclusion, but some of the writing was clunky and the dialogue felt forced. That being said, I think literature like this is important for teaching the Youths™️ about gender and sexuality.

  17. 5 out of 5

    V

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lira

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  20. 5 out of 5

    Patti

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chris Coder

  22. 4 out of 5

    Khyra:)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sue

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

  25. 4 out of 5

    Keith Garrett

  26. 4 out of 5

    Allyson

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rose Marie

  28. 5 out of 5

    Helen

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lira

  30. 4 out of 5

    Polina

  31. 5 out of 5

    Dahlia

  32. 4 out of 5

    Mary H

  33. 5 out of 5

    Ceillie Simkiss

  34. 5 out of 5

    Samantha (A History of Books)

  35. 5 out of 5

    Dee

  36. 4 out of 5

    Cassie Gutman (happybooklovers)

  37. 5 out of 5

    Shana

  38. 4 out of 5

    Marisa

  39. 4 out of 5

    Annelie

  40. 4 out of 5

    kelsey

  41. 4 out of 5

    Marie

  42. 4 out of 5

    Candy Bee

  43. 4 out of 5

    Zeke

  44. 4 out of 5

    lindsey

  45. 5 out of 5

    Beth

  46. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Rozin

  47. 4 out of 5

    Emma

  48. 4 out of 5

    artemis

  49. 5 out of 5

    hades ☾

  50. 5 out of 5

    ♡ jules ♡

  51. 4 out of 5

    Rach A.

  52. 4 out of 5

    Klara

  53. 4 out of 5

    Isa

  54. 5 out of 5

    The Candid Cover (Olivia & Lori)

  55. 5 out of 5

    Lira

  56. 5 out of 5

    Lydia Brickhaus

  57. 4 out of 5

    halfirishgrin

  58. 5 out of 5

    Rae of ☀(artofstoraes)

  59. 4 out of 5

    Reading

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