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A Kids Book About Racism

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Yes, this really is a kids book about racism. Inside, you’ll find a clear description of what racism is, how it makes people feel when they experience it, and how to spot it when it happens. This is one conversation that’s never too early to start, and this book was written to be an introduction for kids on the topic.


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Yes, this really is a kids book about racism. Inside, you’ll find a clear description of what racism is, how it makes people feel when they experience it, and how to spot it when it happens. This is one conversation that’s never too early to start, and this book was written to be an introduction for kids on the topic.

30 review for A Kids Book About Racism

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jillian Heise

    A good informational primer on racism for younger kids. Will definitely add to my school library!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Abbie

    I watched the author read this book on YouTube and applaud the frank simplicity and honestly. I think it is a fantastic book for inspiring candid conversation. It lost one star from me because the scientist in me absolutely cringes at the use of "1000%." I would still definitely recommend it. I watched the author read this book on YouTube and applaud the frank simplicity and honestly. I think it is a fantastic book for inspiring candid conversation. It lost one star from me because the scientist in me absolutely cringes at the use of "1000%." I would still definitely recommend it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Krystal

    I read this to my kids. It was perfect, well written, to the point, clear, and paved the way for some great conversations. I bought the Kindle version, I wish I would have bought the hard copy version.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    4.5 for me. I wasn't sure what the level of the book was before reading it. I like that it defines racism, explains that it can happen in big and small ways, and encouraged the reader to call it what it is. I hope this book can be a springboard for further discussions with my eight year-old son. 4.5 for me. I wasn't sure what the level of the book was before reading it. I like that it defines racism, explains that it can happen in big and small ways, and encouraged the reader to call it what it is. I hope this book can be a springboard for further discussions with my eight year-old son.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Erica Clou

    Simple and good for small kids.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sarah - All The Book Blog Names Are Taken

    Absolute must-read. I love this whole series and this one is probably the best I have read so far - though it is hard to really choose a best because they're all so good. After George Floyd was murdered and our country was on fire with rage and pain and trauma, I began explaining more and more to Eleanor what racism is. This is something that has never occurred to her in her entire seven and a half years. She has had a lot of questions - especially because her best friend has beautiful caramel sk Absolute must-read. I love this whole series and this one is probably the best I have read so far - though it is hard to really choose a best because they're all so good. After George Floyd was murdered and our country was on fire with rage and pain and trauma, I began explaining more and more to Eleanor what racism is. This is something that has never occurred to her in her entire seven and a half years. She has had a lot of questions - especially because her best friend has beautiful caramel skin and she can't ever imagine anyone not liking her BFF because of that. Teaching kids to be colorblind is not the answer. First of all, it is impossible. You can't not see someone's skin color. If you ignore it, you are ignoring a lifetime of their experiences. Teaching kids to love all colors and appreciate their beauty and uniqueness is the answer. We can fight racism with books like this, start those hard conversations with our children, and raise better humans.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jamila

    This book is valuable, though not perfect. It serves the great purpose of helping adults — parents and educators— have conversations with children about race and racism that adults are afraid to have. This book is a starting point that provides useful language. Neither parents nor educators should end with this book because there is much more children to learn in order to become active anti-racists.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sam Bell

    OMG, this is the book I needed! As a white parent to a black child I am always looking for resources to help facilitate the conversations of race and differences. This book makes a super hard subject very approachable and understandable. Reading it with my son gave us the opportunity to talk about big and small examples and that he will face this at some time. He hasn't told me of any instances yet, but I think this book will help give him the words when he does need to talk about this. I have ev OMG, this is the book I needed! As a white parent to a black child I am always looking for resources to help facilitate the conversations of race and differences. This book makes a super hard subject very approachable and understandable. Reading it with my son gave us the opportunity to talk about big and small examples and that he will face this at some time. He hasn't told me of any instances yet, but I think this book will help give him the words when he does need to talk about this. I have every intention of adding more books for this series to our library and am eager to see what topics they cover next.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Swanson

    This book was a great way to deepen the conversations I'm having about racism with my daughter. It's concise and asks questions that she can relate to, and it got her attention. I plan on making this a frequent book we read together. This book was a great way to deepen the conversations I'm having about racism with my daughter. It's concise and asks questions that she can relate to, and it got her attention. I plan on making this a frequent book we read together.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gemini Fernandez

    I LOVED this book so much! I am so much into inclusion, diversity, and awareness/mindfulness for others. This book has no pictures but it is very impactful. I recommend this book to everyone.

  11. 4 out of 5

    J

    Due to the circumstances of our country at this moment I am really leery about books that proclaim to teach about racism, prejudice, activism or any such related subjects. So many have been written in mind lately with faux agendas while others aggravate the issue of racism by actually being racist to those the author(s) are condemning for being racist in the first place even though there is no new proof of such movements. Anyway this book starts off by suggesting it would be a much better read Due to the circumstances of our country at this moment I am really leery about books that proclaim to teach about racism, prejudice, activism or any such related subjects. So many have been written in mind lately with faux agendas while others aggravate the issue of racism by actually being racist to those the author(s) are condemning for being racist in the first place even though there is no new proof of such movements. Anyway this book starts off by suggesting it would be a much better read with parents as the author is hoping the adult will be the one who will take the initiative after reading to talk with their child(ren) about such a sensitive issue. As such I do applaud the thought since the topic with all its sub-topics is such a vast one while depending on the age of your child there may be areas that would be best kept for later teaching instead of the now. And there is no better opportunity as well for answering curious minds than when the question is right on their mind. Unlike the last book from the series I read this one is rather more subdued in its presentation with not a lot of colored backgrounds and those that do have colored or partially colored backgrounds are using them to help make the point on the page. There are also less colors used in the font although there is more change in the font size while once again that is to make a point of the subject on the page. And the way the book was presented with its font color, size and backgrounds really does make for quite a refreshing style of read that is concise and easy-to-follow Now for the part that may ruffle some feathers possibly since everyone's feathers seems to get ruffled today. The author did a great job in putting himself in the book, explaining what makes the color of his skin, how he has been treated and his reaction. I love the author providing an example using himself but that is the extent of mentioned skin colors and to me the lack of skin color inclusion is both a good as well as a bad thing. It's good since he isn't pointing his finger at any one general group and calling them all racist. At the same time I think it is bad due to those who are reading this book may not be brown nor have mixed parents so they may feel at first that this book is a bit hard to be relatable. Second and knowingly to adult readers this is just such a massive undertaking so unfortunately to cut it down to a children's book means that it does become vague at times. Take for example that children are known for their massive amounts of questions and that they communicate usually with looks, which both are mentioned as possibly being racist. How will a child know when these actions are or aren't racist if they are reading this book alone? So to me there will surely be some confusion when it comes to the end product. All in all, though, it was definitely a good read and a great stepping stone into a rocky subject. As the author had suggested at the start of the book this most definitely should be read to children instead of leaving them to tackle the subject alone, especially with the parts that are so vague.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Campf

    A Kids Book About Racism is a work of children’s non-fiction written for children aged about 4-7 years old. In the book, Memory defines racism in a way that is easy for young children to understand. Without having to use illustrations, just thoughtful color and font enhancements, they are able to make this book stand out and be remembered by the child reading it. I personally liked this book a lot. Obviously, racism is a serious issue that still exists in today’s society and all over the world. A Kids Book About Racism is a work of children’s non-fiction written for children aged about 4-7 years old. In the book, Memory defines racism in a way that is easy for young children to understand. Without having to use illustrations, just thoughtful color and font enhancements, they are able to make this book stand out and be remembered by the child reading it. I personally liked this book a lot. Obviously, racism is a serious issue that still exists in today’s society and all over the world. It is very important to start educating children at a young age to understand this and to fight against it. This book does a great job of simply explaining not only what racism is, but how it makes people feel. I think the most important part of this book is when it talks about the different way’s racism can come about. After reading this book, a child will be able to take this information with them and now recognize when racism is at play. This is very important for kids that are entering the school system and will undoubtedly experience racism either towards themselves or towards their peers. This is just the sad truth of the world we live in, and hopefully parents will buy this book and take the time to educate their child about this.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Summertime Readaholic

    I read this alone to be sure I would be prepared. I cried. It is a VERY simple book. Written at the level of a 1st or 2nd grade reader, it is meant to give them a starting place. For children of color it will answer a lot of those why questions about being treated differently or seeing their friends and family being treated differently. For a white family, it will help start the conversation about how they themselves view/treat people of color treat people of color. It is not an in-depth analysis I read this alone to be sure I would be prepared. I cried. It is a VERY simple book. Written at the level of a 1st or 2nd grade reader, it is meant to give them a starting place. For children of color it will answer a lot of those why questions about being treated differently or seeing their friends and family being treated differently. For a white family, it will help start the conversation about how they themselves view/treat people of color treat people of color. It is not an in-depth analysis it is just a short little book to start the conversation. But for those of us who live in the shadow of racism, your heart will sing to see this topic handled so beautifully. It is true to the subject matter without showing malice or spreading hate. Change starts at home.

  14. 4 out of 5

    wendy cortright

    This book by Jelani Memory beautifully and honestly explains racism to children of all ages, including adults. Below is a link that will take you to an interview with the author. Below that link is a link to take you to a video of Jelani Memory reading the book on youtube. When we get back to school in the fall, students will have heard about a lot of the news of the world and will have questions. We will have a great need to learn together and this book will be a part of that discussion. There This book by Jelani Memory beautifully and honestly explains racism to children of all ages, including adults. Below is a link that will take you to an interview with the author. Below that link is a link to take you to a video of Jelani Memory reading the book on youtube. When we get back to school in the fall, students will have heard about a lot of the news of the world and will have questions. We will have a great need to learn together and this book will be a part of that discussion. There are other books in this series, such as a kids book about COVID19, and a kids book about depression, just to name a couple, which speak to the information children will learn from.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne Snead

    Set in the same style as the ever popular The Book With No Pictures, this book tackles a BIG topic in the most simplest of ways for even your youngest readers/listeners. Great primer for parents, teachers, counselors and librarians to ease into a tough topic and spark important, relevant conversations with kids about racism, respecting and appreciating differences, movements that can change mindsets and more.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Breon Randon

    Direct and to the point primer on racism for the littles. There’s not much to this book, but its simple design is part of what makes it so impactful; it’s right there in black and white- don’t judge people for the color of their skin, and be sure to stand against those that do. Obviously there is more to it than that, but for a white woman wondering how to have “the talk” with my preschooler, it’s an accessible place to start.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Z'Nia Morris

    I really love this book because it teaches kids about standing up for one another. The book defines the word racism and explains why it happens. What I love most about the book is how there is a page that has the word ‘racism’ all over and it say” And it happens all the time.” Another thing I love about the book is when he was emphasizing on a word, it came to life. I would definitely read this to my kids.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kristin Cleary

    Direct and straightforward. Looking to start a conversation with your kids? This book is direct, simple, straightforward and loving. I purchased it as a kindle book today and look forward to purchasing a print copy for my school library when it’s back in stock. Highly recommend.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Diana Lebeaux

    This book is short, but it’s a solid starting point to help move conversations about racism to the next level after introducing it verbally on your own with kids in the 5-7 range or, with older kids, as a place to start for families who haven’t had these conversations at all yet. It will leave kids with questions rather than answers, but that is a good starting place.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    We watched a video of the author reading this on YouTube with the kiddos and it was perfect for the 5 year old. Very to-the-point and kid friendly. He *did* curl into a ball and cry after we read it though (he said because it wasn’t “fun” and he likes fun books) but we talked about it and he gets it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah

    Looks just like The Book With No Pictures. It really is very simply done, not dumbed down, but an introduction for little kids (listed as 6+ I think it could go younger) of an important topic. Putting words to a personal subject that grows in understanding in time so we can stand up for others or recognize our own pain.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Denise Hammer

    A big thing to look at the small hurts Simple, direct, and to the point. Accomplishes illustrations not through drawings but through color and size and emphasis. Designed for a younger groups but still thought provoking for older kids to relate to.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kkc

    Absolutely perfect Simple and clear. This book is perfect. Definitely introduced the topic to our 5 yo in a very smart, easy way and engaged her in a conversation about it afterward. Thank you for this book!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Krista Loreen

    If you're looking for a place to start a conversation about race with your kids this is it. The language is simple and to the point and encourages parent and child to read it together and have conversations. If you're looking for a place to start a conversation about race with your kids this is it. The language is simple and to the point and encourages parent and child to read it together and have conversations.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    Simple yet powerful A great book to start a discussion with kids about racism. It's exclaimed simply and honestly. It is a great starting point that can lead to further discussion and exploration on the topic of racism. Simple yet powerful A great book to start a discussion with kids about racism. It's exclaimed simply and honestly. It is a great starting point that can lead to further discussion and exploration on the topic of racism.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    Clear, accessible language to start the conversation on a complicated topic. Suitable for kids slightly older than mine (~2.5 years) but also a great primer for parents to read to get ideas on how to broach the topic. Well done!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rosalie Chamberlain

    Wonderful Book A really good kids book for building awareness and starting the conversation about racism. Adults who were not taught about racism and never had discussions and/or afraid to have discussions can benefit, as well.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rikki

    Great book for kids (and adults). Very clear and to the point. I LOVE that the book specifically tells kids they might want to read it with an adult because there will be lots to talk about afterwards. There is also a great reading of this by the author on YouTube!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Written in a graphic-design style that simply and clearly shows and tells what it is like to be a child experiencing racism ("It makes me feel small.") and how you can help stop this evil. Wonderfully done. Highly recommend this. Written in a graphic-design style that simply and clearly shows and tells what it is like to be a child experiencing racism ("It makes me feel small.") and how you can help stop this evil. Wonderfully done. Highly recommend this.

  30. 5 out of 5

    J.L. Platt

    This is an excellent book for breaking into the conversation surrounding racism with kids. It breaks the big concept down into an entry level to break into conversation(s) about racism with children (and adults, too).

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