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Is it possible to believe in God and be gay? How does it feel to be excluded from a religious community because of your sexuality? Why do some people still believe being LGBT is a sin? The book of Queer Prophets contains modern-day epistles from some of our most important thinkers, writers and activists: Jeanette Winterson tackles religious dogma, Amrou Al-Kadhi writes abou Is it possible to believe in God and be gay? How does it feel to be excluded from a religious community because of your sexuality? Why do some people still believe being LGBT is a sin? The book of Queer Prophets contains modern-day epistles from some of our most important thinkers, writers and activists: Jeanette Winterson tackles religious dogma, Amrou Al-Kadhi writes about trying to make it as a Muslim drag queen in London, John Bell writes about his decision to come out later in life, Tamsin Omond remembers getting married in the middle of a protest and Kate Bottley explains her journey to becoming an LGBT ally. Essays from: Jeanette Winterson, Phyll Opoku-Gyimah, Amrou Al-Kadhi, Pádraig Ó Tuama, Rev. Winnie Varghese, Keith Jarrett, Jay Hulme, Lucy Knight, Tamsin Omond, Erin Clark, Michael Segalov, Jarel Robinson-Brown, John L. Bell, Mpho Tutu van Furth, Karl Rutlidge, Garry Rutter, Rev Rachel Mann, Judith Kotze, Jack Guiness, Dustin Lance Black, Ric Stott. Afterword: Kate Bottley


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Is it possible to believe in God and be gay? How does it feel to be excluded from a religious community because of your sexuality? Why do some people still believe being LGBT is a sin? The book of Queer Prophets contains modern-day epistles from some of our most important thinkers, writers and activists: Jeanette Winterson tackles religious dogma, Amrou Al-Kadhi writes abou Is it possible to believe in God and be gay? How does it feel to be excluded from a religious community because of your sexuality? Why do some people still believe being LGBT is a sin? The book of Queer Prophets contains modern-day epistles from some of our most important thinkers, writers and activists: Jeanette Winterson tackles religious dogma, Amrou Al-Kadhi writes about trying to make it as a Muslim drag queen in London, John Bell writes about his decision to come out later in life, Tamsin Omond remembers getting married in the middle of a protest and Kate Bottley explains her journey to becoming an LGBT ally. Essays from: Jeanette Winterson, Phyll Opoku-Gyimah, Amrou Al-Kadhi, Pádraig Ó Tuama, Rev. Winnie Varghese, Keith Jarrett, Jay Hulme, Lucy Knight, Tamsin Omond, Erin Clark, Michael Segalov, Jarel Robinson-Brown, John L. Bell, Mpho Tutu van Furth, Karl Rutlidge, Garry Rutter, Rev Rachel Mann, Judith Kotze, Jack Guiness, Dustin Lance Black, Ric Stott. Afterword: Kate Bottley

30 review for The Book of Queer Prophets: 21 Writers on Sexuality and Religion

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    (3.5) There isn’t, or needn’t be, a contradiction between faith and queerness, as the authors included in this anthology would agree. Many of them are stalwarts at Greenbelt, a progressive Christian summer festival – Church of Scotland minister John L. Bell even came out there, in his late sixties, in 2017. I’m a lapsed regular attendee, so a lot of the names were familiar to me, including those of poets Rachel Mann and Padraig O’Tuama. Most of the contributors are Christian, then, including orda (3.5) There isn’t, or needn’t be, a contradiction between faith and queerness, as the authors included in this anthology would agree. Many of them are stalwarts at Greenbelt, a progressive Christian summer festival – Church of Scotland minister John L. Bell even came out there, in his late sixties, in 2017. I’m a lapsed regular attendee, so a lot of the names were familiar to me, including those of poets Rachel Mann and Padraig O’Tuama. Most of the contributors are Christian, then, including ordained priests like Desmond Tutu’s daughter, Mpho, and LGBT ally Kate Bottley, but we also hear from Michael Segalov, a gay Jewish man in London, and from Amrou Al-Kahdi (author of Unicorn: The Memoir of a Muslim Drag Queen), who describes the affirmation they found in the Sufi tradition. Dustin Lance Black tells of the exclusion LGBT Mormons still encounter. Jarel Robinson-Brown addresses his lament on mistreatment to his nephew, as James Baldwin did in “My Dungeon Shook” (in The Fire Next Time). Tamsin Omond recounts getting married to Melissa on a London bridge in the middle of an Extinction Rebellion protest. Erin Clark, though bisexual, knows she can pass as straight because she’s marrying a man – so is she ‘gay enough?’ Two trans poets write of the way cathedrals drew them into faith. The only weaker pieces are by Jeanette Winterson (there’s nothing new if you’ve read her memoir) and Juno Dawson (entirely throwaway; ‘I’m an atheist, but it’s okay to be religious, too’). Again and again, these writers voice the certainty that they are who God means them to be. A few of them engage with particular passages from the Bible, offering contextual critiques or new interpretations, but most turn to scripture for its overall message of love and justice. Self-knowledge is a key component of their search for truth. And the truth sets people free. Originally published on my blog, Bookish Beck.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    Thought this began promisingly. I quite enjoyed Amrou’s poetic and thoughtful account of how he, starting with the truth he knew about himself, freely and creatively drew on aspects of his Muslim heritage to discover a liberating personal spirituality that chimed with his own experiences, and so found a kind of healing from the previous sense of alienation he’d felt. Unfortunately (to me) this first chapter didn’t really set the tone for the rest of the book. I’d hoped that this book would be one Thought this began promisingly. I quite enjoyed Amrou’s poetic and thoughtful account of how he, starting with the truth he knew about himself, freely and creatively drew on aspects of his Muslim heritage to discover a liberating personal spirituality that chimed with his own experiences, and so found a kind of healing from the previous sense of alienation he’d felt. Unfortunately (to me) this first chapter didn’t really set the tone for the rest of the book. I’d hoped that this book would be one that could appeal to many LGBT people, by showing how LGBT people could have a positive experience of the “spiritual” dimension (whatever exactly that means - no particular theistic/metaphysical implications intended...) of life and/or find healing from any negative experiences of traditional religion. But the book turned out to be narrower than that, becoming mainly a collection of reflections by LGBT Christians on how they have reconciled themselves with the Christian faith/Church. No doubt there’s an audience for this (LGBT Christians or those drawn to Christianity) but I’m not sure how helpful it would be to LGBT people more widely. As a former Christian, it held some interest for me, although it treads old ground with its ‘prophetic’ lectures to the Church and its tortured grappling with (and strained re-readings of) the Bible. It can sound quasi-evangelical/apologetical, which will jar with some non-religiously-inclined LGBT readers and, again, as a former Christian, I’m personally not mad on attempts to encourage LGBT people along a Christian path - not least because of the painful trials often involved, as laid bare by this very book. On that note, some readers may also find ‘Queer Prophets’ stirs up painful memories or questions they feel they would be best to leave alone, so caution may be advised. It’s their choice whether to go on with the book, of course, and if they feel comfortable enough to read it, some may well find it interesting and enriching to learn about others’ experiences. The chapters are generally well-written and perhaps I’m being a little unfair by not judging the book more on its own terms and intentions. It’s always hard when reviewing a book to know how far to go on personal taste or how far to attempt a more ‘impartial’ assessment. In any case, my own opinion is there are probably different ‘queer prophets’ out there who might have a more beneficial message, with a wider appeal, to share with LGBT people.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Althea

    This collection of essays, despite at times offering some rather difficult to read experiences, felt very hopeful, and I know that it will have a great impact on many people - I particularly loved Ruth's essay at the end. However, I can't help but noticing that the majority of the essays are written by white, cis Christians and are written from a very Western-centric point of view, and I just wish there was more nuance. I also, unfortunately, found Juno Dawson's essay to be a bit pointless...it This collection of essays, despite at times offering some rather difficult to read experiences, felt very hopeful, and I know that it will have a great impact on many people - I particularly loved Ruth's essay at the end. However, I can't help but noticing that the majority of the essays are written by white, cis Christians and are written from a very Western-centric point of view, and I just wish there was more nuance. I also, unfortunately, found Juno Dawson's essay to be a bit pointless...it only lasted a couple of pages compared to the rest and was basically 'I'm not religious but others are and that's okay', and it felt, to me, like a bit of a strange inclusion. Thanks to Netgalley and Harper Collins for an e-ARC copy in return for an honest review!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kira

    Thank you to NetGalley and Harper Collins UK (William Collins) for an advance reader copy in exchange for an honest review. I can't even begin to articulate how I felt whilst reading this book. It's equal parts inspiring and heart-breaking. As someone who isn't religious, I was really interested to hear the stories of people on the lgbtq+ spectrum speaking about their own voices stories of their experiences with religion. This book explores various religious beliefs and their stance on the lgbtq+ Thank you to NetGalley and Harper Collins UK (William Collins) for an advance reader copy in exchange for an honest review. I can't even begin to articulate how I felt whilst reading this book. It's equal parts inspiring and heart-breaking. As someone who isn't religious, I was really interested to hear the stories of people on the lgbtq+ spectrum speaking about their own voices stories of their experiences with religion. This book explores various religious beliefs and their stance on the lgbtq+ community, most of which on a base level seem to deny the identity of those who are different, and don't conform to a ""regular"" heterosexual relationship between a man and a woman. Yet, on a deeper level and through some more progressive figures in each of these authors' lives, they managed to break through that base level belief and find a place in their life where they can be happy with their faith and sexuality intertwining and I love that so much. We see a lot of negativity where the lqbtq+ communities and religion meet and this book doesn't deny the negativity, but instead tells true, inspiring stories of people overcoming this divide. I'm really glad that I got the opportunity to read this book and I'm honestly just in awe of all of these authors and their stories. I think that this book could be so incredibly valuable to an lgbtq+ audience who feel as though they don't fit in within their religious communities. It's so important for there to be more of these own voices stories out there.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Usai

    Comprising 21 highly personal essays in which various LGBT+ individuals discuss their struggles in reconciling faith with self, this is one the most insightful collections of stories that I have read this year. Starting with a lyrical telling by Amrou Al-Kadhi, navigating their queer, Muslim identity, to the heartbreaking Mormon childhood of Dustin Lance, who eventually came out as gay, to the inspiring ordination of Karl, a disabled, bisexual trans man, every story exhibits incredible vulnerabi Comprising 21 highly personal essays in which various LGBT+ individuals discuss their struggles in reconciling faith with self, this is one the most insightful collections of stories that I have read this year. Starting with a lyrical telling by Amrou Al-Kadhi, navigating their queer, Muslim identity, to the heartbreaking Mormon childhood of Dustin Lance, who eventually came out as gay, to the inspiring ordination of Karl, a disabled, bisexual trans man, every story exhibits incredible vulnerability and incredible strength. How DOES one bring together two defining aspects of life, when they often seem at direct odds with each other? How can one love the same gender, but also love God? How can a woman be ordained to the Church of England, and openly support LGBT+ rights? How can religious groups be more open-minded and inclusive? A "prophet" is defined as an inspirational teacher. In this novel, 21 prophets demonstrate the need for understanding - an imperative for societal progress towards inclusivity, and the part that both LGBT+ and LGBT+ allies can play in this vision of a world where diversity is not frowned upon and shunned, but lauded. This book was inspiring, moving and incredibly educational. A must-read, for everyone. Thank you to WM Collins and HarperCollins for this #gifted hardcover copy in exchange for an honest review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sophie (RedheadReading)

    I really valued reading the different perspectives in this and it was an incredibly interesting read. As with all collections, some essays did not impact me quite as much as others, but I've really appreciated getting glimpses into such personal writings. My main critique is that I wish the faiths of the contributors had been a little more balanced. One writer is a Muslim, another is Jewish and one is an atheist, but the rest of the 24 voices were all Christian so that felt quite uneven. I do app I really valued reading the different perspectives in this and it was an incredibly interesting read. As with all collections, some essays did not impact me quite as much as others, but I've really appreciated getting glimpses into such personal writings. My main critique is that I wish the faiths of the contributors had been a little more balanced. One writer is a Muslim, another is Jewish and one is an atheist, but the rest of the 24 voices were all Christian so that felt quite uneven. I do appreciate that the Christian contributors were from a variety of different branches of Christianity so there was variety in that sense, it's just the balance of religions explored in this felt uneven. That said, I really valued getting a glimpse into each contributor's life and journey with their faith, sexuality and/or gender.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Harri

    This book contains twenty one essays about the intersection between sexuality and religion. Each essay is written by a different person, mostly members of the queer community aside from one ally at the end. This book contains both a christian lesbian and a muslim drag queen. Theologians, priests and conversion therapy survivors. Trans and nonbinary people. Artists, activists and writers. Diverse races and nationalities. The different essays cover many different experiences and each gives a uniqu This book contains twenty one essays about the intersection between sexuality and religion. Each essay is written by a different person, mostly members of the queer community aside from one ally at the end. This book contains both a christian lesbian and a muslim drag queen. Theologians, priests and conversion therapy survivors. Trans and nonbinary people. Artists, activists and writers. Diverse races and nationalities. The different essays cover many different experiences and each gives a unique viewpoint on being both religious and queer. The essays do seem to be predominantly christian, although several different denominations are included. Can you be both queer and religious? This is a question that many queer people (including myself) have struggled with. So much homophobia and transphobia seems to come from religious communities, and so many queer people have been hurt by religion. But these essays show that for many queer people, it is possible to be both queer and religious, and to be so without supressing part of your identity. This book doesn't deny the hurt and pain that religion causes to many queer people. In fact, it shows that there is hope, and that there are ways to be both queer and religious without needing to 'reconcile' with your identity, or pick and choose which parts of yourself you can express. This book is beautifully written and at times it's almost poetic. Every story is moving and emotional. Many of the essays talk about family rejection, abuse, exorcisms and conversion therapy, the belief that you are going to hell, and having to choose between religion and identity. Some of the writers explore religion on their own, discovering their own truth. Others have experiences of God, either within or outside of organised religion. There is plenty of discussion of religious texts and how religious groups cherry pick or twist texts to suit their bigotry. The writers of colour talk about reclaiming God as something for them, rather than the weternised, colonial idea of God as a cis straight white man. There are also stories from queer people who have lost their faith entirely, and how conflicting and confusing that can be, and even a story about coming to faith from a non religious background. Whilst there are common themes across all of the essays, each one is a unique voice letting the reader into their heart and mind. I really enjoyed reading this book. It wasn't always an easy read, due to a lot of the issues feeling very personal to me, but a message of hope truly does wind its way through the pages. I think this is the kind of book lots of people could benefit from reading. Queer people struggling with religion, religious people who don't understand why this is an issue for queer people, and even athiests who don't understand why it's all such a big debate. I'll leave you with this quote, which I felt really sums up a lot of the experiences, regardless of religion, and really resonated with me: 'It's not Allah who forbade my queer identity, but the people who ignored the well of alternative potentials in the Quran'.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    Very intrigued who Livvy knows in this one!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Coward

    A book of all the feels! It’s outrageous how some LGBTQIA+ people have been treated by some branches of organised religion and churches. Persecution, conflict and exclusion is the reaction to fear: fear of difference and fear of those who don’t conform to collectively held ‘norms’. This book is a collection of essays by various people who identity with the LGBTQIA+ community and they each give a brief insight into some of their spiritual journey. It’s a book of great sadness in places but also o A book of all the feels! It’s outrageous how some LGBTQIA+ people have been treated by some branches of organised religion and churches. Persecution, conflict and exclusion is the reaction to fear: fear of difference and fear of those who don’t conform to collectively held ‘norms’. This book is a collection of essays by various people who identity with the LGBTQIA+ community and they each give a brief insight into some of their spiritual journey. It’s a book of great sadness in places but also of great hope and courage. There is still much work to be done and it physically pains my heart that so many people of all identities are marginalised in this way.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    21 writing using different styles to express their personal stories in relation to identity and faith. Deeply moving at times, heart breaking in places to hear what some have experienced, thought provoking and challenging all along the way. This is not a book for arguing the ins and outs of theology and sexuality for instance (though it speaks into that). But rather this is a book which calls readers to try and listen well to what is being shared.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Laura Reed

    The Book of Queer Prophets is the book I needed when I was coming out. I was raised in a strict evangelical American style church in the UK. When I first tried to come out to my Mum at 13 , she immediately told me I was going to hell, this book would have been an fantastic resource for both of us, providing relatable stories grounded in faith. The Book of Queer Prophets is a collection of essays by LGBTQ+ people of a variety of different faiths and religious affiliations discussing their own expe The Book of Queer Prophets is the book I needed when I was coming out. I was raised in a strict evangelical American style church in the UK. When I first tried to come out to my Mum at 13 , she immediately told me I was going to hell, this book would have been an fantastic resource for both of us, providing relatable stories grounded in faith. The Book of Queer Prophets is a collection of essays by LGBTQ+ people of a variety of different faiths and religious affiliations discussing their own experiences navigating their sexuality within the confines of their religion, and their religion within the confines of their sexuality. The folx writing the essays often had to forge a new path for themselves, and they explain how they did so and what elements of scripture that they found comfort and acceptance in. The tone and styles of the essays vary, as do the epxeriences of the people writing them. I personally found the content rich, relatable and wholly important. I think this book aimed at teens and adults and I am definitely going to purchase a copy for my mum on release day with the hope that it will help us each understand each other's perspectives.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Yzabel Ginsberg

    [I received a copy through NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.] An interesting, if sometimes uneven collection (like every collection in general, I’d say) of essays from queer people regarding religion and faith, acceptance of LGBTQ+, and how organised religions and individuals alike have both progressed and still need to progress in that regard. Many of these essays resonated with me, not because I am a believer, but precisely because I’m not anymore: I was raised a Catholic, but could n [I received a copy through NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.] An interesting, if sometimes uneven collection (like every collection in general, I’d say) of essays from queer people regarding religion and faith, acceptance of LGBTQ+, and how organised religions and individuals alike have both progressed and still need to progress in that regard. Many of these essays resonated with me, not because I am a believer, but precisely because I’m not anymore: I was raised a Catholic, but could never reconcile religion with all the intolerance (whether snide and discreet or absolutely blatant) it tends to teach. There was always, for me, a clear contradiction between “Jesus is love” and “…but only for people who correspond to the official credo (aka usual cisgender, heterosexual, and if they’re white, it’s even better). Not that these essays have given me renewed faith in any belief whatsoever, but it was good to read about how other people lived this, whether they retained or found their faith again, and especially when it comes to ministers (several of the writers in this collection are or were ordained). While there’s a depressing side to it, considering there’s still a lot of work to be done, there’s also much hope in here for society to change in the future. I do wish there had been more input, though, from people coming from other faiths than the Abrahamic religions. The book’s synopsis does mention “Is it possible to believe in God and be gay?”, so I don’t know if that was to be read as “strictly God in its Islamic or Judeo-Christian acception” or not. I’d still have been interested in additional perspectives. What about Hinduism, Shinto, Wicca? Do monotheistic religions really have a monopoly on intolerance when it comes to LGBTQ+? Conclusion: 3.5 stars

  13. 4 out of 5

    Skip

    An interesting collection of essays on the topic of religion and sexuality. This was a hard one for me at times. It was definitely best read as singular essays, put down for a while for some thinking time and then moving onto the next one - so it took about a month to read and digest. To be honest I picked up this due to Ruth Hunt being attached to the book. Some of the essays are of better quality than others, and naturally some spoke to me more than others too. I'd recommend this to anyone - in An interesting collection of essays on the topic of religion and sexuality. This was a hard one for me at times. It was definitely best read as singular essays, put down for a while for some thinking time and then moving onto the next one - so it took about a month to read and digest. To be honest I picked up this due to Ruth Hunt being attached to the book. Some of the essays are of better quality than others, and naturally some spoke to me more than others too. I'd recommend this to anyone - in fact I think it should be read by everybody, whether people of faith or LGBTQ+ or not. I received an e-ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rohase Piercy

    Edited by (Baroness) Ruth Hunt, 'The Book Of Queer Prophets' brings together the testimonies of twenty-four LGBTQ people of faith (or in a couple of cases, of lost faith) in the form of short essays. I should say at the outset that it's very Christian-heavy - I'd like to have seen a greater variety of faiths represented - there's one Muslim, one Jew, and one Indian Christian with a love of Hindu Goddesses, but that's your lot out of the twenty-four. However if one can accept that this is basically Edited by (Baroness) Ruth Hunt, 'The Book Of Queer Prophets' brings together the testimonies of twenty-four LGBTQ people of faith (or in a couple of cases, of lost faith) in the form of short essays. I should say at the outset that it's very Christian-heavy - I'd like to have seen a greater variety of faiths represented - there's one Muslim, one Jew, and one Indian Christian with a love of Hindu Goddesses, but that's your lot out of the twenty-four. However if one can accept that this is basically a critique of the Christian LGBTQ experience (and probably should have been presented as such), it's a very eloquent and insightful one, with solid theological scholarship presented alongside moving personal testimony. Christians of varied denominations, both lay and clergy - some of whom have changed denomination in their quest for acceptance as a Queer follower of Jesus Christ - recount their struggle for recognition within a Church which is at worst openly hostile and condemnatory and at best placatory and prevaricating. Their persistence in claiming their right to both a sexual and a spiritual identity (and after all, the search for spiritual fulfilment is one of humanity's 'givens', along with sex, food and community) is admirable and inspiring as well as illuminating and instructive. There is no hesitation, for instance, in putting that oft-quoted passage from Leviticus 20:13, which states that it is 'an abomination for a man to lie with a man as with a woman' in context alongside the similarly proscribed 'abominations' of eating shellfish or getting a tattoo. This book is a wake-up call to the Church, calling it to account for its failure to fully recognise and accept on equal terms the lives, loves and spiritual needs of LGBTQ Christians; a call endorsed by (heterosexual) celebrity priest Rev Kate Bottley in a humble but eloquent Afterword. Progress has undoubtedly been made over the last decade or so, but there's still a long way to go. Every would-be priest or Christian minister should read 'The Book Of Queer Prophets!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Brown

    I'm a big fan of Ruth Hunt, but somehow the fact that she was an active Christian had passed me by. I'm not. Indeed, I'm an atheist and humanist these days, having long since turned away from a faith that I could not reconcile with my sexuality. But not everyone does, and this book is an insight into other ways of existing. Hunt has collected 24 musings on faith, sexuality, gender identity, and their interactions... it's fair to say the result is patchy, in terms of quality, and some spoke to me m I'm a big fan of Ruth Hunt, but somehow the fact that she was an active Christian had passed me by. I'm not. Indeed, I'm an atheist and humanist these days, having long since turned away from a faith that I could not reconcile with my sexuality. But not everyone does, and this book is an insight into other ways of existing. Hunt has collected 24 musings on faith, sexuality, gender identity, and their interactions... it's fair to say the result is patchy, in terms of quality, and some spoke to me more than others. However, there was much that was familiar in the book - even if the majority of the writers had come to a different conclusion than I on that key issue of reconciliation. I guess, for the sake of people in the position I was in 20-odd years ago, I wish this book could be read by those who are standing in the way of acceptance within churches... sadly, that audience may be harder to reach than people like me.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kathy S

    Prophets are teachers, full of wisdom and inspiration. This book is full of all these things. Every contributor, in their own way, shared their most inmost parts with their readers: their faith (and not just one faith; there are a number of faiths included, as well as none). So often churches/religious organisations/religions have excluded LGBT people on the basis of our sexuality or gender identity. This book challenges this exclusion, and advocates that being LGBT is a gift and a hope to the c Prophets are teachers, full of wisdom and inspiration. This book is full of all these things. Every contributor, in their own way, shared their most inmost parts with their readers: their faith (and not just one faith; there are a number of faiths included, as well as none). So often churches/religious organisations/religions have excluded LGBT people on the basis of our sexuality or gender identity. This book challenges this exclusion, and advocates that being LGBT is a gift and a hope to the church. Of course, as this is a collection of essays, you might not agree with every single one of them... but you cannot argue against the wisdom, authenticity and inspiration contained in every single one of them. The message is clear: Don’t give up on faith; because (whatever) God (you believe in) has not given up on you ♥️ LGBT people are a gift to our churches ♥️

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    This book is beautifully written and honestly makes you think. The honest truths and feelings that people have had when questioning part of their identity is heartbreaking and something I feel like many people can relate to. This book doesn’t focus around just Christianity and I’m really glad it gets the view of different people across the LGBT+ community. I’m not religious nor do I live in a religious household, none of my family are religious so I will never experience the things the people in This book is beautifully written and honestly makes you think. The honest truths and feelings that people have had when questioning part of their identity is heartbreaking and something I feel like many people can relate to. This book doesn’t focus around just Christianity and I’m really glad it gets the view of different people across the LGBT+ community. I’m not religious nor do I live in a religious household, none of my family are religious so I will never experience the things the people in this book have, and it really opened my eyes to the issues that they face. I knew that it wasn’t easy for religious LGBT+ people, but this really helped to open my eyes and mind to the experiences. I feel like this is a book that people should really read and experience for themself, religious or not.

  18. 5 out of 5

    BooksAndRae

    "The world is full of so many different expressions of what it means to be human." - The Book of Queer Prophets I am not much of a religious person, however these articles of people of the LGBT+ Community struggling with difficulties between their religion and their sexuality were very raw and honest. The accounts range from uplifting and saddening, yet it was completely informative and held a communal message of people just wanting to be accepted for being who they are. I'm grateful for my oppor "The world is full of so many different expressions of what it means to be human." - The Book of Queer Prophets I am not much of a religious person, however these articles of people of the LGBT+ Community struggling with difficulties between their religion and their sexuality were very raw and honest. The accounts range from uplifting and saddening, yet it was completely informative and held a communal message of people just wanting to be accepted for being who they are. I'm grateful for my opportunity to read this book thanks to netgalley and the publishers in exchange for my honest review.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shaun

    Wow what an absolutely great book! I had high expectations and it was better than I thought. Because there's a lot of authors each chapter reads like a mini essay or a medium-length article, which helps to keep it engaging: I read a few back to back each sitting. The variety of authors also makes it hard to summarise. I did have some favourites, of course Pádraig Ó Tuama being on of them. Another advantage is that there are a variety of stories and experiences so many reader will find something Wow what an absolutely great book! I had high expectations and it was better than I thought. Because there's a lot of authors each chapter reads like a mini essay or a medium-length article, which helps to keep it engaging: I read a few back to back each sitting. The variety of authors also makes it hard to summarise. I did have some favourites, of course Pádraig Ó Tuama being on of them. Another advantage is that there are a variety of stories and experiences so many reader will find something they can relate to, be it growing up in a religious environment, or growing up as an LGBTQ+ person, or both.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Aparna

    “The multiple ways in which we experience discrimination and oppression cannot be separated”. An interesting collection of essays about what it means to be an LGBT+ person of faith. This book takes you through people who have walked away from faith, to people who have found God after coming out and accepting themselves as LGBT+ It’s a type of intersectionality between the two communities that I’d never understood. We can’t totally understand someone else’s experience of walking around the world. “The multiple ways in which we experience discrimination and oppression cannot be separated”. An interesting collection of essays about what it means to be an LGBT+ person of faith. This book takes you through people who have walked away from faith, to people who have found God after coming out and accepting themselves as LGBT+ It’s a type of intersectionality between the two communities that I’d never understood. We can’t totally understand someone else’s experience of walking around the world. Being an active ally is just about listening to people, hearing and reading their stories, and asking questions (in appropriate, safe spaces). I’d recommend this to anyone.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michael Cayley

    A shortish book of contributions from LGBT people from different faith backgrounds who have struggled with the tensions between their sexuality and the beliefs in which they were brought up and the prejudices of many who adhere to religious groups. Some of the contributions are harrowing, others uplifting. As a whole the book is a cry for toleration, and a denunciation of the narrow-mindedness of religious fundamentalism. With thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for letting me have an ARC in ex A shortish book of contributions from LGBT people from different faith backgrounds who have struggled with the tensions between their sexuality and the beliefs in which they were brought up and the prejudices of many who adhere to religious groups. Some of the contributions are harrowing, others uplifting. As a whole the book is a cry for toleration, and a denunciation of the narrow-mindedness of religious fundamentalism. With thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for letting me have an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Ingold

    The Book of Queer Prophets is a compelling, provocative and ultimately, uplifting look at what it means to be LGBT and a person of faith. The book doesn’t shy away from conflicts, ambivalences and pain, but it holds this together with the experiences of joy, belonging and happiness that faith brings LGBT people. As someone who is not of faith and used to ardently prop up the false divide between religion and being LGBT, this book is a breakthrough and something everyone (and I mean, everyone) sh The Book of Queer Prophets is a compelling, provocative and ultimately, uplifting look at what it means to be LGBT and a person of faith. The book doesn’t shy away from conflicts, ambivalences and pain, but it holds this together with the experiences of joy, belonging and happiness that faith brings LGBT people. As someone who is not of faith and used to ardently prop up the false divide between religion and being LGBT, this book is a breakthrough and something everyone (and I mean, everyone) should read!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ekmef

    This book is great in showing how religious LGBT people reconcile their faith with their identity. Several very meaningful essays transform biblical frameworks into something that can accommodate LGBT-ness. While it is cool that it works for them, for the rest of us there is the Nashville declaration and conversion therapy. The focus was also very much on Christianity (I would have loved to hear the perspective of a Buddhist, or a Wiccan or...). And you might have missed some letters from the QU This book is great in showing how religious LGBT people reconcile their faith with their identity. Several very meaningful essays transform biblical frameworks into something that can accommodate LGBT-ness. While it is cool that it works for them, for the rest of us there is the Nashville declaration and conversion therapy. The focus was also very much on Christianity (I would have loved to hear the perspective of a Buddhist, or a Wiccan or...). And you might have missed some letters from the QUILTBAG+ acronym; I missed those perspectives in the book as well.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Hilary Campbell

    This is a powerful and often inspiring read. Hearing the stories of these LGBTQIA+ people I feel both hopeful and challenged. There is joy that many of the writers have discovered or allowed themselves to be the truest of themselves. There is still the struggle of prejudice and discomfort from individuals and religious institutions when faced with difference and otherness. Faith is sometimes seen as a barrier and may become part of the liberation of people to become their truest selves. And ther This is a powerful and often inspiring read. Hearing the stories of these LGBTQIA+ people I feel both hopeful and challenged. There is joy that many of the writers have discovered or allowed themselves to be the truest of themselves. There is still the struggle of prejudice and discomfort from individuals and religious institutions when faced with difference and otherness. Faith is sometimes seen as a barrier and may become part of the liberation of people to become their truest selves. And there is still far to go on the journey of real welcome and inclusion.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Liz Mistry

    I'm not a religious person, but I am a supporter of Gay rights. I loved this book. The articles were poignant, relevant and down to earth. What I particularly liked was the way these 'prophets' really looked at their repsective religions and analysed them . As far as I'm concerned this should be on the RE syllabus for schools. Brilliantly informative, well researched and totally and absolutely relevant. Loved it! I'm not a religious person, but I am a supporter of Gay rights. I loved this book. The articles were poignant, relevant and down to earth. What I particularly liked was the way these 'prophets' really looked at their repsective religions and analysed them . As far as I'm concerned this should be on the RE syllabus for schools. Brilliantly informative, well researched and totally and absolutely relevant. Loved it!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Neil Oliver

    An exception book witten by queer pople and those of faith, mainly those whose lives intersect both. There's truth, openness and a delight on both worlds. The hurts done to queer people of faith are told with conviction and their delight in their faiths is beauty. If you have any interest in these stories, epistles, estomanies of intersection this is worth your time. An exception book witten by queer pople and those of faith, mainly those whose lives intersect both. There's truth, openness and a delight on both worlds. The hurts done to queer people of faith are told with conviction and their delight in their faiths is beauty. If you have any interest in these stories, epistles, estomanies of intersection this is worth your time.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jeandre Coetser

    I loved the presoectives these essays brought, so much I related to and learned from and similarities across the essays show that it's your personal relationship with religion and reading any holy book but also how a community you want to belong to can be hurtful. I honestly recommend wether you are religious or not, LGBT+ or not I loved the presoectives these essays brought, so much I related to and learned from and similarities across the essays show that it's your personal relationship with religion and reading any holy book but also how a community you want to belong to can be hurtful. I honestly recommend wether you are religious or not, LGBT+ or not

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elise Thompson

    Some of these essays were really powerful, but unfortunately I found them of equal weight to essays that didn’t really go anywhere or make much of an impact on me. Probably a case of some writing styles being my thing, and others not. A good read for the sentiment and the ending chapter by Kate was excellent.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Robin Fox

    Some amazing stories here. I was in tears more than once. I had to weep at the harm and damage that the church is still doing to the LGBT community in places, but throughout the book is a message of hope.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Metcalf

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Very interesting essays that stretched my understanding. There was only one essay I found distasteful because of its implication that seeing someone try to commit suicide and survive was a personal sign from God...

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